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Jul 13 2018
Jul 13

One of the reasons why I’ve chosen to run for a position on the Drupal Association Board of Directors is because I’ve noticed that small-to-medium-sized agencies would like to contribute more to Drupal’s strategic direction. These businesses have played a huge role in building Drupal’s code, community and success over the years, and I believe they’re also a key component of its long-term sustainability. Companies with 25 or fewer people registered on Drupal.org make up the majority of those listed in Drupal’s Marketplace. It’s not a comprehensive survey, but it suggests that smaller agencies are the backbone of the community.

company numbers according to employees with accounts on drupal.org

I’m an owner and co-founder of an 11-year-old agency that employs just over a dozen team members. We have a diverse client stable that includes non-profits, government departments, universities and businesses of varying sizes. Their project budgets range from $5,000 to $500,000, so it’s important to us—and many others like us—that Drupal continues being able to offer powerful and complex functionality for a wide price range.

I’ve heard the conversations about how Drupal 8 has made it more challenging to work with a smaller team and more expensive to build sites and applications. I’ve seen its relatively sluggish adoption statistics. I’ve watched with interest as Backdrop works on advancing a Drupal fork that doesn’t leave the needs of the smaller agencies behind. I sense that we’re at a watershed moment when these businesses need a strong voice at the table.

Small shops have unique strengths to offer clients: they’re often flexible, speedy, local and personal, with strong customer support. One way the Drupal Association could give a boost to these agencies would be by developing more guidelines and models for Drupal Business Summits. Aimed at helping prospective end-users decide whether Drupal could help meet their needs, these events have the potential to drive Drupal’s growth in new regions. Smaller agencies, often located in places with under-tapped markets, are perfectly positioned to lead the charge.

Getting elected to the Drupal Association Board of Directors would give me the opportunity to share my experience and expertise as a small-business owner. I invite you to make your own voice heard as well, by voting in this important election. (Voting ends today: July 13, 2018).

Jul 12 2018
Jul 12

As you probably know, voting is currently open for the Drupal Association’s Board of Directors. The Board of Directors plays an important role in developing the Association’s strategic direction, and voting for the Board of Directors is an opportunity for members of the Drupal community to participate in shaping the Association’s future.

One of the reasons I’m running for this position is because I want to help grow the Drupal community into new areas, and to ensure that the Association’s strategic vision is representative of the needs of Drupal’s diverse community.

Although Evolving Web is a relatively small Drupal company, we have an incredibly diverse team, with our 15 employees coming from 11 different countries. Managing such an international team has broadened my perspective and made me think about the the Drupal experience in communities around the world.

Where Evolving Web employees come from

There are several areas where I want to make sure that Drupal better serves the needs of its growing communities:

Toolkit for Drupal Event Organizers

Anyone who’s been to DrupalCon or a DrupalCamp knows that it’s an amazing opportunity to make connections with other developers and designers, to ask questions, share knowledge, and build a sense of community.

There are plenty of opportunities I see to create a toolkit that would allow for more and larger community-organized events. Already, the Association has standardized the branding for future DrupalCons, and provided a DrupalCon license that will be available so that the community can organize DrupalCons in Europe.

I think that it would be great to provide a more open version of this license, that would be a template anyone can use to organize DrupalCamps. For regions where the Drupal community is still small, and there are only so many people able to volunteer their time and effort, having an easily-adaptable format, planning procedures and best practices could make organizing a DrupalCamp a much less daunting prospect.

Similarly, this year we’re organizing the first ever Drupal Business Summit in Montreal. This is another type of event which could be replicated in other cities and regions, and could be a great tool for growing Drupal adoption along with community.

Promote Drupal Global Training Days

Drupal Global Training Days (GTD) is an exciting community initiative that I’m proud to be a part of. The idea behind Global Training Days is to introduce new and beginner users to Drupal. It’s a great way to introduce Drupal to regions where there are not yet large or active Drupal communities. It also provides a welcoming environment that can be less intimidating for non-developers or people just starting to explore Drupal.

Global Training Days are a great opportunity to expand any Drupal community, whether new or established, and can be used at the community level to promote Drupal. I think having more shared marketing tools to promote these trainings would be a powerful tool for growing the community.

Suzanne and students

Understand New Users’ Needs

As a trainer, I’ve had the exciting opportunity to introduce people from all over the world to Drupal and to see them on their journey toward using Drupal and becoming involved in the community. Over the past seven years, I’ve trained over 1,200 people from at least 17 different countries; across Canada and the US, at DrupalCon Munich, and at DrupalCon Asia in Mumbai.

Through these trainings, and my interaction with trainees, I’ve developed an understanding of how newcomers perceive Drupal, as well as an appreciation for the diversity of needs and priorities of Drupal users around the world. There’s an Admin UI initiative underway to improve the experience of content editors, which I think will go a long way to making Drupal feel more intuitive for new users.

Jul 10 2018
Jul 10

The best part of my job is teaching Drupal. As a Drupal trainer, I get to meet a lot of Drupalers with really different backgrounds. Some are brand-new to Drupal, some have lots of experience. Listening to them tell of their Drupal journeys, both the highlights and the low points, has given me insights into the different ways people encounter Drupal and some of the most common reasons why they love it, use it and get involved in the community (or not).

Drupal Thanks at DrupalCon Asia 2016

I've recently been thinking about the Drupal community from a user experience point of view. I regularly host UI meetups for developers and designers, and I'm also volunteering on Drupal's Admin UI initiative, which is creating an accessible administrative interface based on user data and feedback. Both have taught me to empathize with others and understand why they might be feeling excited, warm and fuzzy, anxious, frustrated or curious about Drupal at any given point. It's also given me ideas about what we can all can do to improve the Drupal experience, including:

1. Participate in the community

If you think back to your own best experience with Drupal, there's a decent chance that it was a DrupalCon, DrupalCamp or another time when you had the chance to learn from other Drupalers or share your knowledge with them. It feels inspiring to mentor newcomers, help people solve problems on Drupal Slack or get advice from someone who seems to care. Let's keep it up and look for opportunities to take it further!

2. Recognize the challenges that you and others are facing

There's no point in pretending that using Drupal is always smooth sailing. Hiding the challenging parts of our experiences only makes others feel like they're alone or that they've missed something everybody else has understood. Asking new users around the world to tell me about their pain points has shown me, as just one small example, that Drupal terminology can often be intimidating. We all have our issues, and talking about them is the first step toward finding solutions for them.

Drupal Training at Drupal North in Ottawa

3. Get involved with existing initiatives

Community members are on the job when it comes to refining certain aspects of the Drupal experience. The Promote Drupal Initiative has already enhanced Drupal.org's landing page with the persona-specific information its audience was looking for. Their next step will be devising ways to make it easier for new users to find their way into community engagement. And they're not the only ongoing project that could benefit from your time, expertise or financial support: the Out of the Box Experience Initiative, for example, is helping Drupal to make a better and more helpful first impression when it's installed by a prospective user.

4. Imagine new ways of solving problems

The beauty of being part of an open source community is that if you see a problem, you have the power to address it. If you have an idea for helping others have a better Drupal journey, why not try it out? Great user experiences encourage user-base growth and vice versa: a virtuous cycle that I'm committed to supporting.

Inspired by these ideas, I recently decided to run for a position on the Drupal Association's Board of Directors as a "director at large"---a community representative, in other words---because I would love to put my time, energy and knowledge towards growing the community and promoting Drupal to new groups and markets.  If you have an active profile on Drupal.org then you can vote in this election here any time before Friday, July 13.

For a video version of this post, here's a recording of my session on the topic at DrupalCamp Montreal:

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May 01 2018
May 01

By now, we all know the importance of building responsive websites that dynamically adjust to any screen size. According to Statista, 52 percent of all global web pages served in 2018 were viewed on smartphones. And now that Google’s index is mobile first, it’s essential for websites to be designed (or redesigned) mobile first — with a smartphone screen size as the starting point, and resizing up from there.

Building a site to be fully responsive starts with organizing your content so it can be browsed and read on even the smallest smartphone. Whether you’re creating content for a new site, or restructuring a legacy site, begin with a responsive content strategy that defines how you will optimize and structure content for mobile users.

Here are the key components of responsive (and mobile first) content strategy:

1. Be mobile first

When you begin planning content, start with the smallest screen size and work your way up. This will allow you to tackle the most challenging task first, and it will help you make the most of the smallest interface. This process is also very effective for eliminating unnecessary content elements that you may be tempted to include if you’re designing desktop first. An effective and efficient mobile-first design will more easily translate to a clean desktop design (rather than trying to scale down your desktop design).

2. Structure your content first, design later

Begin by stripping all the design elements from your text content. Develop and structure your content, add it to your Drupal 8 CMS and then apply styling and design.

3. Optimize and structure your content for mobile

Responsive content needs to be modular so it will easily break into mobile-friendly pieces. And it needs to be skimmable, so mobile readers can easily consume it.

Create less content (if that’s an option) and keep it short. Organize website copy into small, granular paragraphs or chunks, no longer than three paragraphs. Add subtitles that define each piece, so mobile users can easily browse and scan content.

Working in your Drupal CMS, define separate fields for different pieces of content. The more fields you create for your content, the more flexibility you will have. In other words, you’ll have a field for a title, subtitle, pull-quote, body text, instructions, etc. Each field can be uniquely styled according to its content type. Then prioritize fields based on their importance so they stack in a logical way on a user’s screen — the most important content up top, less useful content can be condensed, stacked below, or even hidden.

4. Simplify navigation

Nobody wants to browse a mega menu that consumes their entire smartphone screen. The ubiquity of mobile means menus need to be reduced and simplified. Put a lot of thought into how you will make your most important content accessible via your menu. How many menu items can you remove or de-prioritize? Flatten your navigation — stop nesting menus inside menus inside menus and instead create fewer layers and way less navigation points. If you’ve decided to take links out of the menu, you can add them elsewhere as links or call to action.

5. Be strategic with your calls to action

Take the time to prioritize your calls to action. On mobile, it’s even more important to define your most important CTAs — the ones that directly impact your business objectives. List your objectives in order of importance, and align a call to action with each one. Then choose objective that’s most critical to your bottom line. This is the only CTA that should live above the fold on your mobile screen.

6. Optimize media

Make sure your sound, video and image files are optimized for devices large and small. Always use image thumbnails so users don’t have to load a video player. And never, never use autoplay on your video and audio content.

For images, start with image sizes and proportions that can be adapted. And don’t resize or add image treatments before adding images to your CMS — let Drupal do the heavy lifting (just like you did with your text content). Images should not be larger than you need them to be (even on large screens). Rely on Drupal 8’s Responsive Image module to resize images to the screen-appropriate size.

7. Begin the long, hard task of cleaning up legacy content

Of course, there’s always the large, old-school website that needs to have its content converted to mobile first. In addition to all the content tips we’ve outlined above, you want to dive into that static HTML and clean it up. Remove fixed-width tables, inline media and floats with content (ouch). And on the content level, start to structure long content into browsable chunks that can be organized into content fields.

Mobile first: it’s universal

Many of us been applying similar content guidelines and strategies for quite some time; but the need for a mobile-first approach was not universal. It was dependent on the project, technology used, the target user, etc. In today’s digital ecosystem, mobile-first has become a given. Now it’s time to explore the creative potential for creating sharp, sparse, targeted content that fits in the palm of a user’s hand.

Apr 04 2018
Apr 04

Structuring Your Drupal Website

Drupal has always been a strong content management platform. The number one reason we use Drupal is because it so easily adapts to our clients’ content models. It enables us to easily map and structure many different types of complex content.

Let’s look at how we go about structuring that content in Drupal, and how we use terminology to define, group and link different types of content.

Content Entities

In Drupal 8, every piece of content is an entity. To structure a site, you want to define different types of entities that will store different types of content.

Let’s take a publishing website as an example. We’re going to create entities for: books, authors, editions, interviews, reviews, book collections, book categories, and so on. You can start by drawing a map of all these nouns. I like mapping out content on a whiteboard because it’s easy to erase and change your mind and it’s bigger than a piece of paper.

Content mapping on a white board

Relationships

Once you’ve mapped all the different types of content that will exist on your site, identify the connections between them. Simply draw arrows arrows between the content types that are related to one another.

For example:

  • A book has an author (or multiple authors): draw an arrow from book to author

  • A book can have editions: draw an arrow from book to edition

  • A book can have reviews, interviews: connect these

  • A book collection has books: group books by collection

  • A book has categories: associate books with topics and categories

Entity Terminology: Bundles, Nodes, Taxonomy, Paragraphs, Blocks

Nodes, taxonomy terms, custom blocks, and paragraphs are all different types of entities. Each entity type has unique properties that make it better suited for different use cases and content types.

Here’s a breakdown of the most important Drupal terminology you need to know to structure your content:

  • Node: A page of content is a node, accessible via its own URL
  • Taxonomy terms: Used to categorize other content, taxonomy terms live in a hierarchy. They can be used to filter content and create unique landing pages.
  • Paragraphs: Content that lives within other content and doesn’t need a dedicated URL is a paragraph.
  • Custom Block: Any content that will be reused throughout the site becomes a custom block. You can also embed a block in a node.
  • Bundle: An entity sub-type is a bundle. Usually, bundles can have unique fields and settings.
  • Field: A field is a component of the content, i.e. an ISBN, author’s name, or book title

Applying this Model to our Example Project

Here’s how we would decide which entity type to use for each content type:

  • Books and authors become nodes

  • Book categories become taxonomy terms

  • Interviews, reviews and editions could be paragraphs

  • Books and authors would be node bundles (aka content types)

  • A book category is a taxonomy bundle (aka vocabulary)

  • A book collection is a block bundle (block type)

  • Reviews and interviews are paragraph bundles (aka paragraph types)

  • A book collection that needs to be displayed on several pages becomes a block

Focusing on Each Entity to Create Fields

Once you’re looking at a book, you can start to think about what defines a book.

Ask yourself:

  • What information should it have?

  • Which information needs to be displayed?

  • How will we filter and order this content?

  • Will there be a single value for the field or multiple values?

List the various components of the content: title, author, ISBN, covers, genres, editions, reviews, interviews. Each of these will be a field.

Fields in Drupal can be single value (for example, each book has a single ISBN number) or multi-value (a book can have multiple reviews or authors). There are many other fields types that can store the content in a certain way that will affect how it can be displayed or used later (text, date, number, email, link, etc). A field that links one entity to another is a ‘reference’ field.

Information Architecture

So far we’ve talked about structuring your content using entities and bundles. But how do users actually access your content? When you’re building out your site map, you’ll probably picture top-level pages. These may link to dynamic lists of content, or they may have sub-pages that are added beneath them.

Linking to Content

In Drupal, we have three main ways to link to content: menus, views, and fields. In general, this is how we use them:

Menus are for static content: Menus are a static hierarchy of content. If you’re creating permanent content on the site that will be relevant for a long time, you’ll probably link to it through a menu.

Views are for dynamic content: Content that is ‘dynamic’ that will be added to frequently and is too abundant to add to a menu will probably be listed and linked to via views (the Drupal term for ‘list of content’).

Entity reference fields or link fields: You can also explicitly add a link from one content item to another using an entity reference field or a link field. For example, if you have a book and you want to have it link to three other hand-selected ‘related books’, you could create a ‘Content’ reference field for this.

You can go through your site map and figure out which pages are static (linked to by the menu) and dynamic content (linked via views). Landing pages tend to be connection pages. For example, a landing page might live in the menu, list a bunch of dynamic pages and also include explicit links to other pages via ‘calls to action’.  

Applying Menus and Views to Our Example

Using our example, you may have a static page for ‘About Us’, ‘Contact Information’, or ‘History of Publishing’. These would be created as pages and linked to via the menu.

You may also have a page that lists all the books and another that lists all the authors. Because your lists of books and authors are likely to change often, these lists should be created using views. When you add a new book or a new author, it automatically appears in the list.

Taxonomies make creating lists more interesting because we can create lists of content that are filtered by a particular taxonomy term. For example, if ‘prize winning’ is a book category, a taxonomy allows us to create a list of all the books that are ‘prize-winning’.

Finally, you might have a landing page for an upcoming book tour that includes details about the tour, a link to the book being promoted, and also links to other books by the author.

Conclusion

There are many more things to know to build a site with Drupal. But when you’re planning out your content, you simply need to be able to draw out the structure and communicate this with your team. Knowing the basic Drupal concepts will help you communicate clearly and think about the site’s architecture at a high level.

To read about a real-life project in which we built out book content in Drupal 8, read about our project for Princeton University Press.

Jan 16 2018
Jan 16

With so many shiny new Drupal 8 modules emerging this year, we were hard pressed to pick our recommendations for 2018. It came down to asking ourselves: which modules are we excited about implementing in 2018… the ones that will make our projects better, faster, smarter brighter? Read on for our list of Drupal 8 modules we're excited about.

Configuration Split

The Drupal Configuration Split module makes Drupal 8 configuration management more customizable. This means you can set up some configurations that can be edited on the live site, without interfering with your configuration management workflow. Instead of importing and exporting the whole set of a site’s configuration, the module enables you to define sets of configuration to export to different directories that automatically merge again when they are imported.

Content Workflow

If you’ve shied away from implementing complicated workflows in the past, you’ll enjoy how the Content Workflow module makes it easy to set up a simple workflow. This core module enables you to streamline the content publication process by defining states for content (such as draft, unpublished and published) and then manage permissions around these states.

Deploy

The Deploy content staging module makes it easier to stage and preview content for a Drupal site. It’s often used to deploy content from one Drupal site to another. Redesigned for Drupal 8, the new version is based on the Multiversion and Replication modules, making it more efficient and flexible.

Drupal Commerce

The new full release of Drupal Commerce has us very excited to start building ecommerce sites in Drupal 8. Fully rebuilt for Drupal 8, the new Drupal Commerce module doesn’t presume a specific ecommerce business model, enabling developers to customize the module to suit a merchant’s needs.

JSON API

The JSON API module formats your JSON requests and responses to make them compliant with the JSON API Specification. This module is the key to setting up Drupal as a backend so you can implement the font-end with React or your front-end platform of choice.

Schema.org Metatag

Ramp up your SEO with structured data that helps Google categorize and display your pages. The Schema.org Metatag module allows you to add and validate Schema.org structured data as JASON LD, one of Google’s preferred data formats.

UI Patterns

If you’re looking for a way to implement an ‘atomic design’ in Drupal the UI Patterns project is a nice option. It consists of six modules that allow you to define and expose UI patterns as Drupal plugins. You can use them as drop-in templates for all entity types — paragraphs, views, field groups and more.

Webform

The Drupal webform module has a new release candidate for Drupal 8. A ton of work has been put into the module; it’s like a whole form-building application inside your Drupal site. Quickly integrate forms into any Drupal 8 website. enables you to build, publish and duplicate webforms. You can also manage and download submissions, and send confirmations to users.

Which Drupal 8 modules are doing it for you?

We’d love to hear about which Drupal 8 modules your team is excited about. Leave us a comment.

May 15 2017
May 15

I train a lot of new Drupal users. Some find it easy-to-use and some find it a daunting maze of forms full of confusing terminology. Sometimes, it just depends on how the admin UI has been configured.

Here are some tips for configuring Drupal so that content editors using your site will love Drupal!

Give Editors Limited Permissions

Often users are overwhelmed by the number of things they can do once they're logged into Drupal. If you take the time to update their permissions and remove un-needed permissions, the administrative interface will be much simpler to use. Content editors probably don't need to modify image styles or manage view modes, so don't give them these permissions.

This is probably to single most important thing you can do to improve the admin UI, and has the added bonus of making your site more secure. It also makes it harder to for editors to break the site by accident by changing a setting they don't understand.

Configure the WYSIWYG Editor

One of the exciting things about Drupal 8 is that the WYSIWYG editor is built-in. But Drupal doesn't know out-of-the-box what HTML you have and who your editors are. That's why you can and should customize the WYSIWYG editor (Configuration > Content Authoring > Text formats and editors).

You can remove unneeded tools and add ones that are really useful (like Paste from Word and Paste as Plain Text). You can also configure the "Styles" and "Format" options that users can add from the WYSIWYG editor. 

Screenshot of WYSIWYG editor configuration

Text Formats

Text formats are one of the keys to content editing success. Remember that text formats are associated with permissions, so your content editors will need to permission to use any given text format. They are also associated with content. If I save a piece of content using Full HTML, the next user who edits the content will also need permission to use that text format. Otherwise, they the text field will be disabled.Screenshot of non-editable body text

So make sure that your content editors have permission to edit all the text formats that will be associated with content that they need to edit.

Field Configuration

The more that you break up your content into nice, manageable fields, the more consistently you can collect and display content on your site. If your content editors are used to one large text box where they enter content on the page, they might not be so excited at first about a set of separate fields. So here are some tips to configuring fields so content editors will like them:

  • Make sure you're using the right field widget. Should you be using an autocomplete instead of a select box? Check out the widget settings on the Manage Form Display tab. 
  • Use help text when needed, especially if you need content in a certain format, or a particular image size.
  • Make required fields required. Don't make your content editors guess what's required for the content to look right.
  • When appropriate, add a default value.
  • Make sure the order of the fields in the admin UI makes sense, and is consistent across different types of content.
  • If you have nested Paragraph fields in your content, try changing the widget to display a preview of each one, instead of an edit form.

Content Type Configuration

Make it easy for content editors to pick the right content type by providing meaningful names and descriptions. Think of this as built-in documentation. Make sure you create different content types for distinct types of data, rather than using catch-all content types. At the same time, don't set up multiple content types with identical fields, since this will add to the administrative overhead of the site. Remember, you can always use taxonomy terms to distinguish different ways that content should be filtered/displayed on the site.

Hide the Cruft

There are lots of elements in the Drupal node edit page, like the 'Sticky at top of lists' checkbox, that can be easily hidden. If you're not using these settings, or if there are legacy fields that are no longer relevant, hide them! It's easy to hide fields from the edit form using the 'Manage Form Display' tab.

Preview

For those of you who haven't tried the Preview button for Drupal 8, it works a whole lot better than it did in Drupal 7. Your content editors might find this really useful. If you're using View Modes to control the display of content in different contexts throughout the site, you'll probably need to provide some documentation/instructions for you content editors, prompting them to switch the view mode when they're previewing.

Screenshot of the preview interface in Drupal 8

Edit a Page with One Click

Ideally, content editors would be able to edit the main content of a page via a single 'Edit' link. If you're creating landing pages that have complex content, this can be difficult. You might be storing some of the page elements as blocks or related nodes.

You can use Paragraphs to set up compound content that's specific to the landing page, or use the Inline Entity Form module to allow users to edit content that's referenced from within your page, and displayed elsewhere on the site.

Create Dashboards or Custom Admin Views

Content editors like to have a landing page they can go to to see the overall state of content on the site. This might take the form of a dashboard, or it might be a series of customized content listing pages (which you can easily build with views). The idea is to give content editors an easy way to search and edit the content, as well as links to the admin pages they'll need most often.

Contrib Modules for Content Editing

The LinkIt module provides a nice interface for inserting links that your content editors will really appreciate.

The media management modules Entity Browser and File Entity Browser together to provide easy file-reuse. This is a usability win for content editors who are working with large libraries of files.

Use Field Group to group related fields together in the content admin UI.

Test

You need to test your content admin UI. Test what it looks like for different types of users. The Masquerade module can help with this. Make sure your list of tests include editing different types of content, making sure that any content that's migrated into Drupal can be edited consistently.

All of this is a lot of work, not a task to do the day before site launch. It's best to start thinking about the content admin experience the day you start building your site.

If you liked this blog post and want more step-by-step tips for setting up your Drupal 8 website, we have several Drupal trainings coming up online and in-person that you might like.

May 08 2017
May 08

Drupal 8 does way more out-of-the-box than previous versions of Drupal. If you're migrating your site from Drupal 6 or Drupal 7, you'll be amazed how many contributed modules you can now do without. 

That being said, there are still a set of handy contrib modules you'll probably use for most of your projects. This isn't a complete list, just a starting point for anyone new to Drupal 8 looking for a useful set of modules to try. 

Admin Toolbar

The Admin Toolbar gives you a dropdown menu to access the sub-items in the toolbar quickly. This is probably the first module to add to your Drupal 8 site.

Admin toolbar dropdown menu

Pathauto

Pathauto is the go-to module for automatically generating nice aliases for all your URLs. You get to define the path patterns for any content on your site that has a path (nodes, users, taxonomy terms...) Works in multiple languages. You need to add Token and Chaos Tools as dependencies.

Screenshot of pathauto pattern editing interface

Redirect

Along with the Pathauto module, most websites benefit from using Redirect to take users to pages if and when the paths change. 

Screenshot of redirect interface

Paragraphs

The Paragraphs module is a favourite for site builders who want to be able to create flexible content types that use compound fields. Want to add a set of calls to action to a landing page? Or mix together some videos, marketing text, and linked images? Or perhaps you need to add a set of time-slots to an event, or a set of editions to a book? Paragraphs to the rescue. Suddenly adding chunks of content within your content is really easy. You need to add Entity Reference Revisions as a dependency.

Screenshot of paragraphs editing interface

Honeypot

If your website has spam, Honeypot is an easy solution that might just fix your spamming issues. It inserts an invisible form element that catches bots that will unknowingly fill it in. 

Add to Any

Add to any is one of a number of options for adding social media links to your content. 

Metatag

Not just for your basic page title and description. Metatag makes sure that your content is going to look good when you share it on Facebook and Twitter too.

Screenshot of Metatag configuration for Drupal 8

Menu Trail by Path

Use Menu Trail by Path to set the active menu trail for your content based on the URL. For example, when you're looking at a blog post, and you want the blog post menu item to be active.

Entity Browser

One of the questions I get most often when I show off Drupal 8's shiny new content authoring features is how to re-use images or files across different pieces of content. Start with the Entity Browser module (entity is a fancy Drupal word for content and this case usually refers to images, videos, and files). You'll want to try this out with the File Entity Browser module. Configure it using the 'Manage Form Display' settings. (Hint: make sure you have all the required libraries installed to get this working.)

Screenshot of entity browser interface

Block Visibility Groups

Block Visibility Groups allows you to control which blocks are displayed on certain types of pages. For example, you can create a set of blocks that will show up on the homepage, and a different set of blocks on the contact page.

Screenshot of block layout with visibility groups settings

Diff

Drupal allows you to track the revisions (or versions) of content each time a user makes an update. The Diff module is a tiny module that allows you to see what's changed. 

Contact storage

If you decide to use the core Contact module, you might notice that contact form submissions get emailed and not saved in the admin UI of the site. If that's something you need, try out the Contact Storage module. For fancier forms, check out Webform.

If you liked this blog post and want some guidance on how to use these modules, we have Drupal trainings coming up online and in-person that you might like.

This is the fun part. Now you get to comment and tell me the essential modules I missed. I promise to try them all and do a follow-up blog post with the highlights.

About Drupal Sun

Drupal Sun is an Evolving Web project. It allows you to:

  • Do full-text search on all the articles in Drupal Planet (thanks to Apache Solr)
  • Facet based on tags, author, or feed
  • Flip through articles quickly (with j/k or arrow keys) to find what you're interested in
  • View the entire article text inline, or in the context of the site where it was created

See the blog post at Evolving Web

Evolving Web