Mar 31 2016
Mar 31

In the previous article of this series we’ve started our dive into the Entity Validation and Typed Data APIs. We’ve seen how DataType plugins interact with data definitions and how various constraints can be added to the latter at multiple levels and extension points.

Drupal 8 logo

In this part, we will cover the aspect of actual validation and violation handling. In addition, we will write our own constraint and validator so that we can use custom behaviors in the data validation process.

Validation and Violation Handling

Even though we don’t yet know exactly how constraints are built, we’ve seen how they can be added to Typed Data definitions, including entity fields. Let us now see how we can validate the entities and handle possible violations we find.

When talking about Typed Data we’ve already seen how the validate() method can be called on the DataType plugin instance which holds a data definition. When it comes to entities, this can happen both at entity and field levels.

For instance, we can validate the entire entity using the validate() method:

$entity->set('title', 'this is too long of a title');
$violations = $entity->validate();

In our previous article, we added the Length constraint to Node titles to prevent title strings longer than 5 characters. If that is still in place and we run the code above, the validation should obviously fail. The $violations object is now, however, an EntityConstraintViolationListInterface instance which provides some helper methods for accessing violation data specific to Drupal content entities. It’s worth looking into that interface for all the helper methods available.

To get a list of Entity level violations we can use the getEntityViolations() method but we can also loop through all of them. Once we have our individual ConstraintViolationInterface instances, we can inspect them for what went wrong. For instance, we can get the error message with getMessage(), the property path that failed with getPropertyPath() and the invalid value with getInvalidValue(), among other useful things.

When it comes to fields, the property path is in the following format: title.0.value. This includes the field name, the key (delta) of the individual field item in the list and the actual property name. This represents the property path of our violation above.

Apart from calling validation on the entire entity (which may be superfluous at times), we can also do so directly on each field:

$entity->set('title', 'this is too long of a title');
$violations = $entity->get('title')->validate();

In this case, $violations is again an instance of ConstraintViolationListInterface and can be looped over to inspect each violation. This time, though, the property path changes to no longer include the field name: 0.value.

And lastly, we can even validate the individual items in the list:

$violations = $entity->get('title')->get(0)->validate();

As we can expect, the difference now is that the property path will only show value in the violation since we know exactly what we are validating: the first data definition in the list.

Constraints and Validators

We only touched upon the aspect of constraints and validators but let us better understand how they work by creating one ourselves. We will create one single constraint and validator but that can be used for both Node entities and their fields. It’s always better to have constraints targeted to the data definition we want but for the sake of brevity, we’ll do it all in one constraint to see how all these options could be handled.

The business case of our example is to have a constraint that we can apply to any string-based content entity field that would force the string to contain a certain alphanumeric code. The latter will be passed on as an option so it can be reused. If it’s applied to a Node entity, we want to make sure the title of the node contains the code. So let’s get started.

First, inside our demo module, which can be found in this git repository, we need to create the Validation folder inside the Plugin folder of our namespace (the src/ directory). Inside that, we need the Constraint folder. This is because constraints are plugins expected to be defined in there.

Second, inside Constraint/, we can create our constraint class:

<?php



namespace Drupal\demo\Plugin\Validation\Constraint;

use Symfony\Component\Validator\Constraint;
use Symfony\Component\Validator\Exception\MissingOptionsException;



class HasCodeConstraint extends Constraint {

  
  public $messageNoCode = 'The string <em>%string</em> does not contain the necessary code: %code.';

  
  public $code;

  
  public function __construct($options = NULL) {
    if ($options !== NULL && is_string($options)) {
      parent::__construct(['code' => $options]);
    }

    if ($options !== NULL && is_array($options) && isset($options['code'])) {
      parent::__construct($options);
    }

    if ($this->code === NULL) {
      throw new MissingOptionsException('The code option is required', __CLASS__);
    }
  }
}

As we mentioned earlier, the constraint plugin class is relatively simple. It has the expected annotation which, among boilerplate metadata, also specifies what type of data this constraint can be applied to. We chose both a simple string and the Node entity type. We then declare two public properties: a message to be used when the constraint fails (with placeholders being populated inside the validator) and the actual code to be checked for (populated by the constructor of the parent Constraint class). Inside our constructor, we check if the options passed are a string or array (just to be a bit flexible) and throw an exception if the code parameter is not passed as an option in any shape or form.

One of the tasks of the parent Constraint class is to specify which class will be used to validate this constraint. By default, it is a class named like the constraint itself but with Validate appended at the end (HasCodeConstraintValidator). If we wanted to create a differently named and/or namespaced class, we would have to override the validatedBy() method and return the fully qualified name of the class we want.

Let’s now see the HasCodeConstraintValidator class since for us the default is fine:

<?php



namespace Drupal\demo\Plugin\Validation\Constraint;

use Drupal\Core\Field\FieldItemListInterface;
use Drupal\node\NodeInterface;
use Symfony\Component\Validator\Constraint;
use Symfony\Component\Validator\ConstraintValidator;
use Symfony\Component\Validator\Exception\UnexpectedTypeException;
use Symfony\Component\Validator\Violation\ConstraintViolationBuilderInterface;


class HasCodeConstraintValidator extends ConstraintValidator {

  
  protected $context;

  
  public function validate($data, Constraint $constraint) {
    if (!$constraint instanceof HasCodeConstraint) {
      throw new UnexpectedTypeException($constraint, __NAMESPACE__.'\HasCodeConstraint');
    }

       if ($data instanceof NodeInterface) {
      $this->validateNodeEntity($data, $constraint);
      return;
    }

       if ($data instanceof FieldItemListInterface) {
      foreach ($data as $key => $item) {
        $violation = $this->validateString($item->value, $constraint);
        if ($violation instanceof ConstraintViolationBuilderInterface) {
          $violation->atPath('title')->addViolation();
        }
      }
      return;
    }

       if (is_string($data)) {
      $violation = $this->validateString($data, $constraint);
      if ($violation instanceof ConstraintViolationBuilderInterface) {
        $violation->addViolation();
        return;
      }
    }
  }

  
  protected function validateNodeEntity($node, $constraint) {
    foreach ($node->title as $item) {
      $violation = $this->validateString($item->value, $constraint);
      if ($violation instanceof ConstraintViolationBuilderInterface) {
        $violation->atPath('title')
          ->addViolation();
      }
    }
  }

  
  protected function validateString($string, $constraint) {
    if (strpos($string, $constraint->code) === FALSE) {
      return $this->context->buildViolation($constraint->messageNoCode, array('%string' => $string, '%code' => $constraint->code));
    }
  }

}

The main job of this class is to implement the validate() method and build violations onto the current execution context if the data passed to it is somehow invalid. The latter can be more than one type of data, depending on what the constraint is applied to.

In our example, we use the constraint for entities, field item lists and primitive data as well. This is just to save us some space. But the logic is that if a Node entity is passed, the code is checked in its title while for the the field items an iteration is performed to check the values of the fields. And of course, the constraint can also be added to individual field items in which case the $data variable would be the value of the data definition.

The $context property has a handy buildViolation() method which allows us to specify a number of things related to what actually failed (path, message, etc).

So if we want to make use of this constraint, we can apply what we learned earlier and do one of the following 3 things:

Inside hook_entity_type_alter():

$node = $entity_types['node'];
$node->addConstraint('HasCode', ['code' => 'UPK']);

This adds the constraint to the Node entities so all node titles now have to contain the code UPK.

Inside hook_entity_base_field_info_alter() or hook_entity_bundle_field_info_alter(), one of the following two lines:

$title->addConstraint('HasCode', ['code' => 'UPK']);
$title->addPropertyConstraints('value', ['HasCode' => ['code' => 'UPK']]);

Where $title is a field definition and the first case adds the constraint to the entire list of items while the latter adds it straight to the individual item.

These three possibilities cover the three cases the constraint validator handles in our example. And that is pretty much it. Not too difficult.

In this article, we’ve continued our dive into the Entity Validation API by looking at two things: validation and violation handling, and the creation of custom constraints. We’ve seen that once applied onto entities or field data definitions, constraints can be very easily validated and inspected for violations. This API borrows a lot from Symfony and makes it a breeze to decouple validation from the Form API.

Also easy, as we’ve seen, is to extend the existing pool of validation criteria available. This is done via constraint plugins, all coupled with their own validators and which can be written in very reusable ways. It’s very interesting to play around with these and see how all the pieces interact. And it is also a great learning experience.

Daniel Sipos

Meet the author

Daniel Sipos is a Drupal developer who lives in Brussels, Belgium. He works professionally with Drupal but likes to use other PHP frameworks and technologies as well. He runs webomelette.com, a Drupal blog where he writes articles and tutorials about Drupal development, theming and site building.
Mar 23 2016
Mar 23

Drupal 8 logo

Views is in Drupal 8 core. We all know that by now. Twig is the new templating engine in Drupal 8. This we also know. But do we know how to interact programmatically with the first in order to theme a View using the second? Aside from overriding View templates like with any other subsystem, we have available a more powerful alternative in the form of Views plugins (Display, Style, Row and Field).

In this article, we are going to look at how we can create a custom Style plugin for Views in Drupal 8. We will use the Bootstrap tab markup as a goal and implement a tabbed output for our View results. In the View configuration, the Style settings will allow us to specify which field will be used as the tab navigation copy, leaving the rest of the fields shown in the respective tab panes. Basically, each View result will represent a tab – so this example is not suited for Views which have more than a few results. The main goal is to illustrate how we can create our own Views Style plugins in Drupal 8.

We will not cover the details on how you can use Bootstrap in your project. However, you can check out the documentation page on assets or even this article on how to make sure anonymous users can benefit from jQuery being loaded on the page. And if you want to see the code we write ahead of time, you can find it in this repository within the Demo module.

What Is the Style Plugin?

The Views Style plugin is the one responsible for rendering the listing. Notable examples of core Style plugins are Unformatted List, HTML List, Table or Grid. They are used by the Display plugin and they in turn use Row plugins that represent one item in the listing.

In Drupal 8, all Views plugin types are built using the new Plugin system and share some common functionality (they always extend from the same Views PluginBase).

Let’s now create our own such Style plugin that can be used by most Display types (Page, Block, etc) and which uses the Field row plugin.

The Bootstrap Tabs Style Plugin

The first step is to create our plugin class located in the Plugin/views/style folder of our module:

namespace Drupal\demo\Plugin\views\style;
use Drupal\Core\Form\FormStateInterface;
use Drupal\views\Plugin\views\style\StylePluginBase;


class BootstrapTabs extends StylePluginBase {

  
  protected $usesRowPlugin = TRUE;

  
  protected $usesGrouping = FALSE;

  
  protected function defineOptions() {
    $options = parent::defineOptions();
    $options['tab_nav_field'] = array('default' => '');
    return $options;
  }

  
  public function buildOptionsForm(&$form, FormStateInterface $form_state) {
    parent::buildOptionsForm($form, $form_state);
    $options = $this->displayHandler->getFieldLabels(TRUE);
    $form['tab_nav_field'] = array(
      '#title' => $this->t('The tab navigation field'),
      '#description' => $this->t('Select the field that will be used as the tab navigation. The rest of the fields will show up in the tab content.'),
      '#type' => 'select',
      '#default_value' => $this->options['tab_nav_field'],
      '#options' => $options,
    );
  }
}

The Drupal plugin type we are creating an instance of is ViewsStyle with some basic configuration passed in the annotation. Leaving aside the obvious ones, we have the theme and display_types keys that are worth mentioning. The first declares which theme function this Style plugin will use to render its data while the second declares which kinds of Display plugins this Style can be used by (in our case all Display types which don’t otherwise specify a custom type: normal). For more information on all the available annotation configuration for this plugin type, check out the Drupal\views\Annotation\ViewsStyle annotation class.

Using the two class properties, we declare that our Style uses row plugins but does not allow grouping. Make sure you check out the parent classes to learn more about what other options can be specified like this. For example, the class we are extending already declares that Views fields can be used with the Style plugin.

As mentioned before, using the two methods we create a plugin option and form element to be able to specify which field should act as the tab navigation. Using the current display handler ($this->displayHandler) we can load up all the available View fields the site builder has added to it. And this new form element will be available on the Style settings form:

Drupal 8 Style Plugins

Since we are extending from the StylePluginBase class, there is nothing more we need to do. For the markup output we can rely on the demo_bootstrap_tabs theme which receives the relevant variables from the executed View. If we want, we can override any of the render methods and add more variables, change the theme, or whatever we need. We are good with the defaults, especially since we will implement a preprocessor to handle the variables that the template receives.

The Theme

It’s time to define the demo_bootstrap_tabs theme as we normally do (inside our .module file):


function demo_theme($existing, $type, $theme, $path) {
  return array(
    'demo_bootstrap_tabs' => array(
      'variables' => array('view' => NULL, 'rows' => NULL),
      'path' => drupal_get_path('module', 'demo') . '/templates',
    ),
  );
}

The Style plugin passes the $view object and the resulting $rows by default to the template. It is up to the preprocessor to do a bit of handling of these variables (if needed) before they are sent to the template:


function template_preprocess_demo_bootstrap_tabs(&$variables) {
  $view = $variables['view'];
  $rows = $variables['rows'];
  $variables['nav'] = array();

   $field = $view->style_plugin->options['tab_nav_field'];
  if (!$field || !isset($view->field[$field])) {
    template_preprocess_views_view_unformatted($variables);
    return;
  }

  $nav = array();
  foreach ($rows as $id => $row) {
    $nav[$id] = array(
      '#theme' => 'views_view_field',
      '#view' => $view,
      '#field' => $view->field[$field],
      '#row' => $row['#row'],
    );
  }

  template_preprocess_views_view_unformatted($variables);
  $variables['nav'] = $nav;
}

So what’s happening here? First, we check the Style plugin options for the field name to be used (the one that was selected when configuring the View). If one is not there, we return, but not before doing a bit of default preprocessing that the template_preprocess_views_view_unformatted function already does well. So we delegate to it. Then, we loop through the Views results and build an array of content for our tab navigation. For this, we use the default Views views_view_field theme function to render the selected field. Finally, we pass this array to the template and also run the default preprocessor of the unformatted list style.

The Template

In Drupal 8 there are no more theme functions, everything is now handled in Twig templates. So let’s see how the demo-bootstrap-tabs.html.twig file looks like in our module’s templates folder:

<div>
    
    <ul class="nav nav-tabs" role="tablist">
        {% for tab in nav %}
            {% set active = '' %}
            {% if loop.index0 == 0 %}
                {% set active = 'active' %}
            {% endif %}
            <li role="presentation" class="{{ active }}"><a href="#tab-{{ loop.index0 }}" aria-controls="profile" role="tab" data-toggle="tab">{{ tab }}</a></li>
        {% endfor %}
    </ul>

    
    <div class="tab-content">
        {% for row in rows %}
            {% set active = '' %}
            {% if loop.index0 == 0 %}
                {% set active = 'active' %}
            {% endif %}
            <div role="tabpanel" class="tab-pane {{ active }}" id="tab-{{ loop.index0 }}">{{ row.content }}</div>
        {% endfor %}
    </div>
</div>

As you can see, this is the necessary markup for the Bootstrap tabs. It won’t work, of course, without making sure the relevant Bootstrap styles and script are loaded in your theme first.

The first thing we render are the tab navigation items (from our nav variable). While looping through this array, we also make use of the loop index value in order to default the first item as active and be able to target the tab content panes below using unique IDs. For the actual value of the items, we just print the render array we created in our preprocessor and Drupal takes care of rendering that. That being said, it is probably a good idea to make sure that the field you use here is relatively short, without a link and plain markup. Titles would probably work just fine. But this is a matter of configuring the View accordingly.

Below the navigation, we print the actual view rows, using the same loop index to default the first row as the active tab pane and identify them uniquely so the navigation above can control their visibility. As for the content, we print the entire row.content variable (which is prepared inside template_preprocess_views_view_unformatted) and which contains all the fields in our View. And if we want to not include the field we used for the navigation, we can just exclude that one from display in the View configuration. It will still appear in the navigation (because we explicitly print it there) but not in the main tab pane.

Conclusion

And there we have it. A Views Style plugin to output the View results as Bootstrap tabs. All we need now is to make sure the Bootstrap assets are loaded and simply configure our View to use the new Style plugin. Do keep in mind that this is not meant for Views with lots of results and it only serves as an example to demonstrate how to create Style plugins.

If you have questions, comments, or suggestions, please leave them below!

Daniel Sipos

Meet the author

Daniel Sipos is a Drupal developer who lives in Brussels, Belgium. He works professionally with Drupal but likes to use other PHP frameworks and technologies as well. He runs webomelette.com, a Drupal blog where he writes articles and tutorials about Drupal development, theming and site building.
Mar 09 2016
Mar 09

Migrate is one of the most established modules in the Drupal ecosystem. So much so that with Drupal 8, a decision has been made to get some of its functionality ported and added to Drupal core. An important reason was that the traditional upgrade between major releases was replaced with a migration of Drupal 6 or 7 content and configuration to Drupal 8.

Drupal 8 logo

Not all the functionality of the Migrate module has been moved into core though. Rather, we have the basic framework within the core migrate module and the functionality serving the upgrade path from Drupal 6 and 7 within the core migrate_drupal module. What’s left can be found in a host of contrib modules. The most important is Migrate Tools which contains, among other things, drush commands and the UI for running migrations. Additionally, the Migrate Source CSV, Migrate Source XML and Migrate Source JSON modules provide plugins for the most used types of migration sources.

In this article we are going to look at how migration works in Drupal 8 by migrating some content into node entities. For simplicity, the data we play with resides in tables in the same database as our Drupal installation. If you want to see the final code, you can check it out in this repository.

Drupal 8 Migration Theory

The structure of a migration in Drupal 8 is made up of three main parts: the source, the process and the destination, all three being built using the new Drupal 8 plugin system. These three parts form a pipeline. The source plugin represents the raw data we are migrating and is responsible for delivering individual rows of it. This data is passed to one or more process plugins that perform any needed manipulation on each row field. Finally, once the process plugins finish preparing the data, the destination plugins save it into Drupal entities (either content or configuration).

Creating a migration involves using such plugins (by either extending or directly using core classes). All of these are then brought together into a special migration configuration entity. This is shipped as module config that gets imported when the module is first enabled or can be constructed using a template (a case we won’t be exploring today). The migration configuration entity provides references to the main plugins used + additional metadata about the migration.

Movie Migration

Let us now get down to it and write a couple of migrations. Our data model is the following: we have two tables in our database: movies and movies_genres. The former has an ID, name and description while the latter has an ID, name and movie ID that maps to a movie from the first table. For the sake of simplicity, this mapping is one on one to avoid the complication of a third table. Here is the MySQL script that you can use to create these tables and populate with a few test records (if you want to follow along):

CREATE TABLE `movies` (
  `id` int(11) unsigned NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,
  `name` varchar(255) DEFAULT NULL,
  `description` text,
  PRIMARY KEY (`id`)
) ENGINE=InnoDB AUTO_INCREMENT=3 DEFAULT CHARSET=utf8;

CREATE TABLE `movies_genres` (
  `id` int(11) unsigned NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,
  `movie_id` int(11) DEFAULT NULL,
  `name` varchar(255) DEFAULT NULL,
  PRIMARY KEY (`id`)
) ENGINE=InnoDB AUTO_INCREMENT=5 DEFAULT CHARSET=utf8;

INSERT INTO `movies` (`id`, `name`, `description`)
VALUES
        (1, 'Big Lebowsky', 'My favorite movie, hands down.'),
        (2, 'Pulp fiction', 'Or this is my favorite movie?');

INSERT INTO `movies_genres` (`id`, `movie_id`, `name`)
VALUES
        (1, 1, 'Comedy'),
        (2, 1, 'Noir'),
        (3, 2, 'Crime');
        

What we want to achieve is migrate the movies into basic Drupal Article nodes and the genres into taxonomy terms of the Tags vocabulary (which the Article nodes reference via a field). Naturally, we also want the migration to mirror the association between the movies and the genres.

Genres

Let us first take care of the genre migration because in Drupal, the movies will depend on them (they will reference them).

Inside the config/install folder of our module, we need the following configuration entity file called migrate.migration.genres.yml:

id: genres
label: Genres
migration_group: demo
source:
  plugin: genres
  key: default
destination:
  plugin: entity:taxonomy_term
process:
  vid:
    plugin: default_value
    default_value: tags
  name: name

The first three elements of this configuration are the migration ID, label and group it belongs to. The following three keys are responsible for the three main parts of the migration pipeline mentioned earlier. Let’s talk about the latter three separately.

Source

Under the source key we specify which plugin the migration should use to represent and deliver the source data (in our case the plugin with the ID of genres). The key key is used to specify which database should our source query use (that is where our data is).

So in the Plugin/migrate/source folder of our module, let’s create our SQL based source plugin for our genres:

Genres.php

namespace Drupal\demo\Plugin\migrate\source;

use Drupal\migrate\Plugin\migrate\source\SqlBase;


class Genres extends SqlBase {

  
  public function query() {
    $query = $this->select('movies_genres', 'g')
      ->fields('g', ['id', 'movie_id', 'name']);
    return $query;
  }

  
  public function fields() {
    $fields = [
      'id' => $this->t('Genre ID'),
      'movie_id' => $this->t('Movie ID'),
      'name' => $this->t('Genre name'),
    ];

    return $fields;
  }

  
  public function getIds() {
    return [
      'id' => [
        'type' => 'integer',
        'alias' => 'g',
      ],
    ];
  }
}

Since we are using a SQL source, we need to have our own source plugin class to provide some information as to how the data needs to be read. It’s not enough to use an existing one from core. The query() method creates the query for the genre data, the fields() method defines each individual row field and the getIds() method specifies the source row field that acts as the unique ID. Nothing complicated happening here.

We are extending from SqlBase which, among other things, looks for the plugin configuration element named key to learn which database it should run the query on. In our case, the default one, as we detailed in the migration configuration entity.

And this is all we need for our simple source plugin.

Destination

For the migration destination, we use the default core taxonomy term destination plugin which handles everything for us. No need to specify anything more.

Process

Under the process key of the migration, we list each destination field we want populated and one or more process plugins that transform the source row fields into data for the destination fields. Since we want the genres to be all terms of the Tags vocabulary, for the vid field we use the default_value plugin which accepts a default_value key that indicates the value each record will have. Since all will be in the same vocabulary, this works well for us.

Lastly, for the term name field we can simply specify the source row field name without an explicit plugin name. This will, under the hood, use the get plugin that simply takes the data from the source and copies it over unaltered to the destination.

For more information on how you can chain multiple process plugins in the pipeline or what other such plugins you have available from core, I recommend you check out the documentation.

Movies

Now that our genres are importable, let’s take a look at the movies migration configuration that resides in the same folder as the previous (config/install):

migrate.migration.movies.yml

id: movies
label: Movies
migration_group: demo
source:
  plugin: movies
  key: default
destination:
  plugin: entity:node
process:
  type:
    plugin: default_value
    default_value: article
  title: name
  body: description
  field_tags:
    plugin: migration
    migration: genres
    source: genres
migration_dependencies:
  required:
    - genres

We notice the same metadata as before, the three main parts of the migration (source, process and destination) but also the explicit dependency which needs to be met before this migration can be successfully run.

Source

Like before, let’s take a look at the movies source plugin, located in the same place as the genres source plugin (Plugin/migrate/source ):

Movies.php:

namespace Drupal\demo\Plugin\migrate\source;

use Drupal\migrate\Plugin\migrate\source\SqlBase;
use Drupal\migrate\Row;


class Movies extends SqlBase {

  
  public function query() {
    $query = $this->select('movies', 'd')
      ->fields('d', ['id', 'name', 'description']);
    return $query;
  }

  
  public function fields() {
    $fields = [
      'id' => $this->t('Movie ID'),
      'name' => $this->t('Movie Name'),
      'description' => $this->t('Movie Description'),
      'genres' => $this->t('Movie Genres'),
    ];

    return $fields;
  }

  
  public function getIds() {
    return [
      'id' => [
        'type' => 'integer',
        'alias' => 'd',
      ],
    ];
  }

  
  public function prepareRow(Row $row) {
    $genres = $this->select('movies_genres', 'g')
      ->fields('g', ['id'])
      ->condition('movie_id', $row->getSourceProperty('id'))
      ->execute()
      ->fetchCol();
    $row->setSourceProperty('genres', $genres);
    return parent::prepareRow($row);
  }
}

We have the same three required methods as before, that do the same thing: query for and define the data. However, here we also use the prepareRow() method in order to alter the row data and available fields. The purpose is to select the ID of the movie genre that matches the current row (movie). That value is populated into a new source field called genres, which we will see in a minute how it’s used to save the Tags taxonomy term reference.

Destination

In this case, we use the node entity destination plugin and we need nothing more.

Process

There are four fields on the Article node we want populated with movie data. First, for the node type we use the same technique as before for the taxonomy vocabulary and set article to be the default value. Second and third, for the title and body fields we map the movie name and description source fields unaltered.

Lastly, for the tags field we use the migration process plugin that allows us to translate the ID of the genre (that we added earlier to the genres source row field) into the ID of its corresponding taxonomy term. This plugin does this for us by checking the migration mapping of the genres and reading these IDs. And this is why the genres migration is also marked as a dependency for the movies import.

Activating and Running the Migration

Now that we have our two migration configuration entities and all the relevant plugins, it’s time to enable our module for the first time and have the configuration imported by Drupal. If your module was already enabled, uninstall it and then enable it again. This will make the config import happen.

Additionally, in order to run the migrations via Drush (which is the recommended way of doing it), install the Migrate Tools module. Then all that’s left to do is to use the commands to migrate or rollback the movies and genres.

To see the available migrations and their status:

drush migrate-status

To import all migrations:

drush migrate-import --all

To roll all migrations back:

drush migrate-rollback --all

Conclusion

And there we have it – a simple migration to illustrate how we can now import, track and roll back migrations in Drupal 8. We’ve seen how the plugin system is used to represent all these different components of functionality, and how the migration definition has been turned into configuration that brings these elements together.

There is much more to learn, though. You can use different source plugins, such as for data in CSV or JSON, complex process plugins (or write your own), or even custom destination plugins for whatever data structure you may have. Good luck!

Daniel Sipos

Meet the author

Daniel Sipos is a Drupal developer who lives in Brussels, Belgium. He works professionally with Drupal but likes to use other PHP frameworks and technologies as well. He runs webomelette.com, a Drupal blog where he writes articles and tutorials about Drupal development, theming and site building.
Jun 10 2015
Jun 10

One of the things that makes Drupal great is its flexible user permission system. The out of the box permissions grid we are all familiar with covers most uses cases of controlling what users can and cannot do. It is also very easy for module developers to create new permissions and roles that restrict the logic they implement.

Drupal logo

Nevertheless, I have encountered a practical use case where the default configuration options are not enough. Namely, if you need to have multiple users with access to edit a particular node of a given type but without them necessarily having access to edit others of the same type. In other words, the next great article should be editable by Laura and Glenn but not by their colleagues. However, out of the box, users of a particular role can be masters either of their own content or of all content of a certain type. So this is not immediately possible.

In this article I am going to show you my solution to this problem in the form of a simple custom module called editor_list. Article nodes will have a field where you can select users and only these users (or those who have full access) will be able to edit that particular node. You can find the module already in this git repository and you can install it on your site for a quick start. Do keep in mind that it has a dependency on the Entity Reference module as we will see in a minute.

I will keep the code comments to a minimum to save space but you can find them in the repository if you want. Basic knowledge of Drupal 7 is assumed in the remainder of this tutorial.

Scaffolding

We first need the editor_list.info file for our module to get us going:

name = Editor List
description = Module illustrating a custom solution for having multiple editors on a node.
core = 7.x
dependencies[] = entityreference

Next, we need our editor_list.module file where most of our business logic will be located. So go ahead and create it and we will populate it as we go on.

Finally, though not covered here, we can have an editor_list.install file where we can implement hook_install() and hook_update hooks to create fields and/or deploy configuration. In the repository, you’ll find that I provided an install hook that already creates an entity reference field called field_editors and attaches it to the Article content type. If you are following along but not using the code in the repository, you should go ahead and create the field manually through the UI. It’s a simple field that references User entities and allows for unlimited selections. Nothing major.

Node access

Going back to our .module file, it’s time to implement our access logic. First though, to make things as flexible and reusable as possible, let’s have a simple function that returns an array of node types to which we apply our access logic:

function editor_list_node_types() {
  return array('article');
}

Since we are only targeting articles, this will suffice. But we will use this function in multiple places so in case we need to target other types as well, we just have to update this array.

Next, let’s write another helpful function that returns all the user IDs set in the editors field of a given node. We will also use this in multiple places:

function editor_list_uids_from_list($node) {
  $users = field_get_items('node', $node, 'field_editors');

  $allowed_uids = array();
  if ($users) {
    $allowed_uids = array_map(function($user) {
      return $user['target_id'];
    }, $users);
  }

  return $allowed_uids;
}

I believe the function is quite self explanatory so I won’t go into details here. Instead, we can turn to our hook_node_access() implementation that gets called by Drupal whenever a user tries to do something with a node (view, edit or delete):

/**
 * Implements hook_node_access().
 */
function editor_list_node_access($node, $op, $account) {
  $node_types = editor_list_node_types();

  if ( ! is_object($node) || ! in_array($node->type, $node_types) || $op !== 'update') {
    return NODE_ACCESS_IGNORE;
  }

  $allowed_uids = editor_list_uids_from_list($node);

  if (empty($allowed_uids)) {
    return NODE_ACCESS_IGNORE;
  }

  if (in_array($account->uid, $allowed_uids)) {
    return NODE_ACCESS_ALLOW;
  }
}

So what’s happening here?

First, we use our previously declared helper function to get the list of node types we want to target, and we basically ignore the situation and return if the node type of the currently accessed node is not within our list or if the operation the user is attempting is not of the type “update”. Then we use our other helper function to check if there are any users in the editor list for this node and again ignore the situation if there aren’t. However, if there are, and our accessing user is among them, we return the NODE_ACCESS_ALLOW constant which basically gives the user access to perform the attempted operation. And that’s it.

You can check out the documentation for more information about how this hook works.

Let’s say you have admin users who can create and edit any type of content and regular authenticated users who cannot edit articles (apart from maybe the ones they created themselves). Adding one of these latter users to a node’s editor list would give them access to that particular node. And another great thing is that since this is all nicely integrated, contextual filters and tabs also take these dynamic permissions into account.

Field access

We now have a working module that does what I initially set out for it to do. But let’s say that your admin users are the only ones responsible for adding users to the editor lists. In other words, you are afraid that if your editors can edit their nodes and remove themselves from the list, they’ll get locked out of the node they are supposed to work on.

To account for this situation, we need to implement a field access check and remove the possibility that editors tamper with that field. Implementing hook_field_access should do the trick nicely. And if you are wondering, this hook is similar to hook_node_access() but is responsible for individual fields rather than the entire node (+ a couple of other small differences).

/**
 * Implements hook_field_access().
 */
function editor_list_field_access($op, $field, $entity_type, $entity, $account) {
  $node_types = editor_list_node_types();
  if ($entity_type === 'node' && is_object($entity) && in_array($entity->type, $node_types)) {
    return editor_list_control_field_access($op, $field, $entity_type, $entity, $account);
  }
}

And here we have it. There are a few more parameters because this hook gets called for all entities, not just nodes. But again, we check if the currently accessed node is one of those we defined earlier (and that the entity is in fact a node) and this time delegate to another function to keep things tidier:

function editor_list_control_field_access($op, $field, $entity_type, $entity, $account) {
  if ($op !== 'edit') {
    return;
  }

  $uids = editor_list_uids_from_list($entity);
  if (!in_array($account->uid, $uids)) {
    return;
  }

  $deny = array('field_editors');
  if (in_array($field['field_name'], $deny)) {
    return false;
  }
}}

Since we only care if the user is trying to update a particular field, we return nothing if this is not the case. Keep in mind that the op string here is edit and not update as it was in the other hook. This is just one of those Drupal quirks of inconsistency we all came to love so much. And like before, we ignore the situation if the current user is not part of the editor list.

Then, we define an array of field names we want to deny access to (in our case only one but we can add to it depending on the use case). Finally, we return false if the currently accessed field is part of our $deny array. Yet another difference here in that we have to return a boolean instead of a constant like we did before.

Now the editors in the list of a given node cannot remove themselves or add anybody else to the list. But then again, in some cases you may want this functionality and in others not. It’s up to you.

Tidying up

The last thing I am going to show you here relates to organization and maybe a bit of user experience. With our current implementation, the editor list field on the Article nodes is present somewhere on the form (wherever you dragged-and-dropped it when editing the field settings). However, wouldn’t it be nice if it were automatically part of the Authoring information group at the bottom of the page? Something like this:

Drupal 7 multiple editors per node

I think so. Let’s see how we can do that.

First, we need to implement hook_form_alter or one of its variations. I prefer the most targeted one to avoid unnecessary calls to it and a bunch of conditional checks:

/**
 * Implements hook_form_BASE_FORM_ID_alter().
 */
function editor_list_form_article_node_form_alter(&$form, &$form_state, $form_id) {
  $form['#after_build'][] = 'editor_list_node_form_after_build';
}

We went with the BASE_FORM_ID of the article nodes here so if we extend our application to other types we would do the same for those as well. Inside, we just define an #after_build function to be triggered when the form has finished building. This is to ensure all the form alterations have been already done by contributed modules. All that is left to be done is to write the function responsible for making changes to the form:

function editor_list_node_form_after_build($form, &$form_state) {
  $field = field_info_field('field_editors');
  if ( ! field_access('edit', $field, 'node', $form['#entity'])) {
    return $form;
  }

  if ($form['author']['#access'] === 0) {
    return $form;
  }

  $field_editors = $form['field_editors'];
  $field_editors['#weight'] = 0;
  $form['author']['additional_authors'] = $field_editors;
  $form['field_editors'] = array();

  return $form;
}

This looks complicated but it really isn’t. We begin by loading the field definition of our editor list field. This is so that we can run the field_access check on it and just return the form array unchanged if the current user doesn’t have access to the field. Next, we do the same if the current user does not have access to the author group on the form (this is the Authoring information group we want to place the field into). And lastly, we make a copy of the field definition, change its weight and place it into the group, followed by unsetting the original definition to avoid having duplicates.

And that is pretty much it. Now the editors list field should be tucked in with the rest of the information related to authorship.

Conclusion

In this article, we created a solution to a content editing problem that Drupal 7 could not fix out of the box. However, it did provide us with the development tools necessary to make this an easy task inside of a custom module.

We now have an editor list field on the article node form by which we can specify exactly which users have access to that particular node. Though do keep in mind that in order for this to be of any use, the users you add to these lists must not have a role that allows them to edit all article nodes. Otherwise you won’t see much of a difference.

May 01 2015
May 01

In this article we are going to look at automated testing in Drupal 8. More specifically, we are going to write a few integration tests for some of the business logic we wrote in the previous Sitepoint articles on Drupal 8 module development. You can find the latest version of that code in this repository along with the tests we write today.

Drupal 8 logo

But before doing that, we will talk a bit about what kinds of tests we can write in Drupal 8 and how they actually work.

Simpletest (Testing)

Simpletest is the Drupal specific testing framework. For Drupal 6 it was a contributed module but since Drupal 7 it has been part of the core package. Simpletest is now an integral part of Drupal core development, allowing for safe API modifications due to an extensive codebase test coverage.

Right off the bat I will mention the authoritative documentation page for Drupal testing with Simpletest. There you can find a hub of information related to how Simpletest works, how you can write tests for it, what API methods you can use, etc.

By default, the Simpletest module that comes with Drupal core is not enabled so we will have to do that ourselves if we want to run tests. It can be found on the Extend page named as Testing.

Once that is done, we can head to admin/config/development/testing and see all the tests currently available for the site. These include both core and contrib module tests. At the very bottom, there is also the Clean environment button that we can use if any of our tests quit unexpectedly and there are some remaining test tables in your database.

How does Simpletest work?

When we run a test written for Simpletest, the latter uses the existing codebase and instructions found in the test to create a separate Drupal environment in which the test can run. This means adding additional tables to the database (prefixed by simpletest_) and test data that are used to replicate the site instance.

Depending on the type of test we are running and what it contains, the nature of this replication can differ. In other words, the environment can have different data and core functionality depending on the test itself.

What kinds of tests are there in Drupal 8?

There are two main types of tests that we can write for Drupal 8: unit tests using PHPUnit (which is in core now) and functional tests (using Simpletest). However, the latter can also be split into two different kinds: web tests (which require web output) and kernel tests (which do not require web output). In this article we will practically cover only web tests because most of the functionality we wrote in the previous articles is manifested through output so that’s how we need to test it as well.

Writing any type of test starts by implementing a specific class and placing it inside the src/Tests folder of the module it tests. I also encourage you to read this documentation page that contains some more information on this topic as I do not want to duplicate it here.

Our tests

As I mentioned, in this article we will focus on providing test coverage for some of the business logic we created in the series on Drupal 8 module development. Although there is nothing complicated happening there, the demo module we built offers a good example for starting out our testing process as well. So let’s get started by first determining what we will test.

By looking at the demo module, we can delineate the following aspects we can test:

That’s pretty much it. The custom menu link we defined inside the demo.links.menu.yml could also be tested but that should already work out of the box so I prefer not to.

For the sake of brevity and the fact that we don’t have too much we need to test, I will include all of our testing methods into one single class. However, you should probably group yours into multiple classes depending on what they are actually responsible for.

Inside a file called DemoTest.php located in the src/Tests/ folder, we can start by adding the following:

<?php

namespace Drupal\demo\Tests;

use Drupal\simpletest\WebTestBase;

/**
 * Tests the Drupal 8 demo module functionality
 *
 * @group demo
 */
class DemoTest extends WebTestBase {

  /**
   * Modules to install.
   *
   * @var array
   */
  public static $modules = array('demo', 'node', 'block');

  /**
   * A simple user with 'access content' permission
   */
  private $user;

  /**
   * Perform any initial set up tasks that run before every test method
   */
  public function setUp() {
    parent::setUp();
    $this->user = $this->drupalCreateUser(array('access content'));
  }
}

Here we have a simple test class which for every test it runs, will enable the modules in the $modules property and create a new user stored inside the $user property (by virtue of running the setUp() method).

For our purposes, we need to enable the demo module because that is what we are testing, the block module because we have a custom block plugin we need to test and the node module because our logic uses the access content permission defined by this module. Additionally, the user is created just so we can make sure this permission is respected.

For the three bullet points we identified above, we will now create three test methods. Keep in mind that each needs to start with the prefix test in order for Simpletest to run them automatically.

Testing the page

We can start by testing the custom page callback:

/**
 * Tests that the 'demo/' path returns the right content
 */
public function testCustomPageExists() {
  $this->drupalLogin($this->user);

  $this->drupalGet('demo');
  $this->assertResponse(200);

  $demo_service = \Drupal::service('demo.demo_service');
  $this->assertText(sprintf('Hello %s!', $demo_service->getDemoValue()), 'Correct message is shown.');
}

And here is the code that does it.

First, we log in with the user we created in the setUp() method and then navigate to the demo path. Simpletest handles this navigation using its own internal browser. Next, we assert that the response of the last accessed page is 200. This validates that the page exists. However, this is not enough because we need to make sure the text rendered on the page is the one loaded from our service.

For this, we statically access the \Drupal class and load our service. Then we assert that the page outputs the hello message composed of the hardcoded string and the return value of the service’s getDemoValue() method. It’s probably a good idea to write a unit test for whatever logic happens inside the service but for our case this would be quite redundant.

And that’s it with the page related logic. We can go to the testing page on our site, find the newly created DemoTest and run it. If all is well, we should have all green and no fails.

drupal 8 automatated tests

Testing the form

For the form we have another method, albeit more meaty, that tests all the necessary logic:

/**
 * Tests the custom form
 */
public function testCustomFormWorks() {
  $this->drupalLogin($this->user);
  $this->drupalGet('demo/form');
  $this->assertResponse(200);

  $config = $this->config('demo.settings');
  $this->assertFieldByName('email', $config->get('demo.email_address'), 'The field was found with the correct value.');

  $this->drupalPostForm(NULL, array(
    'email' => '[email protected]'
  ), t('Save configuration'));
  $this->assertText('The configuration options have been saved.', 'The form was saved correctly.');

  $this->drupalGet('demo/form');
  $this->assertResponse(200);
  $this->assertFieldByName('email', '[email protected]', 'The field was found with the correct value.');

  $this->drupalPostForm('demo/form', array(
    'email' => '[email protected]'
  ), t('Save configuration'));
  $this->assertText('This is not a .com email address.', 'The form validation correctly failed.');

  $this->drupalGet('demo/form');
  $this->assertResponse(200);
  $this->assertNoFieldByName('email', '[email protected]', 'The field was found with the correct value.');
}

The first step is like before. We go to the form page and assert a successful response. Next, we want to test that the email form element exists and that its default value is the value found inside the default module configuration. For this we use the assertFieldByName() assertion.

Another aspect we need to test is that saving the form with a correct email address does what it is supposed to: save the email to configuration. So we use the drupalPostForm() method on the parent class to submit the form with a correct email and assert that a successful status message is printed on the page as a result. This proves that the form saved successfully but not necessarily that the new email was saved. So we redo the step we did earlier but this time assert that the default value of the email field is the new email address.

Finally, we need to also test that the form doesn’t submit with an incorrect email address. We do so again in two steps: test a form validation failure when submitting the form and that loading the form again will not have the incorrect email as the default value of the email field.

Testing the block

/**
 * Tests the functionality of the Demo block
 */
public function testDemoBlock() {
  $user = $this->drupalCreateUser(array('access content', 'administer blocks'));
  $this->drupalLogin($user);

  $block = array();
  $block['id'] = 'demo_block';
  $block['settings[label]'] = $this->randomMachineName(8);
  $block['theme'] = $this->config('system.theme')->get('default');
  $block['region'] = 'header';
  $edit = array(
    'settings[label]' => $block['settings[label]'],
    'id' => $block['id'],
    'region' => $block['region']
  );
  $this->drupalPostForm('admin/structure/block/add/' . $block['id'] . '/' . $block['theme'], $edit, t('Save block'));
  $this->assertText(t('The block configuration has been saved.'), 'Demo block created.');

  $this->drupalGet('');
  $this->assertText('Hello to no one', 'Default text is printed by the block.');

  $edit = array('settings[demo_block_settings]' => 'Test name');
  $this->drupalPostForm('admin/structure/block/manage/' . $block['id'], $edit, t('Save block'));
  $this->assertText(t('The block configuration has been saved.'), 'Demo block saved.');

  $this->drupalGet('');
  $this->assertText('Hello Test name!', 'Configured text is printed by the block.');
}

For this test we need another user that also has the permission to administer blocks. Then we create a new instance of our custom demo_block with no value inside the Who field and assert that a successful confirmation message is printed as a result. Next, we navigate to the front page and assert that our block shows up and displays the correct text: Hello to no one.

Lastly, we edit the block and specify a Test name inside the Who field and assert that saving the block configuration resulted in the presence of a successful confirmation message. And we close off by navigating back to the home page to assert that the block renders the correct text.

Conclusion

In this article, we’ve seen how simple it is to write some basic integration tests for our Drupal 8 business logic. It involves creating one or multiple class files which simply make use of a large collection of API methods and assertions to test the correct behavior of our code. I strongly recommend you give this a try and start testing your custom code early as possible in order to make it more stable and less prone to being broken later on when changes are made.

Additionally, don’t let yourself get discouraged by the slow process of writing tests. This is mostly only in the beginning until you are used to the APIs and you become as fluent as you are with the actual logic you are testing. I feel it’s important to also mention that this article presented a very high level overview of the testing ecosystem in Drupal 8 as well as kept the tests quite simple. I recommend a more in depth look into the topic going forward.

Jun 13 2014
Jun 13

How to Build a Drupal 8 Module

Drupal 8 brings about a lot of changes that seek to enroll it in the same club other modern PHP frameworks belong to. This means the old PHP 4 style procedural programming is heavily replaced with an object oriented architecture. To achieve this, under the initiative of Proudly Found Elsewhere, Drupal 8 includes code not developed specifically for Drupal.

One of the most important additions to Drupal are Symfony components, with 2 major implications for Drupal developers. First, it has the potential to greatly increase the number of devs that will now want to develop for Drupal. And second, it gives quite a scare to some of the current Drupal 7 developers who do not have much experience with modern PHP practices. But that’s ok, we all learn, and lessons taken from frameworks like Symfony (and hopefully Drupal 8), will be easily extensible and applicable to other PHP frameworks out there.

In the meantime, Drupal 8 is in a late stage of its release cycle, the current version at the time of writing being alpha11. We will use this version to show some of the basic changes to module development Drupal 7 devs will first encounter and should get familiar with. I set up a Git repo where you can find the code I write in this series so you can follow along like that if you want.

How do I create a module?

The first thing we are going to look at is defining the necessary files and folder structure to tell Drupal 8 about our new module. In Drupal 7 we had to create at least 2 files (.info and .module), but in Drupal 8, the YAML version of the former is enough. And yes, .info files are now replaced with .info.yml files and contain similar data but structured differently.

Another major change is that custom and contrib module folders now go straight into the root modules/ folder. This is because all of the core code has been moved into a separate core/ folder of its own. Of course, within the modules/ directory, you are encouraged to separate modules between custom and contrib like in Drupal 7.

Let’s go ahead and create a module called demo (very original) and place it in the modules/custom/ directory. And as I mentioned, inside of this newly created demo/ folder, all we need to begin with is a demo.info.yml file with the following required content:

name: Drupal 8 Demo module
description: 'Demo module for Drupal 8 alpha11'
type: module
core: 8.x

Three out of four you should be familiar with (name, description and core). The type is now also a requirement as you can have yml files for themes as well. Another important thing to keep in mind is that white spaces in yml files mean something and proper indentation is used to organize data in array-like structures.

You can check out this documentation page for other key|value pairs that can go into a module .info.yml file and the change notice that announced the switch to this format.

And that’s it, one file. You can now navigate to the Extend page, find the Demo module and enable it.

As I mentioned, we are no longer required to create a .module file before we can enable the module. And architecturally speaking, the .module files will be significantly reduced in size due to most of the business logic moving to service classes, controllers and plugins, but we’ll see some of that later.

What is ‘routing’ and what happened to hook_menu() and its callbacks?

In Drupal 7, hook_menu() was probably the most implemented hook because it was used to define paths to Drupal and connect these paths with callback functions. It was also responsible for creating menu links and a bunch of other stuff.

In Drupal 8 we won’t need hook_menu() anymore as we make heavy use of the Symfony2 components to handle the routing. This involves defining the routes as configuration and handling the callback in a controller (the method of a Controller class). Let’s see how that works by creating a simple page that outputs the classic Hello world!.

First, we need to create a routing file for our module called demo.routing.yml. This file goes in the module root folder (next to demo.info.yml). Inside this file, we can have the following (simple) route definition:

demo.demo:
  path: '/demo'
  defaults:
    _content: '\Drupal\demo\Controller\DemoController::demo'
    _title: 'Demo'
  requirements:
    _permission: 'access content'

The first line marks the beginning of a new route called demo for the module demo (the first is the module name and the second the route name). Under path, we specify the path we want this route to register. Under defaults, we have two things: the default page title (_title) and the _content which references a method on the DemoController class. Under requirements, we specify the permission the accessing user needs to have to be able to view the page. You should consult this documentation page for more options you can have for this routing file.

Now, let’s create our first controller called DemoController that will have a method named demo() getting called when a user requests this page.

Inside the module directory, create a folder called src/ and one called Controller/ inside of it. This will be the place to store the controller classes. Go ahead and create the first one: DemoController.php.

The placement of the Controllers and, as we will see, other classes, into the src/ folder is part of the adoption of the PSR-4 standard. Initially, there was a bigger folder structure we had to create (PSR-0 standard) but now there is a transition phase in which both will work. So if you still see code placed in a folder called lib/, that’s PSR-0.

Inside of our DemoController.php file, we can now declare our class:

<?php
/**
 * @file
 * Contains \Drupal\demo\Controller\DemoController.
 */

namespace Drupal\demo\Controller;

/**
 * DemoController.
 */
class DemoController {
  /**
   * Generates an example page.
   */
  public function demo() {
    return array(
      '#markup' => t('Hello World!'),
    );
  }      
}

This is the simplest and minimum we need to do in order to get something to display on the page. At the top, we specify the class namespace and below we declare the class.

Inside the DemoController class, we only have the demo() method that returns a Drupal 7-like renderable array. Nothing big. All we have to do now is clear the caches and navigate to http://example.com/demo and we should see a Drupal page with Hello World printed on it.

In Drupal 7, when we implement hook_menu(), we can also add the registered paths to menus in order to have menu links showing up on the site. This is again no longer handled with this hook but we use a yml file to declare the menu links as configuration.

Let’s see how we can create a menu link that shows up under the Structure menu of the administration. First, we need to create a file called demo.menu_links.yml in the root of our module. Inside this yml file we will define menu links and their position in existing menus on the site. To achieve what we set out to do, we need the following:

demo.demo:
  title: Demo Link
  description: 'This is a demo link'
  parent: system.admin_structure
  route_name: demo.demo

Again we have a yml structure based on indentation in which we first define the machine name of the menu link (demo) for the module demo (like we did with the routing). Next, we have the link title and description followed by the parent of this link (where it should be placed) and what route it should use.

The value of parent is the parent menu link (appended by its module) and to find it you need to do a bit of digging in *.menu_links.yml files. I know that the Structure link is defined in the core System module so by looking into the system.menu_links.yml file I could determine the name of this link.

The route_name is the machine name of the route we want to use for this link. We defined ours earlier. And with this in place, you can clear the cache and navigate to http://example.com/admin/structure where you should now see a brand new menu link with the right title and description and that links to the demo/ path. Not bad.

Conclusion

In this article we began exploring module development in Drupal 8. At this stage (alpha11 release), it is time to start learning how to work with the new APIs and port contrib modules. To this end, I am putting in writing my exploration of this new and exiting framework that will be Drupal 8 so that we can all learn the changes and hit the ground running when release day comes.

For starters, we looked at some basics: how you start a Drupal 8 module (files, folder structure etc), all compared with Drupal 7. We’ve also seen how to define routes and a Controller class with a method to be called by this route. And finally, we’ve seen how to create a menu link that uses the route we defined.

In the next tutorial, we will continue building this module and look at some other cool new things Drupal 8 works with. We will see how we can create blocks and how to work with forms and the configuration system. See you then.

About Drupal Sun

Drupal Sun is an Evolving Web project. It allows you to:

  • Do full-text search on all the articles in Drupal Planet (thanks to Apache Solr)
  • Facet based on tags, author, or feed
  • Flip through articles quickly (with j/k or arrow keys) to find what you're interested in
  • View the entire article text inline, or in the context of the site where it was created

See the blog post at Evolving Web

Evolving Web