Nov 02 2018
Nov 02

You Can’t Put a Price Tag on Visibility, Creditability, and Collegiality

“pink pig” by Fabian Blank on Unsplash

Organizing a DrupalCamp takes a lot of commitment from volunteers, so when someone gets motivated to help organize these events, the financial risks can be quite alarming and sometimes overwhelming. But forget all that mess, you are a Drupal enthusiast and have drummed up the courage to volunteer with the organization of your local DrupalCamp. During your first meeting, you find out that there are no free college or community spaces in the area and the estimated price tag is $25,000. Holy Batman that is a lot of money!

Naturally, you start thinking about how we are going to cover that price tag, so you immediately ask, “how many people usually attend?” Well unless you are one of the big 5, (BadCamp, NYCCamp, GovCon, MidCamp or FloridaCamp) we average between 100 and 200 people. Then you ask, “how much can we charge?” You are then told that we cannot charge more than $50 because camps are supposed to be affordable for the local community and that has been the culture of most DrupalCamps.

Are you interested in attending the first online DrupalCamp Organizers Meeting, on Friday, November 9th at 4:00pm (EST)? RSVP Here.

If Drupal is the Enterprise solution why are all of our camps priced and sponsored like we are still hobbyist in 2002?

Why Don’t We Treat DrupalCamps Like It’s the Enterprise Solution?

Drupal is the Enterprise solution. Drupal has forgotten about the hobbyist and is only concerned about large-scale projects. Drupal developers and companies make more per hour than Wordpress developers. These are all things I have heard from people within the community. So if any of these statements are valid, why are all the camps priced like it is 2002 and we are all sitting around in a circle singing Kumbaya? In 2016 for DrupalCamp Atlanta, we couldn’t make the numbers work, so we decided to raise the price of the camp from $45 to $65 (early bird) and $85 (regular rate). This was a long drawn out and heated debate that took nearly all of our 2 hours allotted for our google hangout. At the end of the day, one of our board members who is also a Diamond sponsor said,

“when you compare how other technology conferences are priced and what they are offering for sessions, DrupalCamps are severely under-priced for the value they provide to the community.”

Courtesy of Amaziee.io Labs

If a camp roughly costs $25,000 and you can only charge 150 people $50, how in the world are DrupalCamps produced? The simple answer, sponsors, sponsors, and more sponsors. Most camps solely rely on the sponsors to cover the costs. One camp, in particular, BADCamp has roughly 2,000 attendees and the registration is FREE. That’s right, the camp is completely free and did I forget to mention that it’s in San Francisco? Based on the BADCamp model and due to the fact the diamond sponsorship for DrupalCon Nashville was $50,000, getting 10 companies to sponsor your camp at $2,500 will be no sweat. Oh and don’t forget Drupal is the enterprise solution, right?

With all of your newfound confidence in obtaining sponsorships, you start contacting some of the larger Drupal shops in your area and after a week nothing. You reach out again maybe by phone this time and actually speak to someone but they are not committing because they want some more information as to why they should sponsor the camp such as, what other perks can you throw in for the sponsorship, are we guaranteed presentation slots, and do you provide the participant list. Of course, the worst response is the dreaded no, we cannot sponsor your conference because we have already met our sponsorship budget for the year.

At this point, you feel defeated and confused as to why organizations are not chomping at the bit to fork over $2,500 to be the sponsor. Yep, that’s right, twenty-five hundred, not $25,000 to be the highest level, sponsor. Mind you many Drupal shops charge anywhere between $150 — $250 an hour. So that means donating 10–17 hours of your organizations time to support a Drupal event in your local community. Yes, you understand that there are a lot of DrupalCamps contacting the same companies for sponsorship so you ask yourself, what has changed from years past?

Are you interested in attending the first online DrupalCamp Organizers Meeting, on Friday, November 9th at 4:00 pm (EST)? RSVP Here.

What Do Companies Expect to Gain From DrupalCamp Sponsorships?

At DrupalCon Nashville, I got an awesome opportunity to participate in a session around organizing DrupalCamps. It was really interesting to hear about how other organizers produce their camp and what were some of the biggest pain points.

Group Photo — DrupalCon 2018 Nashville by Susanne Coates

During this session, we were talking about a centralized sponsorship program for all DrupalCamps (that I personally disagree with and will save that discussion for another blog post) and an individual asked the question,

“why should my company sponsor DrupalCamp Atlanta? There is nothing there for me that makes it worth it. We don’t pick up clients, you to don’t distribute the participant list, so why should we sponsor the camp?”

Needless to say, they caught me completely off guard, so I paused then replied,

“DrupalCamp Atlanta has between 150–200 people, most of them from other Drupal shops, so what is it that you are expecting to get out of the sponsorship that would make it worth it to you? Why do you sponsor any DrupalCamps?”

Have Drupal Companies Outgrown the Need to Sponsor DrupalCamps?

On the plane ride back to the ATL it got me thinking, why does an organization sponsor DrupalCamps? What is the return on their investment? I started reminiscing of the very first DrupalCamp that I attended in 2008 and all the rage at that time (and still is), was inbound marketing and how using a content strategy and or conference presentations can establish your company as thought leaders in the field, therefore, clients will find your information useful and approach you when its time to hire for services. Maybe this is why so many camps received a ton of presentation submissions and why it was easy to find sponsors, but that was over 10 years ago now and some of those same companies have now been established as leaders in the field. Could it be, that established companies no longer need the visibility of DrupalCamps?

What happens to DrupalCamps when companies no longer need the visibility or credibility from the Drupal community?

The Drupal community thrives when Drupal shops become bigger and take on those huge projects because it results in contributions back to the code, therefore, making our project more competitive. But an unintended consequence of these Drupal shops becoming larger is that there is a lot more pressure on them to raise funding thus they need to spend more resources on obtaining clients outside of the Drupal community. Acquia, the company built by the founder of Drupal, Dries Buytaert, have made it clear that they are pulling back on their local camp sponsorships and have even created their own conference called Acquia Engage that showcases their enterprise clients. Now from a business perspective, I totally understand why they would create this event as it provides a much higher return on their investment but it results in competing with other camps (ahem, this year’s DrupalCamp Atlanta), but more importantly the sponsorship dollars all of us depend on are now being redirected to other initiatives.

Are you interested in attending the first online DrupalCamp Organizers Meeting, on Friday, November 9th at 4:00 pm (EST)? RSVP Here.

Why Should Established Companies Sponsor a DrupalCamp?

The reality of the situation is that sponsoring these DrupalCamps are most likely not going to land your next big client that pays your company a $500,000 contract. So what are true reasons to sponsor a DrupalCamp:

  • Visibility
    When sponsoring these DrupalCamps most of us organizers do a pretty good job of tweeting thanks to the company and if the organization has presenters we usually promote the sessions as well. In addition, most camps print logos on the website, merchandise, and name after parties. Yes, its only a little bit but the internet is forever and the more you are mentioned the better off you are. But you are from a well established Drupal shop so you don’t need any more visibility.
  • Credibility
    Even the companies who are have been established need their staff to be credible. There will always be some amount of turnover and when that happens your clients still want to know if this person is talented. And if your company is new, being associated with Drupal in your local community does provide your company a sense of credibility.
  • Collegiality
    I saved the best for last. Collegiality is highly overlooked when looking at sponsoring camps. Most companies have a referral program for new hires and when the time comes for you to hire, people tend to refer their friends and their professional acquaintances. There is no better place to meet and interact with other Drupalist than a DrupalCamp. What about employee engagement? In a recent focus group I participated in with a Drupal shop, many of the staff wanted more opportunities for professional development. These local camps are affordable and can allow staff to attend multiple events in a year when you have small budgets.

I must end by saying, that there are so many great Drupal companies that I have had the pleasure to work with and if it were not for the Acquia’s of the world Drupal wouldn’t exist. I understand that CEO’s are responsible for their employees and their families so I don’t want to underestimate the pressures that come with making payroll and having a client pipeline. The purpose of this post was to explain how it feels as a volunteer who is doing something for the community and the frustrations that sometimes come with it.

Oct 20 2018
Oct 20

“Alone we can do so little, together we can do so much” 
— Helen Keller

Authored by Gábor Hojtsy, Meike Jung, Baddý Sonja Breidert, Floris van Geel, João Ventura, Surabhi Gokte, Andriy Iun, Lars Stadel Linnet, Rachel Lawson and Stefan Auditor

“In his Driesnote he also talked about the Drupal Europe [leads] and it was really impressive because he invited all the organizers of Drupal Europe up on stage, and all of us in the audience gave them a big round of applause. It was a standing ovation for the team. It was really special and I think it was nice to honor them the privilege to see how important they have been for the Drupal community. They’ve done such a good job. […] Standing in the audience […] it was so emotional.” — Podcast hosts https://drupalsnack.se/drupalsnack-81

“Drupal Europe […] was an outstanding conference like no other. The feeling of being part of the community and working towards common objectives is indescribable and very motivating. The event ran seamlessly and provided value to all participants thanks to the highly driven and competent organizers.” https://thunder.org/thunder-drupal-europe-darmstadt

“I am amazed for sure. I did not know what to expect when I came to Drupal Europe. […] By coming here I was just blown away by how professional it is, how involved everyone is, how dedicated everybody is. So I wanna give a big thanks to all the organizers. […] It’s clear that they have gone out of their way to make this Drupal Europe the event of the year.” — Michael Miles in https://drupalsnack.se/drupalsnack-81

“When we put out a conference like this, we come all together. […] There is a whole spectrum that you can do in the community. And they come all here together. We have other events where maybe the people who are interested in frontend go or those who are interested in backend go. But Drupal Europe or DrupalCon Europe, these events bring us all together. […] It is exciting!” — Baddy Sonja Breidert https://drupalsnack.se/drupalsnack-81

“Darmstadt was far from tourist attraction (I’ve been to DrupalCons in Barcelona, Prague, London, Vienna etc) and for me Drupal Europe was equally as good yet far more accessible to all. I had excellent community conversations and did great business too. Works!” https://twitter.com/pdjohnson/status/1041088750544203776

“On a personal note, I thank you all for your warm welcome and letting me be part of an awesome experience I will never forget. Your contribution makes a difference, it did for me and I’m certain for many others.” https://twitter.com/KenMunene/status/1041651771146416128

“It was lots of fun and new learning at Drupal Europe. Thanks to all the volunteers for tirelessly working in making it successful event. This event has really set higher benchmark for future Drupal events.” https://twitter.com/mohit_rocks/status/1041546210258157568

“Just another day in the park, a Chinese, a Syrian, an Indian and Ethiopian playing basketball in Germany. Once in a lifetime experience!” https://twitter.com/tsegat/status/1040261120664252416

“As a graduate of TU Darmstadt [across the street] I’ve always dreamed of visiting Darmstadtium as a conference speaker. Thanks to Drupal Europe this dream came true! This was an amazing conference at an amazing venue. Thank you for having me!” https://twitter.com/hchonov/status/1040641366609588224

“1.5 years ago I was part of the very hard decision to not do a DrupalCon 2018 in Europe. I always hoped that the Drupal Community will step up and organize something themselves. But Drupal Europe exceeded all wishes and hopes, a very very big thank you to all involved people ❤” https://twitter.com/Schnitzel/status/1040907413703073792

“[…] It was hands down the best Drupal event I have been to! Thank you so much for the organization team and the volunteers! You are the heros!”

https://twitter.com/Ayeshlive/status/1040882648443498498

“Thank you so much to the Drupal Europe organizing team and everyone who attended! This was an amazing week and I enjoyed every minute. […]”

https://twitter.com/ekl1773/status/1040881770646970372

“This Drupal Europe has been the best conference I’ve ever been to, of any kind. There is not a single thing I would have changed from start to finish. It’s the people. You are all fabulous. Every single one of you” https://twitter.com/rachel_norfolk/status/1040707031093727232

“This Drupal Europe has been a really special event. Thanks to all the volunteers that have invested so much time on it: a big event like this is really needed to keep the ball rolling.”

https://twitter.com/chumillas/status/1040631234651742210

“‘The Drupal community is an optimistic one and I love that’ — So says @sparklingrobots and after two days here I can confirm the feeling. Loved every minute I had at Drupal Europe” https://twitter.com/FrancescaMarano/status/1040178911265652737

“The passion, energy and sense of inclusion within the Drupal community has amazed me this week. Loving my first Drupal Europe experience!”

https://twitter.com/KatharineShaw42/status/1039771806067040256

Statistics image by Meike Jung

Why Drupal Europe?

From the first DrupalCon in 2005 in Antwerp, the community self-organized to put on events for itself. Some events where lead by specific companies (DrupalCon Szeged or DrupalCon DC for example), while others were collaborations within the community. As the conferences grew very big and more and more professional, no collaboration of people could take on paying the unimaginable amounts of bills (especially up front) and no company wanted to take on the risk of losing a million euros. The Drupal Association gradually took over the logistics parts and then most of the organization of programming other than sprint teams and track content. However, the Drupal Association needs to make money to pay its bills, keep drupal.org up and organize all its other activities for promoting Drupal. DrupalCon was/is a key income source for the Drupal Association so if DrupalCon is not making money that is a problem.

It turned out in 2017 that when staff costs are factored in, DrupalCon Europe was not making money for the Drupal Association (while DrupalCon in the United States did, providing 45% of the total income of the Drupal Association by itself). Megan Sanicki wrote a very detailed blog series that gives a lot of insights into the finances and goals of DrupalCon. In summary DrupalCon Europe cost the Drupal Association around a million euros to put on and instead of making money, it lost around 15% of that consistently. So based on those facts the Drupal Association decided to put the event on a pause while something more sustainable is figured out.

A group of community members were selected to form a committee to help define what DrupalCon is, so a licensing scheme can be devised for event organization companies to apply to organize DrupalCon Europe instead. If this scheme is to work well, then this could bring DrupalCon to further regions of the globe as well. Some people thought if the event is losing money why would anyone sign up to do it and thought this is a cop-out.

Even if this was to be a hope of a long term solution for Europe, we’ve experienced a lot of sadness and outrage at the time at events and online forums in Europe. According to Dries Buyatert’s stats at the time, almost 45% of Drupal contributors are European with the United States a distant second at 29%. Many felt that the Drupal they helped create makes the Drupal Association money in the United States so contributors and users have a chance to meet there, but the substantially bigger contributor community in Europe (who in no small part made Drupal possible in the first place) lost that opportunity. In this light, we did not agree with the consideration of the two DrupalCon events on their own terms, in that profits from the United States would not be brought to compensate losses in Europe, but at the same time we did not wish cuts at any other parts of the Drupal Association which would have been necessary to offset for the situation.

All in all we needed to take the Drupal Association decision and see what we can work out in that situation. Literally as the news hit, DrupalCamp Antwerpen was happening and various attendees of the camp immediately rallied together to skip sessions and discuss the situation and plot a path forward. Those participating showed great interest in maintaining a large event in Europe but recognised the need for that event to look for different ways to achieve results. It wasn’t enough to just continue as we have before.

The discussions continued at the DrupalCon Vienna community summit and then BoFs throughout DrupalCon Vienna. Ideas ranged from making existing camps bigger, switching to university venues, changing the format drastically, buying a big tent and so on. One of the BADCamp lead organizers David Hwang provided lots of input and encouragement. Read the massive notes document of 17 pages detailing various discussion points.

Ultimately we agreed that we need a melting-pot type of event where developers get inspired by Drupal used for fun projects, customers get inspired by the community spirit and how things are made, designers, translators and marketing folks could productively participate, and so on. DrupalCon Vienna ended with a decision that we are going to organize the event, but we did not yet know anything beyond that.

Distributed online team

We set up an online team of leads on google drive for document sharing and used Slack for chat because that was readily available on drupal.slack.com. We regularly had issues with the disappearing history, had to copy conversations to documents and re-explain things but this was the common denominator we could work with and we were not into revolutionizing the chat system used by Drupal but to put on a conference. We wanted to pick our battles. We used Jitsi for video meetings which worked great on desktop and iOS, people on Android had regular issues though. A bit later, by the time the conference happened, the Android client got more stable as well.

The tools we struggled with most were project/task management. We started using Trello, but left it largely unused and grew out of due to the complexities of the project. We started using OpenSocial but did not have people to actively nurture communities there and abandoned that too. We set up OpenProject on our own servers to rescue ourselves but also left that largely unused. At the end we kept each other in check on our meetings and used various spreadsheets to move processes. It was (not surprisingly) hard to get volunteers to track their contributions in project management software.

Photo by Gábor Hojtsy

Later on when tasks were too complicated for one group to handle, we branched out to a web team, program team, volunteer leads team and lead organizer team each with their own meetings, but still kept the all-team weekly meetings going for over a year until the conference was over. We did not have a team/meeting structure for people working on sponsors, financials, venue/catering, attendee care and communications. Those were discussed more ad-hoc as needed and mostly managed by the respective single person responsible for them.

The web team had great success using GitLab’s issue tracker to track issues and do QA and integration of features developed on a staging site. In the lifespan of the website we developed two different versions, the initial simple version being a manually updated static brochure website and the second being a full-fledged Drupal 8 website.

Email was an important tool, too. It was a good decision to set up dedicated IMAP accounts early that could be shared by working groups. Ticket sales/attendee care, sponsoring, and volunteer coordination are some examples where this approach was really rewarding (especially when you cannot rely on a single person monitoring a mailbox full-time).

With the European General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) coming into full effect in May obviously many web workers (i. e. most team members) had a focus on implications for our tools. We were not perfectly set up for this (using data storage hosted outside the European Union and obviously handling personal data) but we did the best we could for privacy protection. We deliberately did not ask for any personal data other than information we needed for the ticket and to communicate with attendees. We did not send personal data in webform submission notifications. We used tools with GDPR certifications for ticket sales and emails. We did not sign contracts with all site administrators who had access to user accounts, which would have been needed strictly speaking, but we made sure to have a common privacy understanding in the team and limited critical access.

Hello World

We posted our Hello World post a week after DrupalCon Vienna announcing that we are on it because

  1. We wanted an event which brings together the European Drupal community.
  2. We wanted to make sure that the European market sees that Drupal as a technology is a strong brand.
  3. We wanted to prove our community that we can do this conference sustainable and cost effective.

We were primarily looking to solve the financial problems by choosing less fancy venues and not providing food.

It was also very important for us to state that we are not doing this to set up a parallel Drupal Association and we fully intended to collaborate with the Drupal Association. While we did not (intend to) use the DrupalCon brand, the Drupal Association helped us with a lot of historic data, spreadsheet templates, email samples, etc. that sped up a lot of our work and provided key insights to plan our financials. They also helped with our marketing through the Drupal Association channels and drupal.org frontpage. The Drupal Association also needed a place to hold the board meeting and board retreat and organized that around and at Drupal Europe as well.

Settling on a venue

We launched our call for venues two weeks later (which had outstanding results) alongside a call for swag that we could sell and make early money (which did not work). The call for venues had some outstanding results with the following city submissions:

  • Germany
    - Darmstadt
    - Friedrichshafen
    - Mannheim
  • The Netherlands
    - Amsterdam
    - Utrecht
    - Zaanstad (north of Amsterdam)
  • Belgium
    - Antwerp
  • Scotland
    - Edinburgh
    - Glasgow
  • Poland
    - Kraków
    - Wrocław
  • Czech Republic
    - Brno
  • Australia
    - Newstead, Victoria

After all if Australia can participate in the Eurovision song contest, why not have Drupal Europe there, right? ;)

We asked a lot of questions about the venues, and most would have been great in some way for our event. We spent a lot of time discussing various options and locations considering to avoid conflicts with events like IronCamp and Frontend United. We posted an enthusiastic update in November and as you can see there we’ve still been experimenting with how to approach the conference model and proposed a version that got significantly amended later.

We planned to confirm and announce the venue mid-December, but that did not happen before mid-January when we announced our venue and dates.

While most of the venues proposed could have worked, we choose Darmstadt because it provided a good combination of an amazing venue in a very accessible location combined with reasonable venue pricing. It was definitely not a less fancy venue as we set out to have, but the pricing was fair. It was a key deciding factor that the German community not only suggested us the venue but they were ready to stand behind the event and serve as the fiscal entity. While Drupal Europe Stichting has been set up in October in Eindhoven to possibly serve as a backing entity, it did not have staff or experience putting on events and had no reserves in the bank. We also talked to the Drupal Association to serve as the fiscal entity, but as they wanted to avoid losing money and we had no guarantees to not do that, that was also a no-go.

Given how amazing was the venue, we found it surprising that we got it for a reasonable price for this week. We thought that the venue would be hard to work with or there would be lots of hidden costs, so we carefully examined all potential charges listed. We did not find anything hidden and they were very positive and supportive of us. Later on we did find out two issues:

  1. This week clashed with important religious holidays including Rosh Hashanah, Hijra and Ganesh Chaturthi. We did not consider these date conflicts, which speaks to the lack of cultural diversity in the organization team at the time. We regret that some of our (potential) community members could not attend due to these conflicts. One of our volunteer leads celebrated Ganesh Chaturthi at Drupal Europe and helped us become a lot more aware of this religious celebration. Organizers of international events should use http://www.interfaith-calendar.org/ or an equivalent and also consult people to get more context to each holiday/celebration listed especially their significance.
  2. This week also clashed with the Automechanika expo in Frankfurt, which draws 136.000 visitors who take over hotels in the cities around Frankfurt as well. Despite the plenty of hotel rooms normally available in Darmstadt downtown, it is hard to compete with that demand when you are a comparatively tiny conference of at most a couple thousand people. This turned out to cause problems for accommodations for our attendees (but read on later) and even for some of our bigger exhibitors as they had a hard time to find companies to do booth buildup.

Event organizers with a more diverse team would have definitely avoided this week as they would be aware of both conflicts before booking. If we would have known, we would not choose Darmstadt as this was the only complete week available with only 9 months to go before the event in this venue.

Darmstadt

Darmstadt downtown nearby the venue — photo by Jean Fenouil

Darmstadt being a city of 160k people with a sizable university population with the venue located right downtown resulted in an atmosphere where you can go out for dinner and probably bump into another group of Drupal Europe attendees. Randomly meeting other attendees was the norm.

The close proximity of the Frankfurt airport was a big plus. A direct airport bus is running between the venue and the airport normally every 30 minutes daytime. And there are power plugs and free wifi on the bus, how is that for a great arrival / departure experience?

Darmstadtium

While we sometimes felt like mere “conference organizing enthusiasts” in discussions with Darmstadtium, our partnership turned out to be very productive. They worked with us to find the best solutions for our problems within the frameworks they were able to offer. We ended up almost booking the whole venue (except one big auditorium) and basically took over the building for the week. They gradually understood more and more of our diverse program elements and what each meant to us. They even took care of little details like setting the led lighting on the infodesk to the conference’s brand color for the week.

Photo by Jean Fenouil

The venue was very well received by our attendees, especially the natural light in the atriums and most rooms. Even one of our contribution rooms had a huge glass wall letting in natural light and direct street access to get some fresh air.

“We are really digging the venue of Drupal Europe. Large open spaces and some really stunning architecture. […] Our team can’t seem to get over the sheer beauty of the Drupal Europe venue. It’s truly stunning […] Really thankful to Drupal Europe for the great choice!” https://twitter.com/Srijan/status/1039511199312822272 and https://twitter.com/Srijan/status/1040253518798577664

Accommodation

The hotel situation might have cost us a considerable number of potential attendees as the above mentioned expo resulted in many big hotels completely booked by automotive companies. We attempted to negotiate group rates for room blocks in hotels but they said there is no such option for this week as the rooms will be booked either way. And indeed that came true.

We started calling out the issue publicly as early as May telling people to book hotel rooms anticipating this problem, but understandably many people did not yet know if they would attend as no program was available yet, people did not know if they are going to speak or not, etc. Later on some feedback indicated that our calls for hotel room booking was not alarming enough early enough.

Drupal Camping photo by Floris van Geel

After the issue was raised in our Slack channel, several volunteer initiatives started right away and all options were immediately reflected on the web site:

  • Some team members researched hotels farther away and looked up alternative booking portals, even called up remote hotels to reserve room blocks. We did not end up offering those blocks as they were only accessible with cars and the reservations were only valid very short term which did not let us develop a solution to distribute them.
  • A Google map with train stations was set up to indicate towns outside Darmstadt with only a few minutes to reach by train to assist extended accommodation search.
  • Some locals started a couchsurfing channel to share sleeping space available within the Drupal community locally.
  • A group of volunteers started organizing a camping site on drupalchat.me. The so-called Drupal Camping turned out to be quite an attraction with an event bus. We had to cope with very strict german rules, so after 10 pm it was “Nachtruhe”, meaning that we had to skip the bonfire and party elsewhere at the lake to enjoy our music and the stars without bothering other guests. Even with the 60 Drupal people we had at the camping on Tuesday we managed not to get kicked out and in the end be happy campers with not so much troubled camping owners.

Drupal Europe brand

Alongside the call for venues, we also launched a call for designers. While we had a temporary logo right away, we needed a complete brand we can use for the website, roll-ups, stickers, track icons. Our call for designers received many great submissions.

Sample submissions from Aline Skibitzki, Steffen Belz, and sixeleven srl respectively

After thorough discussions we decided to partner with sixeleven srl in Italy, the same company that designed the DrupalCon and Drupal Dev Days Milan brands and work forward from another brand proposal they sent. Sixeleven delivered a brand manual with fonts and colors and worked with us designing the sponsor brochure, stickers, PDF schedule, etc. We also had two designers on the lead team who produced matching designs for the lanyards, rollups, digital signage, further website elements, etc. which worked in perfect unison with the sixeleven designed items.

Social media, giving Drupal Europe a voice

We knew from the get-go that we need to be active on social media. And in fact through the year we posted over a thousand tweets on https://twitter.com/DrupalEurope. We made several announcements on Twitter exclusively especially before we had attendees we could send emails to. We kept posting more detailed posts to our Medium blog, but daily news were delivered over Twitter. While we hoped to be able to, once we had our Drupal website, we did not integrate the blog or the social media channels there, so our Twitter feed was more like the source of the most up to date high level news source while our website was best to review all available information.

While Twitter is quite popular in “insider” Drupal circles, we hoped to reach out of those. We also set up our Facebook presence which replicated a lot of the Twitter messaging and we also had a LinkedIn page that did not get much activity though. Further attempts were made with Xing.com, a dedicated Meetup account, an event page on Airbnb and probably some more volunteer-based initiatives. The idea was to drive interests from various platforms to the channels where we were actually providing information at. None of these approaches were very effective in part because we did not have the resources to keep them up to date.

While we ran a very small ad campaign on Facebook and a bit bigger one on Twitter targeting technology people in the region, we did not seem to succeed with reaching outside of our regular reach with them so abandoned the idea to spend money on them.

Finally we thought it is important to have a consistent social media voice so our Twitter account was managed by a single person. We made sure to make the biggest noise about all the things that helped build our credibility at the start and then things that demonstrated our value provided. Some people considered our social media activity too chatty but it definitely helped give a familiar voice to the conference that was not too formal and contributed to the community camp feel of the event.

Websites and the process of getting them ready

Credits Drupal Europe Web team

As mentioned earlier, over the span of the year we had two different websites. The initial website was a Symfony 4 based HTML-landing page. The other was the full Drupal 8 site with workflows, user generated content and so on, that turned out to be more complex than we initially anticipated.

HTML-landing page

Starting with the simpler of the two first, the goal there was to put together a quick and simple website, just to tell the world that we are here, who we are and what we want to achieve.

It was initially created on the 13. October 2017, in a very simple and slim version, which gradually evolved. We stopped development on it on 17. May 2018 and it was replaced by the Drupal 8 website shortly thereafter. Statistically we had 226 commits over the period, giving an average of 1 commit per day. 8 people contributed to this site with 85% of contributions from 3 contributors.

Using Symfony 4 as a midway point between a fully-fledged website and a simple HTML website worked out quite well, there was a slight overhead to it, but that was mitigated by it providing benefits in regards to asset handling with automated optimization of js, css and image sizes.

Commits graph from GitLab styled by Meike Jung

Drupal 8 website

We explored a lot of different approaches to building the website, the big contenders were CoD, RNG and even using Commerce as a base for the event — but quick prototyping using those approaches did not provide a useful shortcut to a complete website. Ideally CoD for Drupal 8 would be our go-to choice but that was not yet mature enough when we needed it.

We then decided to decouple the ticketing system from the website and later investigate the possibilities of integrating it into the website, which simplified what the website had to do. We ended up going with a setup that required a lot of configuration, but very little custom code for handling the functionalities — we also went at it with the mindset that what we build was not meant to be reusable so if a shortcut was taken that would be okay as the website wasn’t going to live more than a little over a year.

We took good care to make the website responsive and support features we needed with webforms, field permissions and an extensive set of content types, views and paragraphs. We even powered the digital signage in the venue off the website, read on that later.

Ticket sales from Pretix styled by Meike Jung

This website received a total of 795 commits between March 5 when we started its repository until September 26 when our last commits happened as of this writing. That comes down to almost 4 commits per day. There were 17 contributors to this website, the top 3 contributors made 83% of the commits.

Initial release of the Drupal 8 website

While we did not intend to create a reusable website by any means, we realize people may learn from how we did things. So we published the whole source code at the end of the conference at https://www.drupal.org/project/drupaleurope_website. We are not going to support this project, it is merely posted as an example, however other event organisers may want to pick this up and bring it further or cherry-pick some ideas for their websites.

Timing and the website

A look at the calendar can be treacherous when you still have so many months to go until the event. We started too late with defining milestones which put us in tight situations during the course of building the website. At a time when the website team was still evaluating Drupal distributions, it turned out that a placeholder website was not enough to serve the changing requirements during preparation of the event.

We wanted to publish information about sponsorships and found out after a while that it would really help convincing others to show some early sponsors. We wanted to start selling “early supporter” tickets and offer a corresponding badge for download (and optimally already link sold tickets to a user account). While we kept updating the brochure site, that took time away from volunteers’ building the Drupal 8 website. Many little holdups resulted in a really tight timeline before the event. We could not allow much time for session confirmations and we were way too late to use featured speakers for serious marketing on the site.

Verticals as our final program concept

We arrived at our final program concept by the beginning of March. We’ve had lots of discussions with community members to try to solve the life and death problem of DrupalCon Europe that the customer attendees are not there because there is not targeted content for them and sponsors are not there either because they cannot sell to customers as much as in the United States as a consequence. While this is in part a result of how Europe is different culturally from the United States, we could refocus the program on users of Drupal to work around this a bit. We’ve seen the summit model working very well at the beginning of DrupalCons (so much so that DrupalCon Seattle in 2019 is going to dedicate one more day to summits) and we thought we turn that around and organize the program around industry verticals.

Some of us met and sat down at the DrupalCon Nashville sprint to refine the concept and match to possible schedules and room allocations. We published our industry verticals at end of April (and posted the photo above). Our industry verticals where

  • Digital Transformation + Enterprise
  • Government
  • Healthcare
  • E-Commerce
  • Higher Education
  • Publishing + Media
  • Social + Non-profit
  • Infrastructure (later expanded to DevOps + Infrastructure)
  • Drupal Community
  • Drupal + Technology
  • Agency Business

We were still assembling a track team at the time. Ultimately we were more successful with some of the topics than others. Healthcare was least successful and needed to be removed with the sole session we accepted from it transferred to Digital Transformation + Enterprise. Drupal + Technology received the most submissions by far.

We hoped to recruit sponsors for tracks as well but that did not work out too well. Only one sponsor bought a specific track sponsorship and the two diamond sponsors used their track sponsorship option. In hindsight the track sponsor packages were not necessarily providing comparable benefits to similarly priced other packages.

“One of my favorite Drupal Europe things was the eCommerce track. Normally a DrupalCon has one, if even two — or even none. There were TEN sessions about Drupal and eCommerce. I wish more events would reach out to this vast market.” https://twitter.com/nmdmatt/status/1040885627309441024

Session tagging

Alongside the verticals we also announced session tagging. We provided a way for speakers to add arbitrary tags to their sessions which we lightly edited later for consistency (eg. title casing them). No limits were provided for tags as we believed tags would give more details about sessions even on skimming the list. They provided a great cross-section of content to browse with, for example looking at all security sessions at https://www.drupaleurope.org/session-by-expertise/security shows content from building secure containers through writing secure code to the The OpenEuropa Initiative. These would not have been in the same track at a traditional DrupalCon. We pre-created tags with the traditional track names and some technologies and tools we expected would show up to inspire submitters.

Session tagging was then also adopted by BADCamp for 2018 and for DrupalCon Seattle in 2019 with a somewhat different approach, picking up to three tags from a predefined set.

Code Sprint Contribution

This question bugged some of our leads for a while.

DrupalCon already replaced “code sprint” with “sprint” some time ago, recognizing that this activity was not only about development but also about translations, design, marketing, and even planning for future development. Still the “sprint” terminology was so firmly established in the Drupal community that it looked hard to change, even though still not representing the activity too well and confusing for newcomers.

It is not a “sprint” where a backlog of sized stories is used to form a set of tasks that a given team of people commit to deliver in a timeframe and then release / demonstrate. The backlog is fluid, the team is fluid and the timeframe is fluid, while the work may or may not be committed and released. It is also not a sprint in the sense of needing to run real fast and getting very tired at the end. At DrupalCons there was usually a segment attempting to introduce the concept before every keynote and as part of the closing keynote explaining around the misleading terminology. Also sprint is not necessarily something that people associate with working on marketing materials together or do project planning. Why not change the terminology to begin with then?

Contribution is a dictionary word that is more natural to understand, more inclusive to different energy levels and types of work. It does not sound (and does not have the history of being) so attached to code development only. So from March onwards we decided to change the terminology and drop “sprint” entirely in favor of contribution. Contribution day, contribution room, contribution mentoring, etc.

The change was in no small part inspired by WordCamps having Contributor days. We decided to use contribution day rather than contributor day as it sounded slightly more inclusive of new contributors, i. e. not the day of those who are contributors (already). Also contributor room, etc. could have othered contributors as if other rooms or sessions are not for them.

Almost empty contribution room on Monday morning — photo by Gábor Hojtsy

Several sponsors signed up to support contribution, two of which also got to name our two week-long contribution rooms. Feedback about the natural light as well as all day coffee/tea and snacks in the contribution area was really good.

“I arrived with some question-mark-salad in my brain and left Drupal Europe with the proud feeling that I contributed to this community, that I now understand what kind of issues this community also faces and that I really can help to find solutions for those issues as well. I am a part of it, so I will contribute.” https://www.drop-guard.net/blog/johannas-first-mentoring-and-contributing-experience

“I love the emphasis on “contribution day” and “contribution space” rather than “code sprint” at Drupal Europe. OSS contributions comes in many shapes and sizes. And representation matters.” https://twitter.com/eojthebrave/status/1039505954138611713

Mentored contribution

We worked with the existing (also volunteer) contribution mentoring team from the start to carry the tradition of mentored contributions on Friday. Altogether 40 people signed up to be mentors at Drupal Europe.

Many people raised before that if they arrive on Monday without experience, they feel out of place then as mentoring only happened on Friday usually. Contributors working on specific areas often only have dedicated time at events like this to work on issues all day and are therefore not often easily or practically approachable to mentor new contributors on Monday. So we discussed with mentors that some of them would be available on Monday already to introduce new contributors to the Drupal processes. We were happy to see a couple people tweeting they enjoyed this. While it is easy to say that full mentoring from Monday onwards would be useful, it also falls on volunteers with limited capacity.

We also provided a mentor’s table in the exhibition space out of our budget and helped provide mentor supplies for Friday. Due to some miscommunication, not all regular mentor table equipment was ready from our side on Monday, but we managed to solve that throughout the week. We also provided the usual eight free mentor ticket codes for volunteers who primarily attend to mentor so they don’t need to even pay for their ticket to contribute. These tickets were distributed by the mentoring leads.

Mentors usually have custom t-shirts provided by the event but this time we did not have the budget nor the possibility to have the right sizes and fits collected and shirts ordered based on them in time, so mentors printed their own green ribbons which were used to identify people doing mentoring especially on Friday but also throughout the week. Compared to the shirt, the benefit of ribbons were that they were more reusable for multiple days and were possible to combine with all kinds of clothing styles.

On Friday we provided space for the usual three areas:

photo by Gábor Hojtsy)
  1. First-time contributors workshop where Drupal processes and tools are introduced to participants (see photo on the left)
  2. Mentored contribution to put that into practice with actual tasks; helped out by mentors
  3. General contribution with topic teams working together to solve ongoing tasks such as media management, modern admin UI, search API, MongoDB, Drupal demo, etc.

We also recognized contribution day itself needs more work to be well organized for non-code contributors as well. We discussed with mentors to structure the introduction in a way that is modular based on the tools needed for specific tasks. However, more effort and processes need to be in place to have recurring translation, marketing, design, etc. teams at contribution days. We set up the #contribution-funnels Slack channel on drupal.slack.com following contribution day to improve on this.

All-in-all there was so much interest in contribution on the Friday that we needed to expand the available space considerably on the spot and ask the venue to set up a whole new hallway with tables and power strips. The new contribution area was available in less than 15 minutes.

Contribution days also provide rare opportunities for lead Drupal contributors to meet face to face and discuss topics important at the time. Drupal Europe provided space for many of such important meetings and was hopefully useful in moving those initiatives forward.

Admin UI and JavaScript modernization team meeting photo by Gábor Hojtsy

“So many contributors today, really looking forward to see the aftermath! Big thanks to all the mentors, who kept a happy face till the end!” https://twitter.com/rouvenvolk/status/1040696363053473792

Initial audience survey

We also launched our initial audience survey in March. We got 92 responses, which may not be highly representative but the people were quite varied from project managers to site builders to frontend developers. It was clear from the results that people thought DrupalCon was awesome (39%) or at least all right (28%), while 20% of our respondents did not even attend a DrupalCon yet. There was no single other event that all the people responding to our survey could meet at. People liked how DrupalCamps feel, but were not concerned of event size as long as they can meet their peers there.

A sample reason why DrupalCon is the best: “I got to meet people from a wide variety of countries, companies, roles, and also friends from the US who only ever travel over to Europe for the big DrupalCons.” Likewise, “Being part of the community” was listed as the top reason to participate for 40% of our respondents, followed by attending sessions which was top priority for 27%. Interest for business, content and editorial as well as showcase sessions were highest. People were evenly distributed among looking for Drupal speakers and speakers from other areas.

75% of respondents said there should be workshops and/or trainings. We did not ask specifics about costs associated which was an oversight. Read on later about workshops and trainings.

40% of the respondents said they’d rather not get a goodie bag and free t-shirt. On the other hand 42% said free coffee and tea all day should be offered. Only 14% said we should reduce the ticket price and not have coffee and tea at all. In terms of lunch, 38% said they are fine with “venue food” (a further 31% even said they would pay extra for better food at the venue), while only 17% said we should not offer lunch and reduce ticket prices instead. The respondents of course did not yet know what kind of “venue food” to expect in Darmstadt.

All in all, the survey confirmed our goal with creating an event that brings the various folks of Drupal together to meet and inspire each other, as well as our focus on industry case studies. On the other hand, our initial cost cutting ideas about catering were not validated.

The first European Splash Awards

At the end of April alongside the industry verticals, we also announced that we’ll hold the first European Splash Awards. While we thought of it as a social event at first, later on we realized it had a lot of value built into the main program as a keynote.

Splash Awards originates from The Netherlands where in 2014 local companies realized they need more celebration of the great projects built by companies. Later on the format was licensed for local awards ceremonies in Germany and Austria, Norway, Bulgaria, Denmark, France and Romania. In Eurovision style we wanted to bring the country-awards together for a European Splash Awards to showcase the wide variety of highly professional projects built with Drupal. This lined up perfectly well with our industry tracks as we attempted to steer the conference towards showing the real business value of Drupal more. It was a logical step to integrate it into our schedule as a keynote. The variety and quality of nominees also impressed Dries Buytaert sitting in the front row:

“Congratulations to all the Splash Awards winners at Drupal Europe! Such an impressive list of brands and innovative Drupal use cases.” https://twitter.com/Dries/status/1039417091571507203

Photo by Paul Johnson

We believe there is a lot of possibilities for improvement in the presentation of the awards, but we got a lot of good feedback on the format already. More countries are looking to host their own Splash Awards next year and DrupalCon Seattle even includes Splash Awards as a program item now. We are looking forward to see how that turns out in the United States.

Driesnote and the Prenote

Other than ensuring Dries can make it to Drupal Europe, we did not need to do much for the Driesnote. Once realizing the date conflicts with religious holidays on the beginning of the week, we moved the Driesnote to the middle of the conference so everyone had the chance to attend or at least view the stream.

Dries was very professional about the preparation and ran a test of the Driesnote on Monday. It was maybe his most action-packed keynote ever with announcements about Drupal 7 and Drupal 8 end of life and Drupal 9 release dates; a perfectly flowing demo of Drupal 8.6.0; extended Drupal 8 security support; video updates on various initiatives; announcing that drupal.org will adopt GitLab and that DrupalCon is back in Amsterdam in 2019. Phew!

Driesnote audience photo by Gábor Hojtsy

Our only challenge about this session was the room size. We hoped we can have everyone in person in the same room for our most popular session. If the conference is to have the 1600+ people as we hoped, we could have integrated the two adjacent rooms (that we used for contribution) for the Driesnote into a much bigger keynote room that could hold most participants. (And in that case cut back BoF space to have room for contributions).

However for all other sessions, the keynote room even in the more compact size we used it in was too big. We did not afford ourselves the luxury to pay for the room for the day and then not use it for sessions, so we attempted to put the most popular / most important sessions in this room. At least for the keynote our audience size was right in the sweet spot and filled the room.

Photo by Amazee Labs

This Driesnote was also special in that Dries invited the lead organizers of Drupal Europe on stage and we received a stunning standing ovation from the audience. Thank you!

Megan Sanicki also announced shortly before Drupal Europe that she is stepping down from the Executive Director position at the Drupal Association and leaving the organization. Dries also invited her on stage and said farewell to Megan.

We continued to not having a question segment right at the Driesnote but have a separate Q&A session dedicated for questions, so a lot more questions can be asked and detailed answers given, which was quite well received.

“This Dries Q&A format is fantastic! He’s right here with us, not far away on a distant stage. I really liked the new Q&A format and hope you keep building on it. I thought the “cozy” room size actually added to the atmosphere.”

https://twitter.com/wizonesolutions/status/1039894979760582657 and https://twitter.com/wizonesolutions/status/1039957709905436672

We moved the Prenote alongside the Driesnote to Wednesday morning. The Prenote kept its tradition to be a welcome event for the Drupal community and was definitely still as good as ever on Wednesday morning.

“So delighted that Drupal Europe continued the fine tradition, no institution!, of Prenote this year. Always causes belly laughs.” https://twitter.com/pdjohnson/status/1040345314367037440

Finally, we also had the traditional conference group photo after the Driesnote, right outside at the back of the building. Not taking chances here, our team members spent hours on the day before to find the best spot even considering the angle of the sun at the time. The photo turned out amazing.

The future of the open web and open source panel

This was the by far most challenging session to organize for us. First of all, we wanted to inspire our attendees to consider how our work reflects on the future of the internet and society as a whole through our open source practices and whether we are building an open or closed web. Recent developments like Firefox’s Facebook Container extension, Apple’s blocking of third party tracking in Safari, Microsoft’s acquisition of Github, the rise of the IndieWeb (see Drupal integration at https://www.drupal.org/project/indieweb) and the Brave browser among various other things were key moves to discuss.

Photo by Amazee Labs

We hoped to have various voices in this conversation from browser makers through policy makers to consumers and software providers. We confirmed and announced our initial group of Matt Mullenweg (WordPress), Dries Buytaert (Drupal) and Barb Palser (Google) in the middle of June but Matt Mullenweg unfortunately needed to cancel due to scheduling conflicts two months later. Our final lineup was Heather Burns (Tech policy and regulation specialist), Barb Palser (Google), DB Hurley (Founder and technical lead of Mautic, one of former development leads of Joomla) and Dries Buytaert (Drupal). Tim Lehnen (interim Executive Director of the Drupal Association) is also passionate about these topics and moderated the panel. They provided a great mix of of views from concept through regulation to implementation.

“Thanks to @Dries, @WebDevLaw, @dbhurley and @TimLehnen for a rich discussion about open web and open source this morning — and to the Drupal Europe volunteer organizers for putting on a super cool event — it’s been an awesome week.” https://twitter.com/barb_palser/status/1040163192780062722

The Open Web Lounge

When an idea is good, chances are high that you are not the only one who had it. That’s good for the idea.

It popped up at DrupalCon Nashville where a sponsor dedicated their exhibition booth with the label “Open Web Lounge” for barcamp-style sessions, inviting people dedicated to other open source technologies as well. Meanwhile the German Drupal Association, as a founding member of the CMS Garden initiative, discussed options of promoting their project at Drupal Europe during their monthly meeting.

Some weeks later, a detailed concept was there and sponsors were found for a dedicated room. The 337 square meter room called “Darmstadtium Lounge” was a perfect fit for the plans. We created a space for sessions open to passersby but also areas with loose furnishing allowing for informal talks about common interests and lessons learned.

CMS Garden invited the communities of other renowned open source CMS and organized barcamp-style session proposals that were agreed upon on a daily basis. Unfortunately we did not record the sessions, but we had some awesome presentations and insights there by simply comparing how other CMS communities handle topics like marketing, “genius but unpleasant” community members, raising diversity, or of course different approaches of software solutions. This “off the island” programming offered great insights for example in how multi-language concepts differ between Drupal, Joomla!, TYPO3, Neos or WordPress.

“Getting a really open insight on how the #wordpress community takes care of marketing at Drupal Europe. They have an open backlog too ;-)”

https://twitter.com/imregmelig/status/1039797106222030848

The Open Web Lounge leads used the possibility to raise awareness by adding talks to the conference schedule each morning, so they were dynamically displayed on the venue screens.

It was a perfect fit that the program team did a great job to convince founders of great open source tools as speakers, who also visited the Open Web Lounge.

Photo by Floris van Geel on google

Rocket.chat and Nextcloud announced their partnership and integration a week after the conference — with a photo of the founders taken at Drupal Europe

Forming a track team and launching the call for speakers

Once we published the concept of industry verticals at the end of April, we needed a team to help us get to high quality sessions. We planned to follow the basic DrupalCon structure of a program team with a couple track chairs for each vertical. Only this time, we needed track chairs for areas that are not strictly Drupal but more focused on industries using Drupal. Healthcare failed out of the gate in that we did not manage to recruit a single track chair for it. Some tracks were hard to recruit a whole team for, such as the publishing track, but then brought fruits several times over. It took a long time to form the complete team, and we started meeting with the subset we had to make sure we can launch the call for papers.

All-in-all our track chair team of 32 track chairs (one of whom later resigned) did an amazing job across our 10 tracks. First they worked on blog posts to announce their tracks which helped them get on the same page about the focus of each industry vertical. These were published on our Medium blog. Then they worked to reach out to a diverse group of speakers and encourage them to speak. We did all we could to have good diversity in various ways on the chair team and had several first time track chairs mixed with people with experience.

We hoped that having experienced track chairs would smoothen the process, but given that this was a considerably different conference from DrupalCons and we needed to figure out a lot of our own process and priorities, that experience did not necessarily help. Leadership tasks of the track team were divided and handed over between four individuals which did not help with the smooth running of the team. Having one strong hand to lead the track team would have made processes a lot more effective but unfortunately no single person had the capacity to take this on.

While the track team worked really hard, due to our budget uncertainties we could only grant them free entry to the conference quite late in time. However we made it clear throughout the process that the worse it would be for them is a voucher granted for a cheap ticket if we cannot afford free tickets, so they did not have ticket purchase pressure.

Speaker selection

Our call for speakers ran for a month originally and was then extended for one more week until July 8, 2018. The submission dynamics looked like the following:

As with ticket sales, deadlines really made things go. We were glad we extended the deadline for a week as we got a lot of good sessions that were still in the making at the original deadline. We were looking for content in the following three formats:

  1. 20 minute sessions (including questions)
  2. 45 minute sessions (including questions)
  3. 2–3 hour workshops
“Building Local Communities — foster Drupal adoption” workshop leads photo by Shyamala Rajaram

For workshops, we ended up providing two 45 minute slots combined with the break in-between, so in practice 105 minutes, which was even less than 2 hours. We wanted to have one workshop room that consistently hosts workshops on all three session days, and these were indeed very well received. A combination of frontend, backend, devops, community and business workshops were selected.

We aimed to have the 20 minute slots after lunch as a “speed-up” block, so each day most rooms (except the workshop room) had two 20 minute sessions. Where our session selection resulted in more 45 minute sessions, we also used this slot for full sessions.

For each industry vertical we gave full autonomy to the track team to decide their scoring and selection methodology and similar to DrupalCons provide a priority list of their selection. We even expanded the available session slots through the process, which some tracks used to add more to the accepted session list than originally planned.

While we asked about diversity in the session submission process, we did not expose the concrete data provided by the speaker to the track chairs to protect speaker privacy. We did expose if there was a diversity category chosen or not as a yes/no flag. While out of our overall submissions 31% of sessions were self-identified as having at least one diverse presenter, out of the actually delivered sessions (following all cancellations that were resolved) we had 29.5% of our sessions self-identified as diverse. Unfortunately in many cases, due to our lack of speaker funding, diverse speakers needed to cancel due to lack of financial possibilities.

While the track teams got to work frantically after the submission deadline on July 8, summer holidays made it very hard to ensure equal representation from all track chairs. Summer holidays also made it hard to get confirmations from speakers about their sessions. There were speakers we’ve literally been tracking down through colleagues or our friends we knew they knew. Two volunteers shared the task of communicating with speakers through a shared mailbox.

It took us almost a month when we finally announced the public session list with 162 hours of sessions and 9 in-depth workshops on August 3rd. In hindsight, more reviews by track chairs of submissions up front could have helped speed up the selection process a great deal.

While we did not have a speaker funding pool, we did offer one free ticket per session. For sessions with more than one speaker, we also provided a coupon code for early bird ticket rates, so that co-speakers at least don’t get a bad deal even though they waited for so long to see if they get accepted. Finally, we provided a coupon code with all declined sessions, so those who did not get accepted could also still buy on the early bird rate. We also called attention to our free diversity tickets in the emails we sent, given the application process was still open at the time, so declined speakers could also apply there as appropriate.

Finally, we also hoped to get some help from our speakers to promote the conference and sent along a voucher code that they would invite people from their networks with. This voucher was valid for a €100 discount from the tickets being sold at any given time. Unfortunately we’ve only seen 5 uses of this voucher, so it did not work really well.

Trainings

While we already mentioned that potential trainers reached out to us in our post at the end of April, we had a lot of conflicting feelings internally about trainings. We considered them important parts of the event to provide high-bandwidth knowledge sharing. On the other hand the Drupal Association even cancelled trainings for DrupalCon Vienna 2017 (before cancelling the whole conference outright for 2018) to save costs. Our rough calculations also did not indicate we could make profits on trainings, at best we could break even. However that compared with the amount of work it took to organize them did not add up.

Nonetheless several trainers were interested and willing to step up, so we agreed with two trainers that they would organize the whole framework. We launched our call for trainings after call for sessions closed on July 10. As we already had a group of interested folks, we only ran the call for 8 days.

Then we drafted a contract between Drupal Europe and the trainers, so they would get a deadline by which they need to pay for the room they booked as well as costs for food for their trainees. They would sell their trainings themselves while the event would also do promotion of the trainings and profits would be shared with the event. We launched training ticket sales a little more than a month before the conference on August 2nd with the following trainings:

  1. Drupal 8 getting started
  2. GDPR for companies
  3. GDPR for developers
  4. Drupal 8 module development
  5. Drupal 8 migrations
  6. Drupal 8 with ReactJS

Trainings did not sell well, however this could very well be attributed to our self-fulfilling prophecy. They were launched too late and as we were busy with preparing for the conference, we did not have big marketing reserves to help push them and make up for launching late.

In the end two trainings remained, “Drupal 8 getting started” and a merged version of the two GDPR trainings. Neither of the trainers got to deliver a training at the end who lead the whole process. We think the topics were quite good, very relevant, and the trainers were also great. It is probably also the case that the free workshops proved to be competition for the trainings. We had a well received ReactJS workshop and also planned to have a migration workshop (which was unfortunately cancelled later), so that may have attributed to the lack of sales of those trainings.

Informal gatherings (BoFs)

Nobody knows the power of BoFs better than us. Drupal Europe was formed in a series of BoF discussions at DrupalCon Vienna (after the initial discussions at DrupalCamp Antwerp).

It was important for us that we have plenty of BoF space and it is self-serve and entirely digital. We also wanted to have BoFs as first class citizens included in the schedule displays (read on later). So we opened BoF submission on August 20, three weeks before the event with 96 slots for three days that was later even more expanded to over a hundred slots. Submitters could pick from a set of predefined room and time combinations which automatically put their BoF in the right room at the right time. Participants could move their BoF around as needed and also unschedule it if they wanted so.

We were delighted to see BoFs following sessions on diversity, Gutenberg in Drupal, Drupal demo, layout management, etc. Also independent of sessions about paragprahs module’s UI design, the Drupal Business Alliance, mentor orientation etc. There were also various fun BoFs like Tunisian fine pastry tasting or the movement BoF that took place outdoors. The German Drupal Association also used a BoF space to organize its yearly meeting and the DrupalCon Europe 2018 organizers also used a BoF space to meet the community and take questions.

We let submitters to assign industry tracks and expertise tags as appropriate so BoFs would also show up on pages for specific tags or tracks.

Roundtable discussions

While not organized by us, these are important to mention. Events like Drupal Europe are ideal to gather various interested parties for deep discussions. So the Drupal Association organized various roundtable discussions with supporting partners as well as local community leaders.

Community leaders round table photo by Paul Johnson

The reception of the community leaders round tables were great as people had a chance to share pain points cross-borders and get direct feedback from the Drupal Association and Dries Buytaert in person about their concerns. The second community leaders round-table was organized to focus on some top action items. For example, a “Marketing Drupal to Customers” initative was formed by Suzanne Dergacheva, Paul Johson and Ricardo Amaro and is looking for your participation to make materials happen.

“Awesome to meet over 30 Drupal community leaders from different European countries and to represent Austria. As somebody said, together we can create magic!”

https://twitter.com/crizzirc/status/1039173387569049600

Volunteer coordination

“Volunteers do not necessarily have time, they just have the heart” — Elizabeth Andrew

Drupal Europe was organized by volunteer leaders from the get-go. For the scope of this section we’ll use the “volunteers” term for contributors who were not involved in the larger creation of the event but signed up for specific tasks instead.

(Some) volunteers group photo by Dropsolid

No event is successful without helping hands, and we found many of those at the right time. We created and posted a questionnaire on the website asking interested people to answer some basic questions regarding how they want to help, what medium of communication they prefer and will they be able to help on-site.

We sent out the first email to the volunteers who signed up via the questionnaire in early August. In this email, we explained the volunteering tasks and the communication methods to use. In further emails we provided details about the signup sheet we used to let people pair up to tasks.

We designed our volunteer signup sheet based on the sheet from DrupalCon Nashville. The sheet detailed the roles and responsibilities of the tasks they were supposed to do on-site. Two weeks prior to the conference, we sent out the signup sheet and asked volunteers to assign themselves to tasks they are comfortable with. We did not set any required amount of tasks or hours for volunteers, but we were not able to offer any benefits other than warm feelings either. Everyone spent the time they could contribute.

We had a great team of on-site volunteers helping us with activities like check-in at the registration desk, monitoring the sessions in rooms, sponsor care, trivia night, contribution rooms, photography and videography.

The tasks of monitoring sessions in rooms demanded the highest amount of volunteers and we had several gaps. We tried to fill those by approaching attendees we knew who did not yet sign up to volunteer but were attending those sessions either way. A printed checklist was created for room monitoring containing the necessary action items for the room monitor at that time slot to check before and during the session.

The almost 900 amazing photos that you see in our Flickr group were taken by a few people, huge thanks for your continued service!

The first in-person meeting with all the volunteers was held on Monday, September 10 where they could meet other volunteers and ask questions. During the meeting, we also dealt with unassigned gaps in the volunteer sheet.

During the event, we used Slack for communicating with the volunteers. We also decided to use drupal.org issues to give credits for contribution. On drupal.org we have a Drupal Europe 2018 project issue queue where we created issues for most of the volunteering activities from the Drupal Europe volunteer signup sheet.

The budget

The hardest part was always the budget which is probably true for any event of some size. The venue contract required a downpayment and apart from some small savings in the German Drupal Association’s bank account there was no money to work with yet.

The financial report of DrupalCon Dublin served as a benchmark. We used a copy, filled in the cost estimations we had and quickly drafted ticket price levels. While the Drupal Association historically been putting on DrupalCon Europe for somewhat more than a million euros, our target was half a million euros instead. We hoped we can gather similar attendance and sponsorships but we had no history or credibility with participants or sponsors so that was hard to predict. Some people just assumed we are replicating a DrupalCon while others considered this a big DrupalCamp and did not expect the quality we were aiming for. Our target of break-even was set at around a thousand attendees with various flexible budget elements. Selling faster/better would make spending on marketing to wider markets possible, grants to attendees possible, more diversity support possible, etc.

Given very little seed money to work with we needed to sell fast. We decided to sell a batch of “early supporter” tickets for a little less than the estimated break-even ticket price at the time. We also quickly created our initial sponsorship packages and started promoting these. All that while we still had a pretty “drafty” static web page. It all looked far from professional.

A comparison of our actual ticket and shirt sales (ticket shop) income compared to contracted down payments that could not be postponed shows how close we were at the start to make it or break it. While we had sponsor income as well later on, that was not there at the time of the first payment yet and just started to be significant after the second payment.

The chart compares major costs to the actual income situation over time. At each point in time we were interested if we can pay the next down payment (shown also as accumulated amounts) and ultimately hoped for reaching the point when the blue income reaches the pink costs, as we would not be losing money at that point. Week 37 is when Drupal Europe took place, and we only reached break even two weeks before.

Faith moves mountains is beyond any religious context true for the Drupal Europe lead volunteer team. Almost all lead volunteers immediately bought their ticket (and those for their colleagues) at the start. Some even offered a private loan, which we were not too far from needing on week 15. The Drupal Association bought all tickets it needed right away. (Thanks!) About half of our sponsors and around half of our attendees were also relatively easy to convince. The other half took a lot of work to convince which took most of the lead’s time to ensure that the event is at least break even.

In our regular budget reviews, up to two weeks before the event we were to lose money. This has cost us a lot of things. If we would have had financial certainty much sooner we could have had time to raise funds to organize scholarships, could have supported our speakers to cover at least some of their costs, we could have organized better quality video recordings, ensuring all content is recorded, etc. As it was though, we even had uncertainty up to a month before the conference even if we can grant free tickets to the track team who worked for months to assemble the conference program. And we had to plan with a gap to cover incidental expenses like that of the on-the-spot expansion of the contribution area on Friday.

If we may give one advice to the community, for any future Drupal event: sign (and pay) your sponsorship early. Buy your tickets early, don’t wait for the full program if you’ll go anyways. If you are faithful you’ll be part of the momentum that moves a mountain.

Since the tax amounts are only estimated, we only know our profits for sure once the finance authorities make the final decisions in terms of taxes next year. If there is indeed profit left, we hope to support Drupal events in Europe.

General tickets

As mentioned earlier, we set up Early Supporter tickets to be able to pay our first downpayment to the venue. And we succeeded, thanks for believing in us! Our Early Bird rate was the same as for DrupalCon Vienna and our Regular rate was 10% more. That does not sound very much like the affordable conference we set out to organize, right? Well, the Drupal Association kindly provided us with some ticket breakdowns from previous DrupalCons and we were quite surprised about the number of granted tickets. Our final total ticket income of € 270.000 divided by the 1000 or so attendees we had comes down to an average ticket price of € 270. That is well below even the Early Supporter rate. About a third of our attendees did not pay directly for their ticket. Their ticket was either included in a sponsorship package or were speakers or track chairs or received a diversity ticket or they were the few mentors who received free tickets. So if all attendees would have bought their tickets, the price would have come down to € 270. On the other hand, we considered it important to give free tickets to speakers for example and in fact would have loved to provide more financial support to them, since some of them even needed to cancel their participation because they did not have enough funds to attend. None of the people under categories receiving tickets that they did not directly pay for looked fair to exclude.

We were also surprised by the historic sale dynamics of tickets being sold very, very, very late in the process practically starting 5–6 weeks before the event once sessions are announced. Up until then its very hard to tell your conference size or even how many people to plan with. We did not have significant seed money to work with so we needed to have more aggressive timelines and have a larger part of our income earlier. We also did not have certainty of the amount of tickets to be sold. We had a venue flexible to accommodate a DrupalCon Vienna sized event with 1600+ attendees and we shot for that target in our marketing as well.

Our actual ticket sales were as follows. Number of tickets sold in dark blue, number of shirts sold in violet and number of general donations made in light blue from February to September:

Here are all the rates for comparison:

We also sold single day tickets onsite for € 270 to be used on Tuesday, Wednesday or Thursday for one ticket per person. We sold 24 single day tickets at the conference and 28 ahead of the conference. In other words most attendees bought a weekly ticket.

Ticketing and payment processing

We did a lot, really, a lot of research at the start around ticketing and payment providers. All the usual online services came up. We settled on a solution using the Pretix open source ticketing system and Stripe for payments. We could ensure our Pretix setup was GDPR compliant since we hosted it ourselves and controlled all the data. It had good usability even on the admin side. This let us run our own ticketing software and control every detail we needed. We had flexibility to set up various ticket types, coupons, discounts, upsells, etc. Using this setup we estimated we saved €30.000 in fees considering usual online ticketing provider fees.

While we had hoped to integrate Pretix with the website more than the embedded widget, we did not end up having time to do that. Unfortunately that lead to us spending lots of time deduping website accounts with tickets bought and more waiting time at the registration desk for attendees who did not have website accounts (despite receiving a mail to register on the website for a badge).

We also used the open source pretixdroid app on reformatted spare Android devices donated by volunteers for checking in attendees. Some devices and some pretixdroid software versions worked better than others, but scanning the QR code of tickets resulted in very fast check-ins for those who brought their QR codes along.

At the registration desk, we (intended to) split the registration lines in letter batches according to given names, and had a separate line for speakers. In an ideal world, attendees would have noticed the letters and the speaker queue and queued up nicely. In reality they were overwhelmed with their first impressions, were still trying to find their place, noticed familiar faces and started discussions, etc. Maybe more visible signage about letters or volunteers helping people find the right queues even could have helped. In hindsight, the separate speaker line also became an issue since many speakers did not pay attention to it, which resulted in several of them having handwritten badges and loss of time at registration.

Coupons and other promotions at events

While we kept raising the sales prices for tickets, we wanted the community to still get good deals. So we ran various coupon campaigns at DrupalCon Nashville, Frontend United, DevDays, etc. For DevDays we printed little business card size coupons and got them in each attendee bag to encourage people to buy tickets. We also got rollups printed that were brought to various events across Europe and the US and flyers to hand out to conference attendees and meetup participants.

For DrupalCon Nashville the Drupal Association let us place our rollup in their booth and we got Drupal Europe hoodies made to wear there to promote the event and make our organizers easy to spot. For further events we made pilot versions of the event t-shirt in white to wear and use as promotion. Our volunteers were present at each and every event we could be at appropriately dressed, handing out flyers. All-in-all we probably reached all the usual Drupal audience we could.

Photos by Gábor Hojtsy

In hindsight it was not worth the effort to create vouchers for every single event as the conversion rate was very low. It was not enough to offer discounts, we should have promoted them more heavily.

Diversity tickets

Especially since we kept ticket prices comparable to DrupalCon Vienna, we wanted to provide new opportunities to potential attendees from diverse backgrounds who would not have a chance to come. We also wanted to give opportunity to all who believes the same to financially support this effort, so starting with Early Bird tickets, we provided the opportunity to purchase 25% to a 100% of an additional ticket to be used for granting diversity tickets. This did not work at all. We did not sell even a single ticket this way. There are probably many reasons. Our explanation of the options were perhaps unclear and we did not exactly define how such tickets will be distributed (as we did not yet know at the time). It was also definitely a new concept. One track chair offered their previously purchased ticket for this pool.

We did not want to abandon diversity tickets however and decided to dedicate the few general donations we had received (altogether € 1.270) as well as funds from our main budget to cover 25 free diversity tickets. We thought this is going to be such a small drop in the ocean for a conference that hoped to have 1600+ attendees, but without any attendee-funded tickets and no financial certainty of the event yet, this was the extent we could commit.

As we did not have credibility/history in the community and our date selection drew deserved criticism for our lack of diversity earlier, we decided that we should not make decisions about who receives diversity tickets. Instead we partnered with diversitytickets.org which also hopefully helped us reach outside of the Drupal community serving yet another dimension to diversity. While we were ready to even expand the ticket pool if needed, for our 25 offered tickets unfortunately only 17 applicants signed up. All of them received their free ticket codes. 10 of them used the ticket code.

Contributor tickets

Back in our Hello World post right after Vienna we stated we want to make the event accessible to contributors who are not interested in sessions but all the more in meeting community members and work with them to make Drupal happen. We (again) did not know if we’ll have money for this, so we perhaps launched this program a bit late, a month before the conference. After much debate we decided that contributors paying for their catering is fair, so we set up a €100 ticket for contributors. We also decided that one would need to fill in a webform to explain their reason for the ticket, so its not misused and does not endanger the budget. Six applicants requested a contributor ticket, all got the voucher code to buy one and all of them used their vouchers. Honestly we were quite surprised by the low number especially that we promoted the option in social media and right on the frontpage of the event, but it was a late offering.

Sponsors

How to convince sponsors to significantly support an event that has never taken place before? That was the first challenge the sponsorship team had. The goal was set to get sponsorships worth the cost of the venue, which was around € 200.000. That was approximately 1000% of what we were used to raise for local Drupal events and therefore we had to think a lot about how to convince companies to sponsor the event. We decided very early on to use similar sponsorship packages and format as in DrupalCon as many sponsors knew how those worked. We gathered information about potential sponsors and on March 13th, we sent out the first version of the sponsorship brochure.

But what were we selling? To start with, we were just selling an idea. An idea of a large scale Drupal event that would attract 1600+ attendees. Within the first hour, two sponsors signed up and one more followed on the same day. The first diamond sponsorship was signed one week later and also two module sponsorship packages. We got confident that this could work out, as we had raised nearly € 35.000 on the first week.

We had to create formal sponsorship agreements and make sure that all the venue rules got included in them. We noticed that many companies were still unsure about Drupal Europe and were waiting to see what the program would include and how many people we would attract. You could say that we had the famous chicken/egg problem in front of us. We had to think about some alternatives.

At DrupalCon Nashville, we came up with the idea of a country marketing sponsorship, which we presented to some agencies. The idea was to encourage Drupal agencies and communities from different countries to market themselves together. This could attract visitors from the countries to visit the booth and start a conversation with agencies. Some countries showed interest but unfortunately we couldn‘t convince anyone to take this sponsorship package. We still think this could be an interesting approach for agencies / communities to promote their work at DrupalCon Europe.

As this didn‘t work out, we had to come up with more ideas. Again, DrupalCon Nashville inspired us with the Open Web Lounge that was sponsored by Automattic and after discussing the idea with CMS Garden we decided to have an Open Web Lounge at Drupal Europe and started to contact potential sponsors. This idea became successful and we managed to get two sponsors for it.

Only one week before the actual event, the last two sponsors confirmed their sponsorship and we hit our goal and even € 4.000 more. Kuoni, the professional company that will organise DrupalCon Amsterdam 2019 signed the sponsorship agreement that made us hit the goal. Thank you Kuoni for supporting our event and showing the community that you care!

In August we had to start organising the exhibition area. The employees of Darmstadtium helped us to do that and we started to contact sponsors and allocate them a booth area. There is a lot to think about when planning an exhibition area and as we had never organised such a large event before, we definitely hit some hurdles on the way. With the patience of our great sponsors, we managed to organise everything needed for the event, such as renting computers, screens, tables and chairs.

Photo above by Baddý Sonja Breidert.

One of the learnings from the event itself, was that it is important that there are clear rules about what the sponsors are allowed to do and what is not allowed. We noticed a lot of advertising material flying around the venue (literally as well as physically), some of the companies didn‘t ask for permission to do so and we even noticed flyers by companies that did not sponsor the event by any means. Sad.

We should have better promoted the designated „open area“ where the community could place stickers and advertising material, and then keep the sponsor area clean and only available for sponsored content. The German Drupal Association’s community stand close to the registration area served as the “open area”, welcoming every not-for-profit Drupal project to place their promotional materials there.

Again, we want to thank all of our sponsors. Without you, this event wouldn‘t have been possible.

Childcare

Various of our organizers have kids and we thought it would be important to provide professional childcare for attendees and speakers to make their participation possible. This decision was in no small part inspired by very successful childcare services at WordCamps. We announced the plan for childcare on May 18th. In hindsight this was quite late for family-travel planning 4 months before the event. We were expecting small children as most European countries already had school at the time of the event, but ultimately the service we would have offered depended on parent requests. We researched various service providers and were really looking forward to how this turns out. While we got lot of good feedback for trying, less than 10 interested parents signed up and only one of them responded to our request for details (age, etc) about the kids. Even that single parent did not attend at the end, so we did not end up offering childcare.

Our decision to have childcare sparked a lot of discussion and had wide reaching effects of other conferences looking into the option as well.

Onsite services for attendees and speakers

While childcare did not work out, we still wanted to provide parents with support, so we offered a lactation room for those who preferred privacy for breastfeeding or pumping. We also continued the tradition of a quiet room which could be used to get away from the buzz of the conference for some quiet time or prayers. To make these rooms private, we booked two rooms in the quietest area of the venue, the door to which were sometimes unfortunately closed by venue personnel. We were not diligent enough to check often but immediately acted when an attendee called that to our attention.

Speakers were provided their own preparation room that also included drinks catering in the room so they could have personal time to prepare for talks.

All attendees were expected to abide by the conference code of conduct, which we built almost entirely based on the DrupalCon code of conduct for simplicity. There were some necessary changes as our code of conduct contact would of course not be at the Drupal Association and we cannot deny entry to future Drupal Association events for misconduct at our event as we don’t have authority to do that.

We also provided communication stickers (green: open to communicate; yellow: only if you know me; and red: I’m not interested in communicating at this time) at the registration desk and green lanyards to request not be photographed. The Drupal Diversity and Inclusion group provided pronoun stickers (she/her, they/them, he/him, etc) and we planned our badge with enough space to place that sticker as well. Green communication stickers run out fast. We’ve expected a subset of our attendees to use these stickers but they were widely used. No-photography lanyards were ordered as neon green which turned out to be not true. A true neon color would have helped to spot attendees with this lanyard in photos easier and therefore such accidental photos to be discarded easier.

The venue is very accessible for wheelchairs with ramps and elevators. We also offered help with arranging interpreters if needed, but no attendee requested that.

We also offered an all-gender restroom block that included toilets that are otherwise marked men, women and an accessible toilet. This block was right at the second biggest session room with an easy accessible path to it as well.

Social events

What’s a major Drupal conference without good social events? Various people highlighted social events in general or specific social events as their favorite moments in our post-conference survey. In that light, it may sound odd, but we only (co-)organized two social events all week and left the rest to the community to figure out. (And you figured it out very well, thank you!).

Trivia night photo by Amazee Labs

A major social event that is a mainstay is the Trivia night as it is fun for beginners and experienced Drupalers alike. So much so that we built in the financing of it in the sponsorship packages. This has historically been organised by the Irish Drupal community and they were back here to lead the event at Drupal Europe as well. But finding a suitable venue for it was not easy. We got various quotes and explored several options but they were either very expensive or at very sketchy areas of town. We even ping-ponged for a long time between which day it should be, which made social event organization for others a challenge. Finally we settled on the traditional Thursday and agreed that the venue would host it in the convertible keynote hall re-furnished for this occasion. Again we were lucky to find a good partner in Darmstadtium and their technology, as they could create a ballroom with tables for groups of five people out of the keynote theater in an hour. Hosting it in our own space helped us avoid smoking, loud music, etc. but still host a bar. Unfortunately some attendees got very carried away with their party-time, throwing paper airplanes and beer coasters around which we should have stopped when it started as opposed to only when the complaints came in. Other than that we only got good feedback about this event.

“First trivia night. I really enjoyed it, we had pretty good scores for beginners and even made a new friend David Needham”

https://twitter.com/MadaPosto/status/1040362882347802624

Biergarten photo by Jean Fenouil

Our other social event was outdoors in the Bayerischen Biergarten which was organized almost last minute. With luckily amazing weather, the plentiful fully outdoor space helped to not feel like a cramped crowd.

Several other events were submitted by you! Thanks! The game night hosted in the venue drew a very diverse crowd with lots of games (photo on the right by Gábor Hojtsy), a small group of people walked around town, the camping group hosted a social night, there was a CEO dinner discussing the Drupal Business Survey results and other topics, the Belgian and Dutch associations hosted a party as well in the park right next to the venue and there was a publishing and media get-together. In short, you did not disappoint! We made a requirement that all submitted social events would apply the same code of conduct that the conference used.

We did not have capacity to organize a first timer’s social event or the traditional women in Drupal get-together, neither the usual exhibition opening party. While many social events were organized by you all, it is not surprising that nobody took authority independently to organize these. We could have been more transparent about the need to help organize these which may have resulted in them happening.

While we were happily in our bubble, the church bells at Tuesday midnight reminded us of 1944 September 11, when 80% of Darmstadt was destroyed in a bombing. It reminded us of a horrific world war’s scars still present but at the same time of how respectful international collaboration has fostered a long period of peace (at least in Europe) ever since.

Catering

The major issue with conference centers is that if you are to have catering, you are required to work with the house’s caterer and they have their usual pricing. Yes, one of the ideas to reduce the budget was to not offer catering. On the other hand we have been to DrupalCons that were harshly criticized for running out of coffee. Also the need for lunch and especially coffee and tea all day was underscored in our initial survey as well.

We have discussed the option to let attendees go get their lunch outside the venue. Theoretically this would not be difficult because Darmstadtium is located in the center of the city. But Darmstadt’s downtown is not quite big enough to effortlessly feed 1600+ people spreading out to the nearby restaurants, easily expanding beyond a two hour lunch break even. The caterer sent us an offer with a self-buyer’s option for lunch. That was the point when we realized that we would save € 5–7 per person per day on lunch. So we decided that we’d include lunch. Nothing fancy, just basic tasty food.

In dietary terms, the organizer team is pretty diverse. We had no doubts that an inclusive event needs to respect all common diets and have options for diverse food intolerances and allergies.

Photots by Gabor Hojtsy Photo by Shyamala Rajaram

We came up with a brisk idea: let’s serve vegan food. That way it already respects vegetarian, vegan, halal, kosher, lactose-free and free of two major allergens. Looking at the dietary requests in the user registration form one of these were already a requirement for more than 25% of the attendees. The plan to always have one of two dishes gluten-free did not work out on all days, but we managed to provide solutions on the fly with the caterer. We must admit we challenged the cooks a bit. In the end they thanked us for all the new ideas.

So actually on the one hand pre-contracted caterers might be an issue but on the other hand there are several advantages in working with one. They were experienced partners of the venue, they knew their workflows and spaces and they could usually make educated estimations. In our case the caterer made the plans for the placement of the buffet and drinks stations directly with the venue’s people. And we just had to mention once that we don’t want to hear any complaints about the availability of coffee or water.

While feedback on the food was overwhelmingly positive in social media and onsite, the post-conference survey had a more balanced view. Some people really missed meat options and a few people mentioned the food could have had more variety within its boundaries. The option to have a dedicated meat stand with some availability to extend this concept came up while talking to people.

We only heard positive things about the all day coffee and one person mentioned there should have been an option to have tap water. We already had no plastic or single use wrapping or cups or plates and we asked the caterer to donate the leftovers to a local food charity.

“Great atmosphere, interesting talks at Drupal Europe. And btw, all food vegetarian/vegan with no single-use wrappings whatsoever. That’s the way to go!” https://twitter.com/hukkajukka/status/1040186240585355264

“Deep talk about the delicious croissants at Drupal Europe at night! Loving it XD”

https://twitter.com/ChosenLuna/status/1039996687975112704

“Love the fact that all food at Drupal Europe is vegetarian and there are no plastic or paper cups, plates or other such waste. And finally, food is really tasty and there is plenty of it.” https://twitter.com/plastic/status/1040185970564521985

“The food was excellent, plentiful and varied. I like the fact there were pastries in am. As someone who skips breakfast to be at the prenote, keynotes etc that was marvellous. And fruit. Yay!” https://twitter.com/pdjohnson/status/1040320555692503040

Wifi

The Darmstadtium has a dedicated page to boast about their network capabilities and their award won for it.

Latest IT infrastructure, a fast internet connection (up to 10 GB/s), extreme reliability and the provision of individual customer networks (VLAN technology) — with our digital infrastructure, we fulfil the most stringent requirements for network technology and connectivity.

But, you know, we’ve seen many things before and DrupalCon has brought down the wifi system of some venues in the past where the IT people were so confident. Not here! Apart of a few isolated issues with client devices, the network worked flawlessly even on the contribution day when most people were concentrated in one specific corner of the building.

We had more than a thousand clients every session day on wifi. Somewhat less than half of those devices were Apple devices according to network stats. Roughly 10% of all devices used the 802.11ac protocol while 25% used 802.11n on 2.4Ghz and 75% used 802.11n on 5Ghz. 1TB of data was transmitted over wifi on the session days, while our wired devices doing session streaming also transferred another 1.7TB of data.

Our main contribution for making the wifi work was the network name and password. We chose “DrupalEurope” and “ContributeToday” to signify and spread the community spirit that brought together the conference in the first place.

“Very few conference centres deliver on WiFi availability for number of clients nor speed. Not once in the week, even during keynotes, did I experience problems. Fantastic service, that’s not just the WiFi either. Highly recommend your conference centre as a venue.” https://twitter.com/pdjohnson/status/1041595697680797697

“Conference centres never believe us when we say we will eat all your data. And use all your connections. @ds_darmstadtium thank you for providing us with the perfect environment. I hope we’ll be back again some day.”

https://twitter.com/kattekrab/status/1040610271776129024

“Possibly the best internet of any large Drupal event @DrupalEurope. Super productive event and we haven’t really started yet. Hopefully we will see you here. #DrupalEurope”

[Speedtest.net results showing 3ms ping, 140.83Mbps download and 113.76Mbps up]

https://twitter.com/cyberswat/status/1039401275845009408

Digital signage

A significant cost cutting measure that was also great for the environment was to skip printing program booklets. DrupalCon had already done away with goodie bags that we did not have either, but we went one step further. Thankfully for us, the venue had plenty of digital screens everywhere starting from welcome screens in the parking lots and elevators (see on the side, photo by Gábor Hojtsy) through screens in the elevators, screens in the hallways and even screens on the doors on the second and third level.

The screens could display any URL and would normally reload every 10 minutes. So we built some screens as custom styled Drupal nodes while others were powered from Views and included some custom JavaScript and CSS. We built several screen variants up front and used timelapse simulation for testing to check the dynamic time based logic for various screens.

We got some of them tested well with the venue remotely (eg. the door screens for rooms). The ones that were well tested ahead of time worked from Monday onwards without a hitch. As we were ready with some screens last minute, we did not give the venue much time for remote testing, so we had to spend quite some time with testing and adjusting some of them on Monday.

Slightly unfortunately all screens used Internet Explorer 11 to display content and almost none of us had that on their development environments. We relied on a browserstack.com subscription for this occasion. We also set the refresh interval to much more often when we were adjusting screen display. Another issue we had was with Drupal 8’s great caching, which caused us issues once people were not updating their BoFs anymore and Views caches did not get invalidated often enough normally. We adjusted our configuration when we realized this and that made the program overview screens follow time more closely.

All-in-all the usage of digital signage allowed us to skip a lot of housekeeping time before/after the keynotes and update program items dynamically as they needed updates. When a talk was cancelled midday or another replacement was added, we could update the online schedule which updated all screens almost immediately.

Photo by Gábor Hojtsy

Informal gatherings (BoFs) were self-scheduled by participants but immediately showed up alongside every other session or workshop in a timeslot on all screens (see photo on the right by Janne Kalliola). We heard that this resulted in a lot more activity at BoFs. We also created program items throughout the day from the Open Web Lounge unconference schedule that was always defined in the morning for the day, which drew participants to those as well. (Additionally to the Open Web Lounge having its own screen).

Some extra work went into SVG maps of the venue that laid out the spaces of the building including where to find each sponsor. We displayed these as well in rotation (floor by floor) on some of these screens.

Photo by Janne Kalliola Twitter wall photo by Janne Kalliola

Finally, on our last venue visit, we had various interesting ideas for the use of the big gray projector wall in the main hallway. As people arrived and went towards the keynote room and contribution rooms we wanted to add a welcoming touch. Our initial idea was to feature photos from previous events on the first day and then from this event onwards. That morphed into a curated twitter wall that we could still use to display photos on but also had the option to feature text-only posts or photos where the added text was useful for clarification.

We evaluated various ready-made services for the Twitter wall, signed up for a few to try them out but the decent ones usually cost € 200 per day for a live curatable feed and we did not have that kind of budget to spend. Building our own quick solution with Views and oEmbed for tweet display was a logical next step. It would be amazing, if someone could bring this forward and create a supportable module or distribution out of our open sourced code.

We were not even ready with the twitter wall on Tuesday morning, so we used the keynote live feed to display on the screen and invite attendees in to the keynote. Once the session days were over we used this same screen to display wayfinding information for contributors behind the welcome tables of mentors and to say farewell to our participants at the end of the day.

Photos by Gábor Hojtsy

“Brilliant!! [the screens] were amazing, accurate and very helpful.”

https://twitter.com/piyushpoddar/status/1041996646819815424

Video recording (and streaming)

This is an area that was most affected by our lack of funds. We asked for a video recording/streaming offer from the venue which was impossible to fit into our budget so we attempted to put our own solutions in place. There was no single source of existing video recording equipment at the European communities in the quantity needed that we could use and we of course did not have the budget or intention either to buy 10 recording kits. While we did not promise recording or streaming of any of our program, we wanted to do our best to try and do it.

We set up https://www.youtube.com/c/DrupalEurope (for most of the time without the custom URL as we became eligible for that way after the conference) to stream on the week and host our videos after the event.

We ended up with three solutions for video with overall very mixed results.

  1. We had a very dedicated volunteer for recording and streaming the keynote hall. He had been working on a sustainable concept of a bullet-proof hardware solution for such purposes and took the chance to get the most out of his idea. He installed three cameras, one at the back of the stage to cover the audience, one in the middle of the audience and one up at the ceiling where the video control room was. He then mixed these live with the projected screen footage, the digital signage screen developed for this room and audio feed from the venue. The result was recorded locally and streamed live. We had great results with this solution as even though the live streaming broke at some points due to conflicts with configuration of our other live streaming equipment in other rooms, the local recording was consistently useful and could be used later to upload the correct session videos (except where speakers requested to withhold their publication).
  2. We also had four previously used streaming boxes from the Dutch Drupal Association. Without a dedicated volunteer to attend to these and a lack of testing up front, it turned out too late that they were not getting audio from the HDMI over IP boxes they were connected to. Once we installed audio inserters alongside the streaming boxes, the streams were working well, but that was too late for many sessions unfortunately. These did not do local recording, but even if they would have done so, the lack of audio would have been an issue. Finally, the streaming from these boxes only worked if the input was 1080p or lower, higher resolutions did not work. As we got our recording equipments together last minute, we did not have the possibility to let the speakers in these rooms know ahead of time and pre-session setup did not always include setting it to a working resolution.
  3. Finally the remaining five rooms had recording done with boxes we received from the Austrian Drupal Association. These only did local recording, not streaming. They needed to be manually operated and required a lot more work after to cut the recordings and do uploads. Results were also mixed in terms of whether audio or video was recorded.
Keynote hall video setup photo by Floh Klare

It is clear we had too much trust in the self-sufficiency of some of the technology we used, given that the individual solutions were proven at previous Drupal events. However they were not used on this scale nor in this combination and were likely operated/maintained by more dedicated people even at those smaller events.

We should have done better testing of everything and assign one person responsible per room to be sure that the technology works in each case, on top of the room monitor that was there to help the speaker. The German Joomla! community kindly offered their equipment and operating team earlier that we turned down at the time as we did not have the certainty of the budget yet to promise to cover their travel and accommodation expenses.

After the first session day on Tuesday, the organizers team stayed in the venue until sunset for a retrospective meeting to figure out ways to improve how we solved problems especially in regards to the recording solutions on the spot. We received several complaints over Twitter about the video streams at the conference. While we decided to focus more lead volunteers on further days to help speakers set up and make sure recordings work, we did not want to sacrifice the experience of people actually participating in person so we kept that as our first priority.

Tuesday retrospective photo by Gábor Hojtsy

It took us several weeks after the event, but eventually we got most things that were usefully preserved online, see https://www.youtube.com/c/DrupalEurope. As of this writing we are still looking at cutting session slide imagery as a video track on top of session audio recordings where we only had audio.

In hindsight if we would have had the budget capacity and more of a budget certainty in time, we would have signed up professionals or semi-professionals to do this so it does not fall on the limited set of leads who were busy with serving the in-person participants as well. At least we cannot blame the volunteer coordinators, they have been trying really hard to find enough room monitors early enough and still weren’t 100% successful.

In summary what would have improved our situation would have been to split speaker screen video right at the laptop and not receive video from the venue’s system. Ideally we would have been able to record, stream and monitor the output at the same time. Without monitoring, relying on local recording was not sufficient and monitoring the too numerous streams we had would have also required more people. Because we did not have tech personnel available in every single room at the beginning of every single session, some people tried to solve problems unplugging and moving our kits and that did not help. We should have had readily available tech help in every few rooms and tell people not to touch our tech.

Post-event survey

We got lots of feedback onsite, both good and bad. We tried to turn any onsite negative feedback into actionable improvements right there by changing room tech support, getting more tables for contribution when needed, etc. However we also wanted to get a better overview of what people liked and did not like so we can inform future events. While there will not be another Drupal Europe, the results could still help DrupalCon Europe and other events. Here are some highlights from the survey results based on 151 submissions we received as of this writing.

First of all, we asked respondents to rate the conference from 1 to 10 (10 being best) and our average rating was 8.44. Not bad!

For 14% percent of our respondents, Drupal Europe was their first big Drupal event and most of them found it very easy or easy to network with others. The subset of them who said they were new to Drupal said Drupal Europe was a good introduction. This is somewhat contradictory to what we felt that due to the lack of external marketing we only reached the usual suspects. Of the people having their first big Drupal event, most were out of Germany, for example Kenya, Zimbabwe, Greece, etc. 55% of our respondents were DrupalCon regulars and 31% already been to at least one DrupalCon.

In terms of overall country distribution, almost half of our respondents were from one of these three countries: Germany, United Kingdom or the Netherlands. The diversity gets a lot more interesting beyond that, we had attendees from Tunisia, Zimbabwe, India, Ethiopia, Canada, Ukraine, Australia, Pakistan, Armenia, Russia, Jordan, South Africa, Egypt and Congo. Given the numbers of them, it is also no wonder the Dutch and Belgians hosted their own social night! A potentially important data point is that based on the results, Austrians did not turn out in numbers at all, despite or maybe due to the DrupalCon in Vienna last year. (But the usual caveats apply about survey respondent samples).

82% of the respondents said they received somewhat or much more value then they expected and only a single respondent said they received significantly less.

A roughly equal number of people said they missed the opening and closing keynotes or to the contrary they enjoyed having more industry programs instead. Similar about the food, we received many praises for the food being varied and not too heavy so people could keep going with their day while others said we should have had more sauces and variety with the food even if we kept the same constraints we set up.

A considerable number of people said they would love to see more in-depth workshops while at the same time a few people said more high level sessions would be nice. A middle ground as someone suggested is to really mark the approach each session takes well in the schedule (which requires a lot of discipline up front from speakers as well).

Several people noted that first-timers tool workshops would be nice ahead in the week so they can be productive on contribution day or at least get to know the tools even if they don’t manage to attend contribution day. More visible non-developer teams for contribution day was also requested by many. Here’s your chance to recruit design, marketing, project management, translator, documentation, usability testing, event organization, etc. talent for your topics!

As for what should be cut, a recurring line of feedback was to have less sessions as there were too many things going on at once. We designed this conference with 1600+ attendees in mind, and picked optimal distribution of people to room sizes based on that. With around a thousand attendees, some sessions were not that well attended. At the same time, some people pointed out that certain sessions were standing room only. If we were to cut some of the competing topics at the same time, this would have been worse given the same room configuration. We could have merged some session rooms and create bigger session rooms though to adapt to such an event setup.

Our digital signage, website and twitter account were used to keep people up to date with conference changes and program announcements and we did not have pre-keynote segments and opening or closing sessions to inform people. Half of our respondents found this very useful while a third found it only somewhat useful or not very useful. Probably a combination of the two approaches would work best.

Finally some choice quotes about favorite moments:

  • “Seeing many of my favorite Drupalers and being introduced to some excellent new folks! […]”
  • “The constant flair that everyone helps each other.”
  • “Getting (nearly) all of the local association leaders together in a room. Was really powerful. We need to do more of this…”
  • “Becoming a mentor […], learning that I can share my knowledge and people are grateful for the support.”
  • “Randomly having a conversation with someone who then went off [and] had a similar conversation with someone else and connected us.”
  • “Getting help on Friday and that ‘aha!’ moment.”
  • “Celebration of the Drupal Europe team. It reminded me of why I was involved in Drupal for the last 10 years (which has sometimes been hard to remember sometimes, specifically as Drupal and I change over time).”
  • “It was the sum of all those little details, Drupal Europe was an ongoing favourite moment.”

Final words

This year was fast paced and very activity filled for us. We learned a lot and enjoyed working together thoroughly. While we organized an event in Europe, we’ve been working with inspiring people from all over the globe from India, Suriname, Canada, Ethiopia and so on to put on the best event we could.

At the same time as volunteers, hardly any of us had a grasp at the extent of the work needed to do to put on such an event. Many underestimated the time and attention required. Some left the team when it became apparent to them that they cannot contribute as much as they hoped and we tried our best to support them. Even in hindsight reading back all the stuff we wrote about what we did, it is hard to believe. We had a very strong sense of purpose of providing this energizing family reunion that is also a great technology conference and we absolutely put our hearts and souls into it.

At the same time when we give volunteer labour we take that time from somewhere else. Whether that’s taken from our family, friends, employers, free time, or sleep time. It comes from somewhere. We need to account for it. We’d like to extend our thanks to all companies who supported volunteers in some way and especially our families and friends who put up with us.

As you may have learned in the Driesnote or online, DrupalCon is back in 2019 in Amsterdam in partnership with Kuoni. They already attended DrupalCon Nashville earlier in 2017, and following the announcement, a BoF was held at Drupal Europe to provide a place for all to meet Kuoni and ask questions. Three of our organizers will be involved in an advisory capacity in a committee to help transfer know-how and keep the community spirit.

Kuoni at Drupal Europe photo by Paul Johnson

We don’t think we quite figured out a sustainable way to put on Drupal Europe even though we set out to do so. We would not be able to organize another one with the same team for 2019 for sure as many of us need to shift focus back to their families and jobs. Therefore we are looking forward to how a shared model could work with an event production company directly advised by a community group. See you there! If you need more reasons to come, Paul Johnson created a video at Drupal Europe to showcase the various goals people attend Drupal events of this magnitude with.

“It was the first drupal event I attended and I must say I was amazed! I want to go again and do more workshops, more contributions, meet more people. Drupal has such an amazing community! ❤”

Survey respondent

Oct 11 2018
Oct 11

Authors are eager to learn, and a content-focused community is forming. But there’s still work to do.

Video showing highlights of speakers, presenters, and attendees interacting at ConCon 2018.

When you spend most of your time focused on how to serve constituents on digital channels, it can be good to simply get some face time with peers. It’s an interesting paradox of the work we do alongside our partners at organizations across the state. Getting in a room and discussing content strategy is always productive.

That was one of the main reasons behind organizing the first ever Massachusetts Content Conference (ConCon). More than 100 attendees from 35 organizations came together for a day of learning and networking at District Hall in Boston. There were 15 sessions on everything from how to use Mayflower — the Commonwealth’s design system — to what it takes to create an awesome service.

Graphic showing more than 100 attendees from 50 organizations attended 15 sessions from 14 presenters at ConCon 2018.

ConCon is and will always be about our authors, and we’re encouraged by the feedback we’ve received from them so far. Of the attendees who responded to a survey, 93% said they learned about new tools or techniques to help them create better content. More so, 96% said they would return to the next ConCon. The average grade attendees gave to the first ever ConCon on a scale of 1 to 10 — with 1 being the worst and 10 the best — was 8.3.

Our authors were engaged and ready to share their experiences, which made for an educational environment, for their peers as well as our own team at Digital Services. In fact, it was an eye opening experience, and we took a lot away from the event. Here are some of our team’s reflections on what they learned about our authors and our content needs moving forward.

We’re starting to embrace data and feedback

“The way we show feedback and scores per page is great but it doesn’t help authors prioritize their efforts to get the biggest gain for their constituents. We’re working hard to increase visibility of this data in Drupal.”

— Joe Galluccio

Katie Rahhal, Content Strategist
“I learned we’re moving in the right direction with our analysis and Mass.gov feedback tools. In the breakout sessions, I heard over and over that our content authors really like the ones we have and they want more. More ways to review their feedback, more tools to improve their content quality, and they’re open to learning new ways to improve their content.”

Christine Bath, Designer
“It was so interesting and helpful to see how our authors use and respond to user feedback on Mass.gov. It gives us a lot of ideas for how we can make it easier to get user feedback to our authors in more actionable ways. We want to make it easy to share constituent feedback within agencies to power changes on Mass.gov.”

Embedded tweet from @MassGovDigital highlighting a lesson on good design practices from ConCon 2018.

Joe Galluccio, Product Manager
“I learned how important it is for our authors to get performance data integrated into the Drupal authoring experience. The way we show feedback and scores per page is great but it doesn’t help authors prioritize their efforts to get the biggest gain for their constituents. We’re working hard to increase visibility of this data in Drupal.”

Our keynote speaker gave a great use case for improving user journeys

Bryan Hirsch, Deputy Chief Digital Officer
“Having Dana Chisnell, co-founder of the Center for Civic Design, present her work on mapping and improving the journey of American voters was the perfect lesson at the perfect time. The page-level analytics dashboards are a good foundation we want to build on. In the next year, we’re going to research, test, and build Mass.gov journey analytics dashboards. We’re also spending this year working with partner organizations on mapping end-to-end user journeys for different services. Dana’s experience on how to map a journey, identify challenges, and then improve the process was relevant to everyone in the room. It was eye-opening, enlightening, and exciting. There are a lot of opportunities to improve the lives of our constituents.”

Want to know how we created our page-level data dashboards? Read Custom dashboards: Surfacing data where Mass.gov authors need it

Embedded tweet from @epubpupil highlighting her positive thoughts on Dana Chisnell’s keynote presentation on mapping and improving the journey of American voters.

The Mayflower Design System is a work in progress

“It’s great to see there’s a Mayflower community forming among stakeholders in different roles across state government. ”

— Minghua Sun

Sienna Svob, Developer and Data Analyst
“We need to work harder to build a Mayflower community that will support the diversity of print, web, and applications across the Commonwealth. Agencies are willing and excited to use Mayflower and we need to harness this and involve them more to make it a better product.”

Minghua Sun, Mayflower Product Owner
“I’m super excited to see that so many of the content authors came to the Mayflower breakout session. They were not only interested in using the Mayflower Design System to create a single face of government but also raised constructive questions and were willing to collaborate on making it better! After the conference we followed up with more information and invited them to the Mayflower public Slack channel. It’s great to see there’s a Mayflower community forming among stakeholders in different roles across state government. ”

All digital channels support content strategy

Sam Mathius, Digital Communications Strategist
“It was great to see how many of our authors rely on digital newsletters to connect with constituents, which came up during a breakout session on the topic. Most of them feel like they need some help integrating them into their overall content strategy, and they were particularly excited about using tools and software to help them collect better data. In fact, attendees from some organizations mentioned how they’ve used newsletter data to uncover seasonal trends that help them inform the rest of their content strategy. I think that use case got the analytics gears turning for a lot of folks, which is exciting.”

Authors are eager and excited to learn and share

“I’d like to see us create more opportunities for authors to get together in informal sessions. They’re such a diverse group, but they share a desire to get it right.”

— Fiona Molloy

Shannon Desmond, Content Strategist
“I learned that the Mass.gov authors are energetic about the new content types that have been implemented over the past 8 months and are even more eager to learn about the new enhancements to the content management system (CMS) that continue to roll out. Furthermore, as a lifelong Massachusetts resident and a dedicated member of the Mass.gov team, it was enlightening to see how passionate the authors are about translating government language and regulations for constituents in a way that can be easily and quickly understood by the constituents of the State.”

Fiona Molloy, Content Strategist
“Talking to people who came to ConCon and sitting in on various sessions, it really struck me how eager our content authors are to learn — whether from us here at Digital Services or from each other. I’d like to see us create more opportunities for authors to get together in informal sessions. They’re such a diverse group, but they share a desire to get it right and that’s really encouraging as we work together to build a better Mass.gov.”

Embedded tweet from @MassGovDigital highlighting a session from ConCon 2018 in which content authors offered tips for using authoring tools on Mass.gov.

Improving content and author support is a continual process

Adam Cogbill, Content Strategist
“I was reminded that one of the biggest challenges that government content authors face is communicating lots of complex information. We need to make sure we understand our audience’s relationships to our content, both through data about their online behavior and through user testing.”

Greg Derosiers, Content Strategist
“I learned we need to do a better job of offering help and support. There were a number of authors in attendance that didn’t know about readily-available resources that we had assumed people just weren’t interested in. We need to re-evaluate how we’re marketing these services and make sure everyone knows what’s available.”

Embedded tweet from @MassGovDigital highlighting the start of ConCon 2018.

Thinking about hosting your own content conference? Reach out to us! We’d love to share lessons and collaborate with others in the civic tech community.

Sep 02 2018
Sep 02

Over not more then 8 days it is finally there, Drupal Europe will be happening from 10 till 14 September in Darmstadt, Germany. We like to inform, you as active and committed Drupal professional with an update about the organization of this international event.

How it started in the community keynote photo by Amazee Labs

Last summer a lot of volunteers worked really hard to make the event happen. There was a search for sponsors, the session were reviewed, selected and all nicely planned in the big schedule.

The biggest draw of Drupal Europe is the inspiration and knowledge you can get in the 188 (!) sessions, keynotes and workshops. Drupal Europe is an unique possibility to meet your (international) colleagues again and talk about what drives, connect and challenges our community. There is only one open source community where “you come for the code and stay for the community” is so deeply rooted.

Already interested in the line-up? Come and have a look at the diverse and interesting program.

Besides the sessies and BOF’s we also plan our other traditional successful activities. On Wednesday evening we organise the exiting Trivia Night where you can win eternal fame with your team.

On Monday and Friday you can attend the mentored sprints and contribute with your knowledge and skills to the Drupal software.

New this year at Drupal Europe is the first international Splash Awards! All golden and silver winners from Europe will compete for the best European Drupal-website, so it is going to be exiting.

All together we think there are plenty of reasons why you should come to Darmstadt and participate at Drupal Europe.

Therefore we now offer you the last opportunity to buy your ticket during the Flash sale that will end on September 3rd. Use this voucher code while buying your ticket and you are guaranteed of the best price: FLS-LPNLGS5DS84E4

After September 3rd the price will go up.

So, get ready for Drupal Europe, book your overnights and have a safe trip getting there.

See you all in Darmstadt!

Image Darmstadium venue in Darmstadt, Germany
Aug 14 2018
Aug 14

Drupal Europe: Publishing + Media Special Focus

What industries come to mind when you hear blockchain? Banking? Trading? Healthcare? How about publishing? At Drupal Europe publishers will gain insights into the potential blockchain technology offers and learn how they can benefit. Meet Gagik Yeghiazarian, founder of the nonprofit foundation Publiq, and learn how he wants to fight fake news and build a censorship-resistant platform — using blockchain.

The publishing world is changing. Publishers no longer solely control media distribution. Big players like Facebook and Google are middlemen between the publishers and their readers, and technology built to entice publishers — Google’s AMP (Accelerated Mobile Pages) and Facebook Instant Articles — has strengthened social platforms as distribution channels. Additionally, publishers have lost money making classifieds business as employment and real estate markets create their own platforms and portals to reach the audience.

Photo by Ian Schneider on Unsplash

As a result of these developments, publishers are losing direct relationships with their readers as well as critical advertising which traditionally supported the editorial and operational costs. The platforms act as middlemen, using the content of the publishers for collecting data and selling them to advertisers. The publishers are left out in the cold.

Critically, publishers are also facing a crisis of confidence. As social platforms are used to spread fake news and poor content, mistrust in journalism grows.

The nonprofit foundation Publiq wants to face these challenges with a blockchain-powered infrastructure. It aims at removing unnecessary intermediaries from the equation and helping to create an independent, censorship-free environment. Gagik Yeghiazarian, CEO and Co-Founder of Publiq, is convinced: “Blockchain infrastructure allows content creators, readers and other participants to build a trusted relationship.”

You can learn more about Publiq and its blockchain infrastructure at Drupal Europe in Darmstadt: Gagik Yeghiazarian’s session “Blockchain Distributed Media — A Future for good publishing” will give you a glimpse into this new technology and a real-world application of it.

While you’re at Drupal Europe, be sure to check out the exciting blockchain panel discussion where Gagik, Ingo Rübe of Botlabs, and Taco Potze of Open Social, will share insights and use cases for blockchain technology. Don’t miss this!

Drupal Europe
Publishing & Media — Track Chairs

Jun 28 2018
Jun 28

Distributed systems face incredible challenges — Photo by Dennis van Zuijlekom

With Drupal 8 reaching its maturity and coupling/decoupling from other services — including itself — we have an increasing demand for Drupal sites to shine and make engaged teams thrive with good DevOps practices and resilient Infrastructure. All that done in the biggest Distributed System ever created by humans: the Internet. The biggest challenges of any distributed system are heterogeneity of systems and clients, transparency to the end user, openness to other systems, concurrency to support many users simultaneously, security, scalability on the fly and failure handling in a graceful way. Are we there yet?

We envision, in the DevOps + Infrastructure track, to see solutions from the smallest containers that can grow to millions of services to best practices in the DevOps world that accomplish very specific tasks to support Drupal and teams working on it and save precious human time, by reducing repetitive and automatable tasks.

Questions about container orchestration, virtualization and cloud infrastructure arise every day and we expect answers to come in the track sessions to deal with automation and scaling faster — maybe using applied machine learning or some other forms of prediction or self management. See? We’re really into saving time, by using technology to assist us.

We clearly don’t manage our sites in the same way we did years ago, due to increased complexity of what we manage and how we are managing change in process and culture, therefore it’s our goal at Drupal Europe to bring the best ideas, stories and lessons learned from each industry into the room and share them with the community.

What’s your story?

How is your platform scaling? How do you solve automated testing and continuous integrations? How do you keep your team’s happiness with feature velocity and still maintain a healthy platform? How do you make your website’s perceived performance even faster? What chain of tooling is running behind the scenes and what is controlling this chain? Are you using agentless configuration management or are you resorting to an agent. Are you triggering events based on system changes or do you work with command and control.

Be ready to raise, receive and answer some hard questions and but most of all, inspire people to think from a different angle. What works for a high-high traffic website might not be applicable for maintaining a massive amount of smaller sites. We want operations to inspire development on reliability and for development to inspire operations on any kind of automation. We want security to be always top of mind while still have an impact on business value rapidly and efficiently. And that is just the beginning…

About industry tracks

Drupal Europe’s 2018 program is focused on industry verticals, which means there are tons of subjects to discuss therefore when you submit your session be sure to choose the correct industry track in order to increase the chance of your session being selected.

Please help us to spread the word about this awesome conference. Our hashtag is #drupaleurope.

To recommend speakers or topics please get in touch at [email protected].

About the Drupal Europe Conference

Drupal is one of the leading open source technologies empowering digital solutions in the government space around the world.

Drupal Europe 2018 brings over 2,000 creators, innovators, and users of digital technologies from all over Europe and the rest of the world together for three days of intense and inspiring interaction.

Location & Dates

Drupal Europe will be held in Darmstadtium in Darmstadt, Germany — which has a direct connection to Frankfurt International Airport. Drupal Europe will take place 10–14 September 2018 with Drupal contribution opportunities every day. Keynotes, sessions, workshops and BoFs will be from Tuesday to Thursday.

Drupalcon Nashville — Photo by Amazee Labs

Jun 27 2018
Jun 27

Community. Sharing. Helping. This is the spirit of Drupal. These things bind us all together. Be a part of it by joining us during Drupal Europe between 10–14 September 2018 in Darmstadt, Germany.

photo credit Susanne Coates @flickr

The track dedicated to Social + Non-Profit will gather ambitious life stories about helping others and projects whose purpose is to invest everything in making the world a better place. You will have the opportunity to meet colleagues from your field of interest and join forces, learn how to use pre-configured Drupal distributions and get inspired by ambitious social impact projects built with Drupal. Also learn how Drupal can be used to ensure accountability, trustworthiness, honesty, and openness to every person who has invested time, money, and faith into a non-profit organization. Talk and share ideas, learn from each other, improve, innovate … and take a leap forward. There are a lot of things you will learn, no matter your technical skill level. From developers to people with a big heart, you will for sure find something that inspires you.

Interested in attending? Buy your ticket now at https://www.drupaleurope.org/tickets.

We are looking for submissions in various topics. Here are some ideas to share your experience on with the rest of the world.

  1. Every nonprofit organization must apply the 3 E’s: Economy, Efficiency, Effectiveness. Economy forces you to handle your project with low budgets, that is almost always the case with non-profit organizations. Efficiency is required also due to low resources available to most non-profit organizations. Effectiveness ensures you get the job done and complete your targets. How are you doing that? What tools and practices ensure this?
  2. We live in a world that is changing every day and technology is a big part of it. What are the new technologies you integrate in social projects? What do you need and what do you find on the market? How drupal is helping you achieve your goals?
  3. Transparency, accountability and full disclosure on operations is a must for all non-profit organizations. People will donate to and support campaigns only if they know exactly where the money goes and how are things handled. This way, they ensure their credibility in front of the world. How do you technically implement this?
  4. A lot of people talk about making the world a better place. But talking is not enough. You have to take action! How do you plan to do it? How do social activities raise the level of engagement in your community? How are people’s lives improved by your actions?
  5. Non-profit is done mainly from the heart. Volunteering is the key word. What are your life stories about helping others, inspirational first hand experiences? Why, what and how did you do it? What drives you? What are your goals?

We look forward to your submission sharing you experience with the other attendees.

See you in Darmstadt!

About industry tracks

As you’ve probably read in one of our previous blog posts, industry verticals are a new concept being introduced at Drupal Europe and replace the summits, which typically took place on Monday. At Drupal Europe these industry verticals are integrated with the rest of the conference — same location, same ticket and provide more opportunities to learn and exchange within the industry verticals throughout three days.

Now is the perfect time to buy your ticket for Drupal Europe. Session submission is only open for a few more days so please submit your sessions and encourage others who have great ideas.

Please help us to spread the word about this awesome conference. Our hashtag is #drupaleurope.

To recommend speakers or topics please get in touch at [email protected].

About the Drupal Europe Conference

Drupal is one of the leading open source technologies empowering digital solutions in the government space around the world.

Drupal Europe 2018 brings over 2,000 creators, innovators, and users of digital technologies from all over Europe and the rest of the world together for three days of intense and inspiring interaction.

Location & Dates

Drupal Europe will be held in Darmstadtium in Darmstadt, Germany — which has a direct connection to Frankfurt International Airport. Drupal Europe will take place 10–14 September 2018 with Drupal contribution opportunities every day. Keynotes, sessions, workshops and BoFs will be from Tuesday to Thursday.

Jun 20 2018
Jun 20
Jeff Geerling @flickr

With Drupal 8 core now in full swing and the contrib space rapidly maturing, it is an excellent time to get more deeply involved with one of the world’s largest open-source development communities. The Drupal + Technology track is focused on educating developers on the latest techniques and tools for increasing the quality and efficiency of their projects.

The Drupal + Technology track is the place for Drupal experts actively working on and contributing to Drupal to share their knowledge and help attendees to grow their Drupal skills.

We expect deeply technical sessions that inspire developers to see what is possible with Drupal. We welcome sessions sharing knowledge about integrating Drupal with bleeding-edge technologies (blockchain, IoT, decoupled frontend, etc) to empower the audience to create amazing digital experiences.

This year, the Drupal Europe program is designed around the idea of industry verticals with sessions and workshops based on specific industries. We expect a huge amount of session submissions in the Drupal + Technology track and would kindly advise you to look if an industry track could be more appropriate for your talk to have a better chance of being accepted.

Be ready to sharpen your skills and connect with other tech-minded folks. Convince your boss to invest in your skills, and get you a regular Drupal Europe ticket before they increase in price on 12th of August.

There will also be plenty of contribution opportunities during the event. All expertises and energy levels are equally invited!

Susanne Coates @flickr

Location & Dates

The deadline for the call for papers is 30th of June. Share your skills and empower other developers at the Drupal + Technology track. Submit your session now!

About Drupal Europe 2018

Drupal Europe will be held in Darmstadtium in Darmstadt, Germany — with a 15 min direct connection to Frankfurt International Airport. Drupal Europe will take place 10–14 September 2018 and will bring over 2,000 creators, innovators, and users of digital technologies from all over Europe and the rest of the world together for three days of intense and inspiring interaction.

Jun 19 2018
Jun 19
Amazee labs @flickr

Drupal Europe brings a unique opportunity to connect, share and learn from the Drupal community and to talk about what holds us together. We grew to be the biggest open source community under the tagline “Come for the code and stay for the community” which we strive to uphold.

Join us on September 10–14, 2018 in Darmstadt, Germany to discuss and learn about growing and strengthening communities and the challenges that come with that.

Drupal has been a historic example of how Open Source communities can thrive and to maintain this leading position we need to learn from each other, include others and inspire everybody to be an active contributor. This might bring its challenges from time to time, so please come and share your stories, expertise and lessons learned with us. This is the only way to keep our community strong, diverse and open minded.

Who should attend?

You! This vertical topic will be the meeting place for everyone in Drupal and other communities.

Whether you want to organise events, you’re new to the community and want to know where you can get involved, or you want to share a success story from your community, you are welcome.

Target groups:

  • Members of the Drupal community
  • Other open source communities
  • Organisations and those interested in how communities work and prosper

Example talks:

  • Being Human
  • Challenges of contribution
  • Community help
  • Community retention
  • Growing leaders & influencers (by empowering, enabling and adding trust)
  • Growing the Drupal Community
  • Improving diversity
  • Mentorship, sponsorship and allies
  • Organizing events
  • Succession planning for organizers and leaders

As you’ve probably read in one of our previous blog posts, industry verticals are a new concept being introduced at Drupal Europe and replace the summits, which typically took place on Monday. At Drupal Europe. These industry verticals are integrated with the rest of the conference — same location, same ticket and provide more opportunities to learn and exchange within the industry verticals throughout three days.

Industry vertical icons by @sixeleven

Now is the perfect time to buy your ticket for Drupal Europe. Session submission is already open so please submit your sessions and encourage others who have great ideas.

Please help us to spread the word about this awesome conference. Our hashtag is #drupaleurope.

To recommend speakers or topics please get in touch at [email protected].

About Drupal Europe Conference

Drupal is one of the leading open source technologies empowering thousands of digital solutions around the world.

Drupal Europe 2018 brings over 2,000 creators, innovators, and users of digital technologies from all over Europe and the rest of the world together for three days of intense and inspiring interaction.

Location & Dates

Drupal Europe will be held in Darmstadtium in Darmstadt, Germany — which has a direct connection to Frankfurt International Airport. Drupal Europe will take place 10–14 September 2018 with Drupal contribution opportunities every day. Keynotes, sessions, workshops and BoFs will be from Tuesday to Thursday.

Mar 01 2018
Mar 01

We are organizing the biggest Drupal event in Europe in 2018 with a group of community volunteers in collaboration with the Drupal eV (German Drupal Association) and the Drupal Europe Foundation. We’d like to update you on our progress and turn to you for input.

Mark your calendars for September 10–14, 2018 when Drupal Europe will be held in the beautiful Darmstadtium in Darmstadt, Germany. This is a great venue for the conference and only a 20 minutes’ drive from Frankfurt Airport. We just had our second walkthrough last week discussing details with the venue and were impressed.

Photo by Baddy Breidert @baddysonja

Buy your Early Supporter ticket now!

We are now selling Early supporter tickets for 380 EUR (including VAT). Only 300 of these tickets are available, and only for a limited time. Buy now at https://www.drupaleurope.org/#tickets

A new logo

Thanks to all designers we worked with who came up with such great ideas for our branding! We are delighted to release our final logo proudly crafted by sixeleven. Drupal Europe stickers (pictured here) will be available at various Drupal events where our team shows up in the coming months.

Latest on the conference schedule

We are continually looking at how to structure the biggest Drupal event in Europe, and based on exploratory discussions with community members, we believe we are on the right track.

First of all we strongly believe contribution is at the heart of the Drupal project. Figures show that over 44% of Drupal contributors are in Europe. Therefore, in our programme we want to give you more time to contribute by making both Monday and Friday contribution days (formerly called sprints). Mentors will be available on both days to help those new to Drupal contribution.

We are structuring the rest of the event between Tuesday and Thursday on the successful summit model that has worked well at the start of DrupalCons and other regional events. Topics will include government, education, publishing, technology, and community. We are looking for sponsors for each to make possible to put them on.

And the great news is that your single Drupal Europe ticket will give you access to all these workshops, panels and discussions.

We want to hear from you

Although we have plenty of ideas, we realize that this is your conference.

DrupalCON Amsterdam Group photo

Please help us understand you, our audience, better by completing our survey. It should only take 8 minutes or so and still give us lots of valuable insight. While not all questions are mandatory, we added a few open questions to get to know you better.

Thank you, and please share our survey with all your Drupal friends and colleagues to help us make Drupal Europe a success.

See you in September!

Jan 08 2018
Jan 08
Mediacurrent’s Dave Terry and Paul Chason

I’ve been Drupaling for about 8 years and this was my first camp. I really enjoyed the sessions and learning from others. -2016 Attendee

Now that most of us have completed our holiday shopping, we would like to provide the gift of Drupal to the Atlanta and the world — wide Drupal community!

This year’s DrupalCamp Atlanta centered around Drupal 8 and the importance of giving back to open source projects. After the inspiring keynote, “Creating a Culture of Giving for Your Organization” by Mediacurrent’s Dave Terry and Paul Chason, it is our hope that more organizations and individuals make an intentional effort to give back. If you are interested in helping shape the Atlanta Drupal community, feel free to contact us.

DrupalCamp Atlanta 2016 session videos are now live at www.drupalcampatlanta.com. Thanks to Utzu Logigan and his Recall Act team for creating the best session videos on the planet once again.

This year’s training schedule was provided two great sessions: The Absolute Beginner’s Guide to Drupal 8 sponsored by OSTraining and Drupal 8 Theming and Templating by Evolving Web. Without people dedicated to spreading their advanced knowledge, we wouldn’t be able to provide this to you! Thank you OSTraining and Evolving Web!

We also want to thank our sponsors for the time and financial support of this camp, as we can’t make events like this work without them. Special thanks to Mediacurrent and Sevaa group for their help with the Keynote, Afterparty, and general assistance in making DCA a great event! We also had SiteGround, Pantheon, 3Ci, Lingotek, and Acquia as sponsors who we also want to thank for coming from so far to be a part of our event!

Additionally, the Drupal Association made it out to our event, promoting the good word of Drupal. Please donate, as we all benefit from a strong nationwide community. You can join the Drupal Association here.

Last but not least we would like to thank all of the session speakers. Without the willingness to give back to the community, camps like this could not be possible. Their efforts can go unnoticed to so many, and we want to make sure that we acknowledge them here:

Kelly Albrecht, Ed Allison, Kirsten Burgard, Paul Chason, Suzanne Dergacheva, Jitesh Doshi, Dan Hansen, Zack Hawkins, Jimmy Kriigel, Ishan Mahajan, Tom McCracken, Paul McKibben, Todd Nienkerk, Lisa Ridley, Scott Sawyer, Scot Self, Mark Shropshire, Jim Smith, Dave Terry, David Thompson, Cheyenne Throckmorton, Jason Want, Bull Weber.

Happy Holidays from the Atlanta Drupal Users Group to all of the 2016 DrupalCamp Atlanta presenters and attendees.

Enjoy the videos at www.drupalcampatlanta.com

ADUG — Board of Directors
Eric Sembrat
Zach Sines
Taylor Wright
Kaleem Clarkson

Nov 14 2017
Nov 14

Christmas is almost here!

In our last post you saw our call for venues. Europe answered the call and we received 13 venue submissions from 7 countries, including Australia. We are now working through the submissions and we will send out a more detailed question list to all submitters.

Get involved

So far a lot of work has been done in norming and storming and the team continues to build great momentum and is strengthened almost every day. We believe that “Many hands make light work” and we’d like you to get involved. Even helping with small tasks will help to make this great event happen. So if you want to participate then now is the time to take action and get involved! Sign up on our OpenSocial website and spread the word by tweeting and sharing on Facebook about this great community-driven event.

The proposed event model

The current consensus is to start with a minimum viable conference model:

  • Two days of sessions (Thursday and Friday)
  • General Contribution Day (Saturday)
Schema

If possible, this could be expanded with two days beforehand for trainings and a community day. This also means a contributor can contribute for 5 days.

This is still at the planning stage and any ideas you may have would be greatly received.

To make this event sustainable, we may not be providing food which will significantly cut down the cost for this event. We’ll make the final decision based on what is possible with the budget. Best effort will be made to invite food trucks and find good restaurants in the area if needed.

Wifi is under heavy debate and depends on what the location is charging. We are hoping that we can come up with a cost effective solution. It is the next tier in this growing conference model. Followed by coffee and snacks.

If we get the main community event funding model correct, then we might be able to also facilitate food in the training and community days. In summary we are looking at budget items in priority order and not as a given.

Conference costs for Dublin 2016

This might be confusing to read but is in fact very logical if we look at the thumb figures from Dublin. In a blog post from the Drupal Association, the financial problem of DrupalCon Europe was explained.

Around ⅔ of the income comes from ticket sale and the rest comes from sponsorships and other sources. If we look at the expenses, roughly 50% of the expenses are for the catering and the facility cost. For more detailed information you can look at the Profit & Loss statement from the blogpost.

What do these numbers tell us? It helps us to understand what are the largest expenses of an event of this size. We are using this information to help us to find ways to cut down costs. For example, we can:

  • Cut down on the floor space needed by having a smaller auditorium and streaming the keynote to other rooms at the venue.
  • Use a venue that is close to local food outlets which could make supplying food optional
  • Aim for locations that allow us to cut down on staff costs by means of volunteers

If we do this, then this could become a viable, even profitable event. Any profits generated could be used in supporting camps in the region as well as flow back into the project.

Going out of the comfort zone

In 2017 we had over 50 Drupal camps in Europe. Almost all of them were within the Drupal camp comfort zone of 500 attendees maximum, with a budget between 50k and 80k euros. So in order to be successful we need to experiment and consult or even hire some professionals.

Drawing by Baddy

What is next?

The venue is very important for any conference but we are not losing sight of what is ahead. We have many steps that we still have to cover in order to bring you, your friends and colleagues a great event:

  • Define sponsor benefits and packages
  • Decide how to handle talk/session proposal and selection process
  • Marketing and Promotion — in the community and outside
  • Volunteer coordination — can some tasks be crowdsourced?
  • Create an event website — we are still looking for some design help here!

But before we dive too deep into any of those tasks, the venue needs to be in place — we will be reaching out to those that have submitted proposal with some additional questions (if all goes as planned those will be sent out Monday) and we expect to be able to confirm the venue mid-December.

If you can provide some insights, advice or want to help collaborate getting this event further on its way, please do not hesitate reaching out to us! Either on twitter or [email protected]

Oct 24 2017
Oct 24

Two weeks ago we published our first post to introduce ourselves to the Drupal community. Today we are back with the latest updates and also with several calls to action to everyone in the Drupal community. From the very beginning we stated that this is an event organised by the Drupal community, for the Drupal community, and this is a great opportunity to get involved.

Photo credits: Michael Cannon

A lot has happened in the past week. Here is an overview of the highlights we achieved since our last official communication;

In the meantime there are also a lot of behind the scenes tasks that we keep working on to make sure that Drupal Europe 2018 will actually happen. Here’s an overview of what we are currently working on:

  • Defining our internal roles & the leadership team.
  • Design branding materials.
  • Explore event ticketing systems.
  • Exploring payment gateways.
  • Investigating feasibility of using Kickstarter
  • Developing best-practices and various administrational templates which can be reused in the future.

Call for venues

No website or payment gateway will make the event happen alone though. The biggest outstanding question about Drupal Europe is location and timing and we need your help in moving forward on that.

Currently we are collecting data about possible venues in Europe. Is there a possible venue in your country that you could think of? Would you like to invite the Drupal community to your hometown? Let us know by simply answering several questions about the venue.

The more detail there is in the proposal the better we can compare the options.

We are not expecting you to organise the entire conference by yourselves or your local community, we are just looking for venues where our organisation could host Drupal Europe.

Currently we are aiming for a date between the end of August and the beginning of September 2018. We are planning to have the conference from Thursday to Saturday where we will have a sprint room, different session rooms, an exhibition hall for sponsors and the possibility to have our own catering services. Before the actual conference we will be hosting summits and optional two days of training beforehand.

Call for Swag

Drupal enthusiasts like their swag, and so do we. We thought it would be fun to put some creative minds on designing t-shirts, mugs and other cool swag that are all related to Drupal Europe 2018. We would love to see you involved!

Call for Designers

We’d love to have a lasting brand that does not need to be reinvented again if the event ever happens again in the future. So if you are, or if you know, a creative person or company who wants to contribute this and add “Designed the branding for Drupal Europe 2018” to their resume or portfolio, please do let us know via Twitter

Feb 10 2015
Feb 10
nodiac's picture

Members of the Droplabs community can use coupon code DROP to get 50% off their tickets!

christefano's picture

Thanks, Lee! This DROP discount code can be used by anyone here in the Drupal community, too. After all, Droplabs is one of the world's most active places for Drupal meetups, Drupal Coworking Fridays and workshops.

danielwill's picture

Is this going to happen again any time soon? Me and some of my colleges from Fme office would like join the next session.

pcoleman's picture

Hello,
We have just started working on the organization but GLADCAMP will again be part of SCALE (14x).

SCALE is moving venues it will be at the Pasadena Convention Center, January 21 -24 2016. Look for more details to come on the Drupal forums.

Aug 20 2014
Aug 20

We are excited to announce today the amazing keynote speakers that we have lined up for our php[world] conference this November. We’ve worked hard to find the best speakers and talks that cover the breadth of the PHP experience. We want php[world] to be a conference that pulls together all the different fragmented communities of PHP into one place to share ideas, and our keynotes reflect that mission.

We will have Luke Stokes, Co-Founder and CTO of FoxyCart, speaking on his experience of forming his own company. Angela Byron, a core committer to the Drupal Project and Director of Community Development at Acquia, is going to talk to us about the efforts Drupal has been making to break out of its own community and embrace libraries from other projects. Andrew Nacin, a WordPress Lead Developer, is going to share how WordPress built their automatic security updates and convinced their community of its benefits. Also, Jeffrey “Jam” McQuire, Open Source Evangelist at Acquia, will present how the Open Source Software revolution, with PHP leading the way, is making for better business, better government, and, he hopes, a better world!

Finally we are going to wrap up the conference with “The Greatest Panel on Earth.” We will have key people representing seven of the biggest PHP frameworks and applications: WordPress, Drupal, Magento, Joomla!, Symfony, Laravel, and Zend Framework all together in one place to answer all your most difficult questions!

Read on for full descriptions of all the keynotes, or you can visit our php[world] schedule or speaker list online. Register soon and book your hotel before our block sells out! We look forward to seeing you in D.C. this fall!

Turning Your Code Into a Company: The Parts They Don’t Tell You.

Somewhere around 2005 and 2006 my friend and I started tinkering around with building a better shopping cart experience because all the others sucked. Since 2007, we’ve processed over half a billion dollars worth of transactions and enabled thousands of online stores. It was really, really hard. This talk will tell the story of taking some code and persevering it into a company called FoxyCart. If you’ve ever wanted the liberty of being your own boss, hopefully you’ll find yourself in this story and determine if you have what it takes to succeed.

BIO: Luke Stokes is the Co-founder and CTO of FoxyCart.com. Enjoying Nashville, TN with his beautiful wife and three children, he’s passionate about living life on purpose. He’s pragmatic enough to get things done but idealistic enough to still believe we can change the world and make it better. He built his first websites in 1996 (yes, AOL and Geocities) and has been hacking at computers ever since. Always opinionated, he loves a good debate on liberty, Bitcoin, programming or anything interesting. He’s also a generally outgoing guy (for a programmer) and loves connecting with people.

Drupal 8: A Story of Growing Up and Getting Off the Island

The Drupal project has traditionally held a strong internal value for doing things “The Drupal Way.” As a result, Drupal developers have historically needed to build up reams and reams of tricks and workarounds that were specific to Drupal itself, and Drupal was inaccessible to people with a more traditional programming background.

Starting in Drupal 8, however, we’ve effectively done a ground-up rewrite of the underlying code and in the process made major inroads to getting more inline with the rest of the PHP world. Procedural code is out, OO code is in. “Creative” hacks have been replaced with FIG standards. “Not invented here” is now “Proudly found elsewhere.”

This story will talk about the journey that Drupal 8 and the Drupal core development team has taken during this transition over the past 3+ years, including some of the pros and cons of this approach and how we dealt (and are dealing) with some of the community management challenges that resulted.

BIO: Angela Byron is Drupal core committer and Director of Community Development at Acquia. She got her start as a Google Summer of Code student in 2005 and since then has completely immersed herself in the Drupal community. Her work includes reviewing and committing Drupal core patches, supporting community contributors, coordinating with the Drupal.org infrastructure team, and evangelizing Drupal. Angela is the lead author of O’Reilly’s first Drupal book, entitled Using Drupal. She is on the Board of Directors for the Drupal Association. Angie is known as “webchick” on drupal.org.

Idealism as code: From philosophy to empowerment

As part of the LAMP stack, PHP is a dominant web technology and it is getting more powerful all the time: Convergence through things like Composer and the PSR standards is bringing once disparate communities together. Multiple “meta projects” like Drupal are adopting code from around the PHP and FOSS spheres. Contribution to one has become contribution to whole ecosystems.

Many of us are idealists. Powering 80% of the web, we have the chance – and perhaps the responsibility – to make a difference through PHP. Paraphrasing Angie “Webchick” Byron, Drupal core committer, “We make really abstract complicated programming concepts accessible to non-developers, available to them by clicking a few buttons, without having to understand all the code that comes underneath it. What I get really excited about is the idea that we create really easily accessible things to help those people who are on the front lines trying to make the world a better place. We can build technology to enable that.”

I will talk about how the thinking of RSM and other pioneers became code and how that code is empowering people and organisations. I want to draw a few lines from the very definition of free and open source software, through its practical application and native advantages, to how it helps people do better business, better government … and I’m hoping … make a better world.

BIO: Jeffrey A. “jam” McGuire, Open Source Evangelist at Acquia, is involved at the intersection of open source software, business, and culture. A memorable and charismatic communicator, he receives enthusiastic responses from audiences at events around the world, where he talks about open source technology and community, digital disruption, Drupal and more. This helps satisfy his inner diva, which he also feeds with performances as a storyteller and musician.

Trust, Community, and Automatic Updates

In October 2013, WordPress shipped what is perhaps its most polarizing feature ever — automatic updates in the background of self-hosted web software, on by default and no easy way to turn it off. In most open source communities, this would be cause for open revolt. Learn how through trust, communication, and a steadfast commitment to its philosophies, the WordPress core team convinced a skeptical community to go along, even if it meant users giving up some control.

BIO: Andrew Nacin is a lead developer of WordPress, wrangling contributions, spearheading initiatives, advising new development, and squashing bugs. He feels strongly about the core philosophies of WordPress, among them “decisions, not options” — software should be opinionated in lieu of burdening the user with too many options. He works for WordPress founder Matt Mullenweg at Audrey Capital, where he is primarily tasked with working on WordPress core and keeping the lights on at WordPress.org. He resides in downtown Washington, D.C., with his wife.

The Greatest Panel on Earth

Join us for our closing keynote! Have you ever wanted to ask the various framework and application developers questions? Want to see each of their different points of view (and maybe get them to debate a few hot topics)? This is your chance. We are gathering a panel of core developers from WordPress, Drupal, Magento, Joomla!, Symfony, Laravel, and Zend Framework. They’ll be ready to have a discussion and answer your questions.

About the author—Eli has been a PHP coder since the day PHP 4 was released. He's worked for numerous companies in the past, such as Digg.com, Zend Technologies, TripAdvisor, mojoLive, and Goodsie. Though found himself in love with the PHP community so deeply that he ended up here at php[architect], and loves what he does. Conferences, magazine, books, training - Teaching people the love for the language that he himself has.

Jan 07 2014
Jan 07

Start: 

2014-03-07 (All day) - 2014-03-09 (All day) America/Los_Angeles

Organizers: 

Event url: 

Greater Los Angeles Drupal Camp (GLADCamp) is a free, 3-day conference for All Things Drupal on March 7th, 8th & 9th, 2014, at the Hilton Pasadena & Convention Center in Pasadena, California.

We're planning a conference that's packed with 3 full days of activities, including sessions, presentations, trainings, topic-based summits, a job fair, a barn raising to benefit a local non-profit, receptions, and more!

Our community members are also planning their own events to coincide with the conference, including client meetings and company retreats.

GLADCamp 2014

Stay tuned to this event announcement, the GLADCamp.org website and @GLADCamp on Twitter for upcoming news and announcements.

Important Dates

Here's our tentative schedule for the next couple of months:

Session submissions start on January 25, 2014
GLADCamp is 3 days dedicated to all things Drupal, and we're looking for session proposals on everything including site building, coding, development, e-commerce, theming, design, performance, security, site showcases and case studies.

Training submissions start on February 3, 2014
Training companies and individual trainers are welcome to propose a training to be scheduled on Friday, March 7, 2014. We currently have two training spaces, but we might have more depending on demand.

Barn raising applications start on February 10, 2014
Continuing our tradition of holding "barn raisings" for non-profit organizations, we'll be reviewing applications from non-profits who would like to participate in a code sprint dedicated to building their website or adding much-needed features.

1st round of selected sessions will be announced on February 17, 2014
We're combining some elements of barcamp-style organizing with traditional conference planning, and will announce a preliminary schedule on February 17th. This is also when folks coming from out of town should start getting their travel arrangements together.

Final schedule will be posted on February 24, 2014
2 weeks before the conference, we'll have a finalized schedule so everyone will know which sessions to look forward to!

Who should attend GLADCamp?

  • Anyone wanting to know more about how Drupal can help you solve your problems.
  • Anyone wanting to network with others using Drupal in your area, either geographically or in your industry.
  • Anyone wanting to grow their Drupal team, or be hired for Drupal work.
  • Anyone wanting to give back to the Drupal community. The power of Drupal is in the community so contributing back helps us all.
  • Anyone wanting to learn more about Drupal, past, present and the future.
  • Non-profits wanting to learn how to use Open Source and Drupal to amplify your efforts.

What makes GLADCamp different from other events?

  • In addition to being a DrupalCamp with 3 days of events, GLADCamp has a focus on “Drupal for good” and civic engagement and we're featuring a non-profit summit on March 7th and barn raising to benefit a local 501c3 non-profit on March 9th.
  • This is the first time we know of that a DrupalCamp conference in California has also been in a hotel. Save time by staying at the Hilton Pasadena and you can attend the conference in anything from formal business attire to pajamas.
  • We have open books and sponsorships are run through the Drupal Association, a registered 501c3 non-profit. Donations are also tax-deductible!
  • Our organizing team is dedicated to transparency, accountability and professionalism and follows the Greater Los Angeles Drupal Governance Policy.
  • Are you looking forward to warmer weather? Join us at GLADCamp, the sunniest DrupalCamp of the season!

GLADCamp needs you!

This is a free conference that's action-packed with 3 days of activities and we can't do it without your help. We need volunteers to help with the following activities:

  • Join the session selection committee! We need a team that accuratey reflects our community and expected attendees;
  • Help with info/registration desk (2 hour shifts); answer questions, sign attendees in;
  • Picking up coffee and bagels on Saturday and/or Sunday morning;
  • Be a timekeeper at sessions in order to keep our sessions on schedule;
  • Join our video team and help record sessions and assist presenters with screen recording software;
  • Design and print signs, posters and badges for GLADCamp; we can provide logo and brand guidelines;
  • Wrangling volunteers for day-of tasks;
  • Organize evening reception, including help finding a location near the Hilton Pasadena;
  • Print designers: design and print common area signs, posters, badges;
  • GLADCamp set-up and breakdown!

If you or someone you are know are interested in any of the following, please fill out our volunteer information form at https://gladcamp.org/2014/volunteer-information and indicate what you'd like to help with.  

Jun 21 2011
Jun 21

Having been a Drupal exclusive business since inception 7 years ago we've seen Drupal evolve from version 4.6 in to the power of Drupal 7.

We've treated previous Drupal Camps and Drupalcon more as a staff training opportunity - especially for staff moving in to the Drupal field full-time. It's been a great success for learning about new ideas, techniques and even for crash courses on existing components we've not yet had chance to play with at the Ixis office. This year will be no different as we take the whole company down to London for a week of mixing with fellow Drupal users and businesses.

drupalcon gold sponsorFor the London 2011 conference we're a gold sponsor which brings with it booth space to promote our business services of developmentmanaged hosting and Drupal support. If you'd like to learn more about our services, meet us in person for a chat or to simply sit on our sofas and charge your laptop - then hunt us down at the conference.

We will be located at the top of the stairs on the mezzanine level this August.

See you there!

Jan 25 2011
Jan 25

To avoid misinterpretation of the project name, Linux has had a pronunciation guide for quite some time.

At Drupal Down Under in Brisbane, Australia, kattekrab obtained one for Drupal as well. So if you hear people mispronouncing "Drupal", you can now point them at an authoritative example :-)

Jan 13 2011
Jan 13

There is currently severe flooding in Queensland Australia. An area twice the size of Texas is underwater. Entire homes are completely inundated. Bridges and cars have been washed away like toys. In Brisbane, airports are closed and the CBD has been closed down. There are at least 15 dead and more than 60 still missing.

QLDfloods.org is a Drupal 7 website set up by several members of the Australian Drupal community to provide information, track missing persons, find resources and people that need them (like beds), track damage and provide support. It was mentioned four times on CNN on Wednesday and multiple times on Australian national media.

The site builders are seeking help with Drupal 7 multiple-server configuration & infrastructure. Do you have expertise to help? Join #Drupal-AU on IRC, speak up in g.d.o/australia or contact Ryan Cross directly.

Coincidentally, DrupalDownunder is just 9 days away in Brisbane city. At this stage the venue has not been damaged and everything is still on track. Keep an eye on DrupalDownunder.org/flood-update for any changes to that.

Nov 01 2010
Nov 01

FOSDEM banner

It's that time of the year again — the nice folks at FOSDEM have granted us a developer room at their upcoming conference (February 5+6 2011 in Brussels, Belgium)!

As usual there were more applications than they were able to accommodate, so we are very grateful for this opportunity for collaboration. Titled "MySQL and Friends", our room next year will be H.2213 with a capacity of 100 seats. It will be at our disposal on Saturday 5th, from 13:00 till 19:00. Like last year, we would like to set up a schedule of talks related to the MySQL server and the various projects that surround it. Each talk will last 20 minutes, plus 5 minutes of Q&A and a 5 minute break for switching speakers, giving us 12 slots in total to fill with excellent tech talks. Take a look at this year's schedule for some examples! I hope we can assemble an even more exciting and interesting schedule for next year.

Quoting from my last year's call for papers:

We are looking for covering a wide range of topics that attract both MySQL DBAs as well as application developers that work with MySQL as their database of choice. Are you developing a new storage engine or other plugin? Do you want to share your experiences and best practices in administering or deploying MySQL servers? Did you develop a new method to scale a MySQL setup? Let us and the audience know about it! You can submit your talk proposal via this submission form.

The deadline for turning in your proposal is Sunday, 26th of December, 2010, after which there will be a voting and rating period to identify the most interesting and attractive topics.

Please check the FOSDEM 2011 information page on the MySQL Forge Wiki for more details and don't hesitate to contact me directly, if you have any questions or suggestions. I look forward to your proposals!

Oct 06 2010
Oct 06

This past weekend we attended the Pacific Northwest Drupal Summit and I gave an introduction to open data and beautiful maps. I talked about open data, covered the creation of a map in under 10 minutes, and discussed how to create beautiful maps using advanced techniques like custom tilesets. The video is already online thanks to the hard work of Justin Carlson, posted on his blog here and embedded below:

Paraphrasing some of the questions and comments at the end of the video:

Question 1: How does generating views with OpenLayers differ than with GMap?
Question 2: Can you use the Google Maps API when using OpenLayers and a Google Maps tileset?
Question 3: How does location.module differ from others storage methods? How do you decide which storage method to use?
Question 4: Can I use tiles to display polygon data and still interact with it?
Question 5: If I have a database of address how can I convert them into latitude and longitude?
Question 6: What other input data types are supported by mapping modules?
Question 7: Can I use a shapefile to generate an overlay?
Question 8: What other tilesets can I use with OpenLayers?
Question 9: Have you played with polygons and highly granular shapefiles?
Question 10: How did you get the Google Map API entry step into the install profile?
Question 11: Ben comments that using geo.module instead of text fields is helpful if you have a lot of data because it decreases the server load by speeding up your queries.

For the talk I created an install profile and drush make file to build a simple and lean Drupal mapping distribution, which for now I have named Quickmaps. The source code for the distribution is available at github.com/tylor/quickmaps. I am making the slides available as a PDF here and have been tracking my Mapnik and Quantum GIS source files at github.com/tylor/vancouver-mapping.

The inspiration for this talk comes from my Water! drinking fountains map for Vancouver. This is a map I created just over a year ago now and it has been really engaging to see it being discussed and used in so many different ways. Here is the original screencast showing how to set up a water fountain map in under ten minutes:

I had a great time sharing this presentation and it led to some great conversations throughout the rest of the summit. Thanks to all of the organizers for putting on such a successful event!

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Oct 05 2010
Oct 05

It was an incredibly jam-packed weekend for Drupallers here in the Pacific Northwest, with the 2nd annual PNW Drupal Summit in Vancouver. The Summit is a weekend conference that is targeted towards people already working with Drupal (moderate to advanced level), and is done in a regional mini-DrupalCon style: pre-scheduled sessions/tracks, keynotes from Drupal 7 maintainer Angie Byron (aka. webchick) and Chapter 3's Josh Koenig (aka. joshk), and Drupal 7 code sprints (that resulted in bringing the Drupal 7 criticals count from 13 to 8 over the course of the weekend, HOOAH!)

PNW Drupal Summit

We had 240 people altogether for 2 and a half days of awesome Drupal geekery. In addition to all of the attendees from BC, Washington, and Oregon, we had Drupalfriends from Idaho, Montana, Nebraska, Colorado, California, and Minnesota travel here to come join us in the fun!

The Affinity Bridge team was out in full force, presenting 5 sessions and one BOF over the course of the weekend, and co-organizing Friday's Drupal 7 code sprint, which was kindly hosted by our friends and neighbours at The Jibe. All of the sessions we presented were focused on sharing knowledge about some of the cutting edge technology and methods we've been using, and also about business/management/development practices specific to Drupal.

Shawn Price spoke on Simple Continuous Integration with git and CI Joe, demoing some of the tools and practices he's been using to set up continuous integration for one of our recent projects. Shawn continues to push the envelope for automated integration and testing at Affinity Bridge, and has been laying the groundwork for implementing these sorts of practices more broadly for our other projects.

PNW Drupal Summit

Mack Hardy talked about keeping Everything in Code! The importance of storing configuration in code (and, of course, in version control), and how it helps make deployment a much smoother process. He did an extensive review of using .make files, best practices for pushing changes between development/staging/production environments, and how to set up all the various tools needed for this. (Zoë helped prepare the fantastic slides for this, but was hit with the flu and wasn't able to co-present as planned.) Over the last year, we've become fairly religious about these processes, so it was great to be able to share them.

PNW Drupal Summit

Tylor Sherman's session was on Open Data and Beautiful Maps. He demoed how to set up a map from open data using Gmap and Views in under 10 minutes (I believe he clocked in at under 7 minutes on this), and then showed some of the more advanced tools (OpenLayers and MapBox) you can use to theme and customize maps. Tylor has been doing really cool things through his Drupal open data and mapping research, and actually had a map he built for fun used by the City of Vancouver prior to them building their own.

PNW Drupal Summit

Robin Puga, our team's Aegir expert, talked about how to use Aegir and Drush - Harder, Better, Faster, Stronger to make your development life easier. He reviewed the improvements that have been made in Aegir over the last year, especially the migration and multi-server management tools, and how with the help of Drush you can easily and quickly manage and migrate sites.

PNW Drupal Summit

Finally, Mack and myself rounded it all out with a session on Doing Business in an Open Source Ecosystem, and a BOF (birds of a feather) session on Agile Development and Project Management. In the business and open source session, we talked a lot about how working with Drupal can and should differ from working with proprietary software. Notable highlights include: the opportunities that working with and contributing to the Drupal project can afford you, why contributing should be a part of your workflow, how to incorporate/educate your clients on open source (which led to interesting discussions about the GPL and licensing), impacts on corporate culture, and personal benefits. In the Agile BOF, we mainly discussed some of the challenges in sticking to Agile methodologies, how to make it work with clients, and some of the nuances of team dynamics and development processes.

Ariane and Mack presenting on the Business in an Open Source Ecosystem

Keep an eye on the AB blog for more detailed posts from everyone with notes from their talks, links to slides etc., and I'll be sure to update this with links to the video from Tylor, Mack, and Robin's sessions when it's up. This was most of our first times presenting on these topics (especially to such a large audience) so we'd love any feedback you have on the sessions (feel free to post in comments or send in via the contact page).

PNW Drupal Summit

All in all, an extremely fun and fascinating weekend! Everyone's photos can be viewed on Flickr #pnwds. Thanks so much to the other organizers and sponsors, as well as everyone who travelled near and far to attend. It was a huge team effort, and turn out even better than I think any of us had hoped! See you all next year (or in Chicago)!

Apr 24 2010
Apr 24

Posted by admin

Main conference room

Although first day of Drupalcon is officially on Monday, the Sunday you could register and there were some activites.

The conference venue was the Moscone Center, composed of several buildings. In one of them regularly takes place the Apple Developer Conference, where Steve Jobs uses to present it's latest 'one more things'. We were at Moscone south, a building more similar to an airport in size and design.

The welcome pack was the poorest of the several Drupalcons I've been to, it consisted of a little book with sponsors marketing, session schedule and a guide to eating around the conference venue.

Unconference

There was a series of non-planed sessions not necessarily related to Drupal, although most of them were. It basically was people from several companies showing some innovations and projects in very specific fields. There were very little attendees which allowed to extended debates at the end of the sessions between presenters and attendees.

One of the sessions that I (partly) assisted was about image recognition and classification. They had a Drupal site that was capable of recognizing image similarities, find differences, classify them by similitude, and things like that.

The wifi connection was really good in any place of the center, although there were very little people. Will it handle the near 3000 people tomorrow?

In the evening I went to visit Chinatown, awesome experience.

First (official) day of Drupalcon

It was the first time that I think it may be too many people in a Drupalcon, the company stands were full of people and I was not allowed to enter some sessions because the room was full.

The first session was the only one at that hour, a presentation to which almost everyone assisted.

Getting started with Drupal(con)

Presenters: a lot (see session page).

There wasn't room for everyone in the main room so they have setup two more rooms with video streaming from the main room. The presenter asked to raise hands everyone that was new to Drupalcon and those who were new to Drupal in the last year. In both cases a lot of hands were raised.

Presenters of this session spoke in turns, each introduced one basic aspect of Drupal. Core, cck, views, taxonomy, etc. The session was too introductory so there isn't much more to tell.

The Heart of Open Atrium: Context, PURL and Spaces

Presenter:
Young Hahn

Young Hahn, from Development Seed, presents their strategic modules that they use to build their products, being some of their flagship products Open Atrium and Managing News, created from their experience with clients. Notably, all their modules are published in drupal.org, so we can all use them and it serves as an invaluable promotion for them.

This a rather technical session and probably hard to follow if you don't have previous experience developing Drupal sites. The combination of modules tries to find a general solution to some of the most common problem that they find in each project. Ej: preserving context (menus, blocks, theme, etc.).

The modules explained where Context, PURL and Spaces. You can read a short introduction to them and watch the session video on the session page.

Session page: http://sf2010.drupal.org/conference/sessions/heart-open-atrium-context-p....

Dries Keynote

Dries keynote

The near 3000 people is coming in a huge room. I ask myself how many Boeing 747 could you fit in this room, someone comments that it doubles as a storm shelter (http://twitter.com/mrf/status/12473605625).

Dries jumps to the stage, long applause. He does the usual remembering of the first Drupalcons and notes that when he created Drupal he though that no more than ten people will ever use it.

He sends greetings to all those that got stuck in Europe because of the volcano event. Seems like mini-drupalcons have been organized in several cities in which attendants meet to watch the live webcast and share notes. The map of those stuck in Europe shows in the screen.

Announcement of the day, Drupal 8 development will be in git, rip to CVS.

He talks now about RDF and the semantic web. It's something that Dries has given importance in the last Drupalcons, it seems that from Drupal 7 it will have an important role because it could be the first CMS that comes with an API an related modules in core that allow to create sites with RDF metadata. He puts some use cases: an online shop could tag its products with RDF that allows search engines to list them as products with associated metadata, it will perfectly know what is the proce, the product description, the picture, etc., without having to parse the text and use its algorithms to guess all this info.

Dries plays a video in which a woman's voice explains what RDF is while the screen displays some slides.

He shows some statistics about critical bugs pending to release Drupal 7, 112, no much less that there were 6 months ago in Paris. At this speed rate they will be all done by June, December in the works case. He proposes to form 100 groups of 30 people (we are 3000) and each group will solve an issue, so we could have all tickets closed in an hour. People laugh, he says "seriously"!

According to Drupal 7 stats, there have been more than 700 people contributing patches to this version, but they show that 50% of the code has been written by only 25 persons. He shows a slide with the 20 most active contributors to Drupal core and their supporting organizations (foto).

He announces that the next Drupalcon will be at Copenhagen. You an sign up at their web already.

He also talks about how some big names (IBM, Microsoft) have been involved in big projects related to Drupal, although many of these projects are private. He notes that Microsoft is going to launch a new PDO driver for SQL Server and that they have a important commitment to make Drupal run in Microsoft's web platforms. There has even have a Microsoft party in the night.

Objetifiyng PHP

Presenter: Larry Gardfield

Talk 100% about programming. In Drupal 6 we already have some modules that have introduced objects in their code (views, panels, … I cannot think of any which is not from merlinofchaos) and in Drupal 7 we have some layer of core objectified.

He does a review of the best practices when working with objects, like: use factory classes (pizzahut) instead of using object classes (pizza).

A slide notes the fuzziness of the Drupal architecture, different layers of the API overlap and are mixed, we have to build precise boundaries between the subsystems, and that's where OOP plays an important role, proposing to convert each core subsystem in an object. The code is interesting, we could do things like $menu->get_item('node/5')->get_title();

Video here: http://sf2010.drupal.org/conference/sessions/objectifying-php

Drupal as a web services platform using the Services module

A security guy in the door didn't let me in because the room is full. Re-scheduling.

Going Vertical: How niche marketing can launch your Drupal business

Presenter: Corey Smith

Very business oriented talk given by a marketing guy.

He comments about the topic of how focusing your company in a very specific field can launch your company to success, because clients use to look for the most experienced company when doing a project of an specific nature.

Session page: http://sf2010.drupal.org/conference/sessions/going-vertical-how-niche-ma...

Notes and links

Some of the sessions have been recorded on video:

http://sf2010.drupal.org/conference/sessions/getting-started-drupalcon
http://sf2010.drupal.org/conference/sessions/php-designers
http://sf2010.drupal.org/conference/sessions/beginning-drupal
http://sf2010.drupal.org/conference/sessions/state-drupal-web-applicatio...
http://sf2010.drupal.org/conference/sessions/theme-preprocess-functions-...
http://sf2010.drupal.org/conference/sessions/state-panels-3-and-more-wha...
http://sf2010.drupal.org/conference/sessions/theming-fusion-new-approach...
http://sf2010.drupal.org/conference/sessions/objectifying-php

Update: by now most or all sessions' videos have been uploaded.

Relared post in other blogs of first day attendants:

http://oitdesign.ncsu.edu/2010/04/20/drupalcon-2010-day-one/
http://blog.nethazard.net/first-day-at-drupalcon-san-francisco-2010/
http://www.dragonwellmedia.com/node/30
http://www.jcfiala.net/blog/2010/04/19/drupalcon-sf-first-day-thoughts

Drupalcon Copenhagen website: http://cph2010.drupal.org/

Map of people stuck in Europe because of the volcano.

Feb 11 2010
Feb 11

I would like to point the crowd to the Call For Presentaions of Loadays. , the Linux Open Administration Days .


The Linux Open Administration days 2010 will be the first edition of a new conference focusing on Linux and Open Administration, we are trying to fill a gap for System Engineers and Administrators using Open Source technologies"

I'll probably be there .. given the fact that the event will be 5 minutes from where I live .

Jun 29 2009
Jun 29
Penguins Crossing; LCA Wellington 2010 logoLinux Conference Australasia (aka LCA, linux.conf.au) will be in Wellington 18-23 January 2010 – 6 and a half months from now. This presents opportunities for the NZ Drupal community to;
  1. Promote Drupal in the wider FLOSS community (which is good for business)
  2. Run a DrupalCamp/Conference; which allows attendees to combine expenses if attending LCA, and organizers to share venue, admin, financial and other resources with LCA.
  3. Just hang out and drink & talk Drupal! Or perhaps (talk) and (drink drupal)!? :)
  1. Promote Drupal

    With the government moving away from Microsoft products and towards Open Source, and (hopefully) a FLOSS-friendly Patents Act in NZ, it is a very critical time to be making folk aware of Drupal and how it can empower them and their organisation/s.

    This is good for the Drupal marketplace, and good for anyone providing Drupal services in NZ – probably you!? (Conferences like this are also great places to grow your own business network directly!)

    Saturday 23 January is Open Day at LCA and is probably a good opportunity to set up a Drupal stand or similar. We would be able to use the Drupal banner from DrupalSouth for this.

  2. Run a DrupalCamp/Conference

    LCA is taking proposals for miniconfs during, before or after LCA. Given the prominence of Drupal in both the web and FLOSS communities it's likely a well–organised and well-written proposal would be accepted.

    Alternatively, we could organize our own DrupalCamp or mini-conference outside of LCA proper. Though LCA-miniconfs make admin easier and minimize the overhead of organizing a DrupalCamp or miniconf.

    Perhaps such an event could be DrupalSouth 2?

  3. Hang out and talk Drupal!

    With or without the above (or other Drupal events), it'd be great to meetup with other Drupalers and talk Drupal in the bars. Who else is planning on or thinking about attending?

I'm very keen to be involved in any/all of the above, but won't have enough bandwidth to be a driving force behind organizing anything big while living in Thailand (from September). I'm loosely planning on being back and living in NZ (maybe Wellington) in time for LCA. This is a cross-post from groups.drupal.org/new-zealand. Please discuss it there.
Apr 22 2009
Apr 22

I've been involved in the organisation of a number of scientific conferences over the past few years. For example 4m/ICOMM 2009 (submissions), I*PROMS 2009 (submissions). The conference sites are usually powered by drupal, the submissions using OpenConf. Managing the submission and peer review of papers is a chore, unfortunately, as is often the case, software gets in your way. So here I try to skim over some of the experiences I had with OpenConf - the good and the bad.

I've tested indico, which looks like a very good system, but it is heavy and over-engineered, especially if you want to run a couple of events, and not hundreds or thousands. It might be good for organisations managing a big number of events, but not for us.

After going through a number of trials I've settled on openconf. It was simple. It fitted the current web infrastructure - LAMP. I reckoned, I could eventually integrate it, or simply transfer some of the data into drupal, and maybe even benefit from code reuse. Surprisingly, I ended being both pleasantly surprised and not so.

It was an interesting experience. Openconf is a strangely written software. It is quite hackish, in a bad way. Inside it uses quite a lot of cryptic names, virtually no code documentation or useful comments, etc... A lot of 'bad style' code. The system won't win a beauty or security contest - that's for sure.

What won me over, and I will probably use it again, is that it is trivially moldable to my requirements. Let's give a few examples.

Styling it

Well, it has very little significant markup present. Minimal, considering some of the monstrosities I've seen over the years. To personalise the look of the submission pages I had to modify three nearly empty files - the header and footer php scripts for some limited wrapping markup and the openconf css file. That's all. Ok, that was sufficient to modify the overall styling, so that it is consistent with the conference 'mother sites'.

Workflow

Conference systems are not automatically adaptable to your workflow. You usually adapt your workflow to your system. They are not unique in this respect. A lot of enterprise CRM, workflow whatnot systems force you to adopt what they consider good practices, but that is a rant for antoher time - it makes good business for a lot of people. In this respect openconf is not unique - it presumes a workflow, and it even uses terminology which was alien to us.

The first thing to change was the terminology. An afternoon of reading code and testing resulted in a handful of scripts to replace advocates for theme chairs and some such. Annoying, sure, but not that hard.

A sequence of happy coincidences, helped with other problems, for example how do you check if authors revised their papers after review and if not send them a reminder email. I was prepared to check the file modification times and filter by date. Doable, but would result in some strange looking sql queries. Instead, due to publisher requirements, I ended checking for file types, and getting the list of forgetful paper authors that way. Funnily enough, the email.php file is contains both the best and worst of the code in openconf. The emails and recipient kinds declaration is fairly declarative. Just an array of definitions with stuff like titles, and sql queries in there. And based on your choice and php name magic you get the appropriate template, for which the appropriate list of recipients is pulled from the db. Nice. To make matters even better, it is a long flat file of if .. else .. statements with a few function declarations in the middle. It took me a while to get used to that. But for all its ugly insides, there is something good - it is easy to add modify the markup. No over-engineered templates - the system doesn't really need that. These cosmetic changes are surprisingly important, since it helped me improve the interface, to differentiate between emails for positive, negative and other causes - no wrong emails afterwards.

Random addons

For one of the last conferences I had to add scripts to make all paper authors reviewers, do custom reports etc.... It was a couple of days of work, mostly testing and reading code. And only one file to modify - the one where I had to add a link to the new functionality. All that required very little modification. Just add the new functionality.

The end is nigh

To wrap it up. Even badly written software could end up being more useful in practice than a number of well written, carefully designed systems. I have a feeling that this is the story of a lot of php projects, and the language itself. Could it be that the beauty is in the eye of the beholder? Or maybe the authors guys know something I miss - because the software does do the job, maybe not brilliantly, but good enough to be re-used again and again.

What makes openconf so moldable? Probably the php "component" architecture, that is each different kind of page has a different entry point php script, with shared includes for code reuse. This meant I wouldn't break more than one page at a time. Which in turn can lead to task based modifications, which in turn made my life easier, despite occasional the surprises.

Sep 01 2008
Sep 01

I'm back home from DrupalCon 2008 now - it has been a great event! I met a lot of nice people from the Drupal Community and learned a lot about this CMS. I've been very busy in uploading the remaining pictures from the event to my gallery - so here's for your viewing pleasure:

I also gave two talks and held a BoF there - the slides have now been attached to the session nodes, one of them (the HA session) even includes a video recording:

I've also uploaded some pictures from FrOSCon to my Gallery now, hope you enjoy them! The slides of my FrOSCon talks are now uploaded to the conference system as well:

Aug 28 2008
Aug 28

Hello and greetings from DrupalCon 2008 in Szeged, Hungary!

We (Thierry Manfé, Scott Mattoon and myself) are having a great time manning our booth and talking about Drupal, MySQL and Open [email protected] with the nice crowd of Drupal Users and Developers here. Sun is a gold sponsor of the event and we're giving a number of sessions as well.

Today I gave my first presentation about MySQL Backup and Security - Best practices - unfortunately I ran a tad bit out of time at the end... The slides have already been attached to the session page, so you can read up on the last few things I was going to talk about. Feel free to contact me, if you have further questions!

Tomorrow I'll be talking about High availability solutions for MySQL: An Overview and practical demo, which will also include a practical demonstration of a two-Node Linux Cluster, performed by Jakub Suchy. In the afternoon, I will also hold a BoF about bzr - The Bazaar source revision control system

I've also uploaded some pictures from the event (and some impressions from the city) on my gallery (more will follow later). Enjoy!

Aug 05 2008
Aug 05

I am going to Drupalcon Szeged I just got informed that two of my session proposals for DrupalCon 2008 got accepted - I will be speaking about the following topics there:

The second talk will be held in cooperation with Jakub Suchy, who will take over the practical demo. Sun Microsystems is a Gold Sponsor of the event and I am glad that we can show some support for this truly amazing and vibrant community CMS. DrupalCon 2008 will take place from August, 27th-30th in Szeged, Hungary. The list of proposed talks looks truly impressive! Among the key note speakers will be Dries Buytaert and Rasmus Lerdorf. I look very much forward to this conference. If you have a chance, make sure to attend it!

About Drupal Sun

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