Dec 04 2018
Dec 04

We’re featuring some of the people in the Drupalverse! This Q&A series highlights some of the individuals you could meet at DrupalCon. Every year, DrupalCon is the largest gathering of people who belong to this community. To celebrate and take note of what DrupalCon means to them, we’re featuring an array of perspectives and some fun facts to help you get to know your community.


For our second connection in this series, we feature the insight of Kelly Tetterton.

Kelly Tetterton

Kelly Tetterton (DrupalKellyT), is the Director of Web Experience at Clarity Partners, a management and technology consulting firm. She is responsible for managing the elements of a cohesive digital ecosystem, from web development and design through content strategy. In her 20 years of developing and managing website projects across a spectrum of technologies, clients and industries, she’s been focusing on Drupal since 2007. She became acquainted with Drupal when using Drupal 5 in order to develop a platform for a client who required a sophisticated user registration system. 


 

 

Why was it you continued down the Drupal path, and how does it shape what you do currently? 

We were starting to develop a new platform for a non-profit, and when we discovered Drupal, we knew that using its built-in user registration system was a much better solution than trying to build our own from scratch. Once I had my first experience with Drupal, I was hooked—it continues to solve so many basic problems for our clients, including a steady provision of robust maintenance, along with forward-thinking community-contributed code innovations. 

 

What is a piece of advice you received that influenced your career?

Never stop learning.


What book or piece of writing have you read in the last year that impacted the way you approach your work or colleagues? Why?

Design Sprint by Richard Banfield. It’s a good distillation of a specific, but flexible, approach to design that we can tailor to our clients’ needs as appropriate.


What is one thing you think people of today will miss in 20 years?

I think some people will miss being able to drive their own cars (but I won’t be one of them).


What are you most looking forward to for DrupalCon Seattle?

Aside from visiting the city itself for the first time, I’m very much looking forward to deepening my experience with Drupal 8 by hearing other case studies. It’s mature enough now that people have really compelling stories to tell, and it’s always good to hear how other folks have tackled tough coding problems.

 

Any additional thoughts you’d like to share?

DrupalCon is always a chance to re-charge my professional batteries—I’m looking forward to it!

Join us April 8 - 12, 2019 for Drupalcon Seattle! 

Nov 19 2018
Nov 19

We extend a hearty congratulations to our 10 scholarship and 12 grant recipients. A global team of community members were given the green light to award more funds than ever before, aiming to have a cross-section of contributors in attendance at DrupalCon Seattle 2019. As a result, we’re awarding aid to people from nearly every continent: six attendees from Europe, nine attendees from the Americas, two attendees from Africa, four attendees from South Asia, and one attendee from Australia.
 

Pay it Forward ImagePhoto by Jeff Geerling 

Our grant and scholarship program provides assistance to those in the Drupal community who may not otherwise be able to attend DrupalCon Seattle.

Funding is through the support of our generous conference partners, as well as conference registrations from Drupal community members. 

The impact of having these recipients attend is far-reaching.

“There’s so much I can learn at a Con that I can’t learn at our Camps here in South Africa,” wrote Dane Rossenrode in his application. “Like: which techs the big agencies are using with Drupal, how they’re serving their clients, and how they scale up their agencies.” Rossenrode was awarded a scholarship to specifically grow the Drupal community in his home region. 

“DrupalCons are my chance to meet other contributors (code and community) to Drupal to discuss and work on ideas. It is much easier to get ideas across face to face than on issue queues or IRC/Slack,” wrote Hussain Abbas of India, whose grant is specifically for contribution to the Project. 

Likewise, another contribution-specific grant recipient agrees.

“I meet people that show me their module...it improves the Drupal ecosystem...it’s always fun and rewarding to code with amazing people,” wrote

Group PhotoPhoto by Susanne Coates

Philippe Joulot.

Many recipients also applied with specific future outcomes in mind. 

“The museum has an initiative to digitize more of its collections for public use. DrupalCon would provide an opportunity for not only training but to connect with other institutions serving content for the public’s benefit,” wrote John Ivie of his role “as an emerging IT professional in higher education.” 

For an applicant in Nicaragua, attending DrupalCon can directly result in growing community.

“I helped organize a Drupal camp attended by more than 100 people. The Camp was heavily influenced by the things I have learned from attending events,” wrote Mauricio Dinarte. “I also want to attend DrupalCon Seattle to help as a mentor in the contribution sprints.” 

A recipient from Russia has a tangible takeaway as well.

“I’m planning to record more videos....and create the general video that will promote Global Training Days events and show the power of the Drupal community,” wrote Marina Paych, whose scholarship is for growing Drupal adoption. 

Scholarship Recipient   Photo by Amazee Labs

For others, their presence at the event was a motivator for applying. 

“As someone who identifies as marginalized, I want to be visible. I want to stay involved, take leadership roles, and show the community that I’m here. That way, if there are other women who can identify with me, they’ll feel more comfortable being engaged. It’s like paving the road for people who have barriers,” wrote Fatima Khalid of Canada, whose scholarship is to grow local community. 

Some recipients have long lists of objectives they plan to accomplish by attending. 

“I will be a volunteer onsite, mentoring DrupalCon attendees during code sprints, participating in code sprint activities (Issue Triaging, leading Sprint Rooms, leading First-Time Sprinter Workshops, etc.) and managing and coordinating the Core Mentor Booth,” wrote Tushar Thatikonda of India, whose grant is for contribution to the Project. 

“I want to learn best practices on building my own modules...to leverage Drupal as a nonprofit donation platform...to create stronger web accessibility standards..and much more,” wrote Rumeal Lovell, whose scholarship is to grow community. “Drupal is like a vast ocean and I want to swim as much as possible!” 

Congratulations to all the DrupalCon Seattle recipients:

We look forward to welcoming these and all attendees to DrupalCon Seattle 2019

Be Human. Think Digital Photo.

Nov 13 2018
Nov 13

We’re featuring some of the people in the Drupalverse! This Q&A series highlights some of the individuals you could meet at DrupalCon. Every year, DrupalCon is the largest gathering of people who belong to the Drupal community. To celebrate and take note of what DrupalCon means to them, we’re featuring an array of perspectives, insight, and some fun facts to help you get to know your community.

First up, Everett Zufelt

Everett Zufelt photo

Everett Zufelt (@ezufelt) is the Director of Technology Services at Myplanet, a software studio. His Drupal experience dates back a decade, when he was a member of a mailing list for blind software developers and partnered with a researcher from the University of Toronto to assist with the delivery of a community site based around her research project. He began working with Drupal 5, and moved on to work for a small Drupal agency in Ottawa. The majority of his time was spent working with the community to make improvements to the accessibility of Drupal 7 before it went to market; he learned about how both Drupal the software and Drupal the community functioned.

Why was it you continued down the Drupal path, and how does it shape what you do currently?

Over the past 7 years, through my work with Myplanet, I have used Drupal to deliver traditional web/mobile, and headless IoT solutions for our customers. I’ve enjoyed the Drupal community, and the ease with which Drupal can be approached by beginners, while remaining a robust framework for experts. In the past few years we’ve been focusing on how Drupal can be used as an intelligent and personalizable content repository to power mobile, wearable, large screen, and conversational user interfaces.

 

What is a piece of advice you received that influenced your career?

"It is better to be productive than to be right.” Collaboration—being open-minded and approaching new situations with a growth mindset—within the Drupal community, with colleagues, or with customers, is essential to productivity. I've shared more about my continual journey in an article I published about a year ago, Developers Are People, Too: My Five Year Path To Personal Growth.

 

What book or piece of writing have you read in the last year that impacted the way you approach your work or colleagues? Why?

I’m going to cheat here and list four, as I believe they all provide an interesting perspective on the same theme: keep examining yourself, growing, and improving how you relate with and engage with those around you. You are almost certainly showing too little empathy, and contributing to relational difficulties that create friction for productivity.

  • “What Got You Here Won't Get You There: How Successful People Become Even More Successful!” by Marshall Goldsmith & Mark Reiter
  • “Radical Candor: Be a Kick-Ass Boss Without Losing Your Humanity” by Kim Scott
  • “Crucial Conversations: Tools for Talking When Stakes Are High,” Second Edition, by Kerry Patterson, Joseph Grenny, Ron McMillan, Al Switzler & Laura Roppe
  • “No One Understands You and What to Do About It” by Heidi Grant Halvorson & Eliza Foss

 

What is one thing you think people of today will miss in 20 years?

PHP!
Seriously though, 20 years ago my grandmother had a rotary phone in her home. My daughter has never lived in a home with a landline phone. I think there are some simple things that we can hopefully do away with:

  • Wallets full of plastic cards
  • Physical house keys
  • Headphone cables
  • Combustion engines in the majority of automobiles

Although over the next two decades content will continue to be delivered through more new contexts—using Alexa, Google, augmented reality, and other emerging technologies—I don’t think we’ll do away with paper books or devices with screens from which we can read. Content experiences will become more personalized, and content will be pushed to us based on context (time of day, location, simultaneous activities), but reading will remain part of who we are for a long time to come.

 

What are you most looking forward to for DrupalCon Seattle?

Great food, meeting up with colleagues in the community, learning about how Drupal 8 is being used to deliver smarter experiences, and learning alongside the participants in the Front-end Accessibility Summit on April 8.

 

Any additional thoughts you’d like to share?

Over the past decade my involvement in the Drupal community has changed. From a user, to a Core developer, to a technical lead, and now a Director in a software studio. I love the way the software and the community has evolved over the years; whether through bringing in more governance to the product management process or bringing in the Community Working Group, Drupal is anything but a stagnant product.

I also love that as a completely blind participant in the community that there has always been a low barrier to participation. My feedback on the software has always been appreciated, and organizers of local and regional events have been more than accommodating to my disability. I have been fortunate to speak at a number of DrupalCons, including: San Francisco, Munich, Portland, Baltimore, Vienna, and Nashville, and will be co-leading the Front-end Accessibility Summit in Seattle.

Join us April 8 - 12, 2019 for Drupalcon Seattle! 

Oct 17 2018
Oct 17

As you’re performing a cost-benefit analysis about attending DrupalCon Seattle — and the days tick closer to the early-bird registration deadline of October 31 — we have valuable feedback from DrupalCon attendees to share.

Each year, it’s the largest Drupal gathering in the world, which lends an air of excitement as people converge within a convention center, and often see name badges of people they’ve only met online in open source, thus transposing online interactions into interpersonal connections.

“DrupalCon brings in more than regional people. It was great to actually meet and talk face to face with people I've been working issue queues with/Slacked with for so long!” said Jonathan, a DrupalCon Nashville attendee.


Those who are part of the annual DrupalCon North America gathering — as attendees, speakers, exhibitors, volunteers — give three top resounding reasons for going: the outstanding content, networking, and contributing in person. In fact, more than 86% of past attendees say they received more value than expected by going to DrupalCon North America.

Session Content

More than 90% of recent attendees say the quality content is why they attend—and DrupalCon Seattle is shaping up to have content-rich opportunities. More resources than ever have been dedicated to bring in top-notch speakers, as more funding is allocated to aid speakers in getting to the conference and to offer resources in order for diverse voices to be represented.

Another slight shift in this upcoming DrupalCon is that session duration times were changed up; you may just have the opportunity to fit in all the sessions that are of interest to you, particularly with the 30-minute, action-packed, content-filled sessions.

Take a look at the array of submitted sessions in the builder track — filtered by tags ranging from editor experience to PHP to big ideas — and 34 others. Visit this same link to select the lists of sessions submitted to the agency leadership and content & digital marketing tracks as well.  

And the quality of the information being presented continues to be carefully curated, primarily by dedicated volunteers in the Drupal community. It’s a pulse for what’s happening now, and where Drupal is headed.

“I gain so much at DrupalCon because it's so much information on a global scale.” noted Clare, a DrupalCon Nashville attendee.

And being in the room and absorbing new information lends to a greater exchange of information, whether it’s having lunch at the same table as a speaker, or asking questions of a presenter on the spot.

“I gain Drupal-specific knowledge and inspiration. There is high value in learning and asking questions,” says Quentin, a DrupalCon Nashville attendee.

Networking

You have the opportunity at DrupalCon to make new connections at every turn; while getting settled in at a session; refilling on coffee; walking from the host hotel...then joining up on LinkedIn, or chatting on a Slack channel. Meet peers in marketing this year as well; DrupalCon Seattle will be a convergence of builders, marketers, and agency leaders — and all get more out of Drupal by leveraging these cross-channel relationships and connections. These varied insights could result in perspective to move your project forward. “DrupalCon is great to meet people within the community and collaborate,” said Jared, a DrupalCon Nashville attendee.

Common stories of social events at DrupalCon North America abound, and being in the room(s) is what it takes to organically grow your industry connections, and even friendships amongst the camaraderie.  


“I feel DrupalCon has more value than other conferences. It has a direct impact on my career, amplifying opportunities through networking and education,” said Chad, a DrupalCon Nashville attendee.

The structured networking gets its kudos as well. Past attendees tout the value added by  exhibitors, and social events such as trivia night, Women in Drupal meetups, first-time attendee gatherings, and Birds of a Feather (BoF) sessions. The array of offerings give a something-for-everyone feel.

“I leave energized for upcoming work with Drupal; BOFs and sessions are high quality; and seeing people throughout the community I don't see regularly is invaluable,” said Brian, a DrupalCon Nashville attendee.


Contributing in Person

Have a seat next to your old online friend—in person! That may be just who you need to crack the code, so to speak. Being module-specific, gathering to brainstorm over a common thread often expedites processes and answers.

Friday of DrupalCon Seattle is for contribution; with contribution sprints (and a mentor option) and first-time contributor workshop. New this year, those in the Content & Digital Marketing Track can attend a ‘Promote Drupal’ workshop, covering topics such as usability of Drupal and cross-collaboration to form open source Drupal marketing collateral. No matter which track attendees choose, all are welcome.
“I truly understand how diversity exists within a community by being at DrupalCon,” explained DrupalCon Nashville attendee Rahki. “It’s a great platform to connect with complete strangers, with just one common love: Drupal.”

The conference and the project is made powerful by the voices in the room. Secure your spot today.

Can’t afford a ticket to the conference? Apply for a scholarship or grant by October 31. 

Boss need convincing? Try our resources.

Oct 05 2018
Oct 05

The latest Lullabot podcast features the Drupal Association’s Senior Events Manager, Amanda Gonser, speaking about DrupalCon Seattle 2019.

Amanda answered compelling questions from hosts Matt and Mike, who are both Drupal developers. The podcast serves as informative and fun insight about how the "new format better serves the community." 

The podcast begins with a discussion of the new track structure and session differentiation, where Amanda also illuminates the difference between tags and tracks. She delves into DrupalCon Seattle’s format and schedule, as well as summits, sessions and trainings. Amanda addresses the scholarships and grants program, which is larger in 2019 than ever before, for those who are interested in attending but require some support. 

Listen in to hear how the conversation and details unfolded: The Lullabot Podcast 

Lullabot Podcast Image

Sep 25 2018
Sep 25

DrupalCon gathers a range of citizens of the Drupal ecosystem to learn, share, and collaborate together. The value of the conference is in the perspectives, energy and diversity of experiences participants share. No matter who you are or where you’re from, you’re invited to participate in DrupalCon

DrupalCon began setting goals to overtly increase diversity starting with DrupalCon Baltimore 2017. This continued in the planning of DrupalCon Nashville 2018, and is a priority for DrupalCon Seattle 2019. 

The results of these prior DrupalCons are promising. DrupalCon Nashville attendee Peta Hoyes said, “This DrupalCon was the most diversely attended technology conference I have ever seen in terms of the variance of women and people of color attending and speaking. I was completely blown away.”

Submission StatsStats above taken from 2018 submissions and selected sessions.

How can you help?

  • If you are from an underrepresented group, submit a session—and let us know who you are; it helps us improve our inclusion efforts
  • Recommend speakers and/or program committee members to the conference chairs by emailing our DrupalCon Coordinator
  • Forward the session submission form to relevant affinity groups 
  • Suggest to potential speakers that they submit a proposal during our submission period, happening now!
  • Reach out to potential speakers and attendees you'd like to encourage to submit and/or attend. Via Twitter:
    • Session Submission tweet
    • Encourage to present tweet
    • Invitation to join me tweet

How do we help? 

For those submitting proposals, we suggest abstract help, and encourage use of the Drupal Support Community via Slack. The #session-help Slack channel is dedicated to session development, submission support, and proposal feedback. The volunteer Program Team's role in this process is to answer questions, provide support, and offer concrete guidance to help an array of people submit proposals.

On the session submission forms, we ask for self-identification in a number of applicable categories, specifically from individuals who identify with one or more communities in categories that include: ability, age, ethnicity, gender, learning differences, race, religion, sexual orientation, and socio-economic status. We track this information in order to reflect on the process, implement additional outreach, and make adjustments. 

We also offer the DrupalCon Inclusion Fund, which is allocated solely toward attendance of participants from underrepresented groups, and is funded higher than ever for 2019 in order to assure new and different perspectives are on stage.

Submission StatsStats above taken from 2018 sessions.

What about during the conference? 

The onsite experience at DrupalCon is positioned to be informative, inclusive, and engaging for all attendees. Every aspect of the conference is exponentially enhanced by the inclusion of more perspectives; from contribution hubs (sprints) to BoFs; and from sessions to social activities. 

The work efforts at the contribution hubs (sprints) have a substantial and meaningful impact on the Drupal Project. The more diverse the contribution teams, the greater range of experience, viewpoints, and skill sets, leading to a Drupal crafted with many different voices. The Seattle program will also feature Inclusion BoFs, where those who identify with underrepresented groups have the option to gather. These are open-format discussions with no agenda, where attendees are encouraged to listen and discuss topics pertinent to that community. 

Beyond the program components, DrupalCon and the Washington State Convention Center aim to be safe and welcoming for all participants. Planning details include: gender-neutral bathrooms, meals that accommodate a range of dietary needs, sign language interpreters, choosing a pronoun sticker to add to your name badge, stickers to indicate your communication preferences, a quiet space to serve as a getaway during the day, lanyards to opt out of photography, a women in Drupal luncheon, a diversity breakfast, and strict adherence to the Code of Conduct - a “coding standards for people” that directs all in attendance to interact respectfully.

The Code of Conduct was generally well-received at the last DrupalCon, as one attendee stated, "I appreciate the visibility and enforcement of the Code of Conduct for those who need it."

Visit these additional resources: Drupal inclusion resource page and Dries’ recent blog post, Increasing Drupal contributions from underrepresented groups.

Please share this blog and information about DrupalCon Seattle 2019; with your support, we can reach a wider and more inclusive audience! 

Aug 31 2018
Aug 31

Is collaborating with the largest open source community at the go-to event of 2019 on your radar? You’re invited to participate in the next North American DrupalCon, hosted in Seattle on April 8-12, 2019. 

Registration is now open! The early bird ticket pricing only lasts until October 31, 2018, so shore up your plans with tickets this month or next. All attendees’ tickets include: keynote speakers, the opening reception, specialized sessions, Birds of a Feather gatherings, exhibit hall access, complimentary coffee all day, lunches, and, of course, DrupalCon swag. See the full program here

Register Now

For DrupalCon Seattle, ticket categories are divided into ‘tracks’ in order to offer a persona-specific focus for all attendees.

Tracks include:

  • Builder: People who build Drupal sites, from discovery to deployment, whether you're a developer, designer, project manager, or team lead.
  • Agency Leadership: Agency owners and sales leaders who provide Drupal services.
  • Content & Digital Marketing: People who use a Drupal site to achieve organizational goals - from content editors and marketing teams to site owners.

Learn more about the tracks and program upgrades for DrupalCon 2019. 
 

Featured Speakers 

We’re excited to announce an innovative lineup of track speakers: 
 

Builder Track

Content & Digital Marketing Track

Agency Leadership Track

  • Martin Coady, VML (@MartinCoady)
  • Siouxsie Jennet, Mambo Media (@siouxsiejennett)
  • Elissa Fink, Tableau Software (@elissafink)
  • Scott Liewehr, Digital Clarity (@sliewehr)
  • Adam Goodman, McCormick School of Engineering at Northwestern University

In addition to the featured speakers, a number of alumni are already registered. Look who's coming! Sign up early and grant permission on your registration form to be listed on the Community page to start establishing connections to upgrade your DrupalCon engagement. 

Submit a Session Proposal

If there’s a particular topic you’d like to present and be part of this speakers’ list, September marks the opening of our call for papers, so be sure to tailor your compelling idea into a session submission by the October 31 deadline. Submissions will be accepted for 30-minute or 90-minute longer lab-style sessions. 

Submit a Session

Need a little support? 

DrupalCon is now accepting applications for grants and scholarships. For this DrupalCon, we’ll be allotting more than ever before--30 percent more, to be exact—as we aim to have a cross-section of contributors in attendance, all of whom play a part in contributing and advancing the Drupal Project, either in their localities or in the greater whole of the project. This application deadline is also October 31. Read more about the details and application process for our grants and scholarships. We encourage anyone who wants to further contribute to Drupal to learn more and apply.

Apply for a Grant or Scholarship

We look forward to seeing you at this one-of-a-kind experience, DrupalCon North America 2019!

Collage Footer

Thank you David Needham for photos 1 and 3 and Amazee Labs for photo 2. 

Apr 02 2018
Apr 02

Everything you wanted to know about DrupalCon

… but were afraid to ask

Contributed by Jeffrey "JAM" McGuire (horncologne)

If you are getting ready to attend your first DrupalCon, here are a few ideas to help you prepare for an intense week of open source software community. Watch the interview video for more tips and inspiration from my Drupal friends Hussain Abbas, Baddý Breidert, Jordana Fung, and Rachel Lawson.

Open source software is not a bunch of code repos with human creator-servants perpetuating its existence. Sharing with each other the tiny pieces we can contribute as individuals, coming together to build solutions for anyone to use and further improve, creates a whole much greater than the sum of its parts: community.

The code is only a byproduct of our real killer app in open source: tens of thousands of smart people who like solving hard problems together. And you’re going to meet a few thousand of those people at DrupalCon!

First-timers, don’t miss this:

Whatever else you do, you should make it to these three things at DrupalCon Nashville:

  • First-time Attendee Social - Monday, 3:30 p.m., Level 3 Foyer. A short orientation for newcomers, to help understand the mechanics of DrupalCon and introduce you to new Drupal friends. As the Drupal Association says, “Starting out the week with a buddy makes networking and navigating an unfamiliar event so much easier!”
  • The Prenote - Tuesday, 8 a.m., Hall A. Get a taste of real Drupal community tradition: The Grand Ole Drupry Prenote will be full of geeky jokes, dubious amateur singing, and way more fun and energy than you’d expect on a Tuesday morning. The DrupalCon kickoff has become the stuff of legend … or at least the best way to get a good seat for the keynote right after it.
  • The Driesnote - Tuesday, 9 a.m., Hall A. Opening keynote address by Drupal Project Lead, Dries Buytaert. Get Dries’s take on the state of Drupal and what’s on his mind for the immediate and long-term future of Drupal.
  • DrupalCon social events take place every evening. Trivia Night on Thursday has been my personal highlight at more than one Con.

Video: Everything you wanted to know about DrupalCon, but were afraid to ask

[embedded content]

Who is in the interview video?

To help you get the most out of your (first) DrupalCon, I asked a few people to share their thoughts with me. Thank you all for your contribution!

And who am I you might ask? Here are my answers to a couple of my own interview questions:

  • Who are you? What do you do?
  • What is DrupalCon? What is it for?
    • DrupalCon is an enormous show-and-tell. Lots of us come to community events because we have solved a problem of some kind or figured out a new and better way of doing something and we want to share that with you! Most of us also come because we want to know what you have figured out and want to share because that might help and inspire us, too!
  • What was your first DrupalCon?
    • DrupalCon Brussels, 2006
  • What do you remember from your first DrupalCon?
    • One of my standout memories was registration: I handed Dries €20 as I walked in the door and was handed a t-shirt.
    • Evening social events were organized via yelling: Boris Mann standing on a table in the venue explaining very loudly when and where the 200 of us were going to meet.
  • What should first-time attendees know about DrupalCon ahead of time?
    • There’s a whole blog post below here that covers that …
  • What are your top tips for first-time attendees to DrupalCon North America?
    • Along with everything else in this post … bring a sweater and drink enough water.

Plan your DrupalCon

You might be traveling a long distance and spending quite a bit of money to be at DrupalCon. Making a plan ahead of time will help you get the most out of your precious time with the community. Look at the session and activity plan based on your needs and interests. People will tell you not to go to a session in every single time slot–I get the most value out of meeting and getting to know others at DrupalCon … and the sessions are all recorded and available online–but you can do that, too, if that’s what you need! Plan a little time to meet and thank the sponsors that make DrupalCon possible in the exhibitors’ area. Expect spur-of-the-moment conversations. Keep in mind the Con is a few days long, plan some sleep and rest along the way!

Build your personal schedule

  • Check the DrupalCon Schedule for each day of the Con. If you are logged into the site, you can save sessions to your personal online schedule.

  • Want to meet someone in particular? Look up speakers and community members, reach out to them, contact them via Drupal.org or Twitter.
  • Don’t forget the BoFs, sprints, social events (every night of the week!), and try to make it to the First-Time Sprinter Workshop!
  • DrupalCon Apps. Lemberg Solutions has kindly provided DrupalCon apps for iOS and Android. They’ve worked well for me in the past. I’ll be using one on my phone again this time around.

Packing for DrupalCon

Here are a few ideas that have helped me at past DrupalCons:

  • Comfortable shoes. The days are long and the nights can be, too. DrupalCon is definitely not a fashion show; wear shoes that will still feel good after you’ve been on your feet for multiple long days.
  • Refillable water bottle. Keeping hydrated through long days in air-conditioned halls is essential! Creating less paper and plastic waste, too.
  • Snacks. There will be food available at the Con, but add a few snacks or mints if that’s the kind of thing that helps you get through a long mentally intensive day, too.
  • Bring a sweater to the convention center. Or dress in layers. I live in Europe, and I find US buildings to be way over-air-conditioned. Even if it’s hot outside, I throw a cardigan or sweatshirt in my bag for the convention venue.
  • Carry as little as possible. Bring enough devices to take notes, keep charged, and get your job done. Lug as little gear with you as possible. Your back and shoulders will thank you.
  • Bring US plug adapters and/or a multiplug powerstrip. It’s a great way to make friends when outlets are scarce :-)
  • Business cards. Even at an open source tech conference, old-school, paper-based contact info is helpful. Pro-tip: white, non-laminated business cards are the way to go. It’s a huge help if there’s a little room on the card for you or your new contact to add a URL, sketch, or notes on the conversation you just had.
  • Leave room in your bags to take home free t-shirts, giveaways, and goodies that you pick up.

During DrupalCon

  • Be social (media): Tweet, post, and share the smart, inspiring, useful stuff that you learn!
    • @DrupalConNA is the official North American DrupalCon Twitter account.
    • Hashtags: #DrupalCon #DCSprints #DCDriesnote #DC ... Keep an eye out for others in use.
    • The folks who can’t be with us in person will be grateful for your updates about what is going on at DrupalCon!
  • Be sociable! Introduce yourself to new people at lunch, sessions, and activities. Don’t just hang out with your friends and colleagues. Get to know your community, your peers, mentors, future colleagues. This is the single most valuable use of your time at community events.
  • Ask questions. Speakers are always happy to talk about the topics they’ve worked so hard on to present to you.
  • Don’t like, understand, need the session you’re in? You are free to leave quietly. Your time is valuable, and a lot is going on. Go find the next thing!
  • Visit the sponsors in the Exhibition Hall. Thank all these companies for making DrupalCon possible. They’ll have fun competitions, swag to take home with you, drinks, snacks, and information about who they are and what they do.
  • Charge your stuff. As Cory Doctorow put it, “The first rule of the frequent flyer is ABC: Always Be Charging.” Do I need to tell you this? Probably not. Now ... Don't forget to plug everything in to charge before you go to bed!
  • Contribution is for everyone! Open source everything we put into it. If you want to (learn how to ) contribute code, check out the DrupalCon Sprints page. There will be mentors around on Friday if you need help and orientation getting started.
    • Sprints April 9-12: 104A-C at Music City Center
    • Sprint Day April 13: General Sprints, Mentored Core Sprint, First-Time Sprinter Workshop at Music City Center - Add your name to the Sprint Spreadsheet

After DrupalCon

  • Follow up. Look through your photos, the business cards you collected, and all your new social media contacts. Send emails, set up meetings, ask that question you forgot to ask when you were there. Tweet what a great time you had. Thank people.
  • Tell people what you got out of DrupalCon. Tell your boss and colleagues what you learned. Post a blog, do a podcast!.
  • After the Con is before the next Con! Start planning your session submission for the next DrupalCon! Once you have it put together, take it to your local user group, regional Drupal Camp, lunch and learn at your workplace. Check Drupical to see where the next upcoming Drupal community events are in the world.
  • Take part in the Drupal Association survey. You’ll get an email about it right after DrupalCon. Help the DA make the next one even better. Tell them what was great and what could have been better. If there is an open field for comments, I’m going to thank the DA staff for their hard work running DrupalCon, too.

Credits & Inspiration

My thanks to the authors the following posts for their help and inspiration:

Mar 23 2018
Mar 23

We're excited to welcome back the DrupalCon Developer Contest - our first since Los Angeles.

Over the next 2 weeks, we invite DrupalCon Nashville attendees to participate in this fun and creative competition - writing a Drupal module, inspired by Johnny Cash. It's Nashville - how could it not be music inspired?!   

Read the details and join the fun. 

Entries are due Tuesday, April 10, 2018

Winners will be announced Wednesday, April 11, 2018 in the DrupalCon Exhibit Hall during the 10:30 - 10:45 a.m. coffee break.  

Rewards:

1st prize receives a Johnny Cash record and $100 gift card to Etch (a top rated Nashville restaurant).

2nd place - $50 Amazon gift card

3rd place - $25 Amazon gift card

Thanks to our sponsor

Digital Bridge Solutions

Mar 15 2018
Mar 15

DrupalCon Baltimore DA booth at opening reception

Show up to the Drupal Association booth and you'll find some smiling faces, fun activities, and more. Make sure you....

✓ pick up your official conference t-shirt and stickers

✓ sign up for or renew your membership

✓ browse Drupal job opportunities

✓ leave your mark on our world map

✓ and don't forget to pay it forward with your Drupal thanks for other community members.

Our staff will be at the booth to talk with you about the Drupal Association, the community, and how you can get more involved in both. We'll be right near the coffee too.

See you in Nashville!

Photo by Jeff Geerling at DrupalCon Baltimore

Feb 09 2018
Feb 09

The hotels we chose are a perfect hub connecting you to a rewarding DrupalCon experience. It’s also a great way to show up for the community.

Here are some reasons why staying at a DrupalCon partner hotel is great for you and the community:

It’s close. Our hotels are located close to the convention center, a few minutes walk. We choose hotels at various price points within close range of the conference center to make it easy for you to move between your hotel space and the conference space. It’s where we are. Our team and a lot of Drupalers stay at the partner hotels, which means you can catch up with fellow Drupalers at any hour of the day. You’re likely to run into an old friend, meet the person who can answer your Drupal questions, or collaborate on your project over breakfast. Discounts and benefits from the city. Cities structure financial incentives for events based on how many people stay at the host hotel. By staying with us in the host hotels - you financially support the current DrupalCon and future DrupalCons. City incentives help us keep production costs and conference ticket prices low – keeping DrupalCon one of the most affordable technology conferences around. It's another way to give back to the community.

Our strength comes from our great numbers. During the site selection process, we work with a variety of hotels to negotiate the best deals for our attendees. Using past DrupalCon hotel reservations as a baseline, Drupal Association guarantees to the hotels that we’ll fill a minimum percentage of the contracted space. If we meet that target then we can keep our production costs low and provide more benefits to the community. That means keeping the perks you are used to as we plan future locations. With collective bargaining power we are often able to offer perks like these:

We know it’s tempting to find an Airbnb, and it’s fun to have your own space, we get it. But it’s pretty awesome to be in the heart of DrupalCon too. In fact we’d argue that it’s more awesome. And it’s an easy way to contribute back to the community through your stay at DrupalCon. We thank you!

Feb 06 2018
Feb 06

We’re still a few weeks away from announcing our full speaker line-up for DrupalCon Nashville.

Our track chairs are working hard behind the scenes - reviewing session submissions and deciding what topics are going to resonate best with the track themes in Nashville. And guess what? With a record number of session submissions, there are SO many amazing sessions to choose from.

Our full session list will be announced on February 21 - but we're excited to share a few that have already been accepted.

Check out our speakers sneak peek, and then head over to register so you won’t miss a thing.

Nov 28 2017
Nov 28

We want to hear your voice at DrupalCon. 

We've launched our call for papers and look forward to seeing the proposals coming in. If you haven't yet seen the line-up of session tracks, take a look - the track teams have been busy building a fresh approach to topics. 

Last year in Baltimore, training courses were packed with eager learners. If you have a training proposal, we want to hear from you, too. Like Joe says, "everyone has something to share". So what's your thing? 

Make sure to check out our key dates and deadlines so you don't miss the submission deadlines. But don't worry, we'll email you before things close, to give you a reminder. Just make sure you're signed up for the DrupalCon News emails, so you don't miss out. 

Nov 27 2017
Nov 27

DrupalCon is many things to many people. It's a brand that represents the promotion of the Drupal software, the gathering of the community, and open-source ideals. Because DrupalCon is an ever-changing and international event, each year saw us relaunching the brand identity and site design for each con.

Last year we stepped back and said, "What if we can give DrupalCon a consistent brand identity, while preserving those important themes about our community, and still providing a unique flavor for each host city?"

We put out an RFP, and then worked closely with our selected design partner, sixeleven, who helped us develop the essential themes that would underlie the design. We looked for a visual language that would reflect all aspects of our community: dynamic, technological, collective, and multifaceted.

With the help of the SixEleven team, we consolidated these visual themes into a design language to help represent DrupalCon as a whole, and to give us the flexibility we need to give each unique event the flavor of its host city as well.

Brand symbolism

The result of this work was presented at the closing session of DrupalCon Baltimore, and we're very proud to say that it has now been deployed here on https://events.drupal.org. There is now a main DrupalCon site which will house all of the information that remains the same for DrupalCon as a whole from event to event, and the event-specific sub-sites will contain only the additional information specific to that location.

DrupalCon Nashville is the first example of a con to use our new event-specific sub-theme based on this consistent brand identity. We hope you'll check it out to see how we'll use this design language for future events as well.

Speaking of DrupalCon Nashville, it's coming up from April 9-13, 2018 and registration is open now! We hope to see you there.

Nov 27 2017
Nov 27

Looking for the perfect way to celebrate Cyber Monday - you could be one of the first to buy tickets to DrupalCon Nashville!

Did you see our new site? Have you clicked through the pages? Did you read the headline of this story? If you have, then you’ve heard: DrupalCon Nashville 2018 registration is OPEN - and it’s music to our ears.

We’re expecting DrupalCon Nashville to be hotter than their famous chicken. With new session tracks, added Monday summits, and everyone’s favourite - sprints, how could you miss it?

Register today

- and we’ll see you there!

Nov 27 2017
Nov 27

Thank you to the 1,670 people who joined us at DrupalCon Vienna!

So many volunteers! So many sandwiches! We had a wonderful time in Vienna and can't wait to see you all for DrupalCon Europe 2019.

Until then - we hope to see you in Nashville 2018.

Sep 15 2017
Sep 15

Everyone is welcome (including you!)

With just about two weeks to go until DrupalCon Vienna we are anticipating an amazing week of learning and collaborating ahead! There will be code sprints all week, but Friday is our dedicated sprint day when anyone and everyone can come contribute to Drupal core and participate together in guided sprints. Add your name to the sprint signup sheet and join us.

First-time sprinters might spend their sprint day working on just a single issue, and that's okay. Some issues take weeks, months, or even years to solve! We all build on each other's work to improve Drupal for everyone.

Sprint topics at the mentored core sprint

First-time sprinter workshop

This hands-on workshop will cover the basics of contribution essentials like the Drupal.org issue queues and IRC, setting up Drupal 8 for local development on your laptop, and optionally git training. If you want to try setting up a development environment ahead of time, try the tools installer.

After attending the first-time sprinter workshop you will be prepared to participate in the Friday afternoon core sprints in Vienna, which will include plenty of tasks for contributors of all skill levels. There is no need to be a coder to participate in the sprints. There will be tasks like testing issues manually, adding documentation, and updating issue summaries that do not require writing a single line of code. Sometimes, not being a seasoned Drupal contributor is a positive advantage as you can ask the questions others neglect to ask.

Major issue triage

If you're already familiar with Drupal, but haven't contributed much before, the major triage sprint is a good way to get more involved. It's also a good fit for project managers, on-and-off-contributors, QA engineers, contributors coming from the first-time sprinter workshop, anyone interested in how Drupal core is made, or anyone concerned about Drupal 8 bugs.

In the Drupal core issue queue we assign priorities to each bug to streamline the resolution process. In this sprint, we will attack issues tagged "Major" and simply make sure the information in each issue is accurate and actionable.

Contributors will work in pairs to evaluate major issues for Drupal 8.x, update the information in the issue, and determine whether or not the issue is still relevant. The most important thing to keep in mind is forward movement through the process - this sprint is not for solving issues, only for helping maintainers and making it easier for others (possibly you!) to step in and understand what needs to be done at a glance.

You can read the steps for triaging major issues to prepare ahead of time.

This sprint will give you the skills to more successfully navigate the issue queue, comment and contribute constructively on issues, work with other contributors, and understand the process code goes through in becoming part of Drupal core. It takes a lot of contributors with varied skills and perspectives to bring all the pieces together.

Make upgrade paths easier with @deprecated documentation

Drupal 8's release process has been changed to make Drupal upgrades easy forever. We improve Drupal's APIs in scheduled six-month minor releases, but also leave the old ways of doing things in place and mark them as deprecated until Drupal 9. This huge shift for Drupal allows module and theme maintainers to adapt to changes gradually, on their own schedule, instead of needing a massive push all at once on some later release date.

To help maintainers make updates, we are adding documentation references directly in the code. In most cases the update documentation is already written so we merely need to add a link to it! Most existing deprecations are in PHP code, so this is a good task for new contributors with a basic knowledge of PHP. Itc is also a good fit for contributors who are interested in API documentation or who want to learn about API changes in Drupal 8.

How to add change records to all @deprecated code

Clearly define Drupal's public APIs by adding @internal tags

Drupal 8 has 6-month minor releases that improve APIs (as well as adding new features).  In order to make this safe, clear, and maintainable, we defined which parts of Drupal's APIs are internal (not covered by the backwards compatibility promise and allowed to change between minor versions) through a documented policy, but that is not very explicit for developers. Adding explicit @internal tags in code documentation is more clear and effective for anyone reading the code or developing with an IDE.  By helping with this effort, you can learn a lot about Drupal 8 APIs and help with the upgrade path through documenting a better-defined API surface. This sprint is a good fit for programmers who want to learn more about Drupal 8's APIs.

JavaScript and theme new contributor sprints

For new frontend contributors, JavaScript maintainer drpal and theme system maintainer joelpittet will each have a mentor table to help you contribute in either of these areas. Drupal core is always in need of more frontend contributors and we welcome your help! Come and meet the maintainers and see how you can improve Drupal's frontend.

And more!

In addition to the mentored sprints, experienced contributors can join a variety of sprint topics in the main sprint room.There are sprints on porting contributed Media plugin modules to the new core Media API, redesigning the core admin UI for better usability, the Search API family of modules, the Open Social distribution, and much more. Sign up now to let us know you're interested in participating!

Mentors and reviewers welcome

If you are an experienced contributor, we can use your help at the mentored sprint too! Sign up to mentor. Mentors should be familiar with Drupal core and the issue queue so that you can explain the process as well as how sprinting benefits the community and the project. The best way to prepare as a mentor for the Major Issue Triage sprint, for example, is to read the meta and try walking through the steps on your own or explaining them to a co-worker or friend.

We are also looking for reviewers on sprint day. Join us in the mentored sprint room at the dedicated review table to give sprinters feedback in Drupal's peer-review process. This is a great way to participate even if you are remote, as there will be many contributors seeking reviews of their patches on sprint day. Let mentors know you are available as a reviewer and they can ping you on slack/IRC when an issue is ready for review.

See you all soon in Vienna (or online)!

Sep 08 2017
Sep 08

At DrupalCon Vienna One Shoe will host the very first Drupal Marketing Sprint on Thursday, 28 September 2017. The goal is for Drupal businesses and agencies to work together to create marketing materials that promote Drupal as a whole. Come prepared with examples of Drupal marketing material that has caught your attention so you can start the sprint with something to work with. Read more in the following blog from Michel van Velde, One Shoe CEO.

Community code sprints are a vital part of the open source ecosystem. Developers come together to develop new features, solve issues or write translations. But there are more ways to contribute to the success of Drupal. Michel van Velde introduces the first ‘Drupal Marketing Sprint’ at DrupalCon Vienna on Thursday, 28 September 2017.

As Drupal is open source, it has no dedicated marketing team, like closed source solutions as Adobe and Sitecore. In order to promote Drupal, agencies rely on their own public relations and marketing efforts and the work of the Drupal Association. In order to increase the outreach and PR Marketing Value of Drupal, Michel van Velde, CEO of One Shoe came up with a new form of Sprints: Drupal Marketing Sprints. This Sprint takes place for the very first time at DrupalCon Vienna.

Good marketing is critical for Drupal

Michel van Velde: “Drupal has seen little news coverage in the Netherlands and Germany. I guess this is the case everywhere around the globe. I came up with the idea of Drupal Marketing Sprints when I attended DrupalCamp Frankfurt last year. As with other DrupalCamps, DrupalCons and other Drupal related events, it was mostly visited by developers. Developers love to code and often join code sprints during these events. The delivered code is beneficial to Drupal itself but it has no news value for the media. I strongly believe that good marketing is critical to Drupal businesses and organizations all over the world. Unknown equals unwanted, after all.”

The Drupal Marketing Sprint

During Drupal Marketing Sprints people from different Drupal business and agencies work together for a set amount of time to discuss and create Drupal related content. The goal is to produce whitepapers, blogs, infographics or other marketing materials that can promote Drupal as a whole, and that can be used by the whole community. Anyone who likes to discuss, brainstorm, write or design can attend a Drupal Marketing Sprint. Also, developers who like to share their expertise on subjects.

Creating valuable Drupal content

“By organizing a Drupal Marketing Sprint, we sit down with people from different Drupal agencies and businesses to discuss and create valuable Drupal content. We then start writing materials such as press releases and white papers. Challenge of the Drupal Marketing Sprint is to deliver an X amount of content pieces (depending on the time given for the Sprint). Examples could be: ‘X reasons why Drupal is beneficial for…” “Everything you want to know about this new Drupal update”, “What should I do with my Drupal 6 website” and so on. “More publicity for Drupal attracts new clients, new projects and new developers to the community (and thus more contribution to Drupal). It brings pride to those who are working with Drupal.”

First international Drupal Marketing Sprint takes place at DrupalCon Vienna

DrupalCon Vienna will be the first event where a Marketing Sprint will take place, but Michel van Velde encourages other people to start organizing more Drupal Marketing Sprints. “I want to make an appeal to national Drupal communities and local agencies to start working together and organize a local Drupal Marketing Sprints themselves. A large number of organizations and developers out there have no understanding of what Drupal has to offer them. Let’s combine our cooperative effort with creating Drupal content. I have a step-by-step guide available for those who want to organize Drupal Marketing Sprints themselves.

Join the DrupalCon Vienna Marketing Sprint on Thursday, 28 September 2017! You can send an email to [email protected].

About the Author: Michel van Velde – CEO One Shoe

Michel van Velde has been working in the digital landscape for more than 15 years. He's the founder of advertising and digital agency One Shoe, one of the leading Drupal agencies in The Netherlands and Germany. His clients include organizations such as DHL, Sanofi Genzyme, LeasePlan International, the Dutch Government and many others. Michel van Velde is a renowned speaker at digital conferences around the world and is the initiator of many international Drupal community initiatives, like Drupal CEO network, CXO days, Dutch Drupal Business Foundation, German Drupal Business Foundation, Drupal CEO dinner etc.

Sep 05 2017
Sep 05

An Interview with Justin Rhodes | Freelance Sitebuilder and Project Manager

Oh! Hey there, my name is Piyush Jain and as a new staff member at the Drupal Association I wanted to learn what the community likes so much about DrupalCon. Community is what cements Drupal as a leading technology world over, and many community members meet at DrupalCon year after year to learn, share experiences, and bond. So I reached out to a few community members to find out about their experiences. This is the sixth conversation in my series. If you haven’t been to a DrupalCon, here is a little more about our events.

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

This week, I spoke with Justin Rhodes (TheJustinRhodes). Justin has been part of the Drupal community for four years, and has attended four DrupalCons.

Piyush: Tell us about your first or best DrupalCon.

Justin: DrupalCon New Orleans was my most memorable DrupalCon. Not only was the location enjoyable but I truly felt like I was a part of the community and able to contribute. I was able to help organize the first North American Project Management track. This gave me a huge feeling of confidence and pride in my ability to support the Drupal Community without being a technical asset pushing code.
 

Piyush: What was your favorite food this DrupalCon?

Justin: This past DrupalCon in Baltimore I enjoyed many meals off the reservation. About a half mile from the conference center there was a small market. Inside this market there was a place called Faidley’s Seafood with the best crabcakes I’ve ever had.

Piyush: What has your experience been like with the Drupal Community at DrupalCons?

Justin: DrupalCon is like a big family reunion. It’s a chance to see my extended family from all over the world. I enjoy learning and growing along with other driven people who bring their experiences to DrupalCon to share openly. This is the type of community that I really enjoy.

Piyush: Share with us your most memorable moment/ conversation at a DrupalCon?

Justin: DrupalCon after hours is always filled with catching up and networking. I’d have to say that finding places to talk with influential and excited Drupalers during the organized after parties is a lot of fun. It’s hard to choose just one moment, but the Drupal Trivia night was quite a lot of fun!

Piyush: How has DrupalCon given you an edge at work?

Justin: DrupalCon and smaller Drupal events have made my career what it is today. Without the friendships and connections I've made while diving head first into Drupal by attending these events, I would not have been able to learn and grow into the business person I am today.

Piyush: Tell us about a time you were able to incorporate your learning from DrupalCon.

Justin: I’ve learned a lot about Agile project management from DrupalCon sessions and videos from the past. I built a project management career off of those teachings and then began speaking about Agile philosophies at smaller events around the US.

Piyush: How has DrupalCon helped grow your business?

Justin: Instead of reinventing the wheel, DrupalCon allows me to hear the successes and failures of the people in my same role around the world. This gives me a huge opportunity to find mentorship and catharsis amongst my peers.

Piyush: What do you see yourself gaining out of future DrupalCons?

Justin: I believe that I will continue to learn and grow through more DrupalCons. Networking is also a huge point of going to events like this, in order to find more clients and forge more strategic partnerships with like minded entities that value great Drupal work.
 

Piyush: How has DrupalCon helped you develop and evolve your team and your peers?

Justin: DrupalCon has always been a great team building opportunity as well as an educational experience. I’ve had a lot of really good mind-meld sessions with co-workers and as a company we’ve always walked away from DrupalCon with a renewed sense of pride and dedication.

Piyush: Why do you think is DrupalCon important for the Drupal Community?

Justin: It is important for the Drupal Community to come together in a face-to-face format instead of being completely digital. The amount of interactions that we have at a DrupalCon with people that we would have never met is the key to success for any member of a community.

Aug 29 2017
Aug 29

We know you’re going to be very busy learning and sprinting, but we hope you take some time and enjoy the incredible history and entertainment Vienna has to offer.

DrupalCon is located near the Prater, and is easily walkable to many incredible attractions. There are a lot of things to do in this city of music, art, culture.

Here are our top picks for things to see in Vienna:

Baroque Palace Schönbrunn

“The former summer residence of the Habsburgs impresses with imperial ceremonial rooms and magnificent gardens. Maria Theresa, Emperor Franz Joseph, Empress Elisabeth and others once resided here.”

Giant Ferris Wheel

“The Giant Ferris Wheel in the Prater is one of the city's symbols. Almost 50 meters tall, it offers a breathtaking view of the city on the Danube.”

Madame Tussauds

“The world-famous waxworks museum Madame Tussauds is the highlight of the Prater, with over 80 wax figures and an interactive experience based on Sisi.”

Prater Museum

“The Prater Museum shows mementos of the old Wurstelprater amusement park, which was destroyed in 1945 during the last days of World War II. A local Viennese historian, Hans Pemmer, amassed a huge collection of memorabilia and donated it to the City of Vienna.”

The Belvedere

“The Belvedere is not only a magnificent Baroque palace but also houses one of Austria's most valuable art collections – with key works by Gustav Klimt, Egon Schiele and Oskar Kokoschka.”


 

We can’t wait to see you at DrupalCon and hope you are able to find some fun in Vienna while you’re here. A big thanks to our friends from the local community for having us in their city.

Aug 21 2017
Aug 21

An Interview with Chris Shattuck | Founder BuildAModule

Oh! Hey there, my name is Piyush Jain and as a new staff member at the Drupal Association I wanted to learn what the community likes so much about DrupalCon. Community is what cements Drupal as a leading technology world over, and many community members meet at DrupalCon year after year to learn, share experiences, and bond. So I reached out to a few community members to find out about their experiences. This is the fifth conversation in my series. If you haven’t been to a DrupalCon, here is a little more about our events.

This week, I spoke with Chris Shattuck (chrisshattuck), who has been part of the Drupal community for 10 years, and has attended 7 DrupalCons.

Piyush: Tell us about your first or best DrupalCon.

Chris: The DrupalCons I’ve been to have all been pretty amazing. The first one I went to was in Washington DC and it was fascinating to see so many different kinds of people all working with the same tools. By that time, I had become a fan of a number of contributors and it was humbling and exciting to meet them in person. I had only recently met some other Drupalists in my area, so to see that I was part of such a vast community made me feel connected.

Piyush: What has your experience been like with the Drupal Community at DrupalCons?

Chris: Over the years I’ve developed a number of important friendships through the DrupalCons. Just the opportunity to be around the same folks at least once a year for a few days in a row gives it a summer-camp-style vibe. I missed this year’s DrupalCon and feel like I missed a chance to be with a lot of great people. Hopefully that won’t happen again. ;)

Piyush: Share with us your most memorable moment / conversation at a DrupalCon?

Chris: Every DrupalCon, I’ve had conversations that have changed my professional direction. One year, I talked to a couple of people doing Drupal training and decided that would be something I’d like to do. Another year, I talked with someone who sat down and talked me through the logistics of expanding my company, which I ended up doing. There is no way to pick a ‘most memorable,’ but I know that every year I have at least one conversation that changes the course of my professional life, and others that help me grow as a person.

Piyush: How has DrupalCon given you an edge at work?

Chris: Being able to connect with people working with Drupal in a huge variety of ways has helped my develop a diverse network that I have leveraged for advice and inspiration in nearly every stage of my professional growth. I have had the opportunity to meet existing customers to get feedback and make a more personal connection. I have also developed relationships that have resulted in future customers, though I see that more of a positive side-effect than a goal.

Piyush: Tell us about a time you were able to incorporate your learning from DrupalCon.

Chris: A lot of the learning that I do at DrupalCon is not about techniques as much as it is about building a broader picture of what is going on in the Drupal community, how the market for Drupal-related services and products are changing, and how to organize more complicated events, like trainings. At the first DrupalCon I went to, I watched a session by Josh Koenig about handling asynchronous data, and I’ve used techniques from that session for multiple projects through the years. Thanks Josh!

Piyush: How has DrupalCon helped grow your business?

Chris: DrupalCon provides a physical location for anyone who is interested in Drupal to congregate at one time. That’s unique and has been a huge factor in developing partnerships and touching base with people who are important to my business.

Piyush: What do you see yourself gaining out of future DrupalCons?

Chris: I suspect that what I gain from future DrupalCons will be very similar, with the added benefit that the bonds I’ve made with people through the years will continue to grow stronger, and I will value even more the opportunity to see them all in one place.

Piyush: Why do you think DrupalCon is important for the Drupal community?

Chris: Going to DrupalCon initially gave me the sense that Drupal and the people that build it had fostered a living, global, vibrant community. It made me feel like there was more meaning in the work I did, and it fueled my enthusiasm for months afterward. I suspect the same kind of experience is important for anyone who is transitioning from just using Drupal to really owning their relationship with it.

Over time, DrupalCon has helped me feel connected and interested in participating in the Drupal community. Continuing to foster enthusiasm in the community.

Piyush: What was your favorite food this DrupalCon?

Chris: There was a DrupalCon where the catering brought in a kind of buffet and I remember thinking that this wasn’t the typical boxed sandwich lunches. That was the best.

To find a DrupalCamp or DrupalCon near you visit Drupical. Keep yourself notified about DrupalCon, sign up for DrupalCon news.


Read the previous story about Enzo’s experience.

Aug 11 2017
Aug 11

We're looking forward to  our community keynote in Vienna, and here's why.

Joe Shindelar is a developer, artist, and snowboarding enthusiast who has been building Drupal sites and participating in Drupal core development since 2006. Joe is also very active in the Drupal issue queues where he has helped to develop and improve Drupal's image handling and manipulation features, contextual links, and various other bits and pieces.

Learn from Joe’s keynote, Everyone Has Something to Share, as he reflects on 10 years of engagement with the community - the successes and the failures. Learn to help others discover what they have to share, and the benefits to everyone of doing so. Sharing is important because it:

  • Creates diversity, both of thought and culture

  • Builds people up, helps them realize their potential, and enriches our community

  • Fosters connections, and makes you, as an individual, smarter

  • Creates opportunities for yourself and others

  • Feels all warm and fuzzy

Wondering how Joe’s session turned into a community keynote? Well, here is how: It was submitted as a regular session, but it rose to the top as an overarching message that the selection committee felt everyone would benefit from hearing. The track team agreed that making it a community keynote was a great way to share the message with the entire audience in Vienna.

We hope to see you at the community keynote, 27 September, 9:00 to 10:15 in Room Strauss.

Aug 08 2017
Aug 08

An Interview with enzo aka Eduardo Garcia | Drupal Trainer/Consultant, weKnow | CTO, Anexus

Oh! Hey there, my name is Piyush Jain and as a new staff member at the Drupal Association I wanted to learn what the community likes so much about DrupalCon. Community is what cements Drupal as a leading technology world over, and many community members meet at DrupalCon year after year to learn, share experiences, and bond. So I reached out to a few community members to find out about their experiences. Here is another conversation in my series. If you haven’t been to a DrupalCon, here is a little more about our events.

This week, I spoke with Eduardo Garcia (-enzo-), a Drupal Console core maintainer. Eduardo has been part of the Drupal community for 9.5 years, and has attended 6 DrupalCons.
 

Piyush: Tell us about your first or best DrupalCon.

Enzo: The first DrupalCon was the best for me, the experience was new for me, it was in Portland, USA. I never felt this level of community integration in one place. I learnt a lot, people were really welcoming, the spirit and everything was completely awesome. Even though I have been participating in Latin America, in many events the spirit of having your first DrupalCon is really, really overwhelming. You have a lot to learn in terms of working for community, and for business, and for yourself, because there are a lot of people to who can try to help you learn new things.

Piyush: What was your favorite food at a DrupalCon?

Enzo: Mumbai! My first time in India was in Mumbai for DrupalCon Asia and everything smelled like ‘okay this is going to be hot for my tongue’ but I tried everything, and the good thing is I didn't get sick, but the taste and flavors and smells were so so different. It was really amazing.

This is what I am talking about DrupalCons, each are in a different location and you can leave your comfort zone and be a part of a different culture for a few days and food is one of the things you can enjoy in a culture. I remember another thing about DrupalCon Mumbai, the best prenote I have been to, the bollywood dance was the best. The preparation was amazing, this was a cultural engagement.

Piyush: What has your experience been like with the Drupal Community at DrupalCons?

Enzo: Well, I have been seeing for many years that the spaces to try to be integrated as a community member have been undergoing a transformation in a good way. For instance, in the first DrupalCon we did not have a track to talk about how to be a good human. In the cyber community, because obviously we are computer-oriented people, sometimes we forget that we are humans and this kind of conference is a relief for people because it is a big umbrella as it integrates gender, race, religion, and change is coming with time.

Piyush: Share with us your most memorable moment / conversation at a DrupalCon?

Enzo: I am a Drupal Console core maintainer, so I remember conversations, not just with one person but several people during DrupalCon Los Angeles. In that DrupalCon we got a lot of feedback, both positive and negative about the direction we could move in. We got a lot of endorsements and a lot people who did not like what we were doing. Definitely, all these inputs provided us a way to define a roadmap for our community, to try and deliver to the people what we think they are asking for.

Also do you know how it is when you are working in digital environment sometimes and you have disagreement with certain people that you've never met in person? So having the opportunity to talk with these people in person and understand their feelings, because sometimes you read an email and you put thorns in your mind, but talking with people will defeat all the preconceived notions that you might have about that person, and you also get to provide your point of view.

Piyush: How has DrupalCon given you an edge at work?

Enzo: Yes, totally it does! The knowledge you receive is really big and it's really difficult to try to learn everything by yourself. DrupalCons allow you the opportunity to test in a short period of time many trends in our industry and obviously that will increase your productivity in terms you don’t need to test all by yourself. You could see the birth or edge of the technology in one place and that will definitely give you a better position among your competitors.

Piyush: Tell us about a time you were able to incorporate your learning from DrupalCon.

Enzo: Usually everything that is presented at a DrupalCon in terms of sessions I can use in less than 3 months, almost always, because there are some subjects for which I keep on saying I want to try, I want to try, but I never have the time. And then I see how someone showcased it in DrupalCon and then I come back and I want to apply it as soon as possible. In fact, all the information provided in DrupalCon is usually very relevant for the current moment of the technology.

Piyush: How has DrupalCon helped grow your business?

Enzo: Definitely there is a big pull in our business. My company provides outsourcing consulting in the USA and DrupalCon provides us a space to meet a lot of people and showcase who we are, what we do, and what is our experience with the work we have done. DrupalCon allows us the opportunity to do this in person instead of doing it over a call or a cold email.

Piyush: What do you see yourself gaining out of future DrupalCons?

Enzo: During the last changes in Drupal community, I am interested in seeing more integration with other communities like Node.js or even other products. I have been seeing some integrations such as Drupal with artificial intelligence. We have been creating a lot of this kind of stuff. I think these will be sideline subjects for the next or the following years of DrupalCons.
 

Piyush: How has DrupalCon helped you develop and evolve your team and your peers?

Enzo: Yeah, well more than passing it on in our organisation every year, we try to bring a couple from our team and they learn first-hand, the level of professionalism that is required to work for international companies and this has helped changed the mind of our co-workers and employees and to be able to understand what is the process behind attending and acquiring business through DrupalCons, and it’s not all in your computer. I think DrupalCon allows you to define and increase the vision about what is around the Drupal business and Drupal community.

Piyush: Why do you think DrupalCon is important for the Drupal Community?

Enzo: I think that DrupalCon allows us to build an ecosystem. Without it we will not be any different from any other community. DrupalCons allow us to create an identity, and it is good to have this meeting point where we could state ourselves as a community, where we are learning what duration are we going on and what is the rest of the environment doing, in favour of this project or this community.

To find a DrupalCamp or DrupalCon near you visit Drupical. Keep yourself notified about DrupalCon, sign up for DrupalCon news.

Read the previous story about Rachel's experience.

Jul 26 2017
Jul 26

One of the most exciting aspects of preparing for a DrupalCon is selecting its sessions. It’s always incredibly impressive and humbling to see the great ideas that our community comes up with—and they’re all so good that making the official selections is definitely not an easy process!

This time, the Track Chairs had over 500 sessions to evaluate, and only 108 hours worth of time to select. With the addition of the 25-minute talk option, we were able to accept 132 sessions to fill our programming time.

Four tracks—Being Human, Coding and Development, Business, and Site Building—were our most competitive. With 60+ sessions each, this really shows the diversity of content to which our community can talk, and wants to share.

After reading through each session, we're happy to present our selected sessions. We are happy to share that of the 132 sessions, 42 of them include at least one speaker who self-identified as part of one or more underrepresented groups (based on the Big Eight social identifiers question we had in our CFP). There will be voices from almost 90 companies. We're also excited to announce that a little over 37% of the sessions featured will include a new-to-DrupalCon speaker to provide new and different perspectives. 

See the Selected Sessions

Sessions will be presented on Tuesday, Wednesday, and Thursday of DrupalCon, along with daily morning keynotes and exciting sponsor activities in the Exhibit Hall. Make sure to purchase your ticket at the early-bird price by 4 August 2017 before prices go up.

Join us at DrupalCon

Jul 26 2017
Jul 26

DrupalCon is brought to you by the Drupal Association with support from an amazing team of volunteers. Built on COD v.7, the open source conference and event management solution. Creative design by sixeleven.

DrupalCon Vienna is copyright 2016. Drupal is a registered trademark of Dries Buytaert.

Jul 26 2017
Jul 26

DrupalCon is brought to you by the Drupal Association with support from an amazing team of volunteers. Built on COD v.7, the open source conference and event management solution. Creative design by sixeleven.

DrupalCon Vienna is copyright 2016. Drupal is a registered trademark of Dries Buytaert.

Jul 25 2017
Jul 25

DrupalCon is brought to you by the Drupal Association with support from an amazing team of volunteers. Built on COD v.7, the open source conference and event management solution. Creative design by sixeleven.

DrupalCon Vienna is copyright 2016. Drupal is a registered trademark of Dries Buytaert.

Jul 17 2017
Jul 17

An Interview with Rachel Lawson | Sprinkler of the Drupal Sparkle at Open Development Ltd


Oh! Hey there, my name is Piyush Jain and as a new staff member at the Drupal Association I wanted to learn what the community likes so much about DrupalCon. Community is what cements Drupal as a leading technology world over, and many community members meet at DrupalCon year after year to learn, share experiences, and bond. So I reached out to a few community members to find out about their experiences. Here is another conversation in my series. If you haven’t been to a DrupalCon, here is a little more about our events.

This week, I spoke with Rachel Lawson (rachel_norfolk), who has been part of the Drupal community for 11 years, and attended 6 DrupalCons.

Piyush: Rachel how about we start with your first DrupalCon.

Rachel: That would be at DrupalCon London and I had only just really started to use Drupal and become familiar with it, it wasn't a full time job and I was lucky enough for my company to be able to pay for me to go there.

I signed up to volunteer, you know, just kind of help people in rooms and that was fantastic because it meant I got to talk to a lot of people rather than just consume, it made you a part of the experience and got to know people through doing that. There are people that I have gotten to know and are friends with till this day.

Piyush: What do you see yourself gaining out of DrupalCon?

Rachel: Contact with friends, colleagues and peers who I wouldn't normally see. It helps maintain contacts and helps to create the people who will one day replace me, what I hope for most now to be replaced and for the next people who want to get involved in Drupal, to give them the encouragement and confidence to become active members of the community instead of passive members who just consume Drupal, and actually become people who are Drupal, it’s that next generation that comes along and that is a great thing.

Piyush: How has DrupalCon given you an edge at work?

Rachel: I have my own company there is just me in my company, so I can’t really say much about work but I am more visible within the community. I can make more connections, it gives me the ability to ask people about something I might not know and I know if I ask someone I will get a reply.

Piyush: How have you been able to use the learnings from DrupalCon?

Rachel: That happens, of course. I can’t think of any specific examples though.

Piyush: What is your most memorable experience from your first DrupalCon

Rachel: It is funny because I was talking about this with someone today. By coincidence, I knew Jesse Beach before DrupalCon Munich and I had arranged to meet her to kind of say hello, she was in one of the pre-sprints, I think it was a Monday and she was doing some javascripts around responsive tables for Drupal 8, and I was sitting and watching as it was quite new to me and I didn’t really know that kind of thing. We ended up in an intense conversation between me, Jesse Beach and Angie Byron, who I didn’t really know back then. I was flatout in complete disagreement with Angie’s suggestion. We had a disagreement, but it was a very interesting conversation that has stuck in my mind, that I still talk about, because it was the first time I had put forth my opinion about something Drupal-related.

Piyush: What has your experience been like with the Drupal Community at DrupalCons?

Rachel: I started with volunteering the first couple of times and it was a good move. I got to meet people that way and then I started to get more involved in the sprints. I was helping out with the sprint lead and working as a sprint mentor. The combination of being a volunteer and a sprint mentor has taught me so much, I got to meet people who again are good friends today. DrupalCon is a great place for learning. Generally the Friday sprint day is what I get most value out of.

Piyush: How has DrupalCon helped grow your business?

Rachel: I am reasonably well known, various people know me and they come to me when they want work done. Is DrupalCon specifically a part of that, or is it part of a wider effort? I think DrupalCon is a tiny part of that.

Piyush: Why do you think is DrupalCon important for the Drupal Community?

Rachel: Thinking more about DrupalCon in the US, it makes money. Not so much in the EU. Drupal can not exist without cold, hard cash. No open source project can. This is necessary for people, infrastructure, servers. People giving money for tickets and sponsorship can then be used to do good things and help the community. Drupal.org costs us money to run. It is very expensive to maintain one of the world's big websites, it’s a big, big system, and without it Drupal doesn’t exist. We need to raise revenue and DrupalCon is one of our most successful ways of doing that. We should look at more ways of raising money, but DrupalCon is what we have at the moment, it’s what keeps us (the community) alive.

Piyush: What was your favorite food this DrupalCon?

Rachel: I can’t remember what it was but the best food was at DrupalCon Munich; the quality of the food was very good.

To find a DrupalCamp or DrupalCon near you visit Drupical. Keep yourself notified about DrupalCon, sign up for DrupalCon news.


Read the previous story about Marina’s experience.

Jul 05 2017
Jul 05

An Interview with Marina Paych | Head of Organizational Development ADCI Solutions

Oh! Hey there, my name is Piyush Jain and as a new staff member at the Drupal Association I wanted to learn what the community likes so much about DrupalCon. Community is what cements Drupal as a leading technology world over, and many community members meet at DrupalCon year after year to learn, share experiences, and bond. So I reached out to a few community members to find out about their experiences. This is the second conversation in my series. If you haven’t been to a DrupalCon, here is a little more about our events.

This week, I spoke with Marina Paych (paych), who has been part of the Drupal community for 2.5 years, and attended 1 DrupalCon.

Piyush: Marina how about we start with your first DrupalCon.

Marina: My first DrupalCon was held in Baltimore. That was my first time in the US, and my first time speaking at a DrupalCon. So I’ve got a full pack of new experience! I was impressed by the scale of the event. Being in the hall of 3000+ like-minded people is amazing and highly inspiring.

Also that was a chance to meet in person with all the people I have been communicating online for a long time. I’m a member of Global Training Days working group, so I was very excited to meet other members of this group in Baltimore. We even organized a BoF* devoted to this topic to spread the word about such a great way of engaging people with Drupal and also - to collect the feedback from the community.

All in all, DrupalCon Baltimore became an exceptional experience for me: full of new things, bright moments and powerful insights.

 

Piyush: What do you see yourself gaining out of DrupalCon?

Marnia: I believe that if DrupalCon is a place and time for the giant community to get together, we should definitely use it to gain something for ourselves and contribute back at the same time. Therefore I see myself organizing BoFs, delivering sessions, communicating with friends and new acquaintances. To me the best benefit from the event is the new knowledge and people.

Piyush: How has DrupalCon given you an edge at work?

Marina: I met a lot of amazing people, this helped me to establish several business connections and also learn from their experience. Delivering a session at such a big event and in a foreign language boosted my public speaking skills. Overall the event allowed me to feel the community spirit and bring it to our local Drupal events.

 

Piyush: How have you been able to use the learnings from DrupalCon?

Marina: I haven't got a chance yet but I believe it will happen.

 

Piyush: Why do you think DrupalCon is important for the Drupal community?

Marina: DrupalCon is important because it is the moment of unity.

They say that people need the sense of belonging and that is a huge thing to charge the batteries and make sure that you’re on the right track.

 

Piyush: What is your most memorable experience from your first DrupalCon

Marina: As I said above, I was delivering a session at DrupalCon Baltimore. After the session, during the Q&A part one person asked a question and I answered. But then another person shared his experience and after that all the questions triggered productive discussions and knowledge exchange. At that particular point I felt the power and openness of the community.

 

Piyush: What has your experience been like with the Drupal Community at DrupalCons?

Marina: Just great! I met a lot of wonderful people and I’m really glad to be the part of Drupal world.

 

Piyush: How has DrupalCon helped grow your business?

Marina: I talked to more experienced people and received their feedback on my activities. But I believe that the first DrupalCon is like a trial and I’ve just started exploring what this event can offer.

 

Piyush: How has DrupalCon helped you develop and evolve your team and your peers?

Marina: My colleague - a lead developer - was also at DrupalCon and he delivered a BoF about the Drupal 8 module for educational and scientific institutions we've recently contributed (Bibliography and citation). He delivered a bunch of sessions at our local Drupal meet-ups but still he was nervous about his BoF presentation. However, later on he shared that he’d never spoken to such an attentive audience as at DrupalCon. That made him believe in himself and in the power of Drupal even more. DrupalCon is a challenges every participant to grow.

 

Piyush: What was your favorite food this DrupalCon?

Marnia: Guacamole! I tried it for the first time, and it was delicious.

 

To find a DrupalCamp or DrupalCon near you visit Drupical. Keep yourself notified about DrupalCon, sign up for DrupalCon news

Read the previous story about Eric’s experience.

*Birds of a Feather sessions (or BoFs) are informal gatherings of like-minded individuals who wish to discuss a certain topic without a pre-planned agenda. BoFs allow groups to meet and discuss issues relating to regular conference sessions and talk out common problems facing the community.

Jun 27 2017
Jun 27

DrupalCon is brought to you by the Drupal Association with support from an amazing team of volunteers. Built on COD v.7, the open source conference and event management solution. Creative design by sixeleven.

DrupalCon Vienna is copyright 2016. Drupal is a registered trademark of Dries Buytaert.

Jun 12 2017
Jun 12

An Interview with Eric Scott Sembrat; Web Developer, Graduate Student | Atlanta, GA

Oh! Hey there, my name is Piyush Jain and as a new staff member at the Drupal Association I wanted to learn what the community likes so much about DrupalCon. Community is what cements Drupal as a leading technology world over, and many community members meet at DrupalCon year after year to learn, share experiences, and bond. So I reached out to a few community members to find out about their experiences. This is the first conversation in my series. If you haven’t been to a DrupalCon, here is a little more about our events

To start things off, I spoke with Eric Scott Sembrat (webbeh), a web developer and graduate student in Atlanta, GA. Eric has been part of the Drupal community since 2011, and attended 5 DrupalCons. :

Piyush: So Eric, tell me about your first DrupalCon.

Eric: My first DrupalCon was DrupalCon Denver. I was fresh into my first Drupal job after transitioning from Moodle/LMS development, and DrupalCon was an eye-opening experience for me. In all directions and in all rooms were experts, maintainers, developers, themers, managers, coders, and somehow I was eventually going to slide into one of those roles.

All I could do was to go to as many sessions as I could and learn from my peers and presenters on what awesome things you can do with Drupal.

Piyush: What do you see yourself gaining out of DrupalCon?

Eric: DrupalCon allows me to keep up-to-date on the latest and future iterations and shifts in Drupal, and keep my tools and development up-to-date. It’s also a great way to reach out to people at BoFs* and sessions to see what folks are doing with Drupal.

Piyush: How has DrupalCon given you an edge at work?

Eric: Attending DrupalCon has given me a leg-up on the ‘competition’ at work by being ahead of the curve and looking towards the horizon on new features, especially on the front end.

As I work in higher education, we tend to move slowly compared to other industries. DrupalCon has allowed my organization to have a roadmap and know what we want to go toward, even if we can’t get there as fast as other industries.

Piyush: How have you been able to use the learnings from DrupalCon?

Eric: I incorporate a lot of my development strategies for coding and development from DrupalCon. I bring all of this information back and share it to my team and developers across my campus and give them as much support from my end as I can.

Folks who aren’t as fortunate to attend should still be able to reap the benefits of attending a conference like DrupalCon, and it’s my role as an attendee to make that as easy as possible.

Piyush: Why do you think DrupalCon is important for the Drupal community?

Eric: DrupalCon serves as a way to interact with the community as a whole, from the companies to the contractors and everyone in-between. It’s a great way to keep in touch, have thoughtful and beneficial face-to-face discussions, and advance Drupal further.

Piyush: What is your most memorable experience from your first DrupalCon

Eric: DrupalCon, of all places, is where I discovered the incredible Drupal-centric module that is Paragraphs. Struggling with Panels, CKEditor presets, entity references - all become moot when I realized I could build rich content using Paragraphs.

I learned, in this one moment, the power of Drupal’s modules and contrib - that a developer or group can develop a product for a Drupal-case (rich entity types embedded in an entity) that fits the need of users across the scale of the community.

Piyush: And because food is always important, what was your favorite food this DrupalCon?

Eric: It'd have to be the desserts. There was a cheesecake - yum!

To find a DrupalCamp or DrupalCon near you visit Drupical. Keep yourself notified about DrupalCon, sign up for DrupalCon news.

*Birds of a Feather sessions (or BoFs) are informal gatherings of like-minded individuals who wish to discuss a certain topic without a pre-planned agenda. BOFs allow groups to meet and discuss issues relating to regular conference sessions and talk out common problems facing the community.
Jun 02 2017
Jun 02

DrupalCon Vienna T-shirts

Remember how we are making changes to DrupalCon Europe? These were hard decisions and some things we love we found just weren’t financially viable. Like free t-shirts. But one thing we heard a lot was “please don’t take away the t-shirts!”  

We heard you. And while it doesn’t make financial sense to give free t-shirts to all attendees, we still want to be able to continue to offer them. So we’ve come up with a plan.   

At DrupalCon Vienna, t-shirts will be offered to the following groups:

  • Individual Drupal Association members who register for DrupalCon Vienna between 5 - 16 June 2017. You must register in this two week window AND be an individual member of the Drupal Association.

  • Volunteers who work at least four (4) hours onsite in Vienna 26 - 29 September. You must check the volunteer box during registration and must show up on site to volunteer for four (4) hours or until released by event staff.

  • Volunteers part of the DrupalCon Program Team

  • Sprint Mentors

The fine print FAQ

I’m already a member, how do I make sure that I'll get a shirt?

If you are already an individual member, you get a t-shirt! BUT you MUST register in the first two weeks of ticket sales. Registrations after 16 June will not receive a t-shirt, member or not.

I’m not a member, can I do that during registration and still get a shirt?

Yes. If you are not a member you can become an individual member during your conference registration. You will be presented with a page during check-out that gives you the option to become a member.

I already registered but JUST saw this post! What do I do?

If you are a true early bird and register in the two weeks, but somehow missed this news post until after registering - that’s ok. As long as you become a member before the end of 16 June and you’ll still get a t-shirt.

The registration didn’t say anything about t-shirts or ask for my t-shirt size? What’s up?

After the 16 June cut-off date, eligible registrants will receive an email confirming their t-shirt along with a link to select their t-shirt size.

You got a session selected? Great!

We’ll refund your registration amount (but not your membership) and you get to keep the t-shirt. Our regular no-refund policy applies to all other sales.

You’re part of an organization that is buying a bulk amount of tickets for employees? Lucky you.

Your organization should provide you with an individual redemption code. You’ll need to redeem your individual registration before 16 June AND also be an individual member of the Drupal Association in order to get a t-shirt.

--

This news story is cross-posted on the Drupal Association Blog. To leave a comment, please do so on that post

May 15 2017
May 15

DrupalCon is brought to you by the Drupal Association with support from an amazing team of volunteers. Powered by COD, the open source conference and event management solution. Creative design and implementation by Cheeky Monkey Media.

DrupalCon Baltimore is copyright 2016. Drupal is a registered trademark of Dries Buytaert.

Apr 18 2017
Apr 18

A week at DrupalCon is a fantastic way to level up your skills and bring new knowledge back to your work. We have had such high interest in these training courses, that many have sold out!  We know there are still people out there who want to learn these valuable skills, and we want to be sure you have that chance, even if it's not at DrupalCon. 

Some of the awesome companies who lead training courses at DrupalCon, also offer courses elsewhere - at different upcoming events, online, or through different resources. Below we have listed some alternative training options for those who didn't make it into our Monday DrupalCon training courses. Check them out to make sure you stay on top of your Drupal game.

Absolute Beginner's Guide to Drupal 

Message from the trainers: We are sorry you weren't able to attend this class. However, we hold online and live trainings. If you're interested in Drupal training, please click here to contact us.

Content Strategy for Drupal

Message from the trainers: Although this course is sold out, it will run again online via video conference May 3-5. You can sign up on our website or get in touch with us for more information.

Theming Drupal 8

Message from the trainers: We're sorry, but this workshop is currently sold out. You can sign up to access the tutorials on our website, or join our mailing list to be notified of other opportunities to attend this workshop at local camps/conferences throughout the year. Feel free to contact us if you have any questions.

Mastering Drupal 8

Message from the trainers: Although this training is sold out at DrupalCon, you can sign up here for additional training opportunities. Use the promo code DrupalCon to get a discount of $100 in your training registration (expires 04/29).

View all available training courses

Mar 23 2017
Mar 23

It's that time of year again when everyone starts getting excited about DrupalCon.  People are getting geared up to attend sessions, meet up with team members and clients, and let's not forget, load up on as much swag as possible.  But an important piece which often gets overlooked are the Summits that happen the Monday before the conference begins.  These events are happening again in Baltimore, and the Media and Publishing Summit is one you should consider attending.

Media has always been a weakness in Drupal.  Dries, Drupal’s founder and fearless leader, has long mentioned that he saw better media handling being critical to Drupal’s continued success and survival in the future.  Because of this, Dries announced at DrupalCon New Orleans that there would be an official Media Initiative to improve media handling in core.  At DrupalCon Baltimore, the Media and Publishing Summit will highlight what's new in Drupal for media and where the future is headed.

Here are the top agenda items of the day:

Update on Media initiate

Much of the work that is going to move into Drupal core already exists in the contrib workspace.  Modules like media_entity, entity_browsers, and entity_embed allow for a much better way to handle your media in drupal.  Creating, searching and attaching videos and files has become much easier and more intuitive in Drupal 8 than it was in past versions of Drupal. Dries will be giving an update on where these modules stand, what functionality is moving into core as a result of the Media Initiative, and what work still needs to be done.

Panel discussion

The Media and Publishing Summit will also feature a panel discussion that will include industry leaders discussing how they are using Drupal to enhance the digital experiences they provide.  They’ll discuss benefits, problems they’ve run into and the types of things they will need Drupal to be able to do.  You will be able to participate in the conversation which will allow you to use their experience to help improve your own site or brand.

Case studies

Specific case studies will give us all insight into how some of the biggest brands in the Media space have leveraged Drupal to create powerful media experiences for their users.

Future of digital media

Chuck Fishman, Director of Industry Marketing and Development at Acquia, will share trends in the Media industry and will discuss where these trends may go and what we may see in the industry in the future.  We will discuss how we may be able to position Drupal to be able to take advantage of these trends and remain relevant in the media space.

Round table discussions

We will also break out into smaller groups to discuss more targeted subjects.  We will have leaders from different parts of the industry head these discussions.  Sports and Entertainment, Print and Publishing, and Broadcast/Cable will be some of the sectors represented.  This will give you the ability to discuss issues and ideas that are more relevant to their specific aspect of the industry with your professional peers.

This will be an engaging day filled with great information from industry leading professionals, Drupal core media developers, and hopefully you!  Be sure to sign up for the Media and Publishing Summit and grab your tickets now!

Date: Monday, April 24th
Time: 11:30am-5:00pm (lunch and afternoon coffee included)
Cost: $199 advanced | $250 on-site

Register Now

Mar 17 2017
Mar 17

Annnnnnnd we are back for round 2! Last year’s Government Summit was such a success that we offering it again, and this year we have managed to pack even more content and conversations into the day for y’all! We are still catering to the same government audience, so if you find yourself working for the government in some capacity (fed, state, local or contracting), then this Summit for you!

We are working hard to put together an even more engaging one-day Government Summit than last year that will dig deeper into best practices and ideal ways around the government red tape that you so often find yourself faced with.

We have changed our line up to better suit your desires! We have sought out people from near and far, gathering up the greatest Drupal government minds and have worked tirelessly to factor in your feedback from last year. Here are some of the ways we are kicking up into the next gear this year:

  • We have added event more breakouts which you loved so much last year to discuss topics that are relevant to you in real time.  Throughout the day we will have many discussion opportunities for you to interact with your peers  and one we are really excited about is Mass.gov’s Bryan Hirsch.
  • We will have a dedicated space for case studies from our sponsors Accenture and New Target so that you see some awesome government solutions in action
  • We will open the day with a panel all about D8 in the Government - a topic we all know you're interested in hearing about and seeing
  • We plan to feature a special lunch time speaker, Kendra Skeene from the State of Georgia talking about Drupal PaaS!  

Who should come?

The Government Summit is intended for anyone who uses Drupal in the context of government, whether it be at a local, state or federal level. All skill levels and roles are welcome. You’ll meet site builders, developers, themers, project managers, support specialists, and more.

Join the Government Summit

Although the Government Summit is part of the DrupalCon program, it (along with the other Summits) is a separate event and requires a separate registration. On your registration form, there is a section to select which topics pique your interest most, as well as an “Other” field where you can -- and should! -- suggest any other topics about which you are interested.  We look forward to seeing you there!

Date: Monday, April 24
Time: 9:00am-5:00pm
Cost: $199 advanced | $250 on-site

Register Now

 

Mar 14 2017
Mar 14

DrupalCon will begin before you know it. But you can plan your schedule today! There'll be more than 150 sessions, three keynotes, an unforgettable pre-note, and some important community conversations happening all week.

Check out the schedule

Build your own schedule

To start building your own schedule, choose a session. Then choose the “Add to my schedule” option.

Adding a DrupalCon Dublin session, screenshot Adding a DrupalCon Baltimore session

To review the sessions by day of the week, check out the main schedule. There, you can sort sessions by day and track. As you build your agenda, we'll pull the sessions together for you on your own schedule page.

Find Birds of a Feather

Birds of a Feather sessions (BOFs) are informal. They're a chance for you to meet people with shared interests. Topics aren't limited to Drupal; they're up to you. People discuss ideas like working with other open source projects and improving community management. There's even been a roundtable about knitting.

To claim a BOF, pick a day and time on the daily schedule. Choose the "Create a BOF" option and add a description. We just ask that you don't claim more than two BOFs (so other people have space to meet too).

DrupalCon Baltimore BoF creation, screenshotCreating a DrupalCon Baltimore BoF

You can sign up online until April 1, 2017 at 23:59pm EST. But because those spots can fill up fast, it won't be your only chance. While most BOF spots will be gone by April 1, we're setting aside space you can reserve once in Baltimore.

We are also featuring some important community conversations, happening in BoF room 313 - check them out and join the discussion! Check out the BoF schedule now and begin adding them to your schedule.

Get your ticket

Have you been waiting until now to register? Get them now while tickets are still discounted from the door price.

Register now

Mar 12 2017
Mar 12

One of best things about DrupalCon is sharing ideas with and learning from other Drupal users who are facing similar challenges in their work. The Nonprofit Summit will be a chance to connect with technologists, from small and large organizations, to share best practices, ask questions, and get advice about common themes such as CRM integrations, fundraising and campaign management, web accessibility, and how and when to transition to Drupal 8.

Jeff Eaton will keynote the Summit by sharing what he has learned over the last year of working on three mid-sized Drupal 8 migrations and from-scratch builds for small organizations.  The aim of his talk will be to help small to mid-sized nonprofits think strategically about how to approach Drupal 8 projects, and what they can do now to improve existing Drupal 7 sites that will make it easier to move them to Drupal 8 later.

The program is still being finalized and the schedule will be updated in the coming weeks. Taking inspiration from past nonprofit summits at BADcamp, NYCcamp, and past DrupalCon BoFs for social good, co-facilitators Molly Byrnes of Phase2, and Johanna Bates of DevCollaborative, and Michael Haggerty of Trellon are focusing on creating opportunities for learning and networking by offering a mix of case study presentations and small-group breakout discussions.

Case study presentations will include:

  • Robert Dodd of Cycle for Survival will talk about the organization’s work creating brand and user experience consistency across Drupal and a CRM peer-to-peer fundraising product.
  • Accessibility expert Mike Gifford will talk about the importance of building sites that accommodate one of the largest donor demographics, people over 60, who struggle with age-related disabilities, but who may not think of themselves as disabled in the more traditional sense.
  • Staff from Fairfax County Public Schools (FCPS) and ForumOne will share their experience thinking outside the usual boxes to build the innovative FCPS.edu site in Drupal 8.
  • During lunch, Summit sponsors Aten, Brick Factory, and Message Agency will present case studies that demonstrate the Drupal as a powerful tool for nonprofits.

Breakout sessions will be an opportunity to get up from your seat and deep-dive into a topic of your choice with industry experts and other nonprofit technologists.  Among additional conversations, we are excited to feature the following discussion topics for you to partake in: Jess Snyder, senior web systems manager at WETA public broadcasting, will lead a discussion about how and when to plan to transition sites or build from scratch in Drupal 8; Anne Stefanyak of Kanopi Studios will lead a breakout about how to do affordable and meaningful user research on nonprofit budgets; Gordon Withers of FreeFlow Digital will share strategies for wrangling stakeholders; and Ruby Sinreich, developer at the advocacy organization MomsRising, will be facilitating a talk about the all-important topic of digital security.

The event has limited capacity and registrations are going quickly, so please register now if you want to be a part of the first-ever DrupalCon Nonprofit Summit.  

Join the Nonprofit Summit

Date: Monday, April 24
Time: 9:00am-5:00pm
Cost: $150

Register Now

Mar 10 2017
Mar 10

DrupalCon is brought to you by the Drupal Association with support from an amazing team of volunteers. Powered by COD, the open source conference and event management solution. Creative design and implementation by Cheeky Monkey Media.

DrupalCon Baltimore is copyright 2016. Drupal is a registered trademark of Dries Buytaert.

Mar 08 2017
Mar 08

DrupalCon is brought to you by the Drupal Association with support from an amazing team of volunteers. Powered by COD, the open source conference and event management solution. Creative design and implementation by Cheeky Monkey Media.

DrupalCon Baltimore is copyright 2016. Drupal is a registered trademark of Dries Buytaert.

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About Drupal Sun

Drupal Sun is an Evolving Web project. It allows you to:

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  • Facet based on tags, author, or feed
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