Apr 19 2019
Apr 19

Leslie Glynn - 2019 Aaron Winborn Award winnerDuring the opening plenary at DrupalCon Seattle, the members of the Drupal Community Working Group announced the winner of the 2019 Aaron Winborn Award, Leslie Glynn (leslieg).

The award is named after a long-time Drupal contributor who lost his battle with ALS in 2015. This award recognizes an individual who, like Aaron, demonstrates personal integrity, kindness, and an above-and-beyond commitment to the Drupal project and community. Previous winners of the award are Cathy Theys, Gabór Hojtsy, Nikki Stevens, and Kevin Thull. Current CWG members, along with previous winners, selected the winner based on nominations submitted by Drupal community members.

This year, there were 18 individuals nominated for the award. In the coming weeks, the CWG will be contacting all nominees to let them know of their nomination and thank them for their continued work in the community.

In addition to the physical award presented to Leslie during the announcement, Leslie was also provided with a free ticket to DrupalCon Seattle as well as travel expenses. 

Leslie has over 30 years experience in the software development field and has been working with Drupal since 2011. She has been involved in Drupal project management, site building, and client support. She has organized and mentored Drupal sprints, has offered trainings at Drupal camps and DrupalCons, and has volunteered at - as well as help organize - many camps across the United States especially in New England.

Multiple people nominated Leslie for this award. One of them wrote, “If you have ever attended a North American Drupalcon, BADCamp, NYCCamp, NEDCamp, Design4Drupal, or any other major North American Drupal event, then you have seen Leslie. She is a constant inspiration of how our community, and each one of us, should work and act."

Another one of her nominators wrote, “Leslie is a dependable, passionate, kind, and giving individual and the Drupal community is extremely fortunate to have her."

Nominations for the 2020 award will open in early 2020.

Jan 05 2019
Jan 05

The Drupal Community Working Group is pleased to announce that nominations for the 2019 Aaron Winborn Award are now open. This annual award recognizes an individual who demonstrates personal integrity, kindness, and above-and-beyond commitment to the Drupal community. It will include a scholarship and stipend to attend DrupalCon and recognition in a plenary session at the event.

Nominations are open to not only well-known Drupal contributors, but also people who have made a big impact in their local or regional community. If you know of someone who has made a big difference to any number of people in our community, we want to hear about it. The winner of the award will receive a $1200 USD DrupalCon travel stipend as well as a ticket to DrupalCon. 

This award was created in honor of long-time Drupal contributor Aaron Winborn, whose battle with Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) (also referred to as Lou Gehrig's Disease) came to an end on March 24, 2015. Based on a suggestion by Hans Riemenschneider, the Community Working Group, with the support of the Drupal Association, launched the Aaron Winborn Award.

Nominations are open until March 1, 2019. A committee consisting of the Community Working Group members and past award winners will select a winner from the nominations. Current members of the CWG and previous winners are exempt from winning the award.

Previous winners of the award are:

2015: Cathy Theys
2016: Gábor Hojtsy
2017: Nikki Stevens
2018: Kevin Thull

If you know someone amazing who should benefit from this award you can make your nomination here.
 

Jan 05 2019
Jan 05

The Drupal Community Working Group is pleased to announce that nominations for the 2019 Aaron Winborn Award are now open. This annual award recognizes an individual who demonstrates personal integrity, kindness, and above-and-beyond commitment to the Drupal community. It will include a scholarship and stipend to attend DrupalCon and recognition in a plenary session at the event.

Nominations are open to not only well-known Drupal contributors, but also people who have made a big impact in their local or regional community. If you know of someone who has made a big difference to any number of people in our community, we want to hear about it. The winner of the award will receive a $1200 USD DrupalCon travel stipend as well as a ticket to DrupalCon. 

This award was created in honor of long-time Drupal contributor Aaron Winborn, whose battle with Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) (also referred to as Lou Gehrig's Disease) came to an end on March 24, 2015. Based on a suggestion by Hans Riemenschneider, the Community Working Group, with the support of the Drupal Association, launched the Aaron Winborn Award.

Nominations are open until March 1, 2019. A committee consisting of the Community Working Group members and past award winners will select a winner from the nominations. Current members of the CWG and previous winners are exempt from winning the award.

Previous winners of the award are:

2015: Cathy Theys
2016: Gábor Hojtsy
2017: Nikki Stevens
2018: Kevin Thull

If you know someone amazing who should benefit from this award you can make your nomination here.
 

Jun 06 2018
Jun 06

The Drupal Community Working Group (CWG), with support from the Drupal Association, organized and held the first-ever Teamwork and Leadership Workshop at DrupalCon Nashville on April 10, 2018. The goal of the three-hour workshop was to explore teamwork, leadership, and followership in the context of the Drupal community as well as to help provide support and resources for people in the Drupal community who work alongside others in teams and/or may find themselves in positions of responsibility or leadership. Additionally, we hoped to expand the base of people who can step into leadership positions in the Drupal community, and to help those who may already be in those positions be more effective.

The workshop was led by Drupal Association board chair Adam Goodman, who generously donated his time. Adam is the head of Northwestern University’s Center for Leadership, and he works as an executive coach and advisor to senior executives and boards of directors at dozens of companies and organizations around the world. 

As part of the planning for the workshop, Adam asked us to enlist a number of facilitators to help with the various workshop exercises. In addition to three CWG members (Jordana Fung, George Demet, and Mike Anello), the following community members also facilitated: Donna Benjamin, Shyamala Rajaram, Gábor Hojtsy, Angie Byron, and Tiffany Farriss. The facilitators met with Adam prior to the workshop to understand what would be expected of them. 

We wanted to make sure that we invited a diverse range of people to the workshop who are doing awesome work with Drupal around the world, including those whose efforts may not be as well-known or recognized (yet).  We set an internal goal of at least 50% of attendees to be from populations historically underrepresented at DrupalCon, including those who self-identify as women, non-gender binary, people of color, and/or people who are not from Europe, the United States, or Canada.. To this end, prior to the public registration period, we sent out invitations to 64 community members, 75% of whom were from an under-represented cohort. We invited people who are involved in all aspects of the community including (but not limited to) event organizers, sprint organizers, project maintainers, as well as past and current Aaron Winborn Award nominees. At the workshop, there were a total of 50 attendees (there were a total of 60 seats available), with approximately 64% from underrepresented cohorts. 

Attendees were seated at round tables of approximately 10 people per table. The first half of the workshop was focused on large group exercises that focused on helping attendees think about what it meant to be a leader and a team member. We talked about keeping perspective as team members and not jumping to conclusions about each other's behaviors based on an often (extremely) limited set of data. The second half of the workshop focused on smaller group exercises in which individuals responded to various prompts and then discussed them as a small (table-sized) group. 

A few days after the workshop, we asked the attendees to complete an 11-question follow-up survey. Of the 50 attendees, we had 17 responses for a 33% response rate. We asked what their expectations were for the workshop; representative responses included:

I thought it would be a workshop on leadership, but I was surprised by the approach to the Drupal community.

Didn't know what to expect. So...none

The fact that we had multiple responses indicating that the expectations were not clear tells us that we need to do a better job in communicating exactly what the goals and activities of the workshop will be in the future. 

On a scale of 1-5, 73% of respondents indicated that the workshop met their expectations (via a rating of 4 or 5). 

We also asked respondents to share an insight from the workshop. Responses included:

Transition planning for responsibilities you take on and having a plan in place before even taking on the responsibility.

The need to know why each person on the team is present (their motivation) and the importance of unified movement toward a goal.

I hadn't written out what leadership looked like to me before, so I found that part of the exercise to be quite helpful.

The survey also found that the attendees found more value in the smaller group exercises than the large group exercises (81.3% vs. 60%), with 81.3% indicated they'd be interested in attending future similar workshops.

Many of the open ended responses indicated that some attendees were hoping for more practical, hands-on advice for specific situations. In addition, several of the responses felt that parts of the exercises felt rushed, and wished there was more time. Finally, several attendees commented on the appropriateness of some of the imagery used in one of the workshop exercises, for which the CWG made a public apology following the event. We have gone through all of the comments relating to aspects of the event that were considered negative or unhelpful and will take this into consideration on how we can improve the workshop for the future.

Overall, we feel the workshop was a success, and something that has been long overdue for the Drupal community. We've been discussing how we can make similar content available to everyone in the community, not just DrupalCon attendees. We're open to ideas for future workshops on these topics (and format), let us know if you have any ideas.
 

Jun 06 2018
Jun 06

The Drupal Community Working Group (CWG), with support from the Drupal Association, organized and held the first-ever Teamwork and Leadership Workshop at DrupalCon Nashville on April 10, 2018. The goal of the three-hour workshop was to explore teamwork, leadership, and followership in the context of the Drupal community as well as to help provide support and resources for people in the Drupal community who work alongside others in teams and/or may find themselves in positions of responsibility or leadership. Additionally, we hoped to expand the base of people who can step into leadership positions in the Drupal community, and to help those who may already be in those positions be more effective.

The workshop was led by Drupal Association board chair Adam Goodman, who generously donated his time. Adam is the head of Northwestern University’s Center for Leadership, and he works as an executive coach and advisor to senior executives and boards of directors at dozens of companies and organizations around the world. 

As part of the planning for the workshop, Adam asked us to enlist a number of facilitators to help with the various workshop exercises. In addition to three CWG members (Jordana Fung, George Demet, and Mike Anello), the following community members also facilitated: Donna Benjamin, Shyamala Rajaram, Gábor Hojtsy, Angie Byron, and Tiffany Farriss. The facilitators met with Adam prior to the workshop to understand what would be expected of them. 

We wanted to make sure that we invited a diverse range of people to the workshop who are doing awesome work with Drupal around the world, including those whose efforts may not be as well-known or recognized (yet).  We set an internal goal of at least 50% of attendees to be from populations historically underrepresented at DrupalCon, including those who self-identify as women, non-gender binary, people of color, and/or people who are not from Europe, the United States, or Canada.. To this end, prior to the public registration period, we sent out invitations to 64 community members, 75% of whom were from an under-represented cohort. We invited people who are involved in all aspects of the community including (but not limited to) event organizers, sprint organizers, project maintainers, as well as past and current Aaron Winborn Award nominees. At the workshop, there were a total of 50 attendees (there were a total of 60 seats available), with approximately 64% from underrepresented cohorts. 

Attendees were seated at round tables of approximately 10 people per table. The first half of the workshop was focused on large group exercises that focused on helping attendees think about what it meant to be a leader and a team member. We talked about keeping perspective as team members and not jumping to conclusions about each other's behaviors based on an often (extremely) limited set of data. The second half of the workshop focused on smaller group exercises in which individuals responded to various prompts and then discussed them as a small (table-sized) group. 

A few days after the workshop, we asked the attendees to complete an 11-question follow-up survey. Of the 50 attendees, we had 17 responses for a 33% response rate. We asked what their expectations were for the workshop; representative responses included:

I thought it would be a workshop on leadership, but I was surprised by the approach to the Drupal community.

Didn't know what to expect. So...none

The fact that we had multiple responses indicating that the expectations were not clear tells us that we need to do a better job in communicating exactly what the goals and activities of the workshop will be in the future. 

On a scale of 1-5, 73% of respondents indicated that the workshop met their expectations (via a rating of 4 or 5). 

We also asked respondents to share an insight from the workshop. Responses included:

Transition planning for responsibilities you take on and having a plan in place before even taking on the responsibility.

The need to know why each person on the team is present (their motivation) and the importance of unified movement toward a goal.

I hadn't written out what leadership looked like to me before, so I found that part of the exercise to be quite helpful.

The survey also found that the attendees found more value in the smaller group exercises than the large group exercises (81.3% vs. 60%), with 81.3% indicated they'd be interested in attending future similar workshops.

Many of the open ended responses indicated that some attendees were hoping for more practical, hands-on advice for specific situations. In addition, several of the responses felt that parts of the exercises felt rushed, and wished there was more time. Finally, several attendees commented on the appropriateness of some of the imagery used in one of the workshop exercises, for which the CWG made a public apology following the event. We have gone through all of the comments relating to aspects of the event that were considered negative or unhelpful and will take this into consideration on how we can improve the workshop for the future.

Overall, we feel the workshop was a success, and something that has been long overdue for the Drupal community. We've been discussing how we can make similar content available to everyone in the community, not just DrupalCon attendees. We're open to ideas for future workshops on these topics (and format), let us know if you have any ideas.
 

Jan 11 2018
Jan 11

The Drupal Community Working Group is pleased to announce that nominations for the 2018 Aaron Winborn Award are now open. This annual award recognizes an individual who demonstrates personal integrity, kindness, and above-and-beyond commitment to the Drupal community. It will include a scholarship and stipend to attend DrupalCon and recognition in a plenary session at the event.

Nominations are open to not only well-known Drupal contributors, but also people who have made a big impact in their local or regional community. If you know of someone who has made a big difference to any number of people in our community, we want to hear about it.

This award was created in honor of long-time Drupal contributor Aaron Winborn, whose battle with Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) (also referred to as Lou Gehrig's Disease) came to an end on March 24, 2015. Based on a suggestion by Hans Riemenschneider, the Community Working Group, with the support of the Drupal Association, launched the Aaron Winborn Award.

Nominations are open until March 1, 2018. A committee consisting of the Community Working Group members and past award winners will select a winner from the submissions. Members of this committee and previous winners are exempt from winning the award.

Previous winners of the award are:

  • 2015: Cathy Theys
  • 2016: Gábor Hojtsy
  • 2017: Nikki Stevens

If you know someone amazing who should benefit from this award you can make your nomination.
 

Jan 17 2017
Jan 17

The Drupal Community Working Group is pleased to announce that nominations for the 2017 Aaron Winborn Award are now open. This annual award recognizes an individual who demonstrates personal integrity, kindness, and above-and-beyond commitment to the Drupal community. It will include a scholarship and stipend to attend DrupalCon and recognition in a plenary session at the event.

Nominations are open to not only well-known Drupal contributors, but also people who have made a big impact in their local or regional community. If you know of someone who has made a big difference to any number of people in our community, we want to hear about it.

This award was created in honor of long-time Drupal contributor Aaron Winborn, whose battle with Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) (also referred to as Lou Gehrig's Disease) came to an end on March 24, 2015. Based on a suggestion by Hans Riemenschneider, the Community Working Group, with the support of the Drupal Association, launched the Aaron Winborn Award.

Nominations are open until March 1, 2017. A committee consisting of the Community Working Group members and past award winners will select a winner from the submissions. Members of this committee and previous winners are exempt from winning the award.

Previous winners of the award are:

*  2015: Cathy Theys  
*  2016: Gábor Hojtsy  

If you know someone amazing who should benefit from this award please nominate them at https://www.drupal.org/aaron-winborn-award

Oct 11 2012
Oct 11

Getting things off the ground in any open source community is a challenge.  Beyond motivation, you need some resources to help get things moving with outreach and educational programs. To help you overcome some of the barriers, the Drupal Association has been piloting the Community Cultivation Grant program, drawing on the same awesome attitude that has earned the Drupal Community its community-oriented reputation within the open source universe. 

Now moving beyond the pilot stage, the grant program continues to consider proposals and award grants on an ongoing basis. So far, more than $27,000 has been awarded to 23 organizations in 18 different countries. The funds are meant to assist organizers and leaders to transform, support, and educate their local Drupal communities. They fund creative projects and events like lecture series, sprints for newbies and Drupal Camps to spur growth by educating both inside and outside of the existing community.

A few of the recent grants supporting several unique themes include:

  • Room for Families: Village of Oak Park Drupal User Group’s monthly Ladder/Core Contributor Sprints seeks to broaden the number and type of participants by making accommodations for families with small children (safe, fun places for them to play) and older kids (providing assistance for them to participate and contribute.)
  • College Outreach: DrupalCamp Vietnam, is focusing on introducing Drupal to 500-700 computer science students, programmers and institutions interested in OS CMS. The camp takes place in November, and is expected to attract about 500 people early on as powerful web development tool for young IT students & graduates.
  • Group Learning: Drupal Rally Belarus will serve about 100 people in a Drupal-forum-like event that focuses on cooperation, practical tasks in an informal setting. 

It is not hard to apply, if you have a idea that you think is worth funding.  You can get started at http://association.drupal.org/grants. The rolling application process means that there are no deadlines or grant cycles, so proposals can be submitted anytime and will be reviewed as they come in to ensure the association is responsive to groups and their event schedules. 

Applications are judged on the level of positive impact to the community and how effective the project will be in building and supporting that community.  Other criteria include the amount of the request, level of marketing efforts for the project, ability to measure the success of the project, and number of people who will benefit. 

If you or someone you know has a community-building idea or need that could use a little fuel, check out: https://association.drupal.org/grants/apply.

May 14 2012
May 14

Program Seeks to bolster community education and growth with new process

Building on a successful 2011 pilot program, the Drupal Association is opening a new application process for Drupal Community Cultivation Grants. The grants will assist organizers and leaders within the community that seek to transform, support, and educate Drupal communities around the world. The 2011 program awarded more than $20,000 to 17 projects all over the world in support of camps, training, sprints and a publication.

New to the 2012 program is a rolling application process, eliminating grant cycles and deadlines so that support can be more responsive to the ongoing needs of groups and their event schedules. Another key program enhancement is a greater focus on emerging Drupal markets where there are few other options to fund programs. Proposed projects with no other available resources to implement will receive priority in funding decisions.

Funding Ideas

Drupal Community Cultivation Grants help fund creative projects and events that help the community grow by educating both inside and outside of the existing community. Examples of projects that demonstrate the mission of the grants include Drupal lecture series, sprints for newbies, and DrupalCamps.  

Application Process

Applications will be scored on how effective the project will be in building and supporting, and the level of impact to, the community.  Other criteria include the amount of the request, level of marketing efforts for the project, ability to measure the success of the project, and number of people who will benefit. Information and applications are available at: https://association.drupal.org/grants.

Jul 19 2011
Jul 19

With the release of Drupal 7 earlier this year, it's a great time to take a look at some lesser-known modules that you might find yourself using in the future. None of these 7 modules are considered top-tier modules...yet. In fact, none of them are even in the top 150 most downloaded modules. Modules were selected based on their usefulness and their proven ability to do something extremely well without getting in the way of other tasks. In fact, the majority of these modules are quite small demonstrating that you don't have to write 10,000 lines of code to make a big contribution in the Drupal community. All module statistics are accurate as of publication deadlines.

Module Filter

Project URL: http://www.drupal.org/project/module_filter
Usage: Installed on more than 4,000 sites, ranked 299
Maintainers: James Jeffrey greenSkin) and Brian Gilbert (realityloop)

The Module Filter is one of those modules that as soon as you install it on one site you'll know right away you'll be installing it on all your sites. It organizes your site's administrative Modules List page (admin/build/modules) the way it's supposed to be. By making use of vertical tabs, it greatly reduces the vertical scrolling on the page. The genius behind the module is its "Filter list" quick search box. As soon as the page is loaded, the cursor is automatically placed in this field and all the user has to do it start typing the first few letters of the module they're looking for and the list magically displays matches. For those of us who aren't addicted to Drush yet, this module greatly speeds up the navigation on the Modules List page.

Environment Indicator

Project URL: http://drupal.org/project/environment_indicator
Usage: Installed on more than 600 sites, ranked 1,123
Maintainer: Tom Kirkpatrick (mrFelton)

Environment Indicator is a simple module used to do one thing - help developers identify one development environment from another. When installed and enabled, it gives the site a vertical bar down the left-hand side of the page in which the name of the development environment can be displayed. For example, a site might have three environments, "development", "staging", and "production". Environment Indicator allows you to label each environment via settings.php, so you don't accidentally test a content import on your production server. In addition to being able to select the text, you can also select the color of the vertical bar. If you've ever mistakenly modified the wrong environment, this module might be for you.

Override Node Options

Project URL: http://drupal.org/project/override_node_options
Usage: Installed on more than 5,000 sites, ranked 243
Maintainers: Tim Millwood (timmillwood), Dave Reid, and Joachim Noreiko (joachim)

Despite the fact that Drupal is sometimes criticized for having too many administrative options, every now and then you might find yourself in need of a few more. This might be the case, for example, when you want to give a role the ability to add or edit a node, but not the ability to publish it. While there are several ways to accomplish this, the Override Node Options module is one of the simplest at less than 200 lines of code including comments. It adds specific permissions to access the "published" checkbox as well as other node options (promote to front page, sticky, etc...) This is one of those modules that you often don't realize you need until the client asks for it!

Menu Attributes

Project URL: http://drupal.org/project/menu_attributes
Usage: Installed on more than 8,000 sites, ranked 161
Maintainers: Dave Reid, and Nick Schoonens (Schoonzie)

Not all Drupal designers and themers yearn to be module developers. Not all module developers yearn to be designers or themers. Luckily in the Drupal community, there are people who are able to cross over and, when they do, they create modules like Menu Attributes. This module makes themers' jobs easier by allowing administrators the ability to add unique HTML IDs, class names, and other attributes to individual menu items from the administrative interface. Without this module, this is usually something done via theme function overrides. Want to place a special icon next to one particular menu item using CSS? This module makes it simple.

Fieldgroup

Project URL: http://drupal.org/project/field_group
Usage: Installed on more than 500 sites, ranked 1,258
Maintainers: Jochen Stals (Stalski), Nils Destoop (zupperman), and Kristof De Jaeger (swentel)

This selection is almost cheating, but in the spirit of getting the word out, it made the cut. The "field group" has been a mainstay of CCK for quite some time as it allows you to group any number of fields when designing a content type. Unfortunately, it didn't make the cut into Drupal 7, but a bunch of Belgians took it upon themselves to make it available as a contributed module - and they even managed to make it better with additional display options and some nice administrative user interface improvements. Now, instead of just grouping fields in a fieldset, you have the choice of seven display options including accordions and vertical or horizontal tabs.

Conditional Stylesheets

Project URL: http://drupal.org/project/conditional_styles
Usage: Installed on more than 3,000 sites, ranked 335
Maintainer: John Albin (JohnAlbin)

Themers who have to deal with the inconsistencies of (mostly) earlier versions of Internet Explorer have often resorted to hard-coding IE-specific stylesheets into their theme's page template files. Not only is this a less-than-elegant solution, it also removes these IE-specific CSS files from Drupal's CSS aggregation. While it is possible to add these conditional stylesheets via preprocess functions in a theme's template.php, doing so was a bit of a hassle. The tiny Conditional Stylesheets module (about 75 lines of code including comments) makes it a breeze by allowing themers to define conditional stylesheets in a theme's .info file. The syntax is exactly what it is expected to be, and it makes using IE-specific stylesheets that much less of a hassle.

Omega Theme

The title of this article is a lie: it's actually six modules and one base theme, but I'm sure that after you hear about Omega, you won't mind too much. Drupal themers have a great variety of base themes to choose from when building a custom theme from scratch. Zen, Blueprint, Fusion, NineSixty, and Genesis are just a few of the more well-known options. Omega might just be ready to join the list of "top-tier" base themes. Its creator, Jake Strawn, has put an incredible amount of work into making this rising star a flexible and powerful base theme, and it’s already in use as the basis for Acquia’s training site, maximumpc.com, maclife.com, and many more.

Omega is built on the 960 grid framework and allows for 12, 16, 24, or 32 column layouts. One thing that makes Omega unique is that when it is paired with the Delta module, Omega subthemes can define alternate layouts based on site contexts (from the Context module). A companion module, Omega Tools, provides additional functionality including the ability to create a blank subtheme using Drush. Jake also promises that HTML5 support and a visual region/zone manager are on their way.

With more than 7,000 modules to choose from, finding useful and reliable modules on Drupal.org can be a bit of a challenge. While this article is focused on only 7 lesser-known gems, there are plenty more diamonds in the rough just waiting to be found. Anyone who limits themselves to the top 100 modules (http://drupal.org/project/usage) will rarely find anything new. By doing some research or getting involved in the community you can often find modules that usually end up more useful than you think!

About Drupal Sun

Drupal Sun is an Evolving Web project. It allows you to:

  • Do full-text search on all the articles in Drupal Planet (thanks to Apache Solr)
  • Facet based on tags, author, or feed
  • Flip through articles quickly (with j/k or arrow keys) to find what you're interested in
  • View the entire article text inline, or in the context of the site where it was created

See the blog post at Evolving Web

Evolving Web