Feb 19 2018
Feb 19

It took a while before I could write a new edition, I was just busy with the production of customer projects. Here again with a brand new version, what struck me in module updates in the past month:

1. D8 Editor Advanced link

A popular module that extends the standard editor in Drupal 8 with additional options for managing links. You can now add the following attributes:

  • title
  • class
  • id
  • target
  • rel

2. Password strength

Default password checks are stupid and annoying for the user: they can check the entered password meets certain rules, such as the number of characters and varying types herein (symbols, numbers, capital letters etc.).

This is a stupid way of checking because the password ‘Welcome123’ is accepted, while it is easy to guess.

This module enables a secure password policy by “pattern-matching” and “entropy calculation”. Almost every type of password is accepted, as long as it has sufficient entropy.

Source

How it works

Instead of checking strict rules, this module calculates the expected time a brute force attack needs to retrieve the password. This is calculated based on underlying patterns:

  • Words that appear in a standard dictionary, common first and surnames and other default passwords.
  • Words from a dictionary, but written in Leet / 1337. For example, where the “e” is written as a three and “a” like an @.
  • A standard sequence of letters like “abcdef”, “qwerty” or “123456”
  • Dates or years.

This module has been around since 2007, I wonder why I only encounter this now :) It is currently available in alpha for Drupal 8 and stable for Drupal 7 available — it is supported by Acquia and Card.

So if you want people to not have to bother to look for a password such as “one special character, 1 upper case and at least 8 characters’, then this module offers a solution.

3. Better Field Descriptions

In order to give content managers issues, it is possible to write an explanation of all content fields that they import. But the standard explanation in a field in the backend of Drupal are often irrelevant, to not apply these generic texts in the implemented *user story* of the installation concerned.

After installing this module you can:

  • Content managers have their own explanation text per field.
  • Set where it stands: above or below the field.
  • The explanatory style that you like.

4. Better login

Want to make the standard Drupal login screen better? Then install this module and you are good to go: through template overrides you can then do the required further tuning of the layout of the login screen.

5. Ridiculously Responsive Social Sharing Buttons

Another social sharing module, but as you see in the title: these are terribly responsive. The icons are SVG based and you need no external services such as AddThis.

Advantage: you’re less dependent and have your data in hand, downside: you have less functionality- such as comprehensive statistics.

6. Flush Cache

If you are not using Drush or Drupal console works then you can Drupal caches flush via “the ‘Flush all caches” button in the Drupal backend. But in a production environment, you will almost never flush all caches, it can cause severe performance problems.

This module solves that problem: install it and you have more control over the caches you want to flush.

7. Multiple Selects

Have your Drupal content management easier with ‘multiple selects’ administration, this image seems to me to speak for itself:

8. Neutral paths

If you are running a multilingual Drupal website, visitors can see the content in one language: the currently active language. Sometimes you would like to see pages in another language. In addition: content managers / Drupal administrators usually want English and not the backend *default language*, in our case, often Dutch.

Issue tracking for example, much easier if the backend is in English: Drupal documentation and support in English is much more available than in Dutch.

This module ensures that you can visit other pages in another language than the default. And can navigate the backend in English, while frontend is in another language.

9. Password Reset Landing Page (PRLR)

Drupal core includes a ‘password’ function: If you have forgotten your password then you can request a one-time login link that is automatically mailed to you.

If you click on the login link, you will see a screen with a login button. Once you click the ‘login’ button you are logged in and you are redirected to your profile page — that’s it.

You are in this situation where your password is lost / forgotten. You are not required to change your password. This is not usually done, so people often endlessly request login links.

This module solves this: the screen where you end up after clicking on the login link not only contains a login button, but also a function to change your password immediately.

10. Auto Purge Users

The user list in Drupal is usually not or hardly ever administered. If people have long been inactive or have not completed their registration, the account can usually be removed to avoid overhead and security issues.

This module does it for you automatically, it checks inactivity below a point and blocks users if they meet:

  • Certain time inactive.
  • Account never activated after registration.
  • Not been logged in for a period of time.

Not a popular module, but in the case of an example Drupal social intranet it can come in handy.

11. Vertical Tabs Config

Want to influence the order of the Drupal tabs? Or do you want some tabs to not show all of your content manager? To keep tabs simple and usable you can install this module: select which tabs to show and in what order.

Modules with similar functions: Simplify and Hide vertical tabs.

12. Custom Search

The default Drupal search is fine, but really standard: you have few options to tune the engine. After installing this module, changes that you can then include are:

  • Change the default label in the search box.
  • Set a default text in the search box.
  • Tune ‘Advanced Search’.
  • Change the text on the “submit button”.

And much more, see module page:

13. Persistent Login

Drupal 8 core does not have a ‘remember password’ function when you log in. You can remain automatically logged for some time, but that is based on a PHP session. This module does not, you can also:

  • How long users can stay logged in.
  • How many places a person can be logged in at once.
  • Select certain pages that the user must log in again at. These are usually pages where more sensitive information is available.
  • Allow the user to delete all his logins themself.

14. Realistic Dummy Content

Wisdom

Using the Devel module you can automatically generate content so you can see if your modules / themes work well. But it gives an unrealistic picture of the end result, this module generates more realistic images and texts.

15. Password Policy

Although I am a fan of the aforementioned ‘Password strength’ module, this can also be useful if you want to make a specific password policy on your Drupal website.

16. Mass Password Reset

This module, we often use to implement Drupal social intranet: previously, all users and content created by an administrator on a test environment, without it people were informed through e-mail.

Once the social intranet went live, we sent all users at once an email with a login link via this module; the system was live!

Wrap Up

So far that’s what I noticed last month in Drupal modules, stay tuned for more fat Drupal content!

Source header image

Feb 12 2018
Feb 12
Login or get out!

Currently we are busy constructing the production of a realtime messaging platform in Drupal and NodeJS, look at it as a ‘WhatsApp for Business’. This Drupal system works like a web app; logging in is mandatory. How do you make sure that logged out visitors must log in to Drupal 8 before they are allowed to continue?

Drupal has many out-of-the-box functionalities, as well as a powerful API, but because it has so many functions many tracks are standardly available for anonymous visitors. We’d want to make all paths unreachable, until you log in.

That means that visitors always will be redirected to the login screen as long as they aren’t logged in. You wouldn’t want an anonymous user reaching internal news on the homepage.

Redirect URL in Drupal 8

Basically, we want all url’s / paths be made unavailable for non-logged in visitors, except explicitly specified pages like:

  • Login (/user)
  • Forgot password (/user/password)
  • Login link (user/reset/login)

in Drupal 7 you could use the module Logintoboggan for that purpose. You could also easily work around it in hook_init() or hook_boot() in a custom Drupal 7 module.

Quest

This was quite a puzzle, and we soon found some examples as well as exceptions. Everytime it didn’t work how we wanted it to. This example was the most useful.

Implementation in Drupal 8

Eventually, we got it working with the help of following code in a custom Drupal 8 module:

services.yml

put this file in your module root, and format yourmodulename.services.yml:

RedirectAnonymousSubscriber.php

Put the file RedirectAnonymousSubscriber.php in folder /src/EventSubscriber/ and do your custom thing:

This code builds on symfony’s EventSubscriber, the framework on which Drupal8 has been built.

Wrap up

Alright, that’s it. I hope the information as described will help you to always redirect visitors to the login page. Questions or feedback? Let me know!

Sep 05 2014
Sep 05
teaser image for blog post

With the 2014 European Drupal conference fast approaching, the Ixis team members attending this year have scoured the schedule for their must see see sessions this year, and why.

For the Developers

Content Staging in Drupal 8 (Wednesday 10:45) - moving content about from dev to production has always been a huge pain in Drupal, so hopefully we'll get a chance to see how this might work in Drupal 8 and finally put an end to the question of when and where the client should start adding their conent during the development phase.

Drupal's PHP Component Future (Wednesday 14:15) - we're already using and developing modules for our work with Codeception, so we would benefit from learning how this might apply to Drupal 8, or even 9.

A Decoupled Drupal with Silex (Thursday 14:15) - decoupling Drupal from the front end has been a topic for a few years now. Learn from others who have jumped on early and ironed out the development problems. Relevant to Drupal 7and 8.

Drupal 8 CMI on Managed Workflow (Wednesday 13:00) - as projects get more complex the pain of the Features module becomes well known, CMI holds much hope for the future of automated repeatable builds.

Future-Proof your Drupal 7 site (Wednesday 14:15) - Until Drupal 8 is out and under some real world use we can ensure our Drupal 7 development choices make the upgrade path less painful. We'll see what's in Drupal 8 and how that maps back to the available Drupal 7 modules that are currenly available.

Twig and the new Drupal 8 Theme System (Tuesday 10:45) as we all know Drupal 8 will be using a new theme system called Twig. This session should provide an insight into what to expect from a support point of view.

For Business Owners / Project Managers

Project Train Wrecks (Wednesday 14:15) promises to be an insight from other agencies on the problems faced and solutions to keep projects running smoothly.

The Myth of the Meerkat: Organising Self-Organising Teams (Tuesday 13:00) finding the balance between processes and control when working on a project as a team in order to get things done. Leaving everybody to get on with it rarely works.

There's plenty more to attend during the week to keep everybodies minds happy - the countdown to September 29th begins, and tickets are still available at the slightly discounted rate until September 16th.

Jul 17 2014
Jul 17

The world can often seem to rush by and if you don’t stop to smell the roses you can miss it.

In the coming months we at SystemSeed will be “going back to our roots” so to speak and attending DrupalCon Amsterdam from September 29th to Oct 3rd.

We hope to meet like-minded techies (and possibly the next SystemSeed employee), the next incredible minds on stage giving presentations and the busy bees working away in the Birds of a Feather groups.

If you would like to meet us with - either the managers, systems architects or our amazing dev team - please contact us and we’ll grab a coffee or some office space to chat.

Jul 15 2008
Jul 15

Our second episode features Nate Angell or @xolotl, a name that's hard to remember completely, but one that we will always remember. There's development talk later as he demonstrates the shiny, new iPhone app called iToony.

But first, we chatted about Drupal for large organizations and the relative livability of various European cities—all accompanied by extremely loud (but pleasant) French songs, one of which may or may not be a rendition of Cole Porter's Night And Day.

The image Nate made of Bram Pitoyo using the iToony app is here.

About Drupal Sun

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See the blog post at Evolving Web

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