Nov 02 2018
Nov 02

As part of the session I presented in Drupal Europe, REST Ready: Auditing established Drupal 8 websites for use as a content hub, I presented a module called “Entity Access Audit”.

This has proved to be a useful tool for auditing our projects for unusual access scenarios as part of our standard go-live security checks or when opening sites up to additional mechanisms of content delivery, such as REST endpoints. Today this code has been released on Drupal.org: Entity Access Audit.

There are two primary interfaces for viewing access results, the overview screen and a detailed overview for each entity type. Here is a limited example of the whole-site overview showing a few of the entity types you might find in core or custom modules:

Entity access audit

Here is a more detailed report for a single entity type:

Entity access audit

The driving motivation behind these interfaces was being able to visually scan entity types and ensure that the access results align with our expectations. This has so far helped identify various bugs in custom and contributed code.

In order to conduct a thorough access test, the module uses a predefined set of dimensions and then uses a cartesian product of these dimensions to test every combination. The dimensions tested out of the box, where applicable to the given entity type are:

  • All bundles of an entity type.
  • If the current user is the entity owner or not.
  • The access operation: create, view, update, delete.
  • All the available roles.

It’s worth noting that these are only common factors used to determine access results, they are not comprehensive. If access was determined by other factors, there would be no visibility of this in the generated reports.

The module is certainly not a silver bullet for validating the security of Drupal 8 websites, but has proved to be a useful additional tool when conducting audits.

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Posted by Sam Becker
Senior Developer

Dated 2 November 2018

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Jan 15 2018
Jan 15

Managing technical debt is important for the health of all software projects. One way to manage certain types of technical debt is to revisit code and decide if it’s still relevant to the project and to potentially remove it. Doing so can reducing complexity and the amount of code developers are required to maintain.

To address this we’ve been experimenting with adding simple annotations to code, which indicate an “expiry”. A nudge to developers to go and reevaluate if some bit of code will still be needed at some point in the future. This can be integrated into CI pipelines to fail builds which have outstanding expiry annotations.

Some scenarios where this has proved to be helpful have been:

  • Removing workarounds in CSS to address bugs in web browsers which have since been fixed.
  • Removing uninstalled modules, which were required only for hook_uninstall.
  • Removing code that exists for features which are gradually being superseded, like an organisation gradually migrating content from nodes into a new custom entity.

Here is an real snippet of code we were able to recently delete from a project, based on a bug which was fixed upstream in Firefox. I don’t believe without an explicit prompt to revisit the code, which was introduced many months earlier, we would have been able to confidently clean this up.


// @expire Jan 2018
// Fix a bug in firefox which causes all form elements to match the exact size
// specified in the "size" or "cols" attribute. Firefox probably will have
// fixed this bug by now. Test it by removing the following code and visiting
// the contact form at a small screen size. If the elements dont overflow the
// viewport, the bug is fixed.
.form-text__manual-size {
  width: 529px;
  @media (max-width: 598px) {
    width: 100%;
  }
}

The code we've integrated into our CI pipeline to check these expiry annotations simply greps the code base for strings matching the expiry pattern for the last n months worth of time:


#!/bin/bash

SEARCH_FORMAT="@expire %s"
DATE_FORMAT="+%b %Y"
DIRS="./app/modules/custom/ ./app/themes/"
SEARCH_LAST_N_MONTHS=4

# Cross-platform date formatting with a month offset.
case `uname` in
  Darwin)
    function date_offset_month() {
      date -v $1m "$DATE_FORMAT";
    }
    ;;
  Linux)
    function date_offset_month() {
      date --d="$1 month" "$DATE_FORMAT"
    }
    ;;
  *)
esac

for i in $(seq 0 $SEARCH_LAST_N_MONTHS); do
    FORMATTED_DATE=$(date_offset_month -$i)
    SEARCH_STRING=$(printf "$SEARCH_FORMAT" "$FORMATTED_DATE")
    echo "Searching codebase for \"$SEARCH_STRING\"."
    grep -rni "$SEARCH_STRING" $DIRS && exit 1
done

exit 0
Photo of Sam Becker

Posted by Sam Becker
Senior Developer

Dated 16 January 2018

Comments

Nice!
Do you integrate this into your project issue tracking? Maybe have a tech debt story?

Pagination

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Oct 03 2017
Oct 03

Last week I was fortunate enough to attend and deliver a session at DrupalCon Vienna. The session was based around leveraging and getting productive with the automated testing tools we use in the Drupal community.

For the kind of large scale projects we work on, it's essential that automated testing is a priority and firmly embedded in our technical culture. Stability and maintainability of the code we're working on helps to build trusting relationships and happy technical teams. I have for a long time been engaged with the developments of automated testing in Drupal core and internally we've worked hard to adapt these processes into the projects we build and fill-in any blanks where required.

I was fortunate enough to be selected to share this at DrupalCon Vienna. Without further ado, I present, Test all the things! Get productive with automated testing in Drupal 8:

[embedded content]

Our current testing ethos is based around using the same tools for core and contrib for our bespoke Drupal project builds. Doing so allows us to context-switch between our own client work and contributed project or core work. To make this work we've addressed a few gaps in what's available to us out of the box.

Current State of Testing

I had some great conversations after the session with developers who were just starting to explore automated testing in Drupal. While the tools at our disposal are powerful, there is still lots of Drupal-specific knowledge required to become productive. My hope is the session helped to fill in some of the blanks in this regard.

E2E Testing

Because all of the test cases in core are isolated and individually setup environments/installations, end-to-end testing is tricky without some additional work. One of the touch points in the session was based around skipping the traditional set-up processes and using the existing test classes against pre-provisioned environments. Doing so replicates production-like environments in a test suite, which helps to provide a high-level of confidence tests are asserting behaviors of the whole system. Bringing this into core as a native capability is being discussed on drupal.org and was touched on in the session.

JS Unit Testing

One thing Drupal core has yet to address is JavaScript unit testing. For complex front-ends, testing JS application code with a browser is can become clumsy and hard to maintain. One approach we've used to address this is Jest. This nicely compliments front-ends where individual JavaScript modules can be isolated and individually tested.

Summing up, attending DrupalCon Vienna, presenting the session and meeting the members of the broader community was a great experience. I'm hopeful my session was able to contribute to the outstanding quality of sessions and technical discussions.

Photo of Sam Becker

Posted by Sam Becker
Senior Developer

Dated 3 October 2017

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About Drupal Sun

Drupal Sun is an Evolving Web project. It allows you to:

  • Do full-text search on all the articles in Drupal Planet (thanks to Apache Solr)
  • Facet based on tags, author, or feed
  • Flip through articles quickly (with j/k or arrow keys) to find what you're interested in
  • View the entire article text inline, or in the context of the site where it was created

See the blog post at Evolving Web

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