Apr 09 2019
Apr 09

DrupalCon Seattle includes are a number of core conversations where you can learn about current topics in Drupal core development, and a week of sprints where you can participate in shaping Drupal's future.

In addition to the core conversations, we have a few meetings on specific topics for future core development. These meetings will be very focused, so contact the listed organizer for each if you are interested in participating. There are also birds-of-a-feather (BoF) sessions, which are open to all attendees without notice.

Also be sure to watch Dries' keynote for ideas about Drupal's future! Check out the extended Dries Q&A session on Thursday as well to get even more questions answered.

All meetings will be in Room 507-508 in convention center, except for the retrospective on Thursday which is in Room 401 at the Convention Center, very close to lunch.

Time Topic Organizer Monday, April 8th 1pm Automatic updates David Strauss Monday, April 8th 4pm Symfony 4/5 meeting Alex Pott Tuesday, April 9th 4pm Core compatibility, d.o, contrib semantic versioning discussion XJM Wednesday, April 10th 11am Autosave in core discussion Cristina Chumillas Wednesday, April 10th 3:30pm Media path to stable Adam Hoenich Wednesday, April 10th 5pm CMI boundaries Fabian Bircher Thursday, April 11th 9:45am Frontend deprecation, theme policies Lauri Eskola Thursday, April 11th 12pm Initiative leads retrospective discussion Gabor Friday, April 12th 10am Drupal strategy, how to do less, how to gracefully remove things Alex Pott Friday, April 12th 11am Layout translations discussion Ted Bowman Friday, April 12th 1pm Claro path to core Cristina Chumillas
Apr 02 2013
Apr 02

Drupal 8 is the first development cycle introducing Drupal core initiatives, which are key focus areas for improving Drupal. Each core initiative is led by an individual or small team, and these initiative leads guide the efforts of other core contributors around their initiative. The initiatives are only a part of all Drupal 8 development, but most of the big Drupal 8 changes have been worked on by these initiative teams. (Read more about the core initiatives.)

Several of the initiative leads participated in a Drupal 8 question & answer session at DrupalCon Sydney and it went very well, so we want to repeat that experience by providing another opportunity to talk with the global Drupal community!

Goals of the session:

  • Share the status, milestones, and next steps for each Drupal 8 initiative.
  • Answer your questions: Want to know what’s going on, or how you can get involved? Now’s your chance to talk with us!

Who will be there?

When?

April 11th, 2013 10:00-11:00 am EDT (1500 UTC)

Where?

Via Google Hangout broadcast! (link coming soon)

How do I ask questions?

Send a tweet tagged #D8QA, or join the #drupal-initiativeQA IRC room during the Q&A. (IRC instructions) A moderator will curate the questions.

Who should come to this?

  • Anyone interested in getting a D8 status overview.
  • Developers interested in D8 who want to ask questions.
  • Developers interested in helping finish Drupal 8!
  • Helpers (Devs, Front-end, Theme/Design, UX, Project Mgmt & more!) who want to know how they can help & get involved.
Jan 25 2013
Jan 25

Listen online: 

About two months ago we got a comment from a listener, KeyboardCowboy, about questions they had around contributing code to Drupal. Join Addison Berry, Karen Stevenson, Andrew Berry, Kyle Hofmeyer, Joe Shindelar, and Juampy Novillo Requena as we discuss those questions, and chat about how we got involved with contributing code, the challenges we face, and list out things that can be confusing or trip people up as they begin learning how the Drupal community works on code together.

Here is the text of the original comment that this podcast is based on (along with some handy links we've added):

Technical Newbs Podcast?

(asked by KeyboardCowboy)
I've been developing in Drupal since 5.2 but only within the last couple of years have really gotten involved in contributing and trying to be more involved in the community. I know the docs are resource out there on this are plentiful but I would love to hear some Drupal experts talk about some of the finer points of collaboration and contributing such as how they got started and their current process now.

I don't have much free time, but I want to help with D8 and Drupal is the first collaborative system I've worked in, so removing the grey area around these points could be the push I need to dive in more quickly.

1. What's your process to create a patch? Submit a patch? Test a patch?

2. How/Does this process differ between Contrib and Core?

3. How big can patches get and how do you handle the big ones?

4. Can more than one person work on the same patch? If so, how do you handle conflicts?

  • Interdiff: Show a diff between to patches so that you can see what's changed

5. What, exactly, do each of those statuses mean in the issue queue and who is responsible for changing the status of an issue?

6. What was/is your biggest challenge in collaborating on Drupal projects/issues/bugs/features?

7. How do you decide on a release state for a project (alpha, beta, rc)

And I'm sure I could think of others. Just thought I would pose that as an eager developer with limited time. Thanks again for keeping these podcasts going.

Ask away!

If you want to suggest your own ideas for podcasts, or have questions for us to answer on a podcast, let us know:
Twitter
Facebook
Contact us page

Release Date: January 25, 2013 - 9:17am

Album:

Length: 52:02 minutes (30.2 MB)

Format: mono 44kHz 81Kbps (vbr)

Oct 05 2012
Oct 05

Listen online: 

Listen in as Addi talks to five Drupal 8 initiative owners about the amazing new things coming in Drupal 8, why they matter, and what you can do to start learning about them now, and give a helping hand. We are joined by Gábor Hojtsy (Gábor Hojtsy), Larry Garfield (Crell), Kris Vanderwater (EclipseGc), John Albin Wilkins (JohnAlbin), and Greg Dunlap (heyrocker), in a series of separate interviews.

Multilingual Initiative

Web Services and Context Core Initiative (WSCCI)

Blocks and Layouts Initiative (SCOTCH)

Mobile Initiative

Configuration Management Initiative

Release Date: October 5, 2012 - 9:00am

Album:

Length: 68:09 minutes (47.29 MB)

Format: mono 44kHz 97Kbps (vbr)

Jul 19 2012
Jul 19

Feature Freeze is creeping up on D8 faster than you think, so now's a great time to go check out how to help D8 core development initiatives!

That page will tell you:
- what D8 Initiative owners and contributors are up to
- the most important places you can help right now
- thank yous to special snowflakes who have helped
- general information and links for each initiative

It's updated every 2 weeks, so stay tuned for the next one!

Jul 19 2012
Jul 19

Feature Freeze is creeping up on D8 faster than you think, so now's a great time to go check out how to help D8 core development initiatives!

That page will tell you:
- what D8 Initiative owners and contributors are up to
- the most important places you can help right now
- thank yous to special snowflakes who have helped
- general information and links for each initiative

It's updated every 2 weeks, so stay tuned for the next one!

Jul 05 2012
Jul 05

Though Initiative Owners are doing a fantastic job of keeping up with their individual initiatives, we've recently heard that the community would like more visibility on D8 progress in general. We've been trying to find the right format and we've got something for you to check out! http://drupal.org/community-initiatives/drupal-core

The D8 team of Initiative Owners and its supporters want to make it easier for you to find the most important issues to work on, so we've put together a summary page that we'll be updating it every two weeks, and more frequently on an as-needed basis.

The purpose of this page is to give an overview of progress of all the initiatives, as well as to let you know how each individual initiative is fairing and where they need your help the most.

Here's what's in the page right now:

1) High-level Schedule overview: the most important D8 dates are listed here.

2) High-level Progress overview: progress across all initiatives in 3 phases (discovery, design, development) are clearly visible

3) Calendar overview: Don't miss another important meeting, subscribe to this gcal, or check back on this page to see what's coming up

4) Initiative Info: A general overview of the initiative lead, and some important information links are centralized here.

5) Important places to help: Each initiative has important things they need your help with -- here's where we'll point you to the top issues to look into right now.

6) Scrum notes: We meet bi-weekly, and want to share the discussion topics and next steps with you all. Transparency about the progress and next steps will help you know how things are going.

This is only the first version of this bi-weekly information overview, but we hope it's useful for the community to see what's happening on D8 and to help you identify the most impactful issues for D8 so you can get involved.

If you've got ideas for us, or feedback on this format, please feel free to contact me on twitter at @svettes or via email

Jul 05 2012
Jul 05

Though Initiative Owners are doing a fantastic job of keeping up with their individual initiatives, we've recently heard that the community would like more visibility on D8 progress in general. We've been trying to find the right format and we've got something for you to check out! http://drupal.org/community-initiatives/drupal-core

The D8 team of Initiative Owners and its supporters want to make it easier for you to find the most important issues to work on, so we've put together a summary page that we'll be updating it every two weeks, and more frequently on an as-needed basis.

The purpose of this page is to give an overview of progress of all the initiatives, as well as to let you know how each individual initiative is fairing and where they need your help the most.

Here's what's in the page right now:

1) High-level Schedule overview: the most important D8 dates are listed here.

2) High-level Progress overview: progress across all initiatives in 3 phases (discovery, design, development) are clearly visible

3) Calendar overview: Don't miss another important meeting, subscribe to this gcal, or check back on this page to see what's coming up

4) Initiative Info: A general overview of the initiative lead, and some important information links are centralized here.

5) Important places to help: Each initiative has important things they need your help with -- here's where we'll point you to the top issues to look into right now.

6) Scrum notes: We meet bi-weekly, and want to share the discussion topics and next steps with you all. Transparency about the progress and next steps will help you know how things are going.

This is only the first version of this bi-weekly information overview, but we hope it's useful for the community to see what's happening on D8 and to help you identify the most impactful issues for D8 so you can get involved.

If you've got ideas for us, or feedback on this format, please feel free to contact me on twitter at @svettes or via email

Jun 03 2012
Jun 03

The last entity type just moved to classed objects, so all core entity types are classed objects using a defined interface now! See the change record for details!

Jul 21 2009
Jul 21

The Workhabit blog is chock full of updates to our products, videos from our crew, and discussion about our design, development, events, business strategies, and observations.

Oct 17 2008
Oct 17

Manual upgrades of Drupal core are more time-consuming and error-prone than need be. svn vendor branches can help, but it's still not perfect.

The critical thing to realize is that the basic unit of work in svn is the changeset. When I first started playing with vendor branches, I tried to take a shortcut and just diff two arbitrary branches anywhere in my repository. But without a changeset between two revisions, that will get you nowhere. svn can't automatically diff the branches - it will just delete every element and then re-add it. And that will only bring more chaos to a process where we are trying to restore order.

So we need to create a changeset between two revisions of Drupal. But remember why we want to automate upgrades in the first place. For major releases, this set of changes is going to be so complex that doing it manually would be prohibitively error-prone. It's also going to be a huge number of changes, which makes it time-consuming. What to do?

svn_load_dirs

This script will look at a (source) set of files in an svn repository, compare it to a (destination) set of files, and then automate whatever adds, changes, and deletes are necessary to make the source like the destination. It will check the changes in for you, and it will optionally tag the changeset.

If svn_load_dirs isn't already installed on your system, it can get a little tricky. You need to get svn_load_dirs.pl.in, rename it to svn_load_dirs.pl, then point it to your svn binary, which you can find like this:

$ which svn
/usr/bin/svn

Run svn_load_dirs with an older version of core as the source, and the new version as the destination, and we have a changeset that represents all the differences between those versions of core. Now we can merge that changeset with any other existing installation in the repository, and it will upgrade core without touching any of your contrib modules or themes. If you've hacked core at all, it should prompt you to perform a merge.

This worked beautifully for a little while, but there's a catch. Because I frequently partner with other developers, or work with code-savvy clients who need access, putting all my Drupal projects in the same repository won't work for me. And the catch is: you can't merge across repositories.

It would be nice, perfect actually, to have one repository where I maintain vendor branches, and upgrade core on all my Drupal projects from there. Having to maintain vendor branches in every repository that contains a copy of Drupal core is a hassle, but it works.

Oct 01 2008
Oct 01

In listening to the pleading voices of many developers, the infamous Drupal 7 maintainer, webchick, just created the first unstable release of Drupal 7: Drupal 7 Unstable 1. Thank you, Angie!

These unstable release tags will probably never have actual release nodes, and they are before the beta, or even alpha releases, so you generally shouldn't use them on your production site. But, if you're up for an experiment in the bleeding of bleeding edge, try it out. I'm not too sure if they upgrade path will be supported, so we'll have to wait and see. I think I'll wait for the Alpha releases to update my site to Drupal 7 to be on the safe side.

Sep 25 2008
Sep 25

There was some talk recently about releasing pre-alpha versions of Drupal 7 for development and testing purposes and this got me thinking about the actual Drupal 7 code freeze. For those of you who are "in the cold" and don't know what a code freeze is (horrible pun, sorry), it's a given amount of time where features are denied from going into Drupal. Although it's sad to see additional features not be able to go into Drupal, it gives the developers a bit of time to fix bugs and optimize performance before the official releases go out.

If you have a look at Dries' Drupal 7 Timeline, you see that he predicts a November 15th code freeze if we have full test coverage. Now, if you have a look at the Drupal 7 test coverage report, you can see that we're pretty close! So, assuming that we get the three month code freeze, that means we only have about two months left to get all the features and awesomeness that we so ever want in Drupal 7. What awesomeness is missing from Drupal 7, you ask?

Here are the items remaining on my wish list:

Although Drupal 7 has already achieved its awesomeness status, having these items added to its mastery would absolutely blow my mind.

About Drupal Sun

Drupal Sun is an Evolving Web project. It allows you to:

  • Do full-text search on all the articles in Drupal Planet (thanks to Apache Solr)
  • Facet based on tags, author, or feed
  • Flip through articles quickly (with j/k or arrow keys) to find what you're interested in
  • View the entire article text inline, or in the context of the site where it was created

See the blog post at Evolving Web

Evolving Web