Sep 17 2018
Sep 17

Last week, nearly 1,000 Drupalists gathered in Darmstadt, Germany for Drupal Europe. In good tradition, I presented my State of Drupal keynote. You can watch a recording of my keynote (starting at 4:38) or download a copy of my slides (37 MB).


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Drupal 8 continues to mature

I started my keynote by highlighting this month's Drupal 8.6.0 release. Drupal 8.6 marks the sixth consecutive Drupal 8 release that has been delivered on time. Compared to one year ago, we have 46 percent more stable Drupal 8 modules. We also have 10 percent more contributors are working on Drupal 8 Core in comparison to last year. All of these milestones indicate that the Drupal 8 is healthy and growing.

The number of stable modules for Drupal 8 is growing fast

Next, I gave an update on our strategic initiatives:

An overview of Drupal 8's strategic initaitives

Make Drupal better for content creators

A photo from Drupal Europe in Darmstadt© Paul Johnson

The expectations of content creators are changing. For Drupal to be successful, we have to continue to deliver on their needs by providing more powerful content management tools, in addition to delivering simplicity though drag-and-drop functionality, WYSIWYG, and more.

With the release of Drupal 8.6, we have added new functionality for content creators by making improvements to the Media, Workflow, Layout and Out-of-the-Box initiatives. I showed a demo video to demonstrate how all of these new features not only make content authoring easier, but more powerful:


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We also need to improve the content authoring experience through a modern administration user interface. We have been working on a new administration UI using React. I showed a video of our latest prototype:


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Extended security coverage for Drupal 8 minor releases

I announced an update to Drupal 8's security policy. To date, site owners had one month after a new minor Drupal 8 release to upgrade their sites before losing their security updates. Going forward, Drupal 8 site owners have 6 months to upgrade between minor releases. This extra time should give site owners flexibility to plan, prepare and test minor security updates. For more information, check out my recent blog post.

Make Drupal better for evaluators

One of the most significant updates since DrupalCon Nashville is Drupal's improved evaluator experience. The time required to get a Drupal site up and running has decreased from more than 15 minutes to less than two minutes and from 20 clicks to 3. This is a big accomplishment. You can read more about it in my recent blog post.


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Promote Drupal

After launching Promote Drupal at DrupalCon Nashville, we hit the ground running with this initiative and successfully published a community press release for the release of Drupal 8.6, which was also translated into multiple languages. Much more is underway, including building a brand book, marketing collaboration space on Drupal.org, and a Drupal pitch deck.

The Drupal 9 roadmap and a plan to end-of-life Drupal 7 and Drupal 8

To keep Drupal modern, maintainable, and performant, we need to stay on secure, supported versions of Drupal 8's third-party dependencies. This means we need to end-of-life Drupal 8 with Symfony 3's end-of-life. As a result, I announced that:

  1. Drupal 8 will be end-of-life by November 2021.
  2. Drupal 9 will be released in 2020, and it will be an easy upgrade.

Historically, our policy has been to only support two major versions of Drupal; Drupal 7 would ordinarily reach end of life when Drupal 9 is released. Because a large number of sites might still be using Drupal 7 by 2020, we have decided to extend support of Drupal 7 until November 2021.

For those interested, I published a blog post that further explains this.

Adopt GitLab on Drupal.org

Finally, the Drupal Association is working to integrate GitLab with Drupal.org. GitLab will provide support for "merge requests", which means contributing to Drupal will feel more familiar to the broader audience of open source contributors who learned their skills in the post-patch era. Some of GitLab's tools, such as inline editing and web-based code review, will also lower the barrier to contribution, and should help us grow both the number of contributions and contributors on Drupal.org.

To see an exciting preview of Drupal.org's gitlab integration, watch the video below:

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Thank you

Our community has a lot to be proud of, and this progress is the result of thousands of people collaborating and working together. It's pretty amazing! The power of our community isn't just visible in minor releases or a number of stable modules. It was also felt at this very conference, as many volunteers gave their weekends and evenings to help organize Drupal Europe in the absence of a DrupalCon Europe organized by the Drupal Association. From code to community, the Drupal project is making an incredible impact. I look forward to continuing to celebrate our European community's work and friendships at future Drupal conferences.

A summary of our recent progress
Sep 14 2018
Sep 14

Seven months ago, Matthew Grasmick published an article describing how hard it is to install Drupal. His article included the following measurements for creating a new application on his local machine, across four different PHP frameworks:

Platform Clicks Time Drupal 20+ 15:00+ Symfony 3 1:55 WordPress 7 7:51 Laravel 3 17:28

The results from Matthew's blog were clear: Drupal is too hard to install. It required more than 15 minutes and 20 clicks to create a simple site.


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Seeing these results prompted me to launch a number of initiatives to improve the evaluator experience at DrupalCon Nashville. Here is the slide from my DrupalCon Nashville presentation:

Improve technical evaluator experience

A lot has happened between then and now:

  • We improved the download page to improve the discovery experience on drupal.org
  • We added an Evaluator Guide to Drupal.org
  • We added a quick-start command to Drupal 8.6
  • We added the Umami demo profile to Drupal 8.6
  • We started working on a more modern administration experience (in progress)

You can see the result of that work in this video:


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Thanks to this progress, here is the updated table:

Platform Clicks Time Drupal 3 1:27 Symfony 3 1:55 WordPress 7 7:51 Laravel 3 17:28

Drupal now requires the least time and is tied for least clicks! You can now install Drupal in less than two minutes. Moreover, the Drupal site that gets created isn't an "empty canvas" anymore; it's a beautifully designed and fully functional application with demo content.

Copy-paste the following commands in a terminal window if you want to try it yourself:

mkdir drupal && cd drupal && curl -sSL https://www.drupal.org/download-latest/tar.gz | tar -xz --strip-components=1
php core/scripts/drupal quick-start demo_umami

For more detailed information on how we achieved these improvements, read Matthew's latest blog post: The New Drupal Evaluator Experience, by the numbers.

A big thank you to Matthew Grasmick (Acquia) for spearheading this initiative!

Sep 13 2018
Sep 13

Since the launch of Drupal 8.0, we have successfully launched a new minor release on schedule every six months. I'm very proud of the community for this achievement. Prior to Drupal 8, most significant new features were only added in major releases like Drupal 6 or Drupal 7. Thanks to our new release cadence we now consistently and predictably ship great new features twice a year in minor releases (e.g. Drupal 8.6 comes with many new features).

However, only the most recent minor release has been actively supported for both bug fixes and security coverage. With the release of each new minor version, we gave a one-month window to upgrade to the new minor. In order to give site owners time to upgrade, we would not disclose security issues with the previous minor release during that one-month window.

Old Drupal 8 security policy for minor releasesIllustration of the security policy since the launch of Drupal 8.0 for minor releases, demonstrating that previous minor releases receive one month of security coverage. Source: Drupal.org issue #2909665: Extend security support to cover the previous minor version of Drupal and Drupal Europe DriesNote.

Over the past three years, we have learned that users find it challenging to update to the latest minor in one month. Drupal's minor updates can include dependency updates, internal API changes, or features being transitioned from contributed modules to core. It takes time for site owners to prepare and test these types of changes, and a window of one month to upgrade isn't always enough.

At DrupalCon Nashville we declared that we wanted to extend security coverage for minor releases. Throughout 2018, Drupal 8 release managers quietly conducted a trial. You may have noticed that we had several security releases against previous minor releases this year. This trial helped us understand the impact to the release process and learn what additional work remained ahead. You can read about the results of the trial at #2909665: Extend security support to cover the previous minor version of Drupal.

I'm pleased to share that the trial was a success! As a result, we have extended the security coverage of minor releases to six months. Instead of one month, site owners now have six months to upgrade between minor releases. It gives teams time to plan, prepare and test updates. Releases will have six months of normal bug fix support followed by six months of security coverage, for a total lifetime of one year. This is a huge win for Drupal site owners.

New Drupal 8 security policy for minor releasesIllustration of the new security policy for minor releases, demonstrating that the security coverage for minor releases is extended to six months. Source: Drupal.org issue #2909665: Extend security support to cover the previous minor version of Drupal and the Drupal Europe DriesNote.

It's important to note that this new policy only applies to Drupal 8 core starting with Drupal 8.5, and only applies to security issues. Non-security bug fixes will still only be committed to the actively supported release.

While the new policy will provide extended security coverage for Drupal 8.5.x, site owners will need to update to an upcoming release of Drupal 8.5 to be correctly notified about their security coverage.

Next steps

We still have some user experience issues we'd like to address around how site owners are alerted of a security update. We have not yet handled all of the potential edge cases, and we want to be very clear about the potential actions to take when updating.

We also know module developers may need to declare that a release of their project only works against specific versions of Drupal core. Resolving outstanding issues around semantic versioning support for contrib and module version dependency definitions will help developers of contributed projects better support this policy. If you'd like to get involved in the remaining work, the policy and roadmap issue on Drupal.org is a great place to find related issues and see what work is remaining.

Special thanks to Jess and Jeff Beeman for co-authoring this post.

Sep 12 2018
Sep 12

We just released Drupal 8.6.0. With six minor releases behind us, it is time to talk about the long-term future of Drupal 8 (and therefore Drupal 7 and Drupal 9). I've written about when to release Drupal 9 in the past, but this time, I'm ready to provide further details.

The plan outlined in this blog has been discussed with the Drupal 7 Core Committers, the Drupal 8 Core Committers and the Drupal Security Team. While we feel good about this plan, we can't plan for every eventuality and we may continue to make adjustments.

Drupal 8 will be end-of-life by November 2021

Drupal 8's innovation model depends on introducing new functionality in minor versions while maintaining backwards compatibility. This approach is working so well that some people have suggested we institute minor releases forever, and never release Drupal 9 at all.

However that approach is not feasible. We need to periodically remove deprecated functionality to keep Drupal modern, maintainable, and performant, and we need to stay on secure, supported versions of Drupal 8's third-party dependencies. As Nathaniel Catchpole explained in his post "The Long Road to Drupal 9", our use of various third party libraries such as Symfony, Twig, and Guzzle means that we need to be in sync with their release timelines.

Our biggest dependency in Drupal 8 is Symfony 3, and according to Symfony's roadmap, Symfony 3 has an end-of-life date in November 2021. This means that after November 2021, security bugs in Symfony 3 will not get fixed. To keep your Drupal sites secure, Drupal must adopt Symfony 4 or Symfony 5 before Symfony 3 goes end-of-life. A major Symfony upgrade will require us to release Drupal 9 (we don't want to fork Symfony 3 and have to backport Symfony 4 or Symfony 5 bug fixes). This means we have to end-of-life Drupal 8 no later than November 2021.

Drupal 8 will be end-of-life by November 2021

Drupal 9 will be released in 2020, and it will be an easy upgrade

If Drupal 8 will be end-of-life on November 2021, we have to release Drupal 9 before that. Working backwards from November 2021, we'd like to give site owners one year to upgrade from Drupal 8 to Drupal 9.

If November 2020 is the latest we could release Drupal 9, what is the earliest we could release Drupal 9?

We certainly can't release Drupal 9 next week or even next month. Preparing for Drupal 9 takes a lot of work: we need to adopt Symfony 4 and/or Symfony 5, we need to remove deprecated code, we need to allow modules and themes to declare compatibility with more than one major version, and possibly more. The Drupal 8 Core Committers believe we need more than one year to prepare for Drupal 9.

Therefore, our current plan is to release Drupal 9 in 2020. Because we still need to figure out important details, we can't be more specific at this time.

Drupal 9 will be released in 2020

If we release Drupal 9 in 2020, it means we'll certainly have Drupal 8.7 and 8.8 releases.

Wait, I will only have one year to migrate from Drupal 8 to 9?

Yes, but fortunately moving from Drupal 8 to 9 will be far easier than previous major version upgrades. The first release of Drupal 9 will be very similar to the last minor release of Drupal 8, as the primary goal of the Drupal 9.0.0 release will be to remove deprecated code and update third-party dependencies. By keeping your Drupal 8 sites up to date, you should be well prepared for Drupal 9.

And what about contributed modules? The compatibility of contributed modules is historically one of the biggest blockers to upgrading, so we will also make it possible for contributed modules to be compatible with Drupal 8 and Drupal 9 at the same time. As long as contributed modules do not use deprecated APIs, they should work with Drupal 9 while still being compatible with Drupal 8.

Drupal 7 will be supported until November 2021

Historically, our policy has been to only support two major versions of Drupal; Drupal 7 would ordinarily reach end of life when Drupal 9 is released. Because a large number of sites might still be using Drupal 7 by 2020, we have decided to extend support of Drupal 7 until November 2021. Drupal 7 will be receive community support for three whole more years.

Drupal 7 will be supported until November 2021

We'll launch a Drupal 7 commercial Long Term Support program

In the past, commercial vendors have extended Drupal's security support. In 2015, a Drupal 6 commercial Long Term Support program was launched and continues to run to this day. We plan a similar paid program for Drupal 7 to extend support beyond November 2021. The Drupal Security Team will announce the Drupal 7 commercial LTS program information by mid-2019. Just like with the Drupal 6 LTS program, there will be an application for vendors.

We'll update Drupal 7 to support newer versions of PHP

The PHP team will stop supporting PHP 5.x on December 31st, 2018 (in 3 months), PHP 7.0 on December 3rd, 2018 (in 2 months), PHP 7.1 on December 1st, 2019 (in 1 year and 3 months) and PHP 7.2 on November 30th, 2020 (in 2 years and 2 months).

Drupal will drop official support for unsupported PHP versions along the way and Drupal 7 site owners may have to upgrade their PHP version. The details will be provided later.

We plan on updating Drupal 7 to support newer versions of PHP in line with their support schedule. Drupal 7 doesn't fully support PHP 7.2 yet as there have been some backwards-incompatible changes since PHP 7.1. We will release a version of Drupal 7 that supports PHP 7.2. Contributed modules and custom modules will have to be updated too, if not already.

Conclusion

If you are still using Drupal 7 and are wondering what to do, you currently have two options:

  1. Stay on Drupal 7 while also updating your PHP version. If you stay on Drupal 7 until after 2021, you can either engage a vendor for a long term support contract, or migrate to Drupal 9.
  2. Migrate to Drupal 8 by 2020, so that it's easier to update to Drupal 9 when it is released.

The announcements in this blog post made option (1) a lot more viable and/or hopefully helps you better evaluate option (2).

If you are on Drupal 8, you just have to keep your Drupal 8 site up-to-date and you'll be ready for Drupal 9.

We plan to have more specifics by April 2019 (DrupalCon Seattle).

Thanks for the Drupal 7 Core Committers, the Drupal 8 Core Committers and the Drupal Security Team for their contributions to this blog post.

Sep 11 2018
Sep 11

For the past two years, I've examined Drupal.org's commit data to understand who develops Drupal, how much of that work is sponsored, and where that sponsorship comes from.

I have now reported on this data for three years in a row, which means I can start to better compare year-over-year data. Understanding how an open-source project works is important because it establishes a benchmark for project health and scalability.

I would also recommend taking a look at the 2016 report or the 2017 report. Each report looks at data collected in the 12-month period between July 1st and June 30th.

This year's report affirms that Drupal has a large and diverse community of contributors. In the 12-month period between July 1, 2017 and June 30, 2018, 7,287 different individuals and 1,002 different organizations contributed code to Drupal.org. This include contributions to Drupal core and all contributed projects on Drupal.org.

In comparison to last year's report, both the number of contributors and contributions has increased. Our community of contributors (including both individuals and organizations) is also becoming more diverse. This is an important area of growth, but there is still work to do.

For this report, we looked at all of the issues marked "closed" or "fixed" in our ticketing system in the 12-month period from July 1, 2017 to June 30, 2018. This includes Drupal core and all of the contributed projects on Drupal.org, across all major versions of Drupal. This year, 24,447 issues were marked "closed" or "fixed", a 5% increase from the 23,238 issues in the 2016-2017 period. This averages out to 67 feature improvements or bug fixes a day.

In total, we captured 49,793 issue credits across all 24,447 issues. This marks a 17% increase from the 42,449 issue credits recorded in the previous year. Of the 49,793 issue credits reported this year, 18% (8,822 credits) were for Drupal core, while 82% (40,971 credits) went to contributed projects.

"Closed" or "fixed" issues are often the result of multiple people working on the issue. We try to capture who contributes through Drupal.org's unique credit system. We used the data from the credit system for this analysis. There are a few limitations with this approach, which we'll address at the end of this report.

What is the Drupal.org credit system?

In the spring of 2015, after proposing ideas for giving credit and discussing various approaches at length, Drupal.org added the ability for people to attribute their work to an organization or customer in the Drupal.org issue queues. Maintainers of Drupal modules, themes, and distributions can award issue credits to people who help resolve issues with code, translations, documentation, design and more.

Example issue credit on drupal orgA screenshot of an issue comment on Drupal.org. You can see that jamadar worked on this patch as a volunteer, but also as part of his day job working for TATA Consultancy Services on behalf of their customer, Pfizer.

Credits are a powerful motivator for both individuals and organizations. Accumulating credits provides individuals with a way to showcase their expertise. Organizations can utilize credits to help recruit developers, to increase their visibility within the Drupal.org marketplace, or to showcase their Drupal expertise.

Who is working on Drupal?

In the 12-month period between July 1, 2017 to June 30, 2018, 24,447, Drupal.org received code contributions from 7,287 different individuals and 1,002 different organizations.

Contributions by individuals vs organizations

While the number of individual contributors rose, a relatively small number of individuals still do the majority of the work. Approximately 48% of individual contributors received just one credit. Meanwhile, the top 30 contributors (the top 0.4%) account for more than 24% of the total credits. These individuals put an incredible amount of time and effort in developing Drupal and its contributed projects:

Out of the top 30 contributors featured, 15 were also recognized as top contributors in our 2017 report. These Drupalists' dedication and continued contribution to the project has been crucial to Drupal's development. It's also exciting to see 15 new names on the list. This mobility is a testament to the community's evolution and growth. It's also important to recognize that a majority of the 15 repeat top contributors are at least partially sponsored by an organization. We value the organizations that sponsor these remarkable individuals, because without their support, it could be more challenging to be in the top 30 year over year.

How diverse is Drupal?

Next, we looked at both the gender and geographic diversity of Drupal.org code contributors. While these are only two examples of diversity, this is the only available data that contributors can currently choose to share on their Drupal.org profiles. The reported data shows that only 7% of the recorded contributions were made by contributors that do not identify as male, which continues to indicates a steep gender gap. This is a one percent increase compared to last year. The gender imbalance in Drupal is profound and underscores the need to continue fostering diversity and inclusion in our community.

To address this gender gap, in addition to advancing representation across various demographics, the Drupal community is supporting two important initiatives. The first is to adopt more inclusive user demographic forms on Drupal.org. Adopting Open Demographics on Drupal.org will also allow us to improve reporting on diversity and inclusion, which in turn will help us better support initiatives that advance diversity and inclusion. The second initiative is supporting the Drupal Diversity and Inclusion Contribution Team, which works to better include underrepresented groups to increase code and community contributions. The DDI Contribution Team recruits team members from diverse backgrounds and underrepresented groups, and provides support and mentorship to help them contribute to Drupal.

It's important to reiterate that supporting diversity and inclusion within Drupal is essential to the health and success of the project. The people who work on Drupal should reflect the diversity of people who use and work with the software. While there is still a lot of work to do, I'm excited about the impact these various initiatives will have on future reports.

Contributions by gender

When measuring geographic diversity, we saw individual contributors from 6 different continents and 123 different countries:

Contributions by continentContributions by countryThe top 20 countries from which contributions originate. The data is compiled by aggregating the countries of all individual contributors behind each commit. Note that the geographical location of contributors doesn't always correspond with the origin of their sponsorship. Wim Leers, for example, works from Belgium, but his funding comes from Acquia, which has the majority of its customers in North America.

123 different countries is seven more compared to the 2017 report. The new countries include Rwanda, Namibia, Senegal, Sierra Leone, and Swaziland, Zambia. Seeing contributions from more African countries is certainly a highlight.

How much of the work is sponsored?

Issue credits can be marked as "volunteer" and "sponsored" simultaneously (shown in jamadar's screenshot near the top of this post). This could be the case when a contributor does the minimum required work to satisfy the customer's need, in addition to using their spare time to add extra functionality.

While Drupal started out as a 100% volunteer-driven project, today the majority of the code on Drupal.org is sponsored by organizations. Only 12% of the commit credits that we examined in 2017-2018 were "purely volunteer" credits (6,007 credits), in stark contrast to the 49% that were "purely sponsored". In other words, there were four times as many "purely sponsored" credits as "purely volunteer" credits.

Contributions by volunteer vs sponsored

A few comparisons between the 2017-2018 and the 2016-2017 data:

  • The credit system is being used more frequently. In total, we captured 49,793 issue credits across all 24,447 issues in the 2017-2018 period. This marks a 17% increase from the 42,449 issue credits recorded in the previous year. Between July 1, 2016 and June 30, 2017, 28% of all credits had no attribution while in the period between July 1, 2017 to June 30, 2018, only 25% of credits lacked attribution. More people have become aware of the credit system, the attribution options, and their benefits.
  • Sponsored credits are growing faster than volunteer credits. Both "purely volunteer" and "purely sponsored" credits grew, but "purely sponsored" credits grew faster. There are two reasons why this could be the case: (1) more contributions are sponsored and (2) organizations are more likely to use the credit system compared to volunteers.

No data is perfect, but it feels safe to conclude that most of the work on Drupal is sponsored. At the same time, the data shows that volunteer contribution remains very important to Drupal. Maybe most importantly, while the number of volunteers and sponsors has grown year over year in absolute terms, sponsored contributions appear to be growing faster than volunteer contributions. This is consistent with how open source projects grow and scale.

Who is sponsoring the work?

Now that we've established a majority of contributions to Drupal are sponsored, we want to study which organizations contribute to Drupal. While 1,002 different organizations contributed to Drupal, approximately 50% of them received four credits or less. The top 30 organizations (roughly the top 3%) account for approximately 48% of the total credits, which implies that the top 30 companies play a crucial role in the health of the Drupal project. The graph below shows the top 30 organizations and the number of credits they received between July 1, 2017 and June 30, 2018:

Top 30 organizations contributing to DrupalThe top 30 contributing organizations based on the number of Drupal.org commit credits.

While not immediately obvious from the graph above, a variety of different types of companies are active in Drupal's ecosystem:

Category Description Traditional Drupal businesses Small-to-medium-sized professional services companies that primarily make money using Drupal. They typically employ fewer than 100 employees, and because they specialize in Drupal, many of these professional services companies contribute frequently and are a huge part of our community. Examples are Chapter Three and Lullabot (both shown on graph). Digital marketing agencies Larger full-service agencies that have marketing-led practices using a variety of tools, typically including Drupal, Adobe Experience Manager, Sitecore, WordPress, etc. They tend to be larger, with the larger agencies employing thousands of people. Examples are Wunderman and Mirum. System integrators Larger companies that specialize in bringing together different technologies into one solution. Example system agencies are Accenture, TATA Consultancy Services, Capgemini and CI&T (shown on graph). Technology and infrastructure companies Examples are Acquia (shown on graph), Lingotek, BlackMesh, Rackspace, Pantheon and Platform.sh. End-users Examples are Pfizer (shown on graph) or NBCUniversal.

A few observations:

  • Almost all of the sponsors in the top 30 are traditional Drupal businesses. Companies like MD Systems (12 employees), Valuebound (58 employees), Chapter Three (33 employees), Commerce Guys (13 employees) and PreviousNext (22 employees) are, despite their size, critical to Drupal's success.
  • Compared to these traditional Drupal businesses, Acquia has nearly 800 employees and at least ten full-time Drupal contributors. Acquia works to resolve some of the most complex issues on Drupal.org, many of which are not recognized by the credit system (e.g. release management, communication, sprint organizing, and project coordination). Acquia added several full-time contributors compared to last year, however, I believe that Acquia should contribute even more due to its comparative size.
  • No digital marketing agencies show up in the top 30, though some of them are starting to contribute. It's exciting that an increasing number of digital marketing agencies are delivering beautiful experiences using Drupal. As a community, we need to work to ensure that each of these firms are contributing back to the project with the same commitment that we see from firms like Commerce Guys, CI&T or Acro Media. Compared to last year, we have not made meaningful progress on growing contributions from digital marketing agencies. It would be interesting to see what would happen if more large organizations mandated contributions from their partners. Pfizer, for example, only works with agencies and vendors that contribute back to Drupal, and requires that its agency partners contribute to open source. If more organizations took this stance, it could have a big impact on the number of digital agencies that contribute to Drupal
  • The only system integrator in the top 30 is CI&T, which ranked 3rd with 959 credits. As far as system integrators are concerned, CI&T is a smaller player with approximately 2,500 employees. However, we do see various system integrators outside of the top 30, including Globant, Capgemini, Sapient and TATA Consultancy Services. Each of these system integrators reported 30 to 85 credits in the past year. The top contributor is TATA with 85 credits.
  • Infrastructure and software companies also play an important role in our community, yet only Acquia appears in the top 30. While Acquia has a professional services division, more than 75% of the contributions come from the product organization. Other infrastructure companies include Pantheon and Platform.sh, which are both venture-backed, platform-as-a-service companies that were born from the Drupal community. Pantheon has 6 credits and Platform.sh has 47 credits. Amazee Labs, a company that is building an infrastructure business, reported 40 credits. Compared to last year, Acquia and Rackspace have slightly more credits, while Pantheon, Platform.sh and Amazee contributed less. Lingotek, a vendor that offers cloud-based translation management software has 84 credits.
  • We also saw three end-users in the top 30 as corporate sponsors: Pfizer (491 credits, up from 251 credits the year before), Thunder (432 credits), and the German company, bio.logis (319 credits, up from 212 credits the year before). Other notable customers outside of the top 30, include Workday, Wolters Kluwer, Burda Media, YMCA and OpenY, CARD.com and NBCUniversal. We also saw contributions from many universities, including University of Colorado Boulder, University of Waterloo, Princeton University, University of Adelaide, University of Sydney, University of Edinburgh, McGill University and more.
Contributions by technology companies

We can conclude that technology and infrastructure companies, digital marketing agencies, system integrators and end-users are not making significant code contributions to Drupal.org today. How can we explain this disparity in comparison to the traditional Drupal businesses that contribute the most? We believe the biggest reasons are:

  1. Drupal's strategic importance. A variety of the traditional Drupal agencies almost entirely depend on Drupal to support their businesses. Given both their expertise and dependence on Drupal, they are most likely to look after Drupal's development and well-being. Contrast this with most of the digital marketing agencies and system integrators who work with a diversified portfolio of content management platforms. Their well-being is less dependent on Drupal's success.
  2. The level of experience with Drupal and open source. Drupal aside, many organizations have little or no experience with open source, so it is important that we motivate and teach them to contribute.
  3. Legal reservations. We recognize that some organizations are not legally permitted to contribute, let alone attribute their customers. We hope that will change as open source continues to get adopted.
  4. Tools barriers. Drupal contribution still involves a patch-based workflow on Drupal.org's unique issue queue system. This presents a fairly steep learning curve to most developers, who primarily work with more modern and common tools such as GitHub. We hope to lower some of these barriers through our collaboration with GitLab.
  5. Process barriers. Getting code changes accepted into a Drupal project — especially Drupal core — is hard work. Peer reviews, gates such as automated testing and documentation, required sign-offs from maintainers and committers, knowledge of best practices and other community norms are a few of the challenges a contributor must face to get code accepted into Drupal. Collaborating with thousands of people on a project as large and widely-used as Drupal requires such processes, but new contributors often don't know that these processes exist, or don't understand why they exist.

We should do more to entice contribution

Drupal is used by more than one million websites. Everyone who uses Drupal benefits from work that thousands of other individuals and organizations have contributed. Drupal is great because it is continuously improved by a diverse community of contributors who are enthusiastic to give back.

However, the vast majority of the individuals and organizations behind these Drupal websites never participate in the development of the project. They might use the software as it is or don't feel the need to help drive its development. We have to provide more incentive for these individuals and organizations to contribute back to the project.

Consequently, this data shows that the Drupal community can do more to entice companies to contribute code to Drupal.org. The Drupal community has a long tradition of encouraging organizations to share code rather than keep it behind firewalls. While the spirit of the Drupal project cannot be reduced to any single ideology — not every organization can or will share their code — we would like to see organizations continue to prioritize collaboration over individual ownership.

We understand and respect that some can give more than others and that some might not be able to give back at all. Our goal is not to foster an environment that demands what and how others should give back. Our aim is not to criticize those who do not contribute, but rather to help foster an environment worthy of contribution. This is clearly laid out in Drupal's Values and Principles.

Given the vast amount of Drupal users, we believe continuing to encourage organizations and end-users to contribute is still a big opportunity. From my own conversations, it's clear that organizations still need need education, training and help. They ask questions like: "Where can we contribute?", "How can we convince our legal department?", and more.

There are substantial benefits and business drivers for organizations that contribute: (1) it improves their ability to sell and win deals and (2) it improves their ability to hire. Companies that contribute to Drupal tend to promote their contributions in RFPs and sales pitches. Contributing to Drupal also results in being recognized as a great place to work for Drupal experts.

What projects have sponsors?

To understand where the organizations sponsoring Drupal put their money, I've listed the top 20 most sponsored projects:


Who is sponsoring the top 30 contributors?

Rank Username Issues Volunteer Sponsored Not specified Sponsors 1 RenatoG 851 0% 100% 0% CI&T (850), Johnson & Johnson (23) 2 RajabNatshah 745 14% 100% 0% Vardot (653), Webship (90) 3 jrockowitz 700 94% 97% 1% The Big Blue House (680), Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center (7), Rosewood Marketing (2), Kennesaw State University (1) 4 adriancid 529 99% 19% 0% Ville de Montréal (98) 5 bojanz 515 0% 98% 2% Commerce Guys (503), Torchbox (17), Adapt (6), Acro Media (4), Bluespark (1) 6 Berdir 432 0% 92% 8% MD Systems (396), Translations.com (10), Acquia (2) 7 alexpott 414 13% 84% 10% Chapter Three (123), Thunder (120), Acro Media (103) 8 mglaman 414 5% 96% 1% Commerce Guys (393), Impactiv (17), Circle Web Foundry (16), Rosewood Marketing (14), LivePerson (13), Bluespark (4), Acro Media (4), Gaggle.net (3), Thinkbean (2), Matsmart (2) 9 Wim Leers 395 8% 94% 0% Acquia (371) 10 larowlan 360 13% 97% 1% PreviousNext (350), University of Technology, Sydney (24), Charles Darwin University (10), Australian Competition and Consumer Commission (ACCC) (1), Department of Justice & Regulation, Victoria (1) 11 DamienMcKenna 353 1% 95% 5% Mediacurrent (334) 12 dawehner 340 48% 86% 4% Chapter Three (279), Torchbox (10), Drupal Association (5), Tag1 Consulting (3), Acquia (2), TES Global (1) 13 catch 339 1% 97% 3% Third and Grove (320), Tag1 Consulting (8) 14 heddn 327 2% 99% 1% MTech (325) 15 xjm 303 0% 97% 3% Acquia (293) 16 pifagor 284 32% 99% 1% GOLEMS GABB (423), Drupal Ukraine Community (73) 17 quietone 261 48% 55% 5% Acro Media (143) 18 borisson_ 255 93% 55% 3% Dazzle (136), Intracto digital agency (1), Acquia (1), DUG BE vzw (Drupal User Group Belgium) (1) 19 adci_contributor 255 0% 100% 0% ADCI Solutions (255) 20 volkswagenchick 254 1% 100% 0% Hook 42 (253) 21 drunken monkey 231 91% 22% 0% DBC (24), Vizala (20), Sunlime Web Innovations GmbH (4), Wunder Group (1), epiqo (1), Zebralog (1) 22 amateescu 225 3% 95% 3% Pfizer (211), Drupal Association (1), Chapter Three (1) 23 joachim 199 56% 44% 19% Torchbox (88) 24 mkalkbrenner 195 0% 99% 1% bio.logis (193), OSCE: Organization for Security and Co-operation in Europe (119) 25 chr.fritsch 185 0% 99% 1% Thunder (183) 26 gaurav.kapoor 178 0% 81% 19% OpenSense Labs (144), DrupalFit (55) 27 phenaproxima 177 0% 99% 1% Acquia (176) 28 mikeytown2 173 0% 0% 100% 29 joelpittet 170 28% 74% 16% The University of British Columbia (125) 30 timmillwood 169 1% 100% 0% Pfizer (169), Appnovation (163), Millwood Online (6)

We observe that the top 30 contributors are sponsored by 58 organizations. This kind of diversity is aligned with our desire to make sure that Drupal is not controlled by a single organization. These top contributors and organizations are from many different parts of the world, and work with customers large and small. Nonetheless, we will continue to benefit from an increased distribution of contribution.

Limitations of the credit system and the data

While the benefits are evident, it is important to note a few of the limitations in Drupal.org's current credit system:

  • Contributing to issues on Drupal.org is not the only way to contribute. Other activities, such as sponsoring events, promoting Drupal, and providing help and mentorship are also important to the long-term health of the Drupal project. Many of these activities are not currently captured by the credit system. For this post, we chose to only look at code contributions.
  • We acknowledge that parts of Drupal are developed on GitHub and therefore aren't fully credited on Drupal.org. The actual number of contributions and contributors could be significantly higher than what we report. The Drupal Association is working to integrate GitLab with Drupal.org. GitLab will provide support for "merge requests", which means contributing to Drupal will feel more familiar to the broader audience of open source contributors who learned their skills in the post-patch era. Some of GitLab's tools, such as inline editing and web-based code review, will also lower the barrier to contribution, and should help us grow both the number of contributions and contributors on Drupal.org.
  • Even when development is done on Drupal.org, the credit system is not used consistently. As using the credit system is optional, a lot of code committed on Drupal.org has no or incomplete contribution credits.
  • Not all code credits are the same. We currently don't have a way to account for the complexity and quality of contributions; one person might have worked several weeks for just one credit, while another person might receive a credit for ten minutes of work. In the future, we should consider issuing credit data in conjunction with issue priority, patch size, etc. This could help incentivize people to work on larger and more important problems and save coding standards improvements for new contributor sprints. Implementing a scoring system that ranks the complexity of an issue would also allow us to develop more accurate reports of contributed work.

Like Drupal itself, the Drupal.org credit system needs to continue to evolve. Ultimately, the credit system will only be useful when the community uses it, understands its shortcomings, and suggests constructive improvements.

Conclusion

Our data confirms that Drupal is a vibrant community full of contributors who are constantly evolving and improving the software. While we have amazing geographic diversity, we still need greater gender diversity, in addition to better representation across various demographic groups. Our analysis of the Drupal.org credit data concludes that most contributions to Drupal are sponsored. At the same time, the data shows that volunteer contribution remains very important to Drupal.

As a community, we need to understand that a healthy open source ecosystem includes more than the traditional Drupal businesses that contribute the most. We still don't see a lot of contribution from the larger digital marketing agencies, system integrators, technology companies, or end-users of Drupal — we believe that might come as these organizations build out their Drupal practices and Drupal becomes more strategic for them.

To grow and sustain Drupal, we should support those that contribute to Drupal and find ways to get those that are not contributing involved in our community. We invite you to help us continue to strengthen our ecosystem.

Sep 06 2018
Sep 06

Last night, we shipped Drupal 8.6.0! I firmly believe this is the most significant Drupal 8 release to date. It is significant because we made a lot of progress on all twelve of Drupal 8 core's strategic initiatives. As a result, Drupal 8.6 delivers a large number of improvements for content authors, evaluators, site builders and developers.

What is new for content authors?

For content authors, Drupal 8.6 adds support for "remote media types". This means you can now easily embed YouTube or Vimeo videos in your content.

The Media Library in Drupal 8.6The Media Library in Drupal 8.6

Content authors want Drupal to be easy to use. We made incredible progress on a variety of features that will help to achieve that: we've delivered an experimental media library, added the Workspaces module as experimental, providing sophisticated content staging capabilities, and made great strides on the upcoming Layout Builder. The Layout Builder is shaping up to be a very powerful tool that solves a lot of authoring challenges, and is something many are looking forward to.

The Workspaces module in Drupal 8.6The Workspaces module in Drupal 8.6

Each initiative related to content authoring is making disciplined and steady progress. These features not only solve for the most requested authoring improvements, but provide a solid foundation on which we can continue to innovate. This means we can provide better compatibility and upgradability for contributed modules.

Top requests for content authorsThe top 10 requested features for content creators according to the 2016 State of Drupal survey.

What is new for evaluators?

Evaluators want an out-of-the-box experience that allows them to install and test drive Drupal in minutes. With Drupal 8.6, we have finally delivered on this need.

Prior to Drupal 8.6, downloading and installing Drupal was a complex and lengthy process that ended with an underwhelming "blank slate".

Now, you can install Drupal with the new "Umami demo profile". The Umami demo profile showcases some of Drupal's most powerful capabilities by providing a beautiful website filled with content right out of the box. A demo profile will not only help to onboard new users, but it can also be used by Drupal professionals and digital agencies to showcase Drupal to potential customers.

The experimental layout builder in Drupal 8.6 with the Umami demo profileThe new Umami demo profile together with the Layout Builder.

In addition to a new installation profile, we added a "quick-start" command that allows you to launch a Drupal site in one command using only one dependency, PHP. If you want to try Drupal, you no longer have to setup a webserver, a database, containers, etc.

Last but not least, the download experience and evaluator documentation on Drupal.org has been vastly improved.

With Drupal 8.6, you can download and install a fully functional Drupal demo application in less than two minutes. That is something to be very excited about.

What is new for developers?

You can now upgrade a single-language Drupal 6 or Drupal 7 site to Drupal 8 using the built-in user interface. While we saw good progress on multilingual migrations, they will remain experimental as we work on the final gaps.

I recently wrote about our progress in making Drupal an API-first platform, including an overview of REST improvements in Drupal 8.6, an update on JSON API, and the reasons why JSON API didn't make it into this release. I'm looking forward to JSON API being added in Drupal 8.7. Other decoupled efforts, including a React-based administration application and GraphQL support are still under heavy development, but making rapid progress.

We also converted almost all of our tests from SimpleTest to PHPUnit; and we've added Nightwatch.js and Prettier for JavaScript developers. While Drupal 8 has extensive back-end test coverage, using PHPUnit and Nightwatch.js provides a more modern platform that will make Drupal more familiar to PHP and JavaScript developers.

Drupal 8 continues to hit its stride

These are just some of the highlights that I'm most excited about. If you'd like to read more about Drupal 8.6.0, check out the official release announcement and important update information from the release notes. The next couple of months, I will write up more detailed progress reports on initiatives that I didn't touch upon in this blog post.

In my Drupal 8.5.0 announcement, I talked about how Drupal is hitting its stride, consistently delivering improvements and new features:

In future releases, we plan to add a media library, support for remote media types like YouTube videos, support for content staging, a layout builder, JSON API support, GraphQL support, a React-based administration application and a better out-of-the-box experience for evaluators.

As you can see from this blog post, Drupal 8.6 delivered on a number of these plans and made meaningful progress on many others.

In future releases we plan to:

  • Stabilize more of the features targeting content authors
  • Add JSON API, allowing developers to more easily and rapidly create decoupled applications
  • Provide stable multilingual migrations
  • Make big improvements for developers with Composer and configuration management changes
  • Continually improve the evaluator experience
  • Iterate towards an entirely new decoupled administrative experience
  • ... and more

Releases like Drupal 8.6.0 only happen with the help of hundreds of contributors and organizations. Thank you to everyone that contributed to this release. Whether you filed issues, wrote code, tested patches, funded a contributor, tested pre-release versions, or cheered for the team from the sidelines, you made this release happen. Thank you!

Sep 04 2018
Sep 04

Today is the first day back from my two-week vacation. We started our vacation in Maine, and we ended our vacation with a few days in Italy.  

While I did some work on vacation, it was my first two-week vacation since starting Acquia 11 years ago.

This morning when the alarm went off I thought: "Why is my alarm going off in the middle of the night?". A few moments later, reality struck. It's time to go back to work.  

Going on vacation is like going to space. Lots of work before take-off, followed by serenity and peaceful floating around in space, eventually abrupted by an insane re-entry process into the earth's atmosphere.

I got up early this morning to work on my "re-entry" and prioritize what I have to do this week. It's a lot!

Drupal Europe is only one week away and I have to make a lot of progress on my keynote presentation and prepare for other sessions and meetings. Between now and Drupal Europe, I also have two analyst meetings (Forrester and Gartner), three board meetings, and dozens of meetings to catch up with co-workers, projects, partners and customers.  Plus, I would love to write about the upcoming Drupal 8.6.0 release and publish my annual "Who sponsors Drupal development?" report. Lots to do this week, but all things I'm excited about.

If you're expecting to hear from me, know that it might take me several weeks to dig out.

Aug 31 2018
Aug 31

As you might have read on the Drupal Association blog, Megan Sanicki, the Executive Director of the Drupal Association, has decided to move on.

Megan has been part of the Drupal Association for almost 8 years. She began as our very first employee responsible for DrupalCon Chicago sponsorship sales in 2011, and progressed to be our Executive Director, in charge of the Drupal Association.

It's easy to forget how far we've come in those years. When Megan started, the Drupal Association had little to no funding. During her tenure, the Drupal Association grew from one full-time employee to the 17 full-time employees, and from $1.8 million in annual revenues to $4 million today. We have matured into a nonprofit that can support and promote the mission of the Drupal project.

Megan led the way. She helped grow, mature and professionalize every aspect of the Drupal Association. The last two years in her role as Executive Director she was the glue for our staff and the driving force for expanding the Drupal Association's reach and impact. She understood how important it is to diversify the community, and include more stakeholders such as content creators, marketers, and commercial organizations.

I'm very grateful for all of this and more, including the many less visible contributions that it takes to make a global organization run each day, respond to challenges, and, ultimately, to thrive. Her work impacted everyone involved with Drupal.

It's sad to see Megan go, both professionally and personally. I enjoyed working with Megan from our weekly calls, to our strategy sessions as well as our email and text messages about the latest industry developments, fun stories taking place in our community, and even the occasional frustration. Open source stewardship can be hard and I'm glad we could lean on each other. I'll miss our collaboration and her support but I also understand it is time for Megan to move on. I'm excited to see her continue her open source adventure at Google.

It will be hard to fill Megan's shoes, but we have a really great story to tell. The Drupal community and the Drupal Association are doing well. Drupal continues to be a role model in the Open Source world and impacts millions of people around the world. I'm confident we can find excellent candidates.

Megan's last day is September 21st. We have activated our succession plan: putting in place a transition team and readying for a formal search for a new Executive Director. An important part of this plan is naming Tim Lehnen Interim Executive Director, elevating him from Director, Engineering. I'm committed to find a new Executive Director who can take the Drupal Association to the next level. With the help of Tim and the staff, our volunteers, sponsors and the Board of Directors, the Drupal Association is in good hands.

Aug 01 2018
Aug 01

Today, Acquia was named a leader in the 2018 Gartner Magic Quadrant for Web Content Management. Acquia has now been recognized as a leader for five years in a row.

The 2018 Gartner Magic Quadrant for Web Content ManagementAcquia recognized as a leader, next to Adobe and Sitecore, in the 2018 Gartner Magic Quadrant for Web Content Management.

Analyst reports like the Gartner Magic Quadrant are important because they introduce organizations to Acquia and Drupal. Last year, I explained it in the following way: "If you want to find a good coffee place, you use Yelp. If you want to find a nice hotel in New York, you use TripAdvisor. Similarly, if a CIO or CMO wants to spend $250,000 or more on enterprise software, they often consult an analyst firm like Gartner.".

Our tenure as a top vendor is not only a strong endorsement of Acquia's strategy and vision, but also underscores our consistency. Drupal and Acquia are here to stay, which is a good thing.

What I found interesting about year's report is the increased emphasis on flexibility and ease of integration. I've been saying this for a few years now, but it's all about innovation through integration, rather than just innovation in the core platform itself.

Marketing technology landscape 2018An image of the Marketing Technology Landscape 2018. For reference, here are the 2011, 2012, 2014, 2015, 2016 and 2017 versions of the landscape. It shows how fast the marketing technology industry is growing.

Today, there is an incredible amount of value in community-driven innovation. Just look at the 2018 Martech 5000 — the supergraphic now includes 7,000 marketing technology solutions, which is a 27% increase from a year ago. This accelerated innovation isn't exclusive to marketing technology; its happening across every part of the enterprise technology stack. From headless commerce integrations to the growing adoption of JavaScript frameworks and emerging cross-channel experiences, organizations have the opportunity to re-imagine customer experiences like never before.

It's not surprising that customers are looking for an open platform that allows for open innovation and unlimited integrations. The best way to serve this need is through open APIs, decoupled architectures and an Open Source innovation model. This is why Drupal can offer its users thousands of integrations, more than all of the other Gartner leaders combined.

Acquia Experience Platform

When you marry Drupal's community-driven innovation with Acquia's cloud platform and suite of marketing tools, you get an innovative solution across every layer of your technology stack. It allows our customers to bring powerful new experiences to market, across the web, mobile, native applications, chatbots and more. Most importantly, it gives customers the freedom to build on their own terms.

Thank you to everyone who contributed to this result!

Jul 30 2018
Jul 30
Digital backpack

I recently heard a heart-warming story from the University of California, Davis. Last month, UC Davis used Drupal to launch Article 26 Backpack, a platform that helps Syrian Refugees document and share their educational credentials.

Over the course of the Syrian civil war, more than 12 million civilians have been displaced. Hundreds of thousands of these refugees are students, who now have to overcome the obstacle of re-entering the workforce or pursuing educational degrees away from home.

Article 26 Backpack addresses this challenge by offering refugees a secure way to share their educational credentials with admissions offices, scholarship agencies, and potentials employers. The program also includes face-to-face counseling to provide participants with academic advisory and career development.

The UC Davis team launched their Drupal 8 application for Article 26 Backpack in four months. On the site, students can securely store their educational data, such as diplomas, transcripts and resumes. The next phase of the project will be to leverage Drupal’s multilingual capabilities to offer the site in Arabic as well.

This is a great example of how organizations are using Drupal to prioritize impact. It’s always inspiring to hear stories of how Drupal is changing lives for the better. Thank you to the UC Davis team for sharing their story, and continue the good work!

Jul 19 2018
Jul 19

It's been 12 months since my last progress report on Drupal core's API-first initiative. Over the past year, we've made a lot of important progress, so I wanted to provide another update.

Two and a half years ago, we shipped Drupal 8.0 with a built-in REST API. It marked the start of Drupal's evolution to an API-first platform. Since then, each of the five new releases of Drupal 8 introduced significant web service API improvements.

While I was an early advocate for adding web services to Drupal 8 five years ago, I'm even more certain about it today. Important market trends endorse this strategy, including integration with other technology solutions, the proliferation of new devices and digital channels, the growing adoption of JavaScript frameworks, and more.

In fact, I believe that this functionality is so crucial to the success of Drupal, that for several years now, Acquia has sponsored one or more full-time software developers to contribute to Drupal's web service APIs, in addition to funding different community contributors. Today, two Acquia developers work on Drupal web service APIs full time.

Drupal core's REST API

While Drupal 8.0 shipped with a basic REST API, the community has worked hard to improve its capabilities, robustness and test coverage. Drupal 8.5 shipped 5 months ago and included new REST API features and significant improvements. Drupal 8.6 will ship in September with a new batch of improvements.

One Drupal 8.6 improvement is the move of the API-first code to the individual modules, instead of the REST module providing it on their behalf. This might not seem like a significant change, but it is. In the long term, all Drupal modules should ship with web service APIs rather than depending on a central API module to provide their APIs — that forces them to consider the impact on REST API clients when making changes.

Another improvement we've made to the REST API in Drupal 8.6 is support for file uploads. If you want to understand how much thought and care went into REST support for file uploads, check out Wim Leers' blog post: API-first Drupal: file uploads!. It's hard work to make file uploads secure, support large files, optimize for performance, and provide a good developer experience.

JSON API

Adopting the JSON API module into core is important because JSON API is increasingly common in the JavaScript community.

We had originally planned to add JSON API to Drupal 8.3, which didn't happen. When that plan was originally conceived, we were only beginning to discover the extent to which Drupal's Routing, Entity, Field and Typed Data subsystems were insufficiently prepared for an API-first world. It's taken until the end of 2017 to prepare and solidify those foundational subsystems.

The same shortcomings that prevented the REST API to mature also manifested themselves in JSON API, GraphQL and other API-first modules. Properly solving them at the root rather than adding workarounds takes time. However, this approach will make for a stronger API-first ecosystem and increasingly faster progress!

Despite the delay, the JSON API team has been making incredible strides. In just the last six months, they have released 15 versions of their module. They have delivered improvements at a breathtaking pace, including comprehensive test coverage, better compliance with the JSON API specification, and numerous stability improvements.

The Drupal community has been eager for these improvements, and the usage of the JSON API module has grown 50% in the first half of 2018. The fact that module usage has increased while the total number of open issues has gone down is proof that the JSON API module has become stable and mature.

As excited as I am about this growth in adoption, the rapid pace of development, and the maturity of the JSON API module, we have decided not to add JSON API as an experimental module to Drupal 8.6. Instead, we plan to commit it to Drupal core early in the Drupal 8.7 development cycle and ship it as stable in Drupal 8.7.

GraphQL

For more than two years I've advocated that we consider adding GraphQL to Drupal core.

While core committers and core contributors haven't made GraphQL a priority yet, a lot of great progress has been made on the contributed GraphQL module, which has been getting closer to its first stable release. Despite not having a stable release, its adoption has grown an impressive 200% in the first six months of 2018 (though its usage is still measured in the hundreds of sites rather than thousands).

I'm also excited that the GraphQL specification has finally seen a new edition that is no longer encumbered by licensing concerns. This is great news for the Open Source community, and can only benefit GraphQL's adoption.

Admittedly, I don't know yet if the GraphQL module maintainers are on board with my recommendation to add GraphQL to core. We purposely postponed these conversations until we stabilized the REST API and added JSON API support. I'd still love to see the GraphQL module added to a future release of Drupal 8. Regardless of what we decide, GraphQL is an important component to an API-first Drupal, and I'm excited about its progress.

OAuth 2.0

A web services API update would not be complete without touching on the topic of authentication. Last year, I explained how the OAuth 2.0 module would be another logical addition to Drupal core.

Since then, the OAuth 2.0 module was revised to exclude its own OAuth 2.0 implementation, and to adopt The PHP League's OAuth 2.0 Server instead. That implementation is widely used, with over 5 million installs. Instead of having a separate Drupal-specific implementation that we have to maintain, we can leverage a de facto standard implementation maintained by others.

API-first ecosystem

While I've personally been most focused on the REST API and JSON API work, with GraphQL a close second, it's also encouraging to see that many other API-first modules are being developed:

  • OpenAPI, for standards-based API documentation, now at beta 1
  • JSON API Extras, for shaping JSON API to your site's specific needs (aliasing fields, removing fields, etc)
  • JSON-RPC, for help with executing common Drupal site administration actions, for example clearing the cache
  • … and many more

Conclusion

Hopefully, you are as excited for the upcoming release of Drupal 8.6 as I am, and all of the web service improvements that it will bring. I am very thankful for all of the contributions that have been made in our continued efforts to make Drupal API-first, and for the incredible momentum these projects and initiatives have achieved.

Special thanks to Wim Leers (Acquia) and Gabe Sullice (Acquia) for contributions to this blog post and to Mark Winberry (Acquia) and Jeff Beeman (Acquia) for their feedback during the writing process.

Jul 12 2018
Jul 12

If you've ever watched a Drupal Camp video to learn a new Drupal skill, technique or hack, you most likely have Kevin Thull to thank. To date, Kevin has traveled to more than 30 Drupal Camps, recorded more than 1,000 presentations, and has shared them all on YouTube for thousands of people to watch. By recording and posting hundreds of Drupal Camp presentations online, Kevin has has spread knowledge, awareness and a broader understanding of the Drupal project.

I recently attended a conference in Chicago, Kevin's hometown. I had the chance to meet with him, and to learn more about the evolution of his Drupal contributions. I was struck by his story, and decided to write it up on my blog, as I believe it could inspire others around the world.

Kevin began recording sessions during the first community events he helped organize: DrupalCamp Fox Valley in 2013 and MidCamp in 2014. At first, recording and publishing Drupal Camp sessions was an arduous process; Kevin had to oversee dozens of laptops, converters, splitters, camcorders, and trips to Fedex.

After these initial attempts, Kevin sought a different approach for recording sessions. He ended up developing a recording kit, which is a bundle of the equipment and technology needed to record a presentation. After researching various options, he discovered a lightweight, low cost and foolproof solution. Kevin continued to improve this process after he tweeted that if you sponsored his travel, he would record Drupal Camp sessions. It's no surprise that numerous camps took Kevin up on his offer. With more road experience, Kevin has consolidated the recording kits to include just a screen recorder, audio recorder and corresponding cables. With this approach, the kit records a compressed mp4 file that can be uploaded directly to YouTube. In fact, Kevin often finishes uploading all presentation videos to YouTube before the camp is over!

Kevin Thull recording kitThis is one of Kevin Thull's recording kits used to record hundreds of Drupal presentations around the world. Each kit runs at about $450.

Most recently, Kevin has been buying and building more recording kits thanks to financial contributions from various Drupal Camps. He has started to send recording kits and documentation around the world for local camp organizers to use. Not only has Kevin recorded hundreds of sessions himself, he is now sharing his expertise and teaching others how to record and share sessions.

What is exciting about Kevin's contribution is that it reinforces what originally attracted him to Drupal. Kevin ultimately chose to work with Drupal after watching online video tutorials and listening to podcasts created by the community. Today, a majority of people prefer to learn development through video tutorials. I can only imagine how many people have joined and started to contribute to Drupal after they have watched one of the many videos that Kevin has helped to publish.

Kevin's story is a great example of how everyone in the Drupal community has something to contribute, and how contributing back to the Drupal project is not exclusive to code.

This year, the Drupal community celebrated Kevin by honoring him with the 2018 Aaron Winborn Award. The Aaron Winborn award is presented annually to an individual who demonstrates personal integrity, kindness, and above-and-beyond commitment to the Drupal community. It's named after a long-time Drupal contributor Aaron Winborn, who lost his battle with Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) in early 2015. Congratulations Kevin, and thank you for your incredible contribution to the Drupal community!

Jul 03 2018
Jul 03

During my DrupalCon Nashville keynote, I shared a brief video of Mike Lamb, the Senior Director of Architecture, Engineering & Development at Pfizer. Today, I wanted to share an extended version of my interview with Mike, where he explains why the development team at Pfizer has ingrained Open Source contribution into the way they work.

[embedded content]

Mike had some really interesting and important things to share, including:

  1. Why Pfizer has chosen to standardize all of its sites on Drupal (from 0:00 to 03:19). Proprietary software isn't a match.
  2. Why Pfizer only works with agencies and vendors that contribute back to Drupal (from 03:19 to 06:25). Yes, you read that correctly; Pfizer requires that its agency partners contribute to Open Source!
  3. Why Pfizer doesn't fork Drupal modules (from 06:25 to 07:27). It's all about security.
  4. Why Pfizer decided to contribute to the Drupal 8's Workflow Initiative, and what they have learned from working with the Drupal community (from 07:27 to 10:06).
  5. How to convince a large organization (like Pfizer) to contribute back to Drupal (from 10:06 to 12:07).

Between Pfizer's direct contributions to Drupal (e.g. the Drupal 8 Workflow Initiative) and the mandate for its agency partners to contribute code back to Drupal, Pfizer's impact on the Drupal community is invaluable. It's measured in the millions of dollars per year. Just imagine what would happen to Drupal if ten other large organizations adopted Pfizer's contribution models?

Most organizations use Open Source, and don't think twice about it. However, we're starting to see more and more organizations not just use Open Source, but actively contribute to it. Open source offers organizations a completely different way of working, and fosters an innovation model that is not possible with proprietary solutions. Pfizer is a leading example of how organizations are starting to challenge the prevailing model and benefit from contributing to Open Source. Thanks for changing the status quo, Mike!

Jun 28 2018
Jun 28
Drupal is no longer the Drupal you used to know

Today, I gave a keynote presentation at the 10th annual Design 4 Drupal conference at MIT. I talked about the past, present and future of JavaScript, and how this evolution reinforces Drupal's commitment to be API-first, not API-only. I also included behind-the-scene insights into the Drupal community's administration UI and JavaScript modernization initiative, and why this approach presents an exciting future for JavaScript in Drupal.

If you are interested in viewing my keynote, you can download a copy of my slides (256 MB).

Thank you to Design 4 Drupal for having me and happy 10th anniversary!

Jun 26 2018
Jun 26

The Drupal community has done an amazing job organizing thousands of developers around the world. We've built collaboration tools and engineering processes to streamline how our community of developers work together to collectively build Drupal. This collaboration has led to amazing results. Today, more than 1 in 40 of the top one million websites use Drupal. It's inspiring to see how many organizations depend on Drupal to deliver their missions.

What is equally incredible is that historically, we haven't collaborated around the marketing of Drupal. Different organizations have marketed Drupal in their own way without central coordination or collaboration.

In my DrupalCon Nashville keynote, I shared that it's time to make a serious and focused effort to amplify Drupal success stories in the marketplace. Imagine what could happen if we enabled hundreds of marketers to collaborate on the promotion of Drupal, much like we have enabled thousands of developers to collaborate on the development of Drupal.

Accelerating Drupal adoption with business decision makers

To focus Drupal's marketing efforts, we launched the Promote Drupal Initiative. The goal of the Promote Drupal Initiative is to do what we do best: to work together to collectively grow Drupal. In this case, we want to collaborate to raise awareness with business and non-technical decision makers. We need to hone Drupal's strategic messaging, amplify success stories and public relation resources in the marketplace, provide agencies and community groups with sales and marketing tools, and improve the Drupal.org evaluator experience.

To make Promote Drupal sustainable, Rebecca Pilcher, Director of MarComm at the Drupal Association, will be leading the initiative. Rebecca will oversee volunteers with marketing and business skills that can help move these efforts forward.

Promote Drupal Fund: 75% to goal

At DrupalCon Nashville, we set a goal of fundraising $100,000 to support the Promote Drupal Initiative. These funds will help to secure staffing to backfill Rebecca's previous work (someone has to market DrupalCon!), produce critical marketing resources, and sponsor marketing sprints. The faster we reach this goal, the faster we can get to work.

I'm excited to announce that we have already reached 75% of our goal, thanks to many generous organizations and individuals around the world. I wanted to extend a big thank you to the following companies for contributing $1,000 or more to the Promote Drupal Initiative:

Thanks to many financial contributions, the Promote Drupal Initiative hit its $75k milestone!

If you can, please help us reach our total goal of $100,000! By raising a final $25,000, we can build a program that will introduce Drupal to an emerging audience of business decision makers. Together, we can make a big impact on Drupal.

Jun 19 2018
Jun 19

For the past two years, I've published the Who sponsors Drupal development report. The primary goal of the report is to share contribution data to encourage more individuals and organizations to contribute code to Drupal on Drupal.org. However, the report also highlights areas where our community can and should do better.

In 2017, the reported data showed that only 6 percent of recorded code contributions were made by contributors that identify as female. After a conversation in the Drupal Diversity & Inclusion Slack channel about the report, it became clear that many people were concerned about this discrepancy. Inspired by this conversation, Tara King started the Drupal Diversity and Inclusion Contribution Team to understand how the Drupal community could better include women and underrepresented groups to increase code and community contributions.

I recently spoke with Tara to learn more about the Drupal Diversity and Inclusion Contribution Team. I quickly discovered that Tara's leadership exemplifies various Drupal Values and Principles; especially Principle 3 (Foster a learning environment), Principle 5 (Everyone has something to contribute) and Principle 6 (Choose to lead). Inspired by Tara's work, I wanted to spotlight what the DDI Contribution Team has accomplished so far, in addition to how the team is looking to help grow diversity and inclusion in the future.

A mentorship program to help underrepresented groups

Supporting diversity and inclusion within Drupal is essential to the health and success of the project. The people who work on Drupal should reflect the diversity of people who use and work with the software. This includes building better representation across gender, race, sexuality, disability, economic status, nationality, faith, technical experience, and more. Unfortunately, underrepresented groups often lack community connections, time for contribution, resources or programs that foster inclusion, which introduce barriers to entry.

The mission of the Drupal Diversity & Inclusion Contribution Team is to increase contributions from underrepresented groups. To accomplish this goal, the DDI Contribution Team recruits team members from diverse backgrounds and underrepresented groups, and provides support and mentorship to help them contribute to Drupal. Each mentee is matched with a mentor in the Drupal community, who can provide expertise and advice on contribution goals and professional development. To date, the DDI Contribution Team supports over 20 active members.

What I loved most in my conversation with Tara is the various examples of growth she gave. For example, Angela McMahon is a full-time Drupal developer at Iowa State. Angela been working with her mentor, Caroline Boyden, on the External Link Module. Due to her participation with the DDI Contribution Team, Angela has now been credited on 4 fixed issues in the past year.

Improving the reporting around diversity and inclusion

In addition to mentoring, another primary area of focus of the DDI Contribution Team is to improve reporting surrounding diversity and inclusion. For example, in partnership with the Drupal Association and the Open Demographics Project, the DDI Contribution Team is working to implement best practices for data collection and privacy surrounding gender demographics. During the mentored code sprints at DrupalCon Nashville, the DDI Contribution Team built the Gender Field Module, which we hope to deploy on Drupal.org.

The development of the Gender Field Module is exciting, as it establishes a system to improve reporting on diversity demographics. I would love to use this data in future iterations of the 'Who sponsors Drupal development' report, because it would allow us to better measure progress on improving Drupal's diversity and inclusion against community goals.

One person can make a difference

What I love about the story of the DDI Contribution Team is that it demonstrates how one person can make a significant impact on the Drupal project. The DDI Contribution Team has grown from Tara's passion and curiosity to see what would happen if she challenged the status quo. Not only has Tara gotten to see one of her own community goals blossom, but she now also leads a team of mentors and mentees and is a co-maintainer of the Drupal 8 version of the Gender Field Module. Last but not least, she is building a great example for how other Open Source projects can increase contributions from underrepresented groups.

How you can get involved

If you are interested in getting involved with the DDI Contribution Team, there are a number of ways you can participate:

  • Support the DDI Contribution Team as a mentor, or consider recommending the program to prospective mentees. Join #ddi-contrib-team on Drupal Slack to meet the team and get started.
  • In an effort to deliberately recruit teams from spaces where people of diverse backgrounds collaborate, the DDI Contribution Team is looking to partner with Outreachy, an organization that provides paid internships for underrepresented groups to learn Free and Open Source Software and skills. If you would be interested in supporting a Drupal internship for an Outreachy candidate, reach out to Tara King to learn how you can make a financial contribution.
  • One of the long term goals of the DDI Contribution Team is to increase the number of underrepresented people in leadership positions, such as initiative lead, module maintainer, or core maintainer. If you know of open positions, consider understanding how you can work with the DDI Contribution Team to fulfill this goal.

I want to extend a special thanks to Tara King for sharing her story, and for making an important contribution to the Drupal project. Growing diversity and inclusion is something everyone in the Drupal community is responsible for, and I believe that everyone has something to contribute. Congratulations to the entire DDI Contribution Team.

Jun 15 2018
Jun 15
The Composer Initiative for Drupal

At DrupalCon Nashville, we launched a strategic initiative to improve support for Composer in Drupal 8. To learn more, you can watch the recording of my DrupalCon Nashville keynote or read the Composer Initiative issue on Drupal.org.

While Composer isn't required when using Drupal core, many Drupal site builders use it as the preferred way of assembling websites (myself included). A growing number of contributed modules also require the use of Composer, which increases the need to make Composer easier to use with Drupal.

The first step of the Composer Initiative was to develop a plan to simplify Drupal's Composer experience. Since DrupalCon Nashville, Mixologic, Mile23, Bojanz, Webflo, and other Drupal community members have worked on this plan. I was excited to see that last week, they shared their proposal.

The first phase of the proposal is focused on a series of changes in the main Drupal core repository. The directory structure will remain the same, but it will include scripts, plugins, and embedded packages that enable the bundled Drupal product to be built from the core repository using Composer. This provides users who download Drupal from Drupal.org a clear path to manage their Drupal codebase with Composer if they choose.

I'm excited about this first step because it will establish a default, official approach for using Composer with Drupal. That makes using Composer more straightforward, less confusing, and could theoretically lower the bar for evaluators and newcomers who are familiar with other PHP frameworks. Making things easier for site builders is a very important goal; web development has become a difficult task, and removing complexity out of the process is crucial.

It's also worth noting that we are planning the Automatic Updates Initiative. We are exploring if an automated update system can be build on top of the Composer Initiative's work, and provide an abstraction layer for those that don't want to use Composer directly. I believe that could be truly game-changing for Drupal, as it would remove a great deal of complexity.

If you're interested in learning more about the Composer plan, or if you want to provide feedback on the proposal, I recommend you check out the Composer Initiative issue and comment 37 on that issue.

Implementing this plan will be a lot of work. How fast we execute these changes depends on how many people will help. There are a number of different third-party Composer related efforts, and my hope is to see many of them redirect their efforts to make Drupal's out-of-the-box Composer effort better. If you're interested in getting involved or sponsoring this work, let me know and I'd be happy to connect you with the right people!

Jun 06 2018
Jun 06

One of the most stressful experiences for students is the process of choosing the right university. Researching various colleges and universities can be overwhelming, especially when students don't have the luxury of visiting different campuses in person.

At Acquia Labs, we wanted to remove some of the complexity and stress from this process, by making campus tours more accessible through virtual reality. During my presentation at Acquia Engage Europe yesterday, I shared how organizations can use virtual reality to build cross-channel experiences. People that attended Acquia Engage Europe asked if they could have a copy of my video, so I decided to share it on my blog.

The demo video below features a high school student, Jordan, who is interested in learning more about Massachusetts State University (a fictional university). From the comfort of his couch, Jordan is able to take a virtual tour directly from the university's website. After placing his phone in a VR headset, Jordan can move around the university campus, explore buildings, and view program resources, videos, and pictures within the context of his tour.

[embedded content]

All of the content and media featured in the VR tour is stored in the Massachusetts State University's Drupal site. Site administrators can upload media and position hotspots directly from within Drupal backend. The React frontend pulls in information from Drupal using JSON API. In the video below, Chris Hamper (Acquia) further explains how the decoupled React VR application takes advantage of new functionality available in Drupal 8.

[embedded content]

It's exciting to see how Drupal's power and flexibility can be used beyond traditional web pages. If you are interesting in working with Acquia on virtual reality applications, don't hesitate to contact the Acquia Labs team.

Special thanks to Chris Hamper for building the virtual reality application, and thank you to Ash Heath, Preston So and Drew Robertson for producing the demo videos.

Jun 02 2018
Jun 02

Keynoted at Frontend United in The Netherlands about our work on Drupal's web services APIs and our work toward a JavaScript-driven Drupal administration interface. Great event with lots of positive energy!

Frontend United keynote© Christoph Breidert

May 30 2018
May 30

Firefox 60 was released a few weeks ago and now comes with support for the upcoming Web Authentication (WebAuthn) standard.

Other major web browsers weren't far behind. Yesterday, the release of Google Chrome 67 also included support for the Web Authentication standard.

I'm excited about it because it can make the web both easier and safer to use.

The Web Authentication standard will make the web easier, because it is a big step towards eliminating passwords on the web. Instead of having to manage passwords, we'll be able to use web-based fingerprints, facial authentication, voice recognition, a smartphone, or hardware security keys like the YubiKey.

It will also make the web safer, because it will help reduce or even prevent phishing, man-in-the-middle attacks, and credential theft. If you are interested in learning more about the security benefits of the Web Authentication standard, I recommend reading Adam Langley's excellent analysis.

When I have a bit more time for side projects, I'd like to buy a YubiKey 4C to see how it fits in my daily workflow, in addition to what it would look like to add Web Authentication support to Drupal and https://dri.es.

May 29 2018
May 29

In the beginning of the year I started doing some iOS development for my POSSE plan. As I was new to iOS development, I decided to teach myself by watching short, instructional videos. Different people learn in different ways, but for me, videos tutorials were the most effective way to learn.

Given that recent experience, I'm very excited to share that all of the task tutorials in the Drupal 8 User Guide are now accompanied by video tutorials. These videos are embedded directly into every user guide page on Drupal.org. You can see an example on the "Editing with the in-place editor" page.

These videos provide a great introduction to installing, administering, site building and maintaining the content of a Drupal-based website — all important skills for a new Drupalist to learn. Supplementing user guides with video tutorials is an important step towards improving our evaluator experience, as video can often convey a lot more than text.

Creating high-quality videos is hard and time-consuming work. Over the course of six months, the team at Drupalize.Me has generously contributed a total of 52 videos! I want to give a special shout-out to Joe Shindelar and the Drupalize.Me team for creating these videos and to Jennifer Hodgdon and Neil Drumm (Drupal Association) for helping to get each video posted on Drupal.org.

What a fantastic gift to the community!

May 25 2018
May 25

Last weekend, over 29 million people watched the Royal Wedding of Prince Harry and Meghan Markle. While there is a tremendous amount of excitement surrounding the newlyweds, I was personally excited to learn that the royal family's website is built with Drupal! Royal.uk is the official website of the British royal family, and is visited by an average of 12 million people each year. Check it out at https://www.royal.uk!

Royal uk

May 22 2018
May 22
Adobe acquires Magento for $1.68 billion

Yesterday, Adobe announced that it agreed to buy Magento for $1.68 billion. When I woke up this morning, 14 different people had texted me asking for my thoughts on the acquisition.

Adobe acquiring Magento isn't a surprise. One of our industry's worst-kept secrets is that Adobe first tried to buy Hybris, but lost the deal to SAP; subsequently Adobe tried to buy DemandWare and lost out against Salesforce. It's evident that Adobe has been hungry to acquire a commerce platform for quite some time.

The product motivation behind the acquisition

Large platform companies like Salesforce, Oracle, SAP and Adobe are trying to own the digital customer experience market from top to bottom, which includes providing support for marketing, commerce, personalization, and data management, in addition to content and experience management and more.

Compared to the other platform companies, Adobe was missing commerce. With Magento under its belt, Adobe can better compete against Salesforce, Oracle and SAP.

While Salesforce, SAP and Oracle offer good commerce capability, they lack satisfactory content and experience management capabilities. I expect that Adobe closing the commerce gap will compel Salesforce, SAP and Oracle to act more aggressively on their own content and experience management gap.

While Magento has historically thrived in the SMB and mid-market, the company recently started to make inroads into the enterprise. Adobe will bring a lot of operational maturity; how to sell into the enterprise, how to provide enterprise grade support, etc. Magento stands to benefit from this expertise.

The potential financial outcome behind the acquisition

According to Adobe press statements, Magento has achieved "approximately $150 million in annual revenue". We also know that in early 2017, Magento raised $250 million in funding from Hillhouse Capital. Let's assume that $180 million of that is still in the bank. If we do a simple back-of-the-envelope calculation, we can subtract this $180 million from the $1.68 billion, and determine that Magento was valued at roughly $1.5 billion, or a 10x revenue multiple on Magento's trailing twelve months of revenue. That is an incredible multiple for Magento, which is primarily a licensing business today.

Compare that with Shopify, which is trading at a $15 billion dollar valuation and has $760 million of twelve month trailing revenue. This valuation is good for a 20x multiple. Shopify deserves the higher multiple, because it's the better business; all of its business is delivered in the cloud and at 65% year-over-year revenue growth, it is growing much faster than Magento.

Regardless, one could argue that Adobe got a great deal, especially if it can accelerate Magento's transformation from a licensing business into a cloud business.

Most organizations prefer best-of-breed

While both the product and financial motivations behind this acquisition are seemingly compelling, I'm not convinced organizations want an integrated approach.

Instead of being confined to proprietary vendors' prescriptive suites and roadmaps, global brands are looking for an open platform that allows organizations to easily integrate with their preferred technology. Organizations want to build content-rich shopping journeys that integrate their experience management solution of choice with their commerce platform of choice.

We see this first hand at Acquia. These integrations can span various commerce platforms, including IBM WebSphere Commerce, Salesforce Commerce Cloud/Demandware, Oracle/ATG, SAP/hybris, Magento and even custom transaction platforms. Check out Quicken (Magento), Weber (Demandware), Motorola (Broadleaf Commerce), Tesla (custom to order a car, and Shopify to order accessories) as great examples of Drupal and Acquia working with various commerce platforms. And of course, we've quite a few projects with Drupal's native commerce solution, Drupal Commerce.

Owning Magento gives Adobe a disadvantage, because commerce vendors will be less likely to integrate with Adobe Experience Manager moving forward.

It's all about innovation through integration

Today, there is an incredible amount of innovation taking place in the marketing technology landscape (full-size image), and it is impossible for a single vendor to have the most competitive product suite across all of these categories. The only way to keep up with this unfettered innovation is through integrations.

Marketing technology landscape 2018An image of the Marketing Technology Landscape 2018. For reference, here are the 2011, 2012, 2014, 2015, 2016 and 2017 versions of the landscape. It shows how fast the marketing technology industry is growing.

Most customers want an open platform that allows for open innovation and unlimited integrations. It's why Drupal and Acquia are winning, why the work on Drupal's web services is so important, and why Acquia remains committed to a best-of-breed strategy for commerce. It's also why Acquia has strong conviction around Acquia Journey as a marketing integration platform. It's all about innovation through integration, making those integrations easy, and removing friction from adopting preferred technologies.

If you acquire a commerce platform, acquire a headless one

If I were Adobe, I would have looked to acquire a headless commerce platform such as Elastic Path, Commerce Tools, Moltin, Reaction Commerce or even Salsify.

Today, there is a lot of functional overlap between Magento and Adobe Experience Manager — from content editing, content workflows, page building, user management, search engine optimization, theming, and much more. The competing functionality between the two solutions makes for a poor developer experience and for a poor merchant experience.

In a headless approach, the front end and the back end are decoupled, which means the experience or presentation layer is separated from the commerce business layer. There is a lot less overlap of functionality in this approach, and it provides a better experience for merchants and developers.

Alternatively, you could go for a deeply integrated approach like Drupal Commerce. It has zero overlap between its commerce, content management and experience building capabilities.

For Open Source, it could be good or bad

How Adobe will embrace Magento's Open Source community is possibly the most intriguing part of this acquisition — at least for me.

For a long time, Magento operated as Open Source in name, but wasn't very Open Source in practice. Over the last couple of years, the Magento team worked hard to rekindle its Open Source community. I know this because I attended and keynoted one of its conferences on this topic. I have also spent a fair amount of time with Magento's leadership team discussing this. Like other projects, Magento has been taking inspiration from Drupal.

For example, the introduction of Magento 2 allowed the company to move to GitHub for the first time, which gave the community a better way to collaborate on code and other important issues. The latest release of Magento cited 194 contributions from the community. While that is great progress, it is small compared to Drupal.

My hope is that these Open Source efforts continue now that Magento is part of Adobe. If they do, that would be a tremendous win for Open Source.

On the other hand, if Adobe makes Magento cloud-only, radically changes their pricing model, limits integrations with Adobe competitors, or doesn't value the Open Source ethos, it could easily alienate the Magento community. In that case, Adobe bought Magento for its install base and the Magento brand, and not because it believes in the Open Source model.

This acquisition also signals a big win for PHP. Adobe now owns a $1.68 billion PHP product, and this helps validate PHP as an enterprise-grade technology.

Unfortunately, Adobe has a history of being "Open Source"-second and not "Open Source"-first. It acquired Day Software in July 2010. This technology was largely made using open source frameworks — Apache Sling, Apache Jackrabbit and more — and was positioned as an open, best-of-breed solution for developers and agile marketers. Most of that has been masked and buried over the years and Adobe's track record with developers has been mixed, at best.

Will the same happen to Magento? Time will tell.

May 17 2018
May 17

As web applications have evolved from static pages to application-like experiences, end-users' expectations of websites have become increasingly demanding. JavaScript, partnered with effective user-experience design, enable the seamless, instantaneous interactions that users now expect.

The Drupal project anticipated this trend years ago and we have been investing heavily in making Drupal API-first ever since. As a result, more organizations are building decoupled applications served by Drupal. This approach allows organizations to use modern JavaScript frameworks, while still benefiting from Drupal's powerful content management capabilities, such as content modeling, content editing, content workflows, access rights and more.

While organizations use JavaScript frameworks to create visitor-facing experiences with Drupal as a backend, Drupal's own administration interface has not yet embraced a modern JavaScript framework. There is high demand for Drupal to provide a cutting-edge experience for its own users: the site's content creators and administrators.

At DrupalCon Vienna, we decided to start working on an alternative Drupal administrative UI using React. Sally Young, one of the initiative coordinators, recently posted a fantastic update on our progress since DrupalCon Vienna.

Next steps for Drupal's API-first and JavaScript work

While we made great progress improving Drupal's web services support and improving our JavaScript support, I wanted to use this blog post to compile an overview of some of our most important next steps:

1. Stabilize the JSON API module

JSON API is a widely-used specification for building web service APIs in JSON. We are working towards adding JSON API to Drupal core as it makes it easier for JavaScript developers to access the content and configuration managed in Drupal. There is a central plan issue that lists all of the blockers for getting JSON API into core (comprehensive test coverage, specification compliance, and more). We're working hard to get all of them out of the way!

2. Improve our JavaScript testing infrastructure

Drupal's testing infrastructure is excellent for testing PHP code, but until now, it was not optimized for testing JavaScript code. As we expect the amount of JavaScript code in Drupal's administrative interface to dramatically increase in the years to come, we have been working on improving our JavaScript testing infrastructure using Headless Chrome and Nightwatch.js. Nightwatch.js has already been committed for inclusion in Drupal 8.6, however some additional work remains to create a robust JavaScript-to-Drupal bridge. Completing this work is essential to ensure we do not introduce regressions, as we proceed with the other items in our roadmap.

3. Create designs for a React-based administration UI

Having a JavaScript-based UI also allows us to rethink how we can improve Drupal's administration experience. For example, Drupal's current content modeling UI requires a lot of clicking, saving and reloading. By using React, we can reimagine our user experience to be more application-like, intuitive and faster to use. We still need a lot of help to design and test different parts of the Drupal administration UI.

4. Allow contributed modules to use React or Twig

We want to enable modules to provide either a React-powered administration UI or a traditional Twig-based administration UI. We are working on an architecture that can support both at the same time. This will allow us to introduce JavaScript-based UIs incrementally instead of enforcing a massive paradigm shift all at once. It will also provide some level of optionality for modules that want to opt-out from supporting the new administration UI.

5. Implement missing web service APIs

While we have been working for years to add web service APIs to many parts of Drupal, not all of Drupal has web services support yet. For our React-based administration UI prototype we decided to implement a new permission screen (i.e. https://example.com/admin/people/permissions). We learned that Drupal lacked the necessary web service APIs to retrieve a list of all available permissions in the system. This led us to create a support module that provides such an API. This support module is a temporary solution that helped us make progress on our prototype; the goal is to integrate these APIs into core itself. If you want to contribute to Drupal, creating web service APIs for various Drupal subsystems might be a great way to get involved.

6. Make the React UI extensible and configurable

One of the benefits of Drupal's current administration UI is that it can be configured (e.g. you can modify the content listing because it has been built using the Views module) and extended by contributed modules (e.g. the Address module adds a UI that is optimized for editing address information). We want to make sure that in the new React UI we keep enough flexibility for site builders to customize the administrative UI.

All decoupled builds benefit

All decoupled applications will benefit from the six steps above; they're important for building a fully-decoupled administration UI, and for building visitor-facing decoupled applications.

Useful for decoupling of visitor-facing front-ends Useful for decoupling of the administration backend 1. Stabilize the JSON API module ✔ ✔ 2. Improve our JavaScript testing infrastructure ✔ ✔ 3. Create designs for a React-based administration UI ✔ 4. Allow contributed modules to use React or Twig ✔ ✔ 5. Implement missing web service APIs ✔ ✔ 6. Make the React UI extensible and configurable ✔

Conclusion

Over the past three years we've been making steady progress to move Drupal to a more API-first and JavaScript centric world. It's important work given a variety of market trends in our industry. While we have made excellent progress, there are more challenges to be solved. We hope you like our next steps, and we welcome you to get involved with them. Thank you to everyone who has contributed so far!

Special thanks to Matt Grill and Lauri Eskola for co-authoring this blog post and to Wim Leers, Gabe Sullice, Angela Byron, and Preston So for their feedback during the writing process.

May 09 2018
May 09

How the Open Demographics Initiative recommends you ask for gender information© Open Demographics Initiative's gender identification questions

Last week, Nikki Stevens presented "Other, Please Specify" for TEDx at Arizona State University. In her TED Talk, Nikki shares the story behind the Open Demographics Initiative, which is developing a recommended set of questions that anyone can use to ask online community members about their demographics.

Nikki demonstrates how a majority of demographic surveys require users to conform to restrictive identity fields, which can alienate minority or underrepresented groups. The Open Demographics Initiative wants to develop forms that are more inclusive, in addition to giving people more control over the data and information they chose to disclose.

Inspired by Nikki's presentation, I reached out to the engineering team at the Drupal Association to see if there are plans to implement the Open Demographics Initiative's recommendations on Drupal.org. I was happy to learn that they are collaborating with the Open Demographics team to add the recommendations to the user registration process on Drupal.org.

Adopting Open Demographics on Drupal.org will also allow us to improve reporting on diversity and inclusion, which in turn will help us better support initiatives that advance diversity and inclusion. Plus, we can lead by example and inspire other organizations to do the same.

Thank you Nikki, for sharing the story behind the Open Demographics Initiative, and for helping to inspire change in the Drupal community and beyond.

Apr 30 2018
Apr 30

Last month, Acquia discontinued service and support for Mollom, the spam service I started more than ten years ago. As a goodbye, I want to share the untold story of how I founded Mollom.

In 2007, I read Tim Ferriss' book The 4-Hour Work Week, and was hooked. The book provides a blueprint for how entrepreneurs can structure and build a business to fund the lifestyle of their dreams. It's based on Ferriss' own experience; he streamlined his business, automated systems and outsourced tasks until it was not only more profitable, but also took less of his time to operate. The process of automation and outsourcing was so efficient, Ferriss only spent four hours a week to run his business; this gave him time and freedom to take "mini-retirements", travel the world, and write a book. When I first read Ferriss' book, I was inspired by the idea of simultaneously having that much free time and being financially stable.

While I was reading Ferriss' book, I was also working on a website spam filter for my blog, called Mollom. I had started to build Mollom as a personal project for exclusive use on my own blog. Inspired by the 4-Hour Work Week, I was convinced I could turn Mollom into a small SaaS service with global customers, complete self-service, and full automation. This would allow me to operate Mollom from anywhere in the world, and would require just a few hours of my time each week. Because I was starting to use machine learning, I enlisted the help of one of my best friends, Benjamin Schrauwen, a professor in machine learning at the University of Ghent.

In the same year, Jay Batson and I met at DrupalCon Sunnyvale, and we had already started to explore the idea of founding Acquia. My oldest son Axl was also born in the summer of 2007, and I was working hard to finish my PhD. Throughout all of this, we were also working to get Drupal 6 released. Needless to say, it was a busy summer.

With my PhD nearly complete, I needed to decide what to do next. I knew that starting Acquia was going to have a big impact, not just on Drupal but also on my life. However, I was also convinced that Mollom, while much smaller in scope and ambition, could provide a path to the freedom and independence Ferriss describes.

Mollom's foundational years

Exciting 2007, I determined that both Acquia and Mollom were important opportunities to pursue. Jay and I raised $7 million in venture capital, and we publicly launched Acquia in November 2007. Meanwhile, Ben and I pooled together €18,000 of our own money, bootstrapped Mollom, and publicly launched Mollom in March 2008.

I always made a point to run both businesses separately. Even after I moved from Belgium to the US in the summer of 2010, I continued to run Mollom and Acquia independently. The Mollom team was based in Europe, and once or twice a week, I would get up at 4 AM to have a two-hour conference call with the team. After my conference call, I'd help my family get ready for the day, and then I was off to work at Acquia.

By 2011, Mollom had achieved the goals our team set out to accomplish; our revenues had grown to about €250,000 in recurring annual revenue, our gross margins were over 85 percent, and we could pretty much run the business on autopilot. Our platform was completely self-serviced for our users, the anti-spam algorithms self-learning, the service was built to be highly-available, and the backend operations were almost entirely automated. Not bad for a side hustle. I often joked about how I could run Mollom from the beach in Greece, with less than an hour of work a day.

However, our team at Mollom wasn't satisfied yet, so instead of sitting on the beach, we decided to invest Mollom's profits in feature development. We had a team of three engineers working on adding new capabilities, in addition to re-architecting and scaling Mollom to keep up with its growth. On average, Mollom handled more than 100 web service requests per second, and we regularly saw peaks of up to 3,000 web service request per second. In a way, Mollom's architecture was ahead of its time — it used a micro-services architecture with a REST API, a decoupled administration backend and relied heavily on machine learning. From day one, our terms of service respected people's privacy, and we never had a data breach.

Team decemberA photo of the Mollom team at an offsite in 2011: it includes Daniel Kudwien, Benjamin Schrauwen, Cedric De Vleeschauwer, Thomas Meire, Johan Vos and Vicky Van Roeyen. Missing in the picture is Dries.

In the meantime, Acquia had really taken off; Acquia's revenue had grown to over $22 million annually, and I was often working 60 hour work weeks to grow the company. Acquia's Board of Directors wanted my full attention, and had even offered to acquire Mollom a few times. I recognized that running Mollom, Acquia and Drupal simultaneously was not sustainable — you can only endure regular 4 AM meetings for so long. Plus, we had ambitious goals for Mollom; we wanted to add many-site content moderation, sentiment analysis and detection for certain code of conduct violations. Doing these things would require more capital, and unless you are Elon Musk, it's really hard to raise capital for multiple companies at the same time. Most importantly, I wanted to focus more on growing Drupal and driving Acquia's expansion.

Acquia acquires Mollom

By the end of 2012, Ben and I agreed to sell Mollom to Acquia. Acquia's business model was to provide SaaS services around Drupal, and Mollom was exactly that — a SaaS service used by tens of thousands of Drupal sites.

Selling Mollom was a life-changing moment for me. It proved that I was able to bootstrap and grow a company, steer it to profitability and exit successfully.

Mollom closingSelling Mollom to Acquia involved signing a lot of documents. A photo of me signing the acquisition paperwork with Mary Jefts, Acquia's CFO at the time. It took three hours to sign all the paperwork.

Acquia retires Mollom

By 2017, five years after the acquisition, it became clear that Mollom was no longer a strategic priority for Acquia. As a result, Acquia decided it was best to shut down Mollom by April 2018. As the leader of the product organization at Acquia, I'm supportive of this decision. It allows us to sharpen our focus and to better deliver on our mission.

While it was a rational decision, it's bittersweet. I still believe that Mollom could have continued to have a big impact on the Open Web. Not only did that make the web better, it saved people millions of hours moderating their content. I also considered keeping Mollom running as part of Acquia's "Give back more" principle. However, Acquia gives back a lot, and I believe that giving back to Drupal should be our priority.

Mollom end of life announcementMollom's end-of-life announcement that replaced the old https://mollom.com.

Overall, Mollom was a success. While I never got my 4-hour work week, I enjoyed successfully creating a company from scratch, and seeing it evolve through every stage of its life. I learned how to build and run a SaaS service, I made some money in the process, and best of all, Mollom blocked over 15 billion spam comments across tens of thousands of websites. This translates to saving people around the world millions of hours, which would otherwise be devoted to content moderation. Mollom also helped to protect the websites of some of the world's most famous brands; from Harvard, to The Economist, Tesla, Twitter, Sony Music and more. Finally, we were able to offer Mollom for free to the vast majority of our users, which is something we took a lot of pride in.

If you were a user of Mollom the past 10+ years, I hope you enjoyed our service. I also want to extend a special thank you to everyone who contributed to Mollom over the past 11 years!

Rest in peace, Mollom! Thank you for blocking so much spam. I'll think about you next time I visit Greece.

Apr 27 2018
Apr 27

If you are interested in Open Source and have some time this weekend, watch Steve Francia's DrupalCon keynote called "Drupal and the secret of my success". Steve has been involved in Open Source for over 20 years, and has had the unique opportunity to lead three of the most successful Open Source companies in history. He was Chief Developer Advocate of MongoDB, Chief Operator of Docker, and now he is the Product Lead for the Go programming language at Google. Watch the video to hear Steve's personal story about how Drupal influenced his career, in addition to influencing MongoDB, Docker and Go. I don't often get emotional, but I had to wipe a few tears away during his presentation. Thanks for telling your story and being an inspiration, Steve!

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Apr 26 2018
Apr 26

Jacob Rockowitz recently posted a blog post with ideas about how we can make Drupal more welcoming.

What I found most interesting about Jacob's blog post is that he makes the point that every WordPress site (not WordPress.org) has an 'About WordPress' section in the administration backend that shows both WordPress' values and contributor credits.

Wordpress about section

This could be an interesting approach for Drupal and is an idea worth exploring. Today, Drupal's values and principles and Drupal's contribution credits live on Drupal.org, but not in the Drupal software itself. When done well, it's probably one of the most impactful ways to educate people and organizations that are new to Drupal about our community and open source. And by having credits in the software, we'd inspire more people and organizations to contribute back. It's an interesting idea.

Apr 17 2018
Apr 17

On March 28th, the Drupal Security Team released a bug fix for a critical security vulnerability, named SA-CORE-2018-002. Over the past week, various exploits have been identified, as attackers have attempted to compromise unpatched Drupal sites. Hackers continue to try to exploit this vulnerability, and Acquia's own security team has observed more than 100,000 attacks a day.

The SA-CORE-2018-002 security vulnerability is highly critical; it allows an unauthenticated attacker to perform remote code execution on most Drupal installations. When the Drupal Security Team made the security patch available, there were no publicly known exploits or attacks against SA-CORE-2018-002.

That changed six days ago, after Checkpoint Research provided a detailed explanation of the SA-CORE-2018-002 security bug, in addition to step-by-step instructions that explain how to exploit the vulnerability. A few hours after Checkpoint Research's blog post, Vitalii Rudnykh, a Russian security researcher, shared a proof-of-concept exploit on GitHub. Later that day, Acquia's own security team began to witness attempted attacks.

The article by Checkpoint Research and Rudnykh's proof-of-concept code have spawned numerous exploits, which are written in different programming languages such as Ruby, Bash, Python and more. As a result, the number of attacks have grown significantly over the past few days.

Fortunately, Acquia deployed a platform level mitigation for all Acquia Cloud customers one hour after the Drupal Security Team made the SA-CORE-2018-002 release available on March 28th. Over the past week, Acquia has observed over 500,000 attacks from more than 3,000 different IP addresses across our fleet of servers and customer base. To the best of our knowledge, every attempted exploitation of an Acquia customer has failed.


SA-CORE-2018-002 timeline of events as seen by Acquia

The scale and the severity of this attack suggests that if you failed to upgrade your Drupal sites, or your site is not supported by Acquia Cloud or another trusted vendor that provides platform level fixes, the chances of your site being hacked are very high. If you haven't upgraded your site yet and you are not on a protected platform then assume your site is compromised. Rebuild your host, reinstall Drupal from a backup taken before the vulnerability was announced and upgrade before putting the site back online. (Update: restoring a Drupal site from backup may not be sufficient as some of the exploits reinstall themselves from crontab. You should assume the whole host is compromised.)

Drupal's responsible disclosure policy

It's important to keep in mind that all software has security bugs, and fortunately for Drupal, critical security bugs are rare. It's been nearly four years since the Drupal Security Team published a security release for Drupal core that is this critical.

What matters is how software projects or software vendors deal with security bugs. The Drupal Security Team follows a "coordinated disclosure policy": issues remain private until there is a published fix. A public announcement is made when the threat has been addressed and a secure version of Drupal core is also available. Even when a bug fix is made available, the Drupal Security Team is very thoughtful with its communication. The team is careful to withhold as many details about the vulnerability as possible to make it difficult for hackers to create an exploit, and to buy Drupal site owners as much time as possible to upgrade. In this case, Drupal site owners had two weeks before the first public exploits appeared.

Historically, many proprietary CMS vendors have executed a different approach, and don't always disclose security bugs. Instead, they often fix bugs silently. In this scenario, secrecy might sound like a good idea; it prevents sites from being hacked and it avoids bad PR. However, hiding vulnerabilities provides a false sense of security, which can make matters much worse. This approach also functions under the assumption that hackers can't find security problems on their own. They can, and when they do, even more sites are at risk of being compromised.

Drupal's approach to security is best-in-class — from fixing the bug, testing the solution, providing advance notice, coordinating the release, being thoughtful not to over communicate too many details, being available for press inquiries, and repeatedly reminding everyone to upgrade.

Acquia's platform level fix

In addition to the Drupal Security Team's responsible disclosure policy, Acquia's own security team has been closely monitoring attempted attacks on our infrastructure. Following the release of the Checkpoint Research article, Acquia has tracked the origin of the 500,000 attempted attacks:

SA-CORE-2018-002 map of attacks against Acquia Cloud customersThis image captures the geographic distribution of SA-CORE-2018-002 attacks against Acquia's customers. The number denoted in each bubble is the total number of attacks that came from that location.

To date, over 50 percent of the attempted attacks Acquia has witnessed originate from the Ukraine:

SA-CORE-2018-002 countries as seen by Acquia

At Acquia, we provide customers with automatic security patching of both infrastructure and Drupal code, in addition to platform level fixes for security bugs. Our commitment to keeping our customers safe is reflected in our push to release a platform level fix one hour after the Drupal Security Team made SA-CORE-2018-002 available. This mitigation covered all customers with Acquia Cloud Free, Acquia Cloud Professional, Acquia Cloud Enterprise, and Acquia Cloud Site Factory applications; giving our customers peace of mind while they upgraded their Drupal sites, with or without our help. This means that when attempted exploits and attacks first appeared in the wild, Acquia's customers were safe. As a best practice, Acquia always recommends that customers upgrade to the latest secure version of Drupal core, in addition to platform mitigations.

This blog post was co-authored by Dries Buytaert and Cash Williams.
Apr 17 2018
Apr 17
Cowboy Dries at DrupalCon Nashville© Yes Moon

Last week, I shared my State of Drupal presentation at Drupalcon Nashville. In addition to sharing my slides, I wanted to provide more information on how you can participate in the various initiatives presented in my keynote, such as growing Drupal adoption or evolving our community values and principles.

Drupal 8 update

During the first portion of my presentation, I provided an overview of Drupal 8 updates. Last month, the Drupal community celebrated an important milestone with the successful release of Drupal 8.5, which ships with improved features for content creators, site builders, and developers.

Drupal 8 continues to gain momentum, as the number of Drupal 8 sites has grown 51 percent year-over-year:

Drupal 8 site growthThis graph depicts the number of Drupal 8 sites built since April 2015. Last year there were 159,000 sites and this year there are 241,000 sites, representing a 51% increase year-over-year.

Drupal 8's module ecosystem is also maturing quickly, as 81 percent more Drupal 8 modules have become stable in the past year:

Drupal 8 module readinessThis graph depicts the number of modules now stable since January 2016. This time last year there were 1,028 stable projects and this year there are 1,860 stable projects, representing an 81% increase year-over-year.

As you can see from the Drupal 8 roadmap, improving the ease of use for content creators remains our top priority:

Drupal 8 roadmapThis roadmap depicts Drupal 8.5, 8.6, and 8.7+, along with a column for "wishlist" items that are not yet formally slotted. The contents of this roadmap can be found at https://www.drupal.org/core/roadmap.

Four ways to grow Drupal adoption

Drupal 8 was released at the end of 2015, which means our community has had over two years of real-world experience with Drupal 8. It was time to take a step back and assess additional growth initiatives based on what we have learned so far.

In an effort to better understand the biggest hurdles facing Drupal adoption, we interviewed over 150 individuals around the world that hold different roles within the community. We talked to Drupal front-end and back-end developers, contributors, trainers, agency owners, vendors that sell Drupal to customers, end users, and more. Based on their feedback, we established four goals to help accelerate Drupal adoption.

Lets grow Drupal together

Goal 1: Improve the technical evaluation process

Matthew Grasmick recently completed an exercise in which he assessed the technical evaluator experience of four different PHP frameworks, and discovered that Drupal required the most steps to install. Having a good technical evaluator experience is critical, as it has a direct impact on adoption rates.

To improve the Drupal evaluation process, we've proposed the following initiatives:

Initiative Issue link Stakeholders Initiative coordinator Status Better discovery experience on Drupal.org Drupal.org roadmap Drupal Association hestenet Under active development Better "getting started" documentation #2956879 Documentation Working Group grasmash In planning More modern administration experience #2957457 Core contributors ckrina and yoroy Under active development

To become involved with one of these initiatives, click on its "Issue link" in the table above. This will take you to Drupal.org, where you can contribute by sharing your ideas or lending your expertise to move an initiative forward.

Goal 2: Improve the content creator experience

Throughout the interview process, it became clear that ease of use is a feature now expected of all technology. For Drupal, this means improving the content creator experience through a modern administration user interface, drag-and-drop media management and page building, and improved site preview functionality.

The good news is that all of these features are already under development through the Media, Workflow, Layout and JavaScript Modernization initiatives.

Most of these initiative teams meet weekly on Drupal Slack (see the meetings calendar), which gives community members an opportunity to meet team members, receive information on current goals and priorities, and volunteer to contribute code, testing, design, communications, and more.

Goal 3: Improve the site builder experience

Our research also showed that to improve the site builder experience, we should focus on improving the three following areas:

  • The configuration management capabilities in core need to support more common use cases out-of-the-box.
  • Composer and Drupal core should be better integrated to empower site builders to manage dependencies and keep Drupal sites up-to-date.
  • We should provide a longer grace period between required core updates so development teams have more time to prepare, test, and upgrade their Drupal sites after each new minor Drupal release.

We plan to make all of these aspects easier for site builders through the following initiatives:

Initiative Issue link Stakeholders Initiative coordinator Status Composer & Core #2958021 Core contributors + Drupal Association Coordinator needed! Proposed Config Management 2.0 #2957423 Core contributors Coordinator needed! Proposed Security LTS 2909665 Core committers + Drupal Security Team + Drupal Association Core committers and Security team Proposed, under discussion

Goal 4: Promote Drupal to non-technical decision makers

The fourth initiative is unique as it will help our community to better communicate the value of Drupal to the non-technical decision makers. Today, marketing executives and content creators often influence the decision behind what CMS an organization will use. However, many of these individuals are not familiar with Drupal or are discouraged by the misconception that Drupal is primarily for developers.

With these challenges in mind, the Drupal Association has launched the Promote Drupal Initiative. This initiative will include building stronger marketing and branding, demos, events, and public relations resources that digital agencies and local associations can use to promote Drupal. The Drupal Association has set a goal of fundraising $100,000 to support this initiative, including the hiring of a marketing coordinator.

$54k raised for the Promote Drupal initiative

Megan Sanicki and her team have already raised $54,000 from over 30 agencies and 5 individual sponsors in only 4 days. Clearly this initiative resonates with Drupal agencies. Please consider how you or your organization can contribute.

Fostering community with values and principles

This year at DrupalCon Nashville, over 3,000 people traveled to the Music City to collaborate, learn, and connect with one another. It's at events like DrupalCon where the impact of our community becomes tangible for many. It also serves as an important reminder that while Drupal has grown a great deal since the early days, the work needed to scale our community is never done.

Prompted by feedback from our community, I have spent the past five months trying to better establish the Drupal community's principles and values. I have shared an "alpha" version of Drupal's values and principles at https://www.drupal.org/about/values-and-principles. As a next step, I will be drafting a charter for a new working group that will be responsible for maintaining and improving our values and principles. In the meantime, I invite every community member to provide feedback in the issue queue of the Drupal governance project.

Values and principles alphaAn overview of Drupal's values with supporting principles.

I believe that taking time to highlight community members that exemplify each principle can make the proposed framework more accessible. That is why it was very meaningful for me to spotlight three Drupal community members that demonstrate these principles.

Principle 1: Optimize for Impact - Rebecca Pilcher

Rebecca shares a remarkable story about Drupal's impact on her Type 1 diabetes diagnosis:

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Principle 5: Everyone has something to contribute - Mike Lamb

Mike explains why Pfizer contributes millions to Drupal:

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Principle 6: Choose to Lead - Mark Conroy

Mark tells the story of his own Drupal journey, and how his experience inspired him to help other community members:

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Watch the keynote or download my slides

In addition to the community spotlights, you can also watch a recording of my keynote (starting at 19:25), or you can download a copy of my slides (164 MB).

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Apr 10 2018
Apr 10
Values and principles balloons

Since its founding, Drupal has grown a great deal, and today there are thousands of contributors and organizations that make up our community. Over the course of seventeen years, we have spent a great amount of time and effort scaling our community. As a result, Drupal has evolved into one of the largest open source projects in the world.

Today, the Drupal project serves as a role model to many other open source projects; from our governance and funding models, to how we work together globally with thousands of contributors, to our 3,000+ person conferences. However, the work required to scale our community is a continuous process.

Prompted by feedback from the Drupal community, scaling Drupal will be a key focus for me throughout 2018. I have heard a lot of great ideas about how we can scale our community, in addition to improving how we all work together. Today, I wanted to start by better establishing Drupal's values and principles, as it is at the core of everything we do.

Remarkably, after all these years, our values (what guides these behaviors) and our principles (our most important behaviors) are still primarily communicated through word of mouth.

In recent years, various market trends and challenging community events have inspired a variety of changes in the Drupal community. It's in times like these that we need to rely on our values and principles the most. However, that is very difficult to do when our values and principles aren't properly documented.

Over the course of the last five months, I have tried to capture our fundamental values and principles. Based on more than seventeen years of leading and growing the Drupal project, I tried to articulate what I know are "fundamental truths": the culture and behaviors members of our community uphold, how we optimize technical and non-technical decision making, and the attributes shared by successful contributors and leaders in the Drupal project.

Capturing our values and principles as accurately as I could was challenging work. I spent many hours writing, rewriting, and discarding them, and I consulted numerous people in the process. After a lot of consideration, I ended up with five value statements, supported by eleven detailed principles.

I shared both the values and the principles on Drupal.org as version 1.0-alpha (archived PDF). I labeled it alpha, because the principles and values aren't necessarily complete. While I have strong conviction in each of the Drupal principles and corresponding values, some of our values and principles are hard to capture in words, and by no means will I have described them perfectly. However, I arrived at a point where I wanted to share what I have drafted, open it up to the community for feedback, and move the draft forward more collaboratively.

Values and principles alphaAn overview of Drupal's values with supporting principles.

While this may be the first time I've tried to articulate our values and principles in one document, many of these principles have guided the project for a very long time. If communicated well, these principles and values should inspire us to be our best selves, enable us to make good decisions fast, and guide us to work as one unified community.

I also believe this document is an important starting point and framework to help address additional (and potentially unidentified) needs. For example, some have asked for clearer principles about what behavior will and will not be tolerated in addition to defining community values surrounding justice and equity. I hope that this document lays the groundwork for that.

Throughout the writing process, I consulted the work of the Community Governance Group and the feedback that was collected in discussions with the community last fall. The 1.0-alpha version was also reviewed by the following people: Tiffany Farriss, George DeMet, Megan Sanicki, Adam Goodman, Gigi Anderson, Mark Winberry, Angie Byron, ASH Heath, Steve Francia, Rachel Lawson, Helena McCabe, Adam Bergstein, Paul Johnson, Michael Anello, Donna Benjamin, Neil Drumm, Fatima Khalid, Sally Young, Daniel Wehner and Ryan Szrama. I'd like to thank everyone for their input.

As a next step, I invite you to provide feedback. The best way to provide feedback is in the issue queue of the Drupal governance project, but there will also be opportunities to provide feedback at upcoming Drupal events, including DrupalCon Nashville.

Mar 29 2018
Mar 29

We released new versions of Drupal 7 and Drupal 8 yesterday that fixed a highly critical security bug. All software has security bugs, and fortunately for Drupal, critical security bugs are rare. What matters is how you deal with security releases.

I have the utmost respect for how the Drupal Security Team manages a security release like this — from fixing the bug, testing the solution, providing advance notice, coordinating the release, to being available for press inquiries and more.

The amount of effort, care and dedication that the Drupal Security Team invests to keep Drupal secure is unparalleled, and makes Drupal's security best-in-class. Thank you!

Mar 11 2018
Mar 11

Talking about the many contributors to Drupal 8.5, a few of them shouted out on social media that they got their first patch in Drupal 8.5. They were excited but admitted it was more challenging than anticipated. It's true that contributing to Drupal can be challenging, but it is also true that it will accelerate your learning, and that you will likely feel an incredible sense of reward and excitement. And maybe best of all, through your collaboration with others, you'll forge relationships and friendships. I've been contributing to Open Source for 20 years and can tell you that that combined "passion + learning + contribution + relationships"-feeling is one of the most rewarding feelings there is.

Mar 11 2018
Mar 11

I just updated my site to Drupal 8.5 and spent some time reading the Drupal 8.5 release notes. Seeing all the different issues and contributors in the release notes is a good reminder that many small contributions add up to big results. When we all contribute in small ways, we can make a lot of progress together.

Mar 08 2018
Mar 08

I recently had the opportunity to read Tiffany Farriss' Drupal Association Retrospective. In addition to being the CEO of Palantir.net, Tiffany also served on the Drupal Association Board of Directors for nine years. In her retrospective post, Tiffany shares what the Drupal Association looked like when she joined the board in 2009, and how the Drupal Association continues to grow today.

What I really appreciate about Tiffany's retrospective is that it captures the evolution of the Drupal Association. It's easy to forget how far we've come. What started as a scrappy advisory board, with little to no funding, has matured into a nonprofit that can support and promote the mission of the Drupal project. While there is always work to be done, Tiffany's retrospective is a great testament of our community's progress.

I feel very lucky that the Drupal Association was able to benefit from Tiffany's leadership for nine years; she truly helped shape every aspect of the Drupal Association. I'm proud to have worked with Tiffany; she has been one of the most influential, talented members of our Board, and has been very generous by contributing both time and resources to the project.

Mar 08 2018
Mar 08

Earlier today, we released Drupal 8.5.0, which ships with improved features for content authors, site builders and developers.

Content authors can benefit from enhanced media support and content moderation workflows. It is now easier to upload, manage and reuse media assets, in addition to moving content between different workflow states (e.g. draft, archived, published, etc).

Drupal 8.5.0 also ships with a Settings Tray module, which improves the experience for site builders. Under the hood, the Settings Tray module uses Drupal 8.5's new off-canvas dialog library; Drupal module developers are encouraged to start using these new features to improve the end-user experience of their modules.

It's also exciting to see additional improvements to Drupal's REST API. With every new release, Drupal continues to extend investments in being an API-first platform, which makes it easier to integrate with JavaScript frameworks, mobile applications, marketing solutions and more.

Finally, Drupal 8.5 also ships with significant improvements for Drupal 7 to Drupal 8 migration. After four years of work, 1,300+ closed issues and contributions from over 570 Drualists, the migrate system's underlying architecture in Drupal 8.5 is fully stable. With the exception of sites with multilingual content, the migration path is now considered stable. Needless to say, this is a significant milestone.

These are just a few of the major highlights. For more details about what is new in Drupal 8.5, please check out the official release announcement and the detailed release notes.

What I'm probably most excited about is the fact that the new Drupal 8 release system is starting to hit its stride. The number of people contributing to Drupal continues to grow and the number of new features scheduled for Drupal 8.6 and beyond is exciting.

In future releases, we plan to add a media library, support for remote media types like YouTube videos, support for content staging, a layout builder, JSON API support, GraphQL support, a React-based administration application and a better out-of-the-box experience for evaluators. While we have made important progress on these features, they are not yet ready for core inclusion and/or production use. The layout builder is available in Drupal 8.5 as an experimental module; you can beta test the layout builder if you are interested in trying it out.

I want to extend a special thank you to the many contributors that helped make Drupal 8.5 possible. Hundreds of people and organizations have contributed to Drupal 8.5. It can be hard to appreciate what you can't see, but behind every bugfix and new feature there are a number of people and organizations that have given their time and resources to contribute back. Thank you!

Mar 06 2018
Mar 06

When I'm home, one of the devices I use most frequently is the Amazon Echo. I use it to play music, check the weather, set timers, check traffic, and more. It's a gadget that is beginning to inform many of my daily habits.

Discovering how organizations can use a device like the Amazon Echo is big part of my professional life too. For the past two years, Acquia Labs has been helping customers take advantage of conversational interfaces, beacons and augmented reality to remove friction from user experiences. One of the most exciting examples of this was the development of Ask GeorgiaGov, an Alexa skill that enables Georgia state residents to use an Amazon Echo to easily interact with government agencies.

The demo video below shows another example. It features a shopper named Alex, who has just returned from Freshland Market (a fictional grocery store). After selecting a salmon recipe from Freshland Market's website, Alex has all the ingredients she needs to get started. Alex begins by asking Alexa how to make her preferred salmon recipe for eight people. The recipe on Freshland Market's Drupal website is for four people, so the Freshland Market Alexa skill automatically adjusts the number of ingredients needed to accommodate eight people. By simply asking Alexa a series of questions, Alex is able to preheat the oven, make ingredient substitutions and complete the recipe without ever looking at her phone or laptop. With Alexa, Alex is able to stay focused on the joy of cooking, instead of following a complex recipe.

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This project was easy to implement because the team took advantage of the Alexa integration module, which allows Drupal to respond to Alexa skill requests. Originally created by Jakub Suchy (Acquia) and maintained by Chris Hamper (Acquia), the Alexa integration module enables Drupal to respond to custom voice commands, otherwise known as "skills".

Cooking with Amazon Echo and Drupal

Once an Amazon Echo user provides a verbal query, known as an "utterance", this vocal input is converted into a text-based request (the "intent") that is sent to the Freshland Market website (the "endpoint"). From there, a combination of custom code and the Alexa module for Drupal 8 responds to the Amazon Echo with the requested information.

Over the past year, it's been very exciting to see the Acquia Labs team build a connected customer journey using chatbots, augmented reality and now, voice assistance. It's a great example of how organizations can build cross-channel customer experiences that take place both online and offline, in store and at home, and across multiple touch points. While Freshland Market is a fictional store, any organization could begin creating these user experiences today.

Special thanks to Chris Hamper and Preston So for building the Freshland Market Alexa skill, and thank you to Ash Heath and Drew Robertson for producing the demo videos.

Mar 05 2018
Mar 05

Josh Gee, former product manager for the City of Boston's Department of Innovation and Technology, recently shared how Boston.gov identified 425 PDFs used by citizens and moved 122 of them online. Not only did it improve the accessibility of Boston.gov's government services, it also saved residents roughly 10,000 hours filling out agency forms. While Boston.gov is a Drupal website, it opted to use SeamlessDocs for creating online forms, which could provide inspiration for Drupal's webform module. Josh's blog provides an interesting view into what it takes for a government to go paperless and build constituent-centric experiences.

Mar 05 2018
Mar 05

Jonathan Daggerhart wrote a fantastic tutorial on Drupal 8's events system. I especially liked the comparison to Drupal's traditional hook system. When reading Jonathan's tutorial, I couldn't help but think how useful it would be to integrate it into Drupal's official documentation.

Feb 27 2018
Feb 27

Last week, Matthew Grasmick stepped into the shoes of a developer who has no Drupal experience, and attempted to get a new "Hello world!" site up and running using four different PHP frameworks: WordPress, Laravel, Symfony and Drupal. He shared his experience in a transparent blog post. In addition to detailing the inefficiencies in Drupal's download process and end-user documentation, Matt also shows that out of the four frameworks, Drupal required the most steps to get installed.

While it is sobering to read, I'm glad Matthew brought this problem to the forefront. Having a good evaluator experience is critical as it has a direct impact on adoption rates. A lot goes into a successful evaluator experience: from learning what Drupal is, to understanding how it works, getting it installed and getting your first piece of content published.

So how can we make some very necessary improvements to Drupal's evaluator experience?

I like to think of the evaluator experience as a conversion funnel, similar to the purchase funnel developed in 1898 by E. St. Elmo Lewis. It maps an end-user journey from the moment a product attracts the user's attention to the point of use. It's useful to visualize the process as a funnel, because it helps us better understand where the roadblocks are and where to focus our efforts. For example, we know that more than 13 million people visited Drupal.org in 2017 (top of the funnel) and that approximately 75,000 new Drupal 8 websites launched in production (bottom of the funnel). A very large number of evaluators were lost as they moved down the conversion funnel. It would be good to better understand what goes on in between.

An example Drupal conversion funnel and the primary stakeholders for each level.

As you can see from the image above, the Drupal Association plays an important role at the top of the funnel; from educating people about Drupal, to providing a streamlined download experience on Drupal.org, to helping users find themes and modules, and much more.

The Drupal Association could do more to simplify the evaluator experience. For example, I like the idea of the Drupal Association offering and promoting a hosted, one-click trial service. This could be built by extending a service like Simplytest.me into a hosted evaluation service, especially when combined with the upcoming Umami installation profile. (The existing "Try Drupal" program could evolve into a "Try hosting platforms" program. This could help resolve the expectation mismatch with the current "Try Drupal" program, which is currently more focused on showcasing hosting offerings than providing a seamless Drupal evaluation experience.)

The good news is that the Drupal Association recognizes the same needs, and in the past months, we have been working together on plans to improve Drupal's conversional funnel. The Drupal Association will share its 2018 execution plans in the upcoming weeks. As you'll see, the plans address some of the pain points for evaluators (though not necessarily through a hosted trial service, as that could take significant engineering and infrastructure resources).

The Documentation Working Group also plays a very important role in this process. After reading Matthew's post, I reached out to Joe Shindelar, who is a member of the Drupal Documentation Working Group. He explained that the Documentation Working Group has not been meeting regularly nor coordinating initiatives for some time.

It is time to rethink our approach around Drupal's documentation. Adam Hoenich, a long-time Drupal contributor, recommends that documentation becomes a full-fledged core initiative, including the addition of a Documentation Maintainer to the Core Committer team. His proposal includes blocking commits to Drupal on documentation.

I've no doubt that we have to evolve our governance model surrounding documentation. It's hard to write world-class documentation by committee without good governance and Adam's recommendations are compelling. Drupal's API documentation, for example, is governed by the Core Committers; while there is always room for improvement, it's really well-maintained. Some of you might remember that we had an official Documentation Maintainer role in the past, filled by Jennifer Hodgdon. Reinstating this position could bring documentation back into clearer focus and provide the necessary governance. I also suspect that a stronger emphasis on coordination, governance and recognition for documentation work, would inspire more contributors to help.

Last but not least, this also affects the Drupal (Core) Contributors. Evaluators often spend hours trying to get their web server configured, PHP installed or their database setup. As a community, we could help elevate this pain by deciding to have a single, recommended default installation environment. For example, we could maintain and promote a Docker container (including an official docker-compose.yml) that ships with the latest version of Drupal. It would simplify many of our documentation efforts, and eliminate many roadblocks from the evaluation process.

To narrow down my recommendations, I would propose the following three steps:

  1. A single, recommended default installation environment (e.g. Docker container) for evaluators or developers taking their first steps in Drupal development.
  2. Infrastructure budget and engineering resources for the Drupal Association so they can offer a true hosted "Try Drupal" service.
  3. A Documentation Maintainer who can focus on end-user documentation, is a member of the Core Committer team and is responsible for defining the scope of what should be documented. Given the amount of work this position would entail, it would be ideal if this person could be at least partially funded.
Of course, there are many other solutions, but these are the areas I'd focus on. As always, success depends on our ability to align on solutions, coordinate all the work, and allocate the time and money to implement the necessary improvements. If you think you can help with any of the proposed steps, please let us know in the comments, and we'll help you get involved.

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About Drupal Sun

Drupal Sun is an Evolving Web project. It allows you to:

  • Do full-text search on all the articles in Drupal Planet (thanks to Apache Solr)
  • Facet based on tags, author, or feed
  • Flip through articles quickly (with j/k or arrow keys) to find what you're interested in
  • View the entire article text inline, or in the context of the site where it was created

See the blog post at Evolving Web

Evolving Web