Sep 02 2018
Sep 02

Over not more then 8 days it is finally there, Drupal Europe will be happening from 10 till 14 September in Darmstadt, Germany. We like to inform, you as active and committed Drupal professional with an update about the organization of this international event.

How it started in the community keynote photo by Amazee Labs

Last summer a lot of volunteers worked really hard to make the event happen. There was a search for sponsors, the session were reviewed, selected and all nicely planned in the big schedule.

The biggest draw of Drupal Europe is the inspiration and knowledge you can get in the 188 (!) sessions, keynotes and workshops. Drupal Europe is an unique possibility to meet your (international) colleagues again and talk about what drives, connect and challenges our community. There is only one open source community where “you come for the code and stay for the community” is so deeply rooted.

Already interested in the line-up? Come and have a look at the diverse and interesting program.

Besides the sessies and BOF’s we also plan our other traditional successful activities. On Wednesday evening we organise the exiting Trivia Night where you can win eternal fame with your team.

On Monday and Friday you can attend the mentored sprints and contribute with your knowledge and skills to the Drupal software.

New this year at Drupal Europe is the first international Splash Awards! All golden and silver winners from Europe will compete for the best European Drupal-website, so it is going to be exiting.

All together we think there are plenty of reasons why you should come to Darmstadt and participate at Drupal Europe.

Therefore we now offer you the last opportunity to buy your ticket during the Flash sale that will end on September 3rd. Use this voucher code while buying your ticket and you are guaranteed of the best price: FLS-LPNLGS5DS84E4

After September 3rd the price will go up.

So, get ready for Drupal Europe, book your overnights and have a safe trip getting there.

See you all in Darmstadt!

Image Darmstadium venue in Darmstadt, Germany
Aug 14 2018
Aug 14

Drupal Europe: Publishing + Media Special Focus

What industries come to mind when you hear blockchain? Banking? Trading? Healthcare? How about publishing? At Drupal Europe publishers will gain insights into the potential blockchain technology offers and learn how they can benefit. Meet Gagik Yeghiazarian, founder of the nonprofit foundation Publiq, and learn how he wants to fight fake news and build a censorship-resistant platform — using blockchain.

The publishing world is changing. Publishers no longer solely control media distribution. Big players like Facebook and Google are middlemen between the publishers and their readers, and technology built to entice publishers — Google’s AMP (Accelerated Mobile Pages) and Facebook Instant Articles — has strengthened social platforms as distribution channels. Additionally, publishers have lost money making classifieds business as employment and real estate markets create their own platforms and portals to reach the audience.

Photo by Ian Schneider on Unsplash

As a result of these developments, publishers are losing direct relationships with their readers as well as critical advertising which traditionally supported the editorial and operational costs. The platforms act as middlemen, using the content of the publishers for collecting data and selling them to advertisers. The publishers are left out in the cold.

Critically, publishers are also facing a crisis of confidence. As social platforms are used to spread fake news and poor content, mistrust in journalism grows.

The nonprofit foundation Publiq wants to face these challenges with a blockchain-powered infrastructure. It aims at removing unnecessary intermediaries from the equation and helping to create an independent, censorship-free environment. Gagik Yeghiazarian, CEO and Co-Founder of Publiq, is convinced: “Blockchain infrastructure allows content creators, readers and other participants to build a trusted relationship.”

You can learn more about Publiq and its blockchain infrastructure at Drupal Europe in Darmstadt: Gagik Yeghiazarian’s session “Blockchain Distributed Media — A Future for good publishing” will give you a glimpse into this new technology and a real-world application of it.

While you’re at Drupal Europe, be sure to check out the exciting blockchain panel discussion where Gagik, Ingo Rübe of Botlabs, and Taco Potze of Open Social, will share insights and use cases for blockchain technology. Don’t miss this!

Drupal Europe
Publishing & Media — Track Chairs

Jun 28 2018
Jun 28

Distributed systems face incredible challenges — Photo by Dennis van Zuijlekom

With Drupal 8 reaching its maturity and coupling/decoupling from other services — including itself — we have an increasing demand for Drupal sites to shine and make engaged teams thrive with good DevOps practices and resilient Infrastructure. All that done in the biggest Distributed System ever created by humans: the Internet. The biggest challenges of any distributed system are heterogeneity of systems and clients, transparency to the end user, openness to other systems, concurrency to support many users simultaneously, security, scalability on the fly and failure handling in a graceful way. Are we there yet?

We envision, in the DevOps + Infrastructure track, to see solutions from the smallest containers that can grow to millions of services to best practices in the DevOps world that accomplish very specific tasks to support Drupal and teams working on it and save precious human time, by reducing repetitive and automatable tasks.

Questions about container orchestration, virtualization and cloud infrastructure arise every day and we expect answers to come in the track sessions to deal with automation and scaling faster — maybe using applied machine learning or some other forms of prediction or self management. See? We’re really into saving time, by using technology to assist us.

We clearly don’t manage our sites in the same way we did years ago, due to increased complexity of what we manage and how we are managing change in process and culture, therefore it’s our goal at Drupal Europe to bring the best ideas, stories and lessons learned from each industry into the room and share them with the community.

What’s your story?

How is your platform scaling? How do you solve automated testing and continuous integrations? How do you keep your team’s happiness with feature velocity and still maintain a healthy platform? How do you make your website’s perceived performance even faster? What chain of tooling is running behind the scenes and what is controlling this chain? Are you using agentless configuration management or are you resorting to an agent. Are you triggering events based on system changes or do you work with command and control.

Be ready to raise, receive and answer some hard questions and but most of all, inspire people to think from a different angle. What works for a high-high traffic website might not be applicable for maintaining a massive amount of smaller sites. We want operations to inspire development on reliability and for development to inspire operations on any kind of automation. We want security to be always top of mind while still have an impact on business value rapidly and efficiently. And that is just the beginning…

About industry tracks

Drupal Europe’s 2018 program is focused on industry verticals, which means there are tons of subjects to discuss therefore when you submit your session be sure to choose the correct industry track in order to increase the chance of your session being selected.

Please help us to spread the word about this awesome conference. Our hashtag is #drupaleurope.

To recommend speakers or topics please get in touch at [email protected].

About the Drupal Europe Conference

Drupal is one of the leading open source technologies empowering digital solutions in the government space around the world.

Drupal Europe 2018 brings over 2,000 creators, innovators, and users of digital technologies from all over Europe and the rest of the world together for three days of intense and inspiring interaction.

Location & Dates

Drupal Europe will be held in Darmstadtium in Darmstadt, Germany — which has a direct connection to Frankfurt International Airport. Drupal Europe will take place 10–14 September 2018 with Drupal contribution opportunities every day. Keynotes, sessions, workshops and BoFs will be from Tuesday to Thursday.

Drupalcon Nashville — Photo by Amazee Labs

Jun 27 2018
Jun 27

Community. Sharing. Helping. This is the spirit of Drupal. These things bind us all together. Be a part of it by joining us during Drupal Europe between 10–14 September 2018 in Darmstadt, Germany.

photo credit Susanne Coates @flickr

The track dedicated to Social + Non-Profit will gather ambitious life stories about helping others and projects whose purpose is to invest everything in making the world a better place. You will have the opportunity to meet colleagues from your field of interest and join forces, learn how to use pre-configured Drupal distributions and get inspired by ambitious social impact projects built with Drupal. Also learn how Drupal can be used to ensure accountability, trustworthiness, honesty, and openness to every person who has invested time, money, and faith into a non-profit organization. Talk and share ideas, learn from each other, improve, innovate … and take a leap forward. There are a lot of things you will learn, no matter your technical skill level. From developers to people with a big heart, you will for sure find something that inspires you.

Interested in attending? Buy your ticket now at https://www.drupaleurope.org/tickets.

We are looking for submissions in various topics. Here are some ideas to share your experience on with the rest of the world.

  1. Every nonprofit organization must apply the 3 E’s: Economy, Efficiency, Effectiveness. Economy forces you to handle your project with low budgets, that is almost always the case with non-profit organizations. Efficiency is required also due to low resources available to most non-profit organizations. Effectiveness ensures you get the job done and complete your targets. How are you doing that? What tools and practices ensure this?
  2. We live in a world that is changing every day and technology is a big part of it. What are the new technologies you integrate in social projects? What do you need and what do you find on the market? How drupal is helping you achieve your goals?
  3. Transparency, accountability and full disclosure on operations is a must for all non-profit organizations. People will donate to and support campaigns only if they know exactly where the money goes and how are things handled. This way, they ensure their credibility in front of the world. How do you technically implement this?
  4. A lot of people talk about making the world a better place. But talking is not enough. You have to take action! How do you plan to do it? How do social activities raise the level of engagement in your community? How are people’s lives improved by your actions?
  5. Non-profit is done mainly from the heart. Volunteering is the key word. What are your life stories about helping others, inspirational first hand experiences? Why, what and how did you do it? What drives you? What are your goals?

We look forward to your submission sharing you experience with the other attendees.

See you in Darmstadt!

About industry tracks

As you’ve probably read in one of our previous blog posts, industry verticals are a new concept being introduced at Drupal Europe and replace the summits, which typically took place on Monday. At Drupal Europe these industry verticals are integrated with the rest of the conference — same location, same ticket and provide more opportunities to learn and exchange within the industry verticals throughout three days.

Now is the perfect time to buy your ticket for Drupal Europe. Session submission is only open for a few more days so please submit your sessions and encourage others who have great ideas.

Please help us to spread the word about this awesome conference. Our hashtag is #drupaleurope.

To recommend speakers or topics please get in touch at [email protected].

About the Drupal Europe Conference

Drupal is one of the leading open source technologies empowering digital solutions in the government space around the world.

Drupal Europe 2018 brings over 2,000 creators, innovators, and users of digital technologies from all over Europe and the rest of the world together for three days of intense and inspiring interaction.

Location & Dates

Drupal Europe will be held in Darmstadtium in Darmstadt, Germany — which has a direct connection to Frankfurt International Airport. Drupal Europe will take place 10–14 September 2018 with Drupal contribution opportunities every day. Keynotes, sessions, workshops and BoFs will be from Tuesday to Thursday.

Jun 20 2018
Jun 20
Jeff Geerling @flickr

With Drupal 8 core now in full swing and the contrib space rapidly maturing, it is an excellent time to get more deeply involved with one of the world’s largest open-source development communities. The Drupal + Technology track is focused on educating developers on the latest techniques and tools for increasing the quality and efficiency of their projects.

The Drupal + Technology track is the place for Drupal experts actively working on and contributing to Drupal to share their knowledge and help attendees to grow their Drupal skills.

We expect deeply technical sessions that inspire developers to see what is possible with Drupal. We welcome sessions sharing knowledge about integrating Drupal with bleeding-edge technologies (blockchain, IoT, decoupled frontend, etc) to empower the audience to create amazing digital experiences.

This year, the Drupal Europe program is designed around the idea of industry verticals with sessions and workshops based on specific industries. We expect a huge amount of session submissions in the Drupal + Technology track and would kindly advise you to look if an industry track could be more appropriate for your talk to have a better chance of being accepted.

Be ready to sharpen your skills and connect with other tech-minded folks. Convince your boss to invest in your skills, and get you a regular Drupal Europe ticket before they increase in price on 12th of August.

There will also be plenty of contribution opportunities during the event. All expertises and energy levels are equally invited!

Susanne Coates @flickr

Location & Dates

The deadline for the call for papers is 30th of June. Share your skills and empower other developers at the Drupal + Technology track. Submit your session now!

About Drupal Europe 2018

Drupal Europe will be held in Darmstadtium in Darmstadt, Germany — with a 15 min direct connection to Frankfurt International Airport. Drupal Europe will take place 10–14 September 2018 and will bring over 2,000 creators, innovators, and users of digital technologies from all over Europe and the rest of the world together for three days of intense and inspiring interaction.

Jun 19 2018
Jun 19
Amazee labs @flickr

Drupal Europe brings a unique opportunity to connect, share and learn from the Drupal community and to talk about what holds us together. We grew to be the biggest open source community under the tagline “Come for the code and stay for the community” which we strive to uphold.

Join us on September 10–14, 2018 in Darmstadt, Germany to discuss and learn about growing and strengthening communities and the challenges that come with that.

Drupal has been a historic example of how Open Source communities can thrive and to maintain this leading position we need to learn from each other, include others and inspire everybody to be an active contributor. This might bring its challenges from time to time, so please come and share your stories, expertise and lessons learned with us. This is the only way to keep our community strong, diverse and open minded.

Who should attend?

You! This vertical topic will be the meeting place for everyone in Drupal and other communities.

Whether you want to organise events, you’re new to the community and want to know where you can get involved, or you want to share a success story from your community, you are welcome.

Target groups:

  • Members of the Drupal community
  • Other open source communities
  • Organisations and those interested in how communities work and prosper

Example talks:

  • Being Human
  • Challenges of contribution
  • Community help
  • Community retention
  • Growing leaders & influencers (by empowering, enabling and adding trust)
  • Growing the Drupal Community
  • Improving diversity
  • Mentorship, sponsorship and allies
  • Organizing events
  • Succession planning for organizers and leaders

As you’ve probably read in one of our previous blog posts, industry verticals are a new concept being introduced at Drupal Europe and replace the summits, which typically took place on Monday. At Drupal Europe. These industry verticals are integrated with the rest of the conference — same location, same ticket and provide more opportunities to learn and exchange within the industry verticals throughout three days.

Industry vertical icons by @sixeleven

Now is the perfect time to buy your ticket for Drupal Europe. Session submission is already open so please submit your sessions and encourage others who have great ideas.

Please help us to spread the word about this awesome conference. Our hashtag is #drupaleurope.

To recommend speakers or topics please get in touch at [email protected].

About Drupal Europe Conference

Drupal is one of the leading open source technologies empowering thousands of digital solutions around the world.

Drupal Europe 2018 brings over 2,000 creators, innovators, and users of digital technologies from all over Europe and the rest of the world together for three days of intense and inspiring interaction.

Location & Dates

Drupal Europe will be held in Darmstadtium in Darmstadt, Germany — which has a direct connection to Frankfurt International Airport. Drupal Europe will take place 10–14 September 2018 with Drupal contribution opportunities every day. Keynotes, sessions, workshops and BoFs will be from Tuesday to Thursday.

Mar 01 2018
Mar 01

We are organizing the biggest Drupal event in Europe in 2018 with a group of community volunteers in collaboration with the Drupal eV (German Drupal Association) and the Drupal Europe Foundation. We’d like to update you on our progress and turn to you for input.

Mark your calendars for September 10–14, 2018 when Drupal Europe will be held in the beautiful Darmstadtium in Darmstadt, Germany. This is a great venue for the conference and only a 20 minutes’ drive from Frankfurt Airport. We just had our second walkthrough last week discussing details with the venue and were impressed.

Photo by Baddy Breidert @baddysonja

Buy your Early Supporter ticket now!

We are now selling Early supporter tickets for 380 EUR (including VAT). Only 300 of these tickets are available, and only for a limited time. Buy now at https://www.drupaleurope.org/#tickets

A new logo

Thanks to all designers we worked with who came up with such great ideas for our branding! We are delighted to release our final logo proudly crafted by sixeleven. Drupal Europe stickers (pictured here) will be available at various Drupal events where our team shows up in the coming months.

Latest on the conference schedule

We are continually looking at how to structure the biggest Drupal event in Europe, and based on exploratory discussions with community members, we believe we are on the right track.

First of all we strongly believe contribution is at the heart of the Drupal project. Figures show that over 44% of Drupal contributors are in Europe. Therefore, in our programme we want to give you more time to contribute by making both Monday and Friday contribution days (formerly called sprints). Mentors will be available on both days to help those new to Drupal contribution.

We are structuring the rest of the event between Tuesday and Thursday on the successful summit model that has worked well at the start of DrupalCons and other regional events. Topics will include government, education, publishing, technology, and community. We are looking for sponsors for each to make possible to put them on.

And the great news is that your single Drupal Europe ticket will give you access to all these workshops, panels and discussions.

We want to hear from you

Although we have plenty of ideas, we realize that this is your conference.

DrupalCON Amsterdam Group photo

Please help us understand you, our audience, better by completing our survey. It should only take 8 minutes or so and still give us lots of valuable insight. While not all questions are mandatory, we added a few open questions to get to know you better.

Thank you, and please share our survey with all your Drupal friends and colleagues to help us make Drupal Europe a success.

See you in September!

Jan 08 2018
Jan 08
Mediacurrent’s Dave Terry and Paul Chason

I’ve been Drupaling for about 8 years and this was my first camp. I really enjoyed the sessions and learning from others. -2016 Attendee

Now that most of us have completed our holiday shopping, we would like to provide the gift of Drupal to the Atlanta and the world — wide Drupal community!

This year’s DrupalCamp Atlanta centered around Drupal 8 and the importance of giving back to open source projects. After the inspiring keynote, “Creating a Culture of Giving for Your Organization” by Mediacurrent’s Dave Terry and Paul Chason, it is our hope that more organizations and individuals make an intentional effort to give back. If you are interested in helping shape the Atlanta Drupal community, feel free to contact us.

DrupalCamp Atlanta 2016 session videos are now live at www.drupalcampatlanta.com. Thanks to Utzu Logigan and his Recall Act team for creating the best session videos on the planet once again.

This year’s training schedule was provided two great sessions: The Absolute Beginner’s Guide to Drupal 8 sponsored by OSTraining and Drupal 8 Theming and Templating by Evolving Web. Without people dedicated to spreading their advanced knowledge, we wouldn’t be able to provide this to you! Thank you OSTraining and Evolving Web!

We also want to thank our sponsors for the time and financial support of this camp, as we can’t make events like this work without them. Special thanks to Mediacurrent and Sevaa group for their help with the Keynote, Afterparty, and general assistance in making DCA a great event! We also had SiteGround, Pantheon, 3Ci, Lingotek, and Acquia as sponsors who we also want to thank for coming from so far to be a part of our event!

Additionally, the Drupal Association made it out to our event, promoting the good word of Drupal. Please donate, as we all benefit from a strong nationwide community. You can join the Drupal Association here.

Last but not least we would like to thank all of the session speakers. Without the willingness to give back to the community, camps like this could not be possible. Their efforts can go unnoticed to so many, and we want to make sure that we acknowledge them here:

Kelly Albrecht, Ed Allison, Kirsten Burgard, Paul Chason, Suzanne Dergacheva, Jitesh Doshi, Dan Hansen, Zack Hawkins, Jimmy Kriigel, Ishan Mahajan, Tom McCracken, Paul McKibben, Todd Nienkerk, Lisa Ridley, Scott Sawyer, Scot Self, Mark Shropshire, Jim Smith, Dave Terry, David Thompson, Cheyenne Throckmorton, Jason Want, Bull Weber.

Happy Holidays from the Atlanta Drupal Users Group to all of the 2016 DrupalCamp Atlanta presenters and attendees.

Enjoy the videos at www.drupalcampatlanta.com

ADUG — Board of Directors
Eric Sembrat
Zach Sines
Taylor Wright
Kaleem Clarkson

Nov 14 2017
Nov 14

Christmas is almost here!

In our last post you saw our call for venues. Europe answered the call and we received 13 venue submissions from 7 countries, including Australia. We are now working through the submissions and we will send out a more detailed question list to all submitters.

Get involved

So far a lot of work has been done in norming and storming and the team continues to build great momentum and is strengthened almost every day. We believe that “Many hands make light work” and we’d like you to get involved. Even helping with small tasks will help to make this great event happen. So if you want to participate then now is the time to take action and get involved! Sign up on our OpenSocial website and spread the word by tweeting and sharing on Facebook about this great community-driven event.

The proposed event model

The current consensus is to start with a minimum viable conference model:

  • Two days of sessions (Thursday and Friday)
  • General Contribution Day (Saturday)
Schema

If possible, this could be expanded with two days beforehand for trainings and a community day. This also means a contributor can contribute for 5 days.

This is still at the planning stage and any ideas you may have would be greatly received.

To make this event sustainable, we may not be providing food which will significantly cut down the cost for this event. We’ll make the final decision based on what is possible with the budget. Best effort will be made to invite food trucks and find good restaurants in the area if needed.

Wifi is under heavy debate and depends on what the location is charging. We are hoping that we can come up with a cost effective solution. It is the next tier in this growing conference model. Followed by coffee and snacks.

If we get the main community event funding model correct, then we might be able to also facilitate food in the training and community days. In summary we are looking at budget items in priority order and not as a given.

Conference costs for Dublin 2016

This might be confusing to read but is in fact very logical if we look at the thumb figures from Dublin. In a blog post from the Drupal Association, the financial problem of DrupalCon Europe was explained.

Around ⅔ of the income comes from ticket sale and the rest comes from sponsorships and other sources. If we look at the expenses, roughly 50% of the expenses are for the catering and the facility cost. For more detailed information you can look at the Profit & Loss statement from the blogpost.

What do these numbers tell us? It helps us to understand what are the largest expenses of an event of this size. We are using this information to help us to find ways to cut down costs. For example, we can:

  • Cut down on the floor space needed by having a smaller auditorium and streaming the keynote to other rooms at the venue.
  • Use a venue that is close to local food outlets which could make supplying food optional
  • Aim for locations that allow us to cut down on staff costs by means of volunteers

If we do this, then this could become a viable, even profitable event. Any profits generated could be used in supporting camps in the region as well as flow back into the project.

Going out of the comfort zone

In 2017 we had over 50 Drupal camps in Europe. Almost all of them were within the Drupal camp comfort zone of 500 attendees maximum, with a budget between 50k and 80k euros. So in order to be successful we need to experiment and consult or even hire some professionals.

Drawing by Baddy

What is next?

The venue is very important for any conference but we are not losing sight of what is ahead. We have many steps that we still have to cover in order to bring you, your friends and colleagues a great event:

  • Define sponsor benefits and packages
  • Decide how to handle talk/session proposal and selection process
  • Marketing and Promotion — in the community and outside
  • Volunteer coordination — can some tasks be crowdsourced?
  • Create an event website — we are still looking for some design help here!

But before we dive too deep into any of those tasks, the venue needs to be in place — we will be reaching out to those that have submitted proposal with some additional questions (if all goes as planned those will be sent out Monday) and we expect to be able to confirm the venue mid-December.

If you can provide some insights, advice or want to help collaborate getting this event further on its way, please do not hesitate reaching out to us! Either on twitter or [email protected]

Oct 24 2017
Oct 24

Two weeks ago we published our first post to introduce ourselves to the Drupal community. Today we are back with the latest updates and also with several calls to action to everyone in the Drupal community. From the very beginning we stated that this is an event organised by the Drupal community, for the Drupal community, and this is a great opportunity to get involved.

Photo credits: Michael Cannon

A lot has happened in the past week. Here is an overview of the highlights we achieved since our last official communication;

In the meantime there are also a lot of behind the scenes tasks that we keep working on to make sure that Drupal Europe 2018 will actually happen. Here’s an overview of what we are currently working on:

  • Defining our internal roles & the leadership team.
  • Design branding materials.
  • Explore event ticketing systems.
  • Exploring payment gateways.
  • Investigating feasibility of using Kickstarter
  • Developing best-practices and various administrational templates which can be reused in the future.

Call for venues

No website or payment gateway will make the event happen alone though. The biggest outstanding question about Drupal Europe is location and timing and we need your help in moving forward on that.

Currently we are collecting data about possible venues in Europe. Is there a possible venue in your country that you could think of? Would you like to invite the Drupal community to your hometown? Let us know by simply answering several questions about the venue.

The more detail there is in the proposal the better we can compare the options.

We are not expecting you to organise the entire conference by yourselves or your local community, we are just looking for venues where our organisation could host Drupal Europe.

Currently we are aiming for a date between the end of August and the beginning of September 2018. We are planning to have the conference from Thursday to Saturday where we will have a sprint room, different session rooms, an exhibition hall for sponsors and the possibility to have our own catering services. Before the actual conference we will be hosting summits and optional two days of training beforehand.

Call for Swag

Drupal enthusiasts like their swag, and so do we. We thought it would be fun to put some creative minds on designing t-shirts, mugs and other cool swag that are all related to Drupal Europe 2018. We would love to see you involved!

Call for Designers

We’d love to have a lasting brand that does not need to be reinvented again if the event ever happens again in the future. So if you are, or if you know, a creative person or company who wants to contribute this and add “Designed the branding for Drupal Europe 2018” to their resume or portfolio, please do let us know via Twitter

Feb 10 2015
Feb 10
nodiac's picture

Members of the Droplabs community can use coupon code DROP to get 50% off their tickets!

christefano's picture

Thanks, Lee! This DROP discount code can be used by anyone here in the Drupal community, too. After all, Droplabs is one of the world's most active places for Drupal meetups, Drupal Coworking Fridays and workshops.

danielwill's picture

Is this going to happen again any time soon? Me and some of my colleges from Fme office would like join the next session.

pcoleman's picture

Hello,
We have just started working on the organization but GLADCAMP will again be part of SCALE (14x).

SCALE is moving venues it will be at the Pasadena Convention Center, January 21 -24 2016. Look for more details to come on the Drupal forums.

Aug 20 2014
Aug 20

We are excited to announce today the amazing keynote speakers that we have lined up for our php[world] conference this November. We’ve worked hard to find the best speakers and talks that cover the breadth of the PHP experience. We want php[world] to be a conference that pulls together all the different fragmented communities of PHP into one place to share ideas, and our keynotes reflect that mission.

We will have Luke Stokes, Co-Founder and CTO of FoxyCart, speaking on his experience of forming his own company. Angela Byron, a core committer to the Drupal Project and Director of Community Development at Acquia, is going to talk to us about the efforts Drupal has been making to break out of its own community and embrace libraries from other projects. Andrew Nacin, a WordPress Lead Developer, is going to share how WordPress built their automatic security updates and convinced their community of its benefits. Also, Jeffrey “Jam” McQuire, Open Source Evangelist at Acquia, will present how the Open Source Software revolution, with PHP leading the way, is making for better business, better government, and, he hopes, a better world!

Finally we are going to wrap up the conference with “The Greatest Panel on Earth.” We will have key people representing seven of the biggest PHP frameworks and applications: WordPress, Drupal, Magento, Joomla!, Symfony, Laravel, and Zend Framework all together in one place to answer all your most difficult questions!

Read on for full descriptions of all the keynotes, or you can visit our php[world] schedule or speaker list online. Register soon and book your hotel before our block sells out! We look forward to seeing you in D.C. this fall!

Turning Your Code Into a Company: The Parts They Don’t Tell You.

Somewhere around 2005 and 2006 my friend and I started tinkering around with building a better shopping cart experience because all the others sucked. Since 2007, we’ve processed over half a billion dollars worth of transactions and enabled thousands of online stores. It was really, really hard. This talk will tell the story of taking some code and persevering it into a company called FoxyCart. If you’ve ever wanted the liberty of being your own boss, hopefully you’ll find yourself in this story and determine if you have what it takes to succeed.

BIO: Luke Stokes is the Co-founder and CTO of FoxyCart.com. Enjoying Nashville, TN with his beautiful wife and three children, he’s passionate about living life on purpose. He’s pragmatic enough to get things done but idealistic enough to still believe we can change the world and make it better. He built his first websites in 1996 (yes, AOL and Geocities) and has been hacking at computers ever since. Always opinionated, he loves a good debate on liberty, Bitcoin, programming or anything interesting. He’s also a generally outgoing guy (for a programmer) and loves connecting with people.

Drupal 8: A Story of Growing Up and Getting Off the Island

The Drupal project has traditionally held a strong internal value for doing things “The Drupal Way.” As a result, Drupal developers have historically needed to build up reams and reams of tricks and workarounds that were specific to Drupal itself, and Drupal was inaccessible to people with a more traditional programming background.

Starting in Drupal 8, however, we’ve effectively done a ground-up rewrite of the underlying code and in the process made major inroads to getting more inline with the rest of the PHP world. Procedural code is out, OO code is in. “Creative” hacks have been replaced with FIG standards. “Not invented here” is now “Proudly found elsewhere.”

This story will talk about the journey that Drupal 8 and the Drupal core development team has taken during this transition over the past 3+ years, including some of the pros and cons of this approach and how we dealt (and are dealing) with some of the community management challenges that resulted.

BIO: Angela Byron is Drupal core committer and Director of Community Development at Acquia. She got her start as a Google Summer of Code student in 2005 and since then has completely immersed herself in the Drupal community. Her work includes reviewing and committing Drupal core patches, supporting community contributors, coordinating with the Drupal.org infrastructure team, and evangelizing Drupal. Angela is the lead author of O’Reilly’s first Drupal book, entitled Using Drupal. She is on the Board of Directors for the Drupal Association. Angie is known as “webchick” on drupal.org.

Idealism as code: From philosophy to empowerment

As part of the LAMP stack, PHP is a dominant web technology and it is getting more powerful all the time: Convergence through things like Composer and the PSR standards is bringing once disparate communities together. Multiple “meta projects” like Drupal are adopting code from around the PHP and FOSS spheres. Contribution to one has become contribution to whole ecosystems.

Many of us are idealists. Powering 80% of the web, we have the chance – and perhaps the responsibility – to make a difference through PHP. Paraphrasing Angie “Webchick” Byron, Drupal core committer, “We make really abstract complicated programming concepts accessible to non-developers, available to them by clicking a few buttons, without having to understand all the code that comes underneath it. What I get really excited about is the idea that we create really easily accessible things to help those people who are on the front lines trying to make the world a better place. We can build technology to enable that.”

I will talk about how the thinking of RSM and other pioneers became code and how that code is empowering people and organisations. I want to draw a few lines from the very definition of free and open source software, through its practical application and native advantages, to how it helps people do better business, better government … and I’m hoping … make a better world.

BIO: Jeffrey A. “jam” McGuire, Open Source Evangelist at Acquia, is involved at the intersection of open source software, business, and culture. A memorable and charismatic communicator, he receives enthusiastic responses from audiences at events around the world, where he talks about open source technology and community, digital disruption, Drupal and more. This helps satisfy his inner diva, which he also feeds with performances as a storyteller and musician.

Trust, Community, and Automatic Updates

In October 2013, WordPress shipped what is perhaps its most polarizing feature ever — automatic updates in the background of self-hosted web software, on by default and no easy way to turn it off. In most open source communities, this would be cause for open revolt. Learn how through trust, communication, and a steadfast commitment to its philosophies, the WordPress core team convinced a skeptical community to go along, even if it meant users giving up some control.

BIO: Andrew Nacin is a lead developer of WordPress, wrangling contributions, spearheading initiatives, advising new development, and squashing bugs. He feels strongly about the core philosophies of WordPress, among them “decisions, not options” — software should be opinionated in lieu of burdening the user with too many options. He works for WordPress founder Matt Mullenweg at Audrey Capital, where he is primarily tasked with working on WordPress core and keeping the lights on at WordPress.org. He resides in downtown Washington, D.C., with his wife.

The Greatest Panel on Earth

Join us for our closing keynote! Have you ever wanted to ask the various framework and application developers questions? Want to see each of their different points of view (and maybe get them to debate a few hot topics)? This is your chance. We are gathering a panel of core developers from WordPress, Drupal, Magento, Joomla!, Symfony, Laravel, and Zend Framework. They’ll be ready to have a discussion and answer your questions.

About the author—Eli has been a PHP coder since the day PHP 4 was released. He's worked for numerous companies in the past, such as Digg.com, Zend Technologies, TripAdvisor, mojoLive, and Goodsie. Though found himself in love with the PHP community so deeply that he ended up here at php[architect], and loves what he does. Conferences, magazine, books, training - Teaching people the love for the language that he himself has.

Jan 07 2014
Jan 07

Start: 

2014-03-07 (All day) - 2014-03-09 (All day) America/Los_Angeles

Organizers: 

Event url: 

Greater Los Angeles Drupal Camp (GLADCamp) is a free, 3-day conference for All Things Drupal on March 7th, 8th & 9th, 2014, at the Hilton Pasadena & Convention Center in Pasadena, California.

We're planning a conference that's packed with 3 full days of activities, including sessions, presentations, trainings, topic-based summits, a job fair, a barn raising to benefit a local non-profit, receptions, and more!

Our community members are also planning their own events to coincide with the conference, including client meetings and company retreats.

GLADCamp 2014

Stay tuned to this event announcement, the GLADCamp.org website and @GLADCamp on Twitter for upcoming news and announcements.

Important Dates

Here's our tentative schedule for the next couple of months:

Session submissions start on January 25, 2014
GLADCamp is 3 days dedicated to all things Drupal, and we're looking for session proposals on everything including site building, coding, development, e-commerce, theming, design, performance, security, site showcases and case studies.

Training submissions start on February 3, 2014
Training companies and individual trainers are welcome to propose a training to be scheduled on Friday, March 7, 2014. We currently have two training spaces, but we might have more depending on demand.

Barn raising applications start on February 10, 2014
Continuing our tradition of holding "barn raisings" for non-profit organizations, we'll be reviewing applications from non-profits who would like to participate in a code sprint dedicated to building their website or adding much-needed features.

1st round of selected sessions will be announced on February 17, 2014
We're combining some elements of barcamp-style organizing with traditional conference planning, and will announce a preliminary schedule on February 17th. This is also when folks coming from out of town should start getting their travel arrangements together.

Final schedule will be posted on February 24, 2014
2 weeks before the conference, we'll have a finalized schedule so everyone will know which sessions to look forward to!

Who should attend GLADCamp?

  • Anyone wanting to know more about how Drupal can help you solve your problems.
  • Anyone wanting to network with others using Drupal in your area, either geographically or in your industry.
  • Anyone wanting to grow their Drupal team, or be hired for Drupal work.
  • Anyone wanting to give back to the Drupal community. The power of Drupal is in the community so contributing back helps us all.
  • Anyone wanting to learn more about Drupal, past, present and the future.
  • Non-profits wanting to learn how to use Open Source and Drupal to amplify your efforts.

What makes GLADCamp different from other events?

  • In addition to being a DrupalCamp with 3 days of events, GLADCamp has a focus on “Drupal for good” and civic engagement and we're featuring a non-profit summit on March 7th and barn raising to benefit a local 501c3 non-profit on March 9th.
  • This is the first time we know of that a DrupalCamp conference in California has also been in a hotel. Save time by staying at the Hilton Pasadena and you can attend the conference in anything from formal business attire to pajamas.
  • We have open books and sponsorships are run through the Drupal Association, a registered 501c3 non-profit. Donations are also tax-deductible!
  • Our organizing team is dedicated to transparency, accountability and professionalism and follows the Greater Los Angeles Drupal Governance Policy.
  • Are you looking forward to warmer weather? Join us at GLADCamp, the sunniest DrupalCamp of the season!

GLADCamp needs you!

This is a free conference that's action-packed with 3 days of activities and we can't do it without your help. We need volunteers to help with the following activities:

  • Join the session selection committee! We need a team that accuratey reflects our community and expected attendees;
  • Help with info/registration desk (2 hour shifts); answer questions, sign attendees in;
  • Picking up coffee and bagels on Saturday and/or Sunday morning;
  • Be a timekeeper at sessions in order to keep our sessions on schedule;
  • Join our video team and help record sessions and assist presenters with screen recording software;
  • Design and print signs, posters and badges for GLADCamp; we can provide logo and brand guidelines;
  • Wrangling volunteers for day-of tasks;
  • Organize evening reception, including help finding a location near the Hilton Pasadena;
  • Print designers: design and print common area signs, posters, badges;
  • GLADCamp set-up and breakdown!

If you or someone you are know are interested in any of the following, please fill out our volunteer information form at https://gladcamp.org/2014/volunteer-information and indicate what you'd like to help with.  

Jun 21 2011
Jun 21

Having been a Drupal exclusive business since inception 7 years ago we've seen Drupal evolve from version 4.6 in to the power of Drupal 7.

We've treated previous Drupal Camps and Drupalcon more as a staff training opportunity - especially for staff moving in to the Drupal field full-time. It's been a great success for learning about new ideas, techniques and even for crash courses on existing components we've not yet had chance to play with at the Ixis office. This year will be no different as we take the whole company down to London for a week of mixing with fellow Drupal users and businesses.

drupalcon gold sponsorFor the London 2011 conference we're a gold sponsor which brings with it booth space to promote our business services of developmentmanaged hosting and Drupal support. If you'd like to learn more about our services, meet us in person for a chat or to simply sit on our sofas and charge your laptop - then hunt us down at the conference.

We will be located at the top of the stairs on the mezzanine level this August.

See you there!

Jan 25 2011
Jan 25

To avoid misinterpretation of the project name, Linux has had a pronunciation guide for quite some time.

At Drupal Down Under in Brisbane, Australia, kattekrab obtained one for Drupal as well. So if you hear people mispronouncing "Drupal", you can now point them at an authoritative example :-)

Jan 13 2011
Jan 13

There is currently severe flooding in Queensland Australia. An area twice the size of Texas is underwater. Entire homes are completely inundated. Bridges and cars have been washed away like toys. In Brisbane, airports are closed and the CBD has been closed down. There are at least 15 dead and more than 60 still missing.

QLDfloods.org is a Drupal 7 website set up by several members of the Australian Drupal community to provide information, track missing persons, find resources and people that need them (like beds), track damage and provide support. It was mentioned four times on CNN on Wednesday and multiple times on Australian national media.

The site builders are seeking help with Drupal 7 multiple-server configuration & infrastructure. Do you have expertise to help? Join #Drupal-AU on IRC, speak up in g.d.o/australia or contact Ryan Cross directly.

Coincidentally, DrupalDownunder is just 9 days away in Brisbane city. At this stage the venue has not been damaged and everything is still on track. Keep an eye on DrupalDownunder.org/flood-update for any changes to that.

Nov 01 2010
Nov 01

FOSDEM banner

It's that time of the year again — the nice folks at FOSDEM have granted us a developer room at their upcoming conference (February 5+6 2011 in Brussels, Belgium)!

As usual there were more applications than they were able to accommodate, so we are very grateful for this opportunity for collaboration. Titled "MySQL and Friends", our room next year will be H.2213 with a capacity of 100 seats. It will be at our disposal on Saturday 5th, from 13:00 till 19:00. Like last year, we would like to set up a schedule of talks related to the MySQL server and the various projects that surround it. Each talk will last 20 minutes, plus 5 minutes of Q&A and a 5 minute break for switching speakers, giving us 12 slots in total to fill with excellent tech talks. Take a look at this year's schedule for some examples! I hope we can assemble an even more exciting and interesting schedule for next year.

Quoting from my last year's call for papers:

We are looking for covering a wide range of topics that attract both MySQL DBAs as well as application developers that work with MySQL as their database of choice. Are you developing a new storage engine or other plugin? Do you want to share your experiences and best practices in administering or deploying MySQL servers? Did you develop a new method to scale a MySQL setup? Let us and the audience know about it! You can submit your talk proposal via this submission form.

The deadline for turning in your proposal is Sunday, 26th of December, 2010, after which there will be a voting and rating period to identify the most interesting and attractive topics.

Please check the FOSDEM 2011 information page on the MySQL Forge Wiki for more details and don't hesitate to contact me directly, if you have any questions or suggestions. I look forward to your proposals!

Oct 06 2010
Oct 06

This past weekend we attended the Pacific Northwest Drupal Summit and I gave an introduction to open data and beautiful maps. I talked about open data, covered the creation of a map in under 10 minutes, and discussed how to create beautiful maps using advanced techniques like custom tilesets. The video is already online thanks to the hard work of Justin Carlson, posted on his blog here and embedded below:

Paraphrasing some of the questions and comments at the end of the video:

Question 1: How does generating views with OpenLayers differ than with GMap?
Question 2: Can you use the Google Maps API when using OpenLayers and a Google Maps tileset?
Question 3: How does location.module differ from others storage methods? How do you decide which storage method to use?
Question 4: Can I use tiles to display polygon data and still interact with it?
Question 5: If I have a database of address how can I convert them into latitude and longitude?
Question 6: What other input data types are supported by mapping modules?
Question 7: Can I use a shapefile to generate an overlay?
Question 8: What other tilesets can I use with OpenLayers?
Question 9: Have you played with polygons and highly granular shapefiles?
Question 10: How did you get the Google Map API entry step into the install profile?
Question 11: Ben comments that using geo.module instead of text fields is helpful if you have a lot of data because it decreases the server load by speeding up your queries.

For the talk I created an install profile and drush make file to build a simple and lean Drupal mapping distribution, which for now I have named Quickmaps. The source code for the distribution is available at github.com/tylor/quickmaps. I am making the slides available as a PDF here and have been tracking my Mapnik and Quantum GIS source files at github.com/tylor/vancouver-mapping.

The inspiration for this talk comes from my Water! drinking fountains map for Vancouver. This is a map I created just over a year ago now and it has been really engaging to see it being discussed and used in so many different ways. Here is the original screencast showing how to set up a water fountain map in under ten minutes:

I had a great time sharing this presentation and it led to some great conversations throughout the rest of the summit. Thanks to all of the organizers for putting on such a successful event!

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Oct 05 2010
Oct 05

It was an incredibly jam-packed weekend for Drupallers here in the Pacific Northwest, with the 2nd annual PNW Drupal Summit in Vancouver. The Summit is a weekend conference that is targeted towards people already working with Drupal (moderate to advanced level), and is done in a regional mini-DrupalCon style: pre-scheduled sessions/tracks, keynotes from Drupal 7 maintainer Angie Byron (aka. webchick) and Chapter 3's Josh Koenig (aka. joshk), and Drupal 7 code sprints (that resulted in bringing the Drupal 7 criticals count from 13 to 8 over the course of the weekend, HOOAH!)

PNW Drupal Summit

We had 240 people altogether for 2 and a half days of awesome Drupal geekery. In addition to all of the attendees from BC, Washington, and Oregon, we had Drupalfriends from Idaho, Montana, Nebraska, Colorado, California, and Minnesota travel here to come join us in the fun!

The Affinity Bridge team was out in full force, presenting 5 sessions and one BOF over the course of the weekend, and co-organizing Friday's Drupal 7 code sprint, which was kindly hosted by our friends and neighbours at The Jibe. All of the sessions we presented were focused on sharing knowledge about some of the cutting edge technology and methods we've been using, and also about business/management/development practices specific to Drupal.

Shawn Price spoke on Simple Continuous Integration with git and CI Joe, demoing some of the tools and practices he's been using to set up continuous integration for one of our recent projects. Shawn continues to push the envelope for automated integration and testing at Affinity Bridge, and has been laying the groundwork for implementing these sorts of practices more broadly for our other projects.

PNW Drupal Summit

Mack Hardy talked about keeping Everything in Code! The importance of storing configuration in code (and, of course, in version control), and how it helps make deployment a much smoother process. He did an extensive review of using .make files, best practices for pushing changes between development/staging/production environments, and how to set up all the various tools needed for this. (Zoë helped prepare the fantastic slides for this, but was hit with the flu and wasn't able to co-present as planned.) Over the last year, we've become fairly religious about these processes, so it was great to be able to share them.

PNW Drupal Summit

Tylor Sherman's session was on Open Data and Beautiful Maps. He demoed how to set up a map from open data using Gmap and Views in under 10 minutes (I believe he clocked in at under 7 minutes on this), and then showed some of the more advanced tools (OpenLayers and MapBox) you can use to theme and customize maps. Tylor has been doing really cool things through his Drupal open data and mapping research, and actually had a map he built for fun used by the City of Vancouver prior to them building their own.

PNW Drupal Summit

Robin Puga, our team's Aegir expert, talked about how to use Aegir and Drush - Harder, Better, Faster, Stronger to make your development life easier. He reviewed the improvements that have been made in Aegir over the last year, especially the migration and multi-server management tools, and how with the help of Drush you can easily and quickly manage and migrate sites.

PNW Drupal Summit

Finally, Mack and myself rounded it all out with a session on Doing Business in an Open Source Ecosystem, and a BOF (birds of a feather) session on Agile Development and Project Management. In the business and open source session, we talked a lot about how working with Drupal can and should differ from working with proprietary software. Notable highlights include: the opportunities that working with and contributing to the Drupal project can afford you, why contributing should be a part of your workflow, how to incorporate/educate your clients on open source (which led to interesting discussions about the GPL and licensing), impacts on corporate culture, and personal benefits. In the Agile BOF, we mainly discussed some of the challenges in sticking to Agile methodologies, how to make it work with clients, and some of the nuances of team dynamics and development processes.

Ariane and Mack presenting on the Business in an Open Source Ecosystem

Keep an eye on the AB blog for more detailed posts from everyone with notes from their talks, links to slides etc., and I'll be sure to update this with links to the video from Tylor, Mack, and Robin's sessions when it's up. This was most of our first times presenting on these topics (especially to such a large audience) so we'd love any feedback you have on the sessions (feel free to post in comments or send in via the contact page).

PNW Drupal Summit

All in all, an extremely fun and fascinating weekend! Everyone's photos can be viewed on Flickr #pnwds. Thanks so much to the other organizers and sponsors, as well as everyone who travelled near and far to attend. It was a huge team effort, and turn out even better than I think any of us had hoped! See you all next year (or in Chicago)!

Apr 24 2010
Apr 24

Posted by admin

Main conference room

Although first day of Drupalcon is officially on Monday, the Sunday you could register and there were some activites.

The conference venue was the Moscone Center, composed of several buildings. In one of them regularly takes place the Apple Developer Conference, where Steve Jobs uses to present it's latest 'one more things'. We were at Moscone south, a building more similar to an airport in size and design.

The welcome pack was the poorest of the several Drupalcons I've been to, it consisted of a little book with sponsors marketing, session schedule and a guide to eating around the conference venue.

Unconference

There was a series of non-planed sessions not necessarily related to Drupal, although most of them were. It basically was people from several companies showing some innovations and projects in very specific fields. There were very little attendees which allowed to extended debates at the end of the sessions between presenters and attendees.

One of the sessions that I (partly) assisted was about image recognition and classification. They had a Drupal site that was capable of recognizing image similarities, find differences, classify them by similitude, and things like that.

The wifi connection was really good in any place of the center, although there were very little people. Will it handle the near 3000 people tomorrow?

In the evening I went to visit Chinatown, awesome experience.

First (official) day of Drupalcon

It was the first time that I think it may be too many people in a Drupalcon, the company stands were full of people and I was not allowed to enter some sessions because the room was full.

The first session was the only one at that hour, a presentation to which almost everyone assisted.

Getting started with Drupal(con)

Presenters: a lot (see session page).

There wasn't room for everyone in the main room so they have setup two more rooms with video streaming from the main room. The presenter asked to raise hands everyone that was new to Drupalcon and those who were new to Drupal in the last year. In both cases a lot of hands were raised.

Presenters of this session spoke in turns, each introduced one basic aspect of Drupal. Core, cck, views, taxonomy, etc. The session was too introductory so there isn't much more to tell.

The Heart of Open Atrium: Context, PURL and Spaces

Presenter:
Young Hahn

Young Hahn, from Development Seed, presents their strategic modules that they use to build their products, being some of their flagship products Open Atrium and Managing News, created from their experience with clients. Notably, all their modules are published in drupal.org, so we can all use them and it serves as an invaluable promotion for them.

This a rather technical session and probably hard to follow if you don't have previous experience developing Drupal sites. The combination of modules tries to find a general solution to some of the most common problem that they find in each project. Ej: preserving context (menus, blocks, theme, etc.).

The modules explained where Context, PURL and Spaces. You can read a short introduction to them and watch the session video on the session page.

Session page: http://sf2010.drupal.org/conference/sessions/heart-open-atrium-context-p....

Dries Keynote

Dries keynote

The near 3000 people is coming in a huge room. I ask myself how many Boeing 747 could you fit in this room, someone comments that it doubles as a storm shelter (http://twitter.com/mrf/status/12473605625).

Dries jumps to the stage, long applause. He does the usual remembering of the first Drupalcons and notes that when he created Drupal he though that no more than ten people will ever use it.

He sends greetings to all those that got stuck in Europe because of the volcano event. Seems like mini-drupalcons have been organized in several cities in which attendants meet to watch the live webcast and share notes. The map of those stuck in Europe shows in the screen.

Announcement of the day, Drupal 8 development will be in git, rip to CVS.

He talks now about RDF and the semantic web. It's something that Dries has given importance in the last Drupalcons, it seems that from Drupal 7 it will have an important role because it could be the first CMS that comes with an API an related modules in core that allow to create sites with RDF metadata. He puts some use cases: an online shop could tag its products with RDF that allows search engines to list them as products with associated metadata, it will perfectly know what is the proce, the product description, the picture, etc., without having to parse the text and use its algorithms to guess all this info.

Dries plays a video in which a woman's voice explains what RDF is while the screen displays some slides.

He shows some statistics about critical bugs pending to release Drupal 7, 112, no much less that there were 6 months ago in Paris. At this speed rate they will be all done by June, December in the works case. He proposes to form 100 groups of 30 people (we are 3000) and each group will solve an issue, so we could have all tickets closed in an hour. People laugh, he says "seriously"!

According to Drupal 7 stats, there have been more than 700 people contributing patches to this version, but they show that 50% of the code has been written by only 25 persons. He shows a slide with the 20 most active contributors to Drupal core and their supporting organizations (foto).

He announces that the next Drupalcon will be at Copenhagen. You an sign up at their web already.

He also talks about how some big names (IBM, Microsoft) have been involved in big projects related to Drupal, although many of these projects are private. He notes that Microsoft is going to launch a new PDO driver for SQL Server and that they have a important commitment to make Drupal run in Microsoft's web platforms. There has even have a Microsoft party in the night.

Objetifiyng PHP

Presenter: Larry Gardfield

Talk 100% about programming. In Drupal 6 we already have some modules that have introduced objects in their code (views, panels, … I cannot think of any which is not from merlinofchaos) and in Drupal 7 we have some layer of core objectified.

He does a review of the best practices when working with objects, like: use factory classes (pizzahut) instead of using object classes (pizza).

A slide notes the fuzziness of the Drupal architecture, different layers of the API overlap and are mixed, we have to build precise boundaries between the subsystems, and that's where OOP plays an important role, proposing to convert each core subsystem in an object. The code is interesting, we could do things like $menu->get_item('node/5')->get_title();

Video here: http://sf2010.drupal.org/conference/sessions/objectifying-php

Drupal as a web services platform using the Services module

A security guy in the door didn't let me in because the room is full. Re-scheduling.

Going Vertical: How niche marketing can launch your Drupal business

Presenter: Corey Smith

Very business oriented talk given by a marketing guy.

He comments about the topic of how focusing your company in a very specific field can launch your company to success, because clients use to look for the most experienced company when doing a project of an specific nature.

Session page: http://sf2010.drupal.org/conference/sessions/going-vertical-how-niche-ma...

Notes and links

Some of the sessions have been recorded on video:

http://sf2010.drupal.org/conference/sessions/getting-started-drupalcon
http://sf2010.drupal.org/conference/sessions/php-designers
http://sf2010.drupal.org/conference/sessions/beginning-drupal
http://sf2010.drupal.org/conference/sessions/state-drupal-web-applicatio...
http://sf2010.drupal.org/conference/sessions/theme-preprocess-functions-...
http://sf2010.drupal.org/conference/sessions/state-panels-3-and-more-wha...
http://sf2010.drupal.org/conference/sessions/theming-fusion-new-approach...
http://sf2010.drupal.org/conference/sessions/objectifying-php

Update: by now most or all sessions' videos have been uploaded.

Relared post in other blogs of first day attendants:

http://oitdesign.ncsu.edu/2010/04/20/drupalcon-2010-day-one/
http://blog.nethazard.net/first-day-at-drupalcon-san-francisco-2010/
http://www.dragonwellmedia.com/node/30
http://www.jcfiala.net/blog/2010/04/19/drupalcon-sf-first-day-thoughts

Drupalcon Copenhagen website: http://cph2010.drupal.org/

Map of people stuck in Europe because of the volcano.

Feb 11 2010
Feb 11

I would like to point the crowd to the Call For Presentaions of Loadays. , the Linux Open Administration Days .


The Linux Open Administration days 2010 will be the first edition of a new conference focusing on Linux and Open Administration, we are trying to fill a gap for System Engineers and Administrators using Open Source technologies"

I'll probably be there .. given the fact that the event will be 5 minutes from where I live .

Jun 29 2009
Jun 29
Penguins Crossing; LCA Wellington 2010 logoLinux Conference Australasia (aka LCA, linux.conf.au) will be in Wellington 18-23 January 2010 – 6 and a half months from now. This presents opportunities for the NZ Drupal community to;
  1. Promote Drupal in the wider FLOSS community (which is good for business)
  2. Run a DrupalCamp/Conference; which allows attendees to combine expenses if attending LCA, and organizers to share venue, admin, financial and other resources with LCA.
  3. Just hang out and drink & talk Drupal! Or perhaps (talk) and (drink drupal)!? :)
  1. Promote Drupal

    With the government moving away from Microsoft products and towards Open Source, and (hopefully) a FLOSS-friendly Patents Act in NZ, it is a very critical time to be making folk aware of Drupal and how it can empower them and their organisation/s.

    This is good for the Drupal marketplace, and good for anyone providing Drupal services in NZ – probably you!? (Conferences like this are also great places to grow your own business network directly!)

    Saturday 23 January is Open Day at LCA and is probably a good opportunity to set up a Drupal stand or similar. We would be able to use the Drupal banner from DrupalSouth for this.

  2. Run a DrupalCamp/Conference

    LCA is taking proposals for miniconfs during, before or after LCA. Given the prominence of Drupal in both the web and FLOSS communities it's likely a well–organised and well-written proposal would be accepted.

    Alternatively, we could organize our own DrupalCamp or mini-conference outside of LCA proper. Though LCA-miniconfs make admin easier and minimize the overhead of organizing a DrupalCamp or miniconf.

    Perhaps such an event could be DrupalSouth 2?

  3. Hang out and talk Drupal!

    With or without the above (or other Drupal events), it'd be great to meetup with other Drupalers and talk Drupal in the bars. Who else is planning on or thinking about attending?

I'm very keen to be involved in any/all of the above, but won't have enough bandwidth to be a driving force behind organizing anything big while living in Thailand (from September). I'm loosely planning on being back and living in NZ (maybe Wellington) in time for LCA. This is a cross-post from groups.drupal.org/new-zealand. Please discuss it there.
Apr 22 2009
Apr 22

I've been involved in the organisation of a number of scientific conferences over the past few years. For example 4m/ICOMM 2009 (submissions), I*PROMS 2009 (submissions). The conference sites are usually powered by drupal, the submissions using OpenConf. Managing the submission and peer review of papers is a chore, unfortunately, as is often the case, software gets in your way. So here I try to skim over some of the experiences I had with OpenConf - the good and the bad.

I've tested indico, which looks like a very good system, but it is heavy and over-engineered, especially if you want to run a couple of events, and not hundreds or thousands. It might be good for organisations managing a big number of events, but not for us.

After going through a number of trials I've settled on openconf. It was simple. It fitted the current web infrastructure - LAMP. I reckoned, I could eventually integrate it, or simply transfer some of the data into drupal, and maybe even benefit from code reuse. Surprisingly, I ended being both pleasantly surprised and not so.

It was an interesting experience. Openconf is a strangely written software. It is quite hackish, in a bad way. Inside it uses quite a lot of cryptic names, virtually no code documentation or useful comments, etc... A lot of 'bad style' code. The system won't win a beauty or security contest - that's for sure.

What won me over, and I will probably use it again, is that it is trivially moldable to my requirements. Let's give a few examples.

Styling it

Well, it has very little significant markup present. Minimal, considering some of the monstrosities I've seen over the years. To personalise the look of the submission pages I had to modify three nearly empty files - the header and footer php scripts for some limited wrapping markup and the openconf css file. That's all. Ok, that was sufficient to modify the overall styling, so that it is consistent with the conference 'mother sites'.

Workflow

Conference systems are not automatically adaptable to your workflow. You usually adapt your workflow to your system. They are not unique in this respect. A lot of enterprise CRM, workflow whatnot systems force you to adopt what they consider good practices, but that is a rant for antoher time - it makes good business for a lot of people. In this respect openconf is not unique - it presumes a workflow, and it even uses terminology which was alien to us.

The first thing to change was the terminology. An afternoon of reading code and testing resulted in a handful of scripts to replace advocates for theme chairs and some such. Annoying, sure, but not that hard.

A sequence of happy coincidences, helped with other problems, for example how do you check if authors revised their papers after review and if not send them a reminder email. I was prepared to check the file modification times and filter by date. Doable, but would result in some strange looking sql queries. Instead, due to publisher requirements, I ended checking for file types, and getting the list of forgetful paper authors that way. Funnily enough, the email.php file is contains both the best and worst of the code in openconf. The emails and recipient kinds declaration is fairly declarative. Just an array of definitions with stuff like titles, and sql queries in there. And based on your choice and php name magic you get the appropriate template, for which the appropriate list of recipients is pulled from the db. Nice. To make matters even better, it is a long flat file of if .. else .. statements with a few function declarations in the middle. It took me a while to get used to that. But for all its ugly insides, there is something good - it is easy to add modify the markup. No over-engineered templates - the system doesn't really need that. These cosmetic changes are surprisingly important, since it helped me improve the interface, to differentiate between emails for positive, negative and other causes - no wrong emails afterwards.

Random addons

For one of the last conferences I had to add scripts to make all paper authors reviewers, do custom reports etc.... It was a couple of days of work, mostly testing and reading code. And only one file to modify - the one where I had to add a link to the new functionality. All that required very little modification. Just add the new functionality.

The end is nigh

To wrap it up. Even badly written software could end up being more useful in practice than a number of well written, carefully designed systems. I have a feeling that this is the story of a lot of php projects, and the language itself. Could it be that the beauty is in the eye of the beholder? Or maybe the authors guys know something I miss - because the software does do the job, maybe not brilliantly, but good enough to be re-used again and again.

What makes openconf so moldable? Probably the php "component" architecture, that is each different kind of page has a different entry point php script, with shared includes for code reuse. This meant I wouldn't break more than one page at a time. Which in turn can lead to task based modifications, which in turn made my life easier, despite occasional the surprises.

Sep 01 2008
Sep 01

I'm back home from DrupalCon 2008 now - it has been a great event! I met a lot of nice people from the Drupal Community and learned a lot about this CMS. I've been very busy in uploading the remaining pictures from the event to my gallery - so here's for your viewing pleasure:

I also gave two talks and held a BoF there - the slides have now been attached to the session nodes, one of them (the HA session) even includes a video recording:

I've also uploaded some pictures from FrOSCon to my Gallery now, hope you enjoy them! The slides of my FrOSCon talks are now uploaded to the conference system as well:

Aug 28 2008
Aug 28

Hello and greetings from DrupalCon 2008 in Szeged, Hungary!

We (Thierry Manfé, Scott Mattoon and myself) are having a great time manning our booth and talking about Drupal, MySQL and Open [email protected] with the nice crowd of Drupal Users and Developers here. Sun is a gold sponsor of the event and we're giving a number of sessions as well.

Today I gave my first presentation about MySQL Backup and Security - Best practices - unfortunately I ran a tad bit out of time at the end... The slides have already been attached to the session page, so you can read up on the last few things I was going to talk about. Feel free to contact me, if you have further questions!

Tomorrow I'll be talking about High availability solutions for MySQL: An Overview and practical demo, which will also include a practical demonstration of a two-Node Linux Cluster, performed by Jakub Suchy. In the afternoon, I will also hold a BoF about bzr - The Bazaar source revision control system

I've also uploaded some pictures from the event (and some impressions from the city) on my gallery (more will follow later). Enjoy!

Aug 05 2008
Aug 05

I am going to Drupalcon Szeged I just got informed that two of my session proposals for DrupalCon 2008 got accepted - I will be speaking about the following topics there:

The second talk will be held in cooperation with Jakub Suchy, who will take over the practical demo. Sun Microsystems is a Gold Sponsor of the event and I am glad that we can show some support for this truly amazing and vibrant community CMS. DrupalCon 2008 will take place from August, 27th-30th in Szeged, Hungary. The list of proposed talks looks truly impressive! Among the key note speakers will be Dries Buytaert and Rasmus Lerdorf. I look very much forward to this conference. If you have a chance, make sure to attend it!

About Drupal Sun

Drupal Sun is an Evolving Web project. It allows you to:

  • Do full-text search on all the articles in Drupal Planet (thanks to Apache Solr)
  • Facet based on tags, author, or feed
  • Flip through articles quickly (with j/k or arrow keys) to find what you're interested in
  • View the entire article text inline, or in the context of the site where it was created

See the blog post at Evolving Web

Evolving Web