Aug 15 2017
Aug 15

This year European DrupalCon will take place in Vienna, Austria. It's still more than a month away. However, the sessions were already selected. We will look at the ones, which were accepted in the business track. And we will also explain why.

DrupalCon Vienna is one of the biggest Drupal events in the world this year. Therefore, some of our team members will be present at the event in the capital city of Austria. But once again our AGILEDROP team will not be just present at the event. We had a »bigger« role.

Namely, our commercial director Iztok Smolic was invited to the Business track team. Together with Janne Kalliola (CEO of Exove) and Stella Power (CEO of Annertech) he prepared the program and selected sessions. And there is our reason why we are presenting them.

 

Business session

 

Many business sessions were proposed, so the decision was tough. It was expected to be tough, of course. But after some thought and discussions between the business track team, in the end, these Business sessions for DrupalCon Vienna were accepted:

1) Aligning your customers and product success. by Evelien Schut from GoalGorilla

2) Better together, a client/agency relationship based on trust and value by Andrii Podanenko and Alexander Schedrov from FFW

3) Challenges and Solutions in Getting your Open Source Company to Contribute by Chris Jansen from Deeson and Jeffrey A. "jam" McGuire from Acquia

4) Co-operative Drupal: Growth & Sustainability through Worker Ownership by Finn Lewis from Agile Collective

5) Content management market and Drupal by Nemanja Drobnjak from WONDROUS LLC

6) Creating business value with Drupal by Baddý Breidert from 1xINTERNET

 

Iztok session

 

7) Drupal Enterprise Marketing as a Global Business Alliance by Ivo Radulovski from Trio-interactive

8) How to go from one to seven companies around the world and how to run them by Michael Schmid and Dania Gerhardt from Amazee Labs

9) Is Selling Drupal an Art or a Science? by Michel van Velde from One Shoe

10) Marketing and Selling the Drupal Commerce Ecosystem by Ryan Szrama from Commerce Guys

11) Move up the value chain: DISCOVER, DEFINE, DESIGN, DELIVER, DISTRIBUTE (MAINTAIN, GROW & MEASURE) by Lukas Fischer and Michi Mauch from NETNODE

12) Observations from the Peanut Gallery. Confessions of a non-Technical Drupalist by Tom Erickson from Acquia

13) Teaching Clients How to Succeed by Ken Rickard from Palantir.net

14) Using Drupal 8 to build transactional & business critical enterprise applications by Maxime Topolov from Adyax

We hope you find something of your taste if you would be present at the event. In case you won't be, you will have to wait for the sessions to be published on Youtube.

Aug 08 2017
Aug 08

Holidays are at the peak, so some activities rest. But not in Drupal. There were many blog posts written in the past month by us in by other authors. Since we already presented our part, it's time to look at the others and present the Top Drupal Blogs from July.

We'll begin our list with Michael Silverman and his 6 Reasons to use Drupal vs Wordpress. The author discusses all the numbers that favour Wordpress and then completely turns the blog post to the reasons why Drupal is better suited for your (business) website than Wordpress. A little hint. Reasons are connected with growth.

We continue with Sprint Week 2017 Recap by Mike Hubbard. Acro Media organized a Sprint Week, which brought together their staff to have fun weekend of Drupal contrib work. It is a community development of all aspects of the Drupal software, including code, design/UX, documentation and more. The author has written a very comprehensive and detailed recap.

Our third choice is Make your plans for DrupalCon Vienna by Josef Dabernig. Although DrupalCon Vienna is still more than a month ago, the author made an overview of what’s planned so far, so that Drupalistas will keep that in mind when they will be planning your their stay in Vienna.

 

wordpress vs drupal

 

The next one is Comparing Drupal and Sitecore by Bill Shaouy. In fact, the author has written the blog post in two parts, so it's probably best to read them both. However, in the first part he compared the two from the perspectives of content authoring, marketing, and business, while in the second part he looked at the two platforms from an IT and community perspective.

We continue with How to Migrate Posts from Wordpress to Drupal 8 by Minnur Yunusov. The blog post shows us how to migrate thumbnail content from Wordpress to Drupal 8. With it, Drupalistas will better understand the content migration process and are given the starting point for future migrations.

We conclude our list with Merging Entities During a Migration to Drupal 8 by Matt Robison. The author walked us through an example of migrating part of a Drupal 7 site to Drupal 8, with an eye toward cleaning up the content model a bit.

That's our selection for the past month. We are quite aware that not everyone is interested in everything and that some other important topics were covered as well. But as we said, that's our selection. Don't forget, we'll make a list every month so that you will be informed as much as possible. Until then, wait for our next blog post.

Aug 01 2017
Aug 01

We've never been that fast. It's the first day of the new month and we are already giving you the overview of our blog activities in the past month. There has been plenty of action, so let us not waste any more time and take a look at our Drupal Blogs from July.

We have started the month with the Most popular Drupal modules. It was a topic that we wanted to cover a long time ago, but it somehow always slipped away. Nevertheless, we have explored, which ones are the most downloaded ones and which ones are used by the most sites. The list includes Views, Token ...

Since it is summer time, some of you were already on a vacation, while some of you will still go on a vacation. Therefore, we have made a list of Holiday and Travel sites that were made with Drupal. We hoped that with them, your decision about where to rest and gain more energy will be easily achieved.

Travel and Holiday Drupal sites

Our third blog topic in July were Drupal Mini Camps. We have explained the history of them, the criteria for being a Mini Camp and the most recent one, which took place in Atlanta.

We continued the month with How to improve the SEO on your Drupal site. With this blog post, we revealed the ways to boost your rankings in search engine results. Namely, you must score high on them, because when people look for information, they rarely get past the first page of Google, Yahoo, Bing ... And if you are not on it, your potential clients won’t find you.

SEO

The focus was then back to the modules. More specifically, it was up to the ones related to the newest version of Drupal. However, Top Drupal 8 Modules consisted without the ones that were already mentioned in the first blog post of the month. Nevertheless, we wanted to point out the best ones for solving everyday problems.

We concluded the month with a blog topic Are you ready to take a chance with experimental modules? We explained, what experimental modules are, what different stabilities they have, gave you some examples and in the end warned you about risks you take with having them. A lot of users are not aware of them, so it’s good to know, what lays ahead of you.

Jul 27 2017
Jul 27

Lately, a lot of our attention has been dedicated to Drupal modules. We have explored the most popular ones and the best for Drupal 8. But we will not stop here. We'll also look at the experimental modules, which may confuse some Drupal users. As you will see, there is also some risk in having them.

What are the experimental modules?

As stated on the official website of Drupal, experimental modules are modules that are included in Drupal core but are for testing purposes, so they are not (yet) fully supported. This new approach was introduced in Drupal 8. New experimental modules can only be added in minor releases. They may change between patch releases, while still being experimental. That differs them from the other features. Experimental modules allow site builders and core contributors to receive feedback and test out functionality that might eventually be supported in an upcoming minor release and might be included as a stable part of Drupal core. However, not any module can be experimental, because they too have to meet the minimal standards.

 

Experimental modules not stable

 

Alpha, Beta, Release candidate …

There are different stability levels of the experimental modules. Alpha experimental modules are still under development. They are, however available for testing, but may include bugs, security issues and the developers should not rely on their APIs. Beta experimental modules are, on the other hand, considered API and feature complete. They are still not fully supported and may still have bugs. If critical bugs are removed, the experimental module can become a release candidate, which means that it is release-ready. Once they are judged as stable, they are labelled as stable core modules. But they can become so only in minor or major releases.

Examples

These are experimental modules in Drupal 8.0, released in November 2015.

 

Experimental modules

 

However, the number of the experimental modules has at least doubled since then. Until recently, it was only the Big Pipe module that »has evolved« from being an experimental module to being an official module. But there might (!) be two more in Drupal 8.4.0 on 4th October 2017, as the Drupal 8.4.x Media API has become stable, after an enormous effort by the Drupal Media Initiative. The second one is DateTime Range, which also became stable for Drupal 8.4.0.

On the other hand, several experimental modules have 8.4.x alpha deadlines, which is on Monday next week (31th July!), when Drupal 8.4.0-alpha1 will be released. If these experimental modules will not reach their follow-up requirements until that deadline, they may be removed from core. These experimental modules are:

1.      Workflows and Content Moderation 

2.      Inline Form Errors

3.      Place Blocks

4.      Settings Tray

 

Workflow

 

Drupal 8.4.0-beta1 will be then released on the week of August 14th, while the release candidate phase will begin the week of September 4th.

Possible risks

Despite the fact that new capabilities can be added faster to Drupal – for that you have previously required a new major version – there are some possible risks of having the experimental modules. As you may have found out, not all experimental modules became or will become stable core modules. If they turn out not to be a good fit, they are removed from the core in future versions. Moreover, they can even change. That basically means that if you have found a solution to optimize your work, you may, after some time, be left without it. So, there were some arguments about, what kind of message does the Drupal send to the end users by giving them something that might not work.

 

Experimental modules at own risk

 

There are of course some other reasons for experimental modules to not become the stable core modules. They may not have made a sufficient progress or a better solution in core supersedes the module. Nevertheless, the experimental modules do not share core's version. When you want to enable them, you get the message saying "Use at your own risk", which is also a big problem, especially with the users that do not like to take risks. The risks are, in general, connected with APIs, bugs, security and other issues.

All in all, it will be once again up to everyone to choose whether to use experimental modules. But as the founder of Drupal Dries Buytaert said on DrupalCon Baltimore, it’s probably not wise to use them in production.

Jul 25 2017
Jul 25

Last time, we have looked at the most popular Drupal modules. There are around 12 000 modules available for Drupal 7 and 3 000 for Drupal 8, of whom only 1 000 are in a stable version. Not so much as some would perhaps expect. However a lot of them make our lives easier each day, so this time we will look at the top Drupal 8 modules.

Firstly, we must point out that modules that were already used in the blog post Most popular Drupal modules will be left out. Namely, we already presented, which are available for Drupal 8 and their popularity makes them useful for the newest version of Drupal as well. Where to start then?

We will kink-off with the module, which successfully replaced the Administration menu. It's Admin Toolbar, which is probably the first module you have to add to your Drupal 8 site. The entire menu is responsive and you can access the subitems in the toolbar quickly.

The second choice is Metatag. It's one of the SEO modules we have already presented. A module doesn't include just the description and the title, but it also makes sure that your content is going to look good when you share it on social media. It gives you the control of how your content appears when shared.

 

Drupal 8 Module Metatag

 

We continue with Devel, a module which has been with the Drupal community for a long time. It has almost four million downloads. It is a great module for developer debugging. Moreover, its sub modules include some other useful features for developers and themers as well.

In Drupal 7, the module for managing media was Media, which in Drupal 8 broken up into smaller modules. That means that you can manage media with Entity Browser, Media Entity, File Entity Browser and Entity Embed. The Entity Browser is a starting one, with whom you are able to add File Entity Browser to your Drupal 8 site, which allows you to reuse images or files across different pieces of content.

The Media entity transforms a YouTube video, tweet on Twitter, Instagram photo, local file, or other media resource into an Entity, while Entity Embed allows any entity to be embedded within a text area using a WYSIWYG editor. Latter is also a worthy mention. It allows Drupal to replace text area with CKEditor. If you don’t have the described media modules, content editors have to upload the same picture again and again. But that changed with Drupal minor version 8.3.0. There, you can drag and drop images into image fields in Quick Edit mode. For something more, we’ll have to wait until next minor or perhaps major releases.

 

Drupal 8 Module File Entity Browser

 

If you have troubles with spams, Honeypot is a right solution for you. If you want to link content with a nice interface for editors, you should use Linkit. It allows auto-complete feature for all internal and external links.

A list can go on because there are a lot of Drupal 8 modules, which deserve to be mentioned, but every story needs the ending. So, we will conclude our list with a Webform, a module, used for making forms and surveys in Drupal site. But don't worry, that was not the last post from Drupal module's action because, in the future, we will also look at some of the most popular Drupal (8) modules we use at AGILEDROP.

Jul 20 2017
Jul 20

Everybody wants to be high on web search engines results because when people look for information, they rarely get past the first page of Google, Yahoo, Bing ... So, if you don’t show up high in a search engine results, the potential customers will have hard times finding you. Or, most likely, they won’t find you at all. Luckily, there are some ways to boost your rankings in search engine results.

With Modules

There are many Drupal modules, which will help you enhance the search engine optimization (SEO). In fact, we have already made a list of the best Drupal SEO modules to optimize your website. The list includes Google Analytics, SEO Checklist, Metatags, Content Optimizer, Pathauto and so on. It's hard to expect that you will try all of them, so it's up to you to test some of them and see if the results match your expectations.

 

Drupal SEO Modules

 

With Keywords

It's crucial to define the keywords you will target. These keywords can be then in the centre of your SEO campaign. But to do so, you must make a research about them. Some of the Drupal SEO modules will help you have control over the keywords, but you must first find them. The easiest way to do so is with Google Trends, which allows you to see how a specific keyword has done over the years. And with that, you will know if there is any traffic potential from that keyword. After you have selected them, you can use a Keyword planner to see, how frequently terms are searched per month, how competitive they are for ranking, and how much they cost to advertise on.

With Images

Not just because the readers like to break the monotony of the connected on-going texts and look at some other content-related things, but because people look for images as well. They don't look just for content. And the latter will be easily explored if your images score high as well. A little tip in achieving this is making sure that at least one of the alternative texts of your images in the article, blog ... contains a focus keyword from your content. However, keep in mind that images, which are not compressed and optimised for serving up over slower internet connections are seeking for trouble.

 

SEO

 

With speed and without dead links

Make sure your page loads fast. Search engines don't favour the ones, which have high bounce rates due to the slow loading speed. So, make sure your site is not a »slow loader«. Moreover, the problem we still, accidentally, face sometimes are dead links. The ones, which are headed towards non-existing locations or the ones, which guide you to sites that are not working. Broken link issues also lower your score, so make sure you don't have them. Therefore, your URLs should be clean, readable and should contain the page title.

With continuous updates

The SEO is flexible, so it requires a continuous improvement. The idea of improving your Drupal site can come from your competitors as well, so make sure you monitor them. However, we hope that at the moment we have helped you on your way to rank better in search engines results. But one thing is crucial and keep that in mind. Primarily, you write a content for your Drupal site visitors and then comes the optimisation for search engines. Not the other way around!

Jul 18 2017
Jul 18

Remember when we have made a complete tour around the world to look at the Drupal Camps? If you don't, you can refresh your memories and find out which continent has the most Drupal camp activities. Besides that, we also highlighted the importance of attending such events. Drupal camps bring you many positive things. Lately, we came across a new term – Drupal Mini Camps. Let's see what they are.

Almost a month ago we saw that Atlanta is organizing a Drupal event. Nothing special at first. Drupal Camp Atlanta has been there for the Drupal Community a long time. But with further reading, something caught our eye. It was a word »mini«. We wanted to know more about it, so we dug in it.

Paying for virtual things

Drupal mini camps are camps that are organized online. They are very similar to virtual Drupal camps, which we have already presented, with an exception that if you want to listen to Drupal (8) sessions on a Mini Camp, you have to pay. Like paying for a ticket, but an online one. So the shared knowledge by the speakers is, unlike virtual Drupal Camps, not for free. Moreover, it's a single-track event, so no sessions run parallel.

 

Virtual Drupal Camp

 

Most of the sessions from any Drupal Camps are, after the conference, available on the web. So, roughly speaking, the money you pay for a ticket to enter a Drupal Camp is only for socializing and making new business partners and friends. Shared knowledge is, in this way, free for everyone. But with the admission (online ticket), Drupal Mini Camps bring a new dimension to it. Drupal developers, site builders, Drupal themers, experts, beginners ... are confronted with the fact that if they want to learn something new, they have to pay for it. The real question is, is the knowledge they’ll get worth spending their money?

Busy schedule

Mini Drupal Camps last only one day, some hours to be precise, in contrast to Drupal Camps, which are usually two or three-day events with workshops and so on. Drupal MiniCamp Atlanta, for example, lasted for seven hours with only ten-minute breaks between the sessions, so the concentration had to be very high. Since it lasted between business hours and you also have to invest the money in it, you probably have to take a day off at work. That's also one fact to look at.

 

Drupal Mini Camps

 

Mini meaning just something smaller

The MiniCamp in Atlanta was not the first such event. There were some in the past as well. Like PHP Mini-Camp within DrupalCamp LA in 2014 or Drupal Mini Camp Bangalore in the same year. But above examples are named mini just because they represent the smaller version of the event. Not because of something else. Therefore, in our eyes, it was Drupal MiniCamp Atlanta that set-up the criteria for the (new) term.

Jul 13 2017
Jul 13

As we like to point out, it is summer time and some of you will still go on a vacation. You will rest and gain more energy to later begin with new challenges. It's up to you to decide how you would like to spend your free time. Will you travel or just lay on the beach? Be it either way, you can help yourself with this holiday and travel sites, made on Drupal.

There are many exotic places on earth to visit and one is definitely Fiji. It's true that all the flights to the island are long, with the closest one from New Zealand lasts three hours, but the island has a lot to offer. So in order to make sure that tourists came and will come there, the official website of Tourism Fiji had to make a responsive, attractive, interactive, user-friendly, and multilingual site and opted for Drupal.

The next one is Boreal Mountain Resort, which Helps Skiers Find Resort Information Quickly. They have chosen Drupal, because of the speed. Namely, their main goal is to get skiers to the mountain quicker, so the site’s design and development had to be quick as well.

 

boreal mountain resort

 

The third is the Princess cruise app, which is built on Drupal. The application lets passengers of the ship access the ship’s schedule of events, stateroom account, itinerary, instant messaging, and personalized cruise planner. It's definitely comforting to be a passenger with it.

And don't think that none of the airports is using Drupal. Gatwick, one of the airports in London launched the site Gatwick Obviously on Drupal to make sure that passengers find the ideal combination for transport both to and from London.

 

gatwick obviously

 

Like Fiji, some other exotic places also opted for Drupal. These sites are Bahamas and Seychelles. Worthy mentions are also Canadian Tourism Commission - Business Events, Safe Travel and Squaw Valley.

All in all, if you are still going on a vacation, these Drupal sites may help you. In case you are considering launching a travel or holiday site, we hope we have shown you Drupal as the worthy fit for your needs.

Jul 11 2017
Jul 11

Because of the summer, many people were or are going to the holidays. But that doesn't mean that they rested. In fact, there were many high-quality blog post about Drupal in the past month, so let's take a lot at the top Drupal Blogs from June.

We'll start with Sasa Nikolic and his Nested Paragraphs Translation. In this blog post the author warns that translating content in Drupal isn't a straightforward task and has many obstacles. So, he recapped the basics first and then dug deeper in nested paragraph translation.

Our second choice is a fascinating story of how Jack switched his career from teaching English to web development titled Learning Web Development with Agile Collective. He reveals how everything began and what all he learned on the way.

We continue with When Drupal Met CARTO from Pablo López Escobés. The author reveals that Drupal hasn't always been the best option for handling spatial data visualisation. Therefore, he offers a solution with the combination of Drupal and CARTO, a powerful spatial data analysis platform.

 

Spam modules

 

Making the fourth spot was Geoff Appleby with Drupal and HTTP/2: Time to Experiment. He discusses where HTTP/2 works and is supportive. Moreover, he also explores the possibilities for Drupal 8 to take advantage of some new features and improvements.

For the second time in the row, Luke Zagata makes our list. This time with 4 Must-Have Drupal Spam Prevention Modules. As the title says it all, the author presented Drupal spam prevention modules he sees as the best fit for your site.

The next one in line is Ben Regis with How to Customize Content Forms and Pages Using Field Group in Drupal 8. The blog post reveals what module Field Group does. The first part of the blog post talks about how to group fields to make editing content easier, while the second part demonstrates how to display groups of fields to create a simple but effective layout.

We'll conclude our list with Do I have to wait for Drupal 9 for my web project? by the author, we could not find. This blog post is about the release cycles of Drupal and some issues and speculations going with it. However, the most focus is on the maintenance.

That's our selection for the past month. We are quite aware that not everyone is interested in everything and that some other important topics were covered as well. But as we said, that's our selection. Don't forget, we'll make a list every month so that you will be informed as much as possible. Until then, wait for our next blog post.

Jul 06 2017
Jul 06

Modules. You practically cannot master Drupal without them. They extend and customize Drupal functionality. It's true that some are still not converted properly to the newest version and some are poorly or not maintained at all. But there are many who solve your everyday problems efficiently. Therefore, we will look at the most popular Drupal modules according to the official website of Drupal.

Chaos tool suite (ctools) is the most popular Drupal module, with almost nine hundred thousand sites using it, making it the most installed Drupal module. This module is a set of tools to improve the developer experience. The tools are, for example, Plugins, Exportables, Contexts, AJAX responder ... It also has a Page Manager, whose job is to manage panel pages. The latest version for Drupal 8 is 8.x-3.0, while for Drupal 7 it’s 7.x-1.12.

The next one is in Drupal 8 core. It is Views, which therefore needs to be downloaded only for the Drupal versions 6 and 7. You need this module if you want to, for example, alphabetically sort the default taxonomy view, sort the default front page view differently, want to provide 'unread forum posts', don’t like the way articles are displayed in the article module and so on.

The third most popular Drupal module, which still has more than eight hundred thousand sites using it, is Token. It provides UI for browsing tokens and additional tokens not supported by the core. It’s available for version 8.x-1.0 and 7.x-1.7.

 

Drupal Module Token

 

If you have ctools and Token, you can have Pathauto. It’s a module, which automatically generates URL aliases for various kinds of content, like nodes or taxonomy terms. This means that users don’t have to manually specify the path alias. The version for Drupal 8 is the same as for Tokens, while the available version for Drupal 7 is 7.x-1.3.

Libraries API is the next one and you can say that it’s the denominator for all Drupal modules that integrate with external libraries. It’s the first module, which is installed in a little less than seven hundred thousand sites. Although Drupal 8 core introduced some improved library management tools, Libraries API remains an important API module for the Drupal 8 contrib environment.

In order to deal with entities and their properties, you need Entity API. It provides API functions allowing modules to create, delete, view, save or to determine access for any entity. There are still more than six hundred thousand sites using this module. Entity API for the newest version of Drupal will someday be moved to Drupal core, but until then it is still used as a module.

One more absent from Drupal 8 is jQuery Update, a module which, the name says it all actually, upgrades the version of jQuery in a Drupal core.

We’ll conclude our list with the one, very helpful to the newcomers. Administration menu provides an administration interface or to be easily understood navigation. But be careful! The project is not covered by Drupal’s security advisory policy, so in case you use it, it will be at your own risk.

You can find more of the most popular Drupal modules here.

Jul 04 2017
Jul 04

The summer is here. Holidays as well. But our blog activities don't rest. Far from that. We have written quite a lot of blog posts about Drupal for you in the past month. Therefore, it' time to look at the topics we covered in June.

We began the June with our commercial director Iztok Smolic inviting everyone who would like to speak at the following DrupalCon in Vienna to propose their sessions about Business. Namely, he was chosen to prepare the program and select the sessions, so it was up to you to take the chance.

Our second blog post was for Front Enders. All the sessions from the last DrupalCon were gathered in one place and presented to Front End Drupal developers.

 

Preparing a session

 

Our next blog topic also covered DrupalCon sessions. It was about DevOps. A number of sessions were the biggest here, so it was a little harder to pick up the specific things to anyone's liking.

We did not forget about PHP. Since everybody must have some knowledge about it to successfully deal with Drupal challenges, we presented DrupalCon sessions about PHP as well.

We were nearly at the end. Our fifth blog post was dedicated to business. In case anyone had any doubts about proposing a session about business for the next DrupalCon, we helped them the way, that they could look at the kind of topics this Drupalcon track covers.

The last blog topic of the month and also the last one from the series of Drupalcon was DrupalCon sessions about Symfony. It was dedicated to all Symfony users. It surprised us that two companies completely dominated in that area.

That's it. More blog posts are coming in July when we have a lot in store for you as well.

Jun 29 2017
Jun 29

Last time, we gathered together DrupalCon Baltimore sessions about Business. Before that, we explored the area of PHP, DevOps, Front End, Site Building, Drupal Showcase, Coding and Development, Project Management and Case Studies. Quite a lot of areas, so this will be our last stop. We will only look at Drupalcon sessions about Symfony.

Events: The Object Oriented Hook System by Nida Ismail Shah from Acquia

This session threw some light on how to create, trigger, subscribe and listen to events in Drupal 8.

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Everything about Unicode all PHP devs should know by Nicolas Grekas from SensioLabs

This session dived into Unicode vocabularies that snapshots some important linguistic and cultural bits of our times. It showed how developers have been given the privilege to play with them at the technical level.

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How I learned to Stop Wiring and Love Autowiring Containers by Beau Simensen from SensioLabs

In this session the developer presented his journey into the wild world of containers. Attendees learned how autowiring works and their using can free them from having to manually configure every dependency.

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Twig: Tips and Tricks by Fabien Potencier from SensioLabs

This session presented lots of practical tips and tricks about Twig that will help you improve your Drupal templates. It also showed some rarely used Twig options and features.

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Wait, there are 35 Symfony Components? What Cool Stuff am I Missing? by Ryan Weaver from SensioLabs

In this session, the attendees took a look at the Symfony's components, how to install them into Drupal (or anywhere) and how to use some of the author’s favourite, lesser-known components. All in all, attendees had a better appreciation of what Symfony really is and learned about some new tools for using immediately.

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Jun 27 2017
Jun 27

Last time, we gathered together DrupalCon Baltimore sessions about PHP. Before that, we explored the area of DevOps, Front End, Site Building, Drupal Showcase, Coding and Development, Project Management and Case Studies. And that was not our last stop. We have two to go. This time, we looked at sessions that were presented in the area of Business.

Beyond the .Com: Drupal's new role in the Large Enterprise by Josh Linard from Mediacurrent

This session was not about Gartner rankings and CMS comparisons, but it was about attendees gaining an understanding of how Drupal now fits into a global organization’s product roadmap in 2017 and beyond. The primary challenges that the Large Enterprises are using Drupal to solve were also explored.

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Buzzword Blitz: What You Need To Know About Digital Transformation and Drupal by Shellie Hutchens from Mediacurrent

This session broke down what business and marketing buzzwords you need to know and what’s just noise, helped you gain a clearer understanding of how each concept may or may not impact your organization’s Digital Transformation journey, explored the challenges your organization may face when integrating Drupal and your technology stack, including the best place to start and showed you how innovations in Drupal are helping organizations like yours tackle these big ideas to reach their business goals.

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Change prospects’ perceptions by Productizing your services by Shailesh Gogate from Faichi Solutions

In this session, attendees learned how to productize their services and change the perception of customers. They might have gotten the ideas on how to choose specific verticals based on their current or past experience and scale their business.

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Creating a Culture of Engagement: The ROI of Transparency and Communication by Anne Stefanyk from Kanopi Studios

In this session attendees learned what employee engagement looks like, how to hold employees accountable for goals and their outcomes, the importance of transparency, ways to create business value through culture, how to harness the talents of all personality types and the tactics to put ideas into action.

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Cultivating a Digital Ecosystem: Do you have a holistic digital strategy? by Nikhil Deshpande from GeorgiaGov Interactive

This session addressed how to cultivate a digital ecosystem to build an environment for customer interactions, mapping customer touch points and designing experience roadmaps for the customer journey.

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Data Driven Design for Better Business by Melissa DuFresne from Elevated Third

In this session, Elevated Third presented how they run tests, do research and generate numbers to support almost every design decision their teams make. So, learn how everything can be supported by numbers.

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Drupal As Tech Education: Fostering New Staff Via the Drupal Stack by Chris Wright, Caitlin Loos and Chris Bloom from phase2

Attendees of this session learned how to pitch the business case for junior talent development to their company, how to find and identify the best, most diverse junior talent, the benefits to their existing staff and how to start small and plan big for junior talent development.

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Drupal hosting, avalanches and risk management lessons learned the hard way by Daniel Kanchev from SiteGround

This session was the story of how SiteGround managed to successfully implement a risk management framework. It is a story of why you need a risk management framework, how to create it, how to implement it and how to test it.

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Forecasting with Metrics for Digital Agencies by Jody Gruden from Summit CPA Group

This session touched the financial and non-financial Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) that all digital agencies should know and understand in order to effectively manage their business.

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Government of Bermuda: How to pitch, plan, and build a citizen-centric web portal with Drupal by Steve Lavigne from OPIN Software Inc.

This session explored how Drupal was pitched as the right choice over SharePoint & other proprietary systems, how the company proposed third-parties for seamless integration with existing systems, explained reasons behind moving to Drupal specific hosting (Acquia), revealed the future plan to move to Drupal 8 and explained the plan on how the company intend to bring 100s of government services online with Drupal.

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Know your friends, pick the right fights by Jeffrey McGuire from Acquia and Mathias Schreiber from TYPO 3

This session addressed the threats (some were very specific ) outside the open source cocoon, how this treats can be dealt with, how collaboration is more powerful than protectionism and how can everyone from an open source together form a world a better place.

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New Business is Everyone's Responsibility by Jeff Calderone, Nick Switzer and Nelson Harris from Elevated Third

This session focused on how to solve the issue of the sales team getting isolated from the rest of the staff. It provided insights on how to develop a process that brings everyone together during the sales phase.

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Section 508 Refresh, Accessibility & the Law in the USA by Mike Gifford from OpenConcept Consulting Inc.

This session highlighted what organizations need to know about Section 508 Refresh, and more importantly what web development companies should be informing their clients.

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Jun 22 2017
Jun 22

Last time, we gathered together DrupalCon Baltimore sessions about DevOps. Before that, we explored the area of Front End, Site Building, Drupal Showcase, Coding and Development, Project Management and Case Studies. And that was not our last stop. This time, we looked at sessions that were presented in the area of PHP.

Advanced debugging techniques from Patrick Allaert

This session was not about Xdebug. It was about tools that let you know what’s really happening in your PHP code. Tools like the phpdbg debugger, process tracing tools like strace, ltrace, the Linux inotify mechanism, tcpdump/wireshark for network analysis or MySQL Proxy for real-time SQL debugging and monitoring.

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Bending Behat's Benefits by Steve Persch from Pantheon

This session covered some of the good, bad, and ugly ways Pantheon uses Behat. Behat is a tool for having better conversations with your team about expectations for the software being built.

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Dependency Injection in PHP and Drupal by Hussain Abbas from Axelerant

In this session, attendees learned what Dependency Injection is and how it helps them structure their programs better. They learned some very basic concepts like constructor injection with analogies and examples and then moved on to see how it is done in real life.

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Development Workflow Tools for Open-Source PHP Libraries by Greg Anderson from Pantheon

In this session, the author looked at how attendees could get the most out of GitHub source code repository, Packagist package manager for Composer, Travis CI continuous integration service, Coveralls code coverage service, Scrutinizer static analysis service, Box2 phar builder, Sami api documentation generator, ReadTheDocs online documentation reader service, Composer scripts and projects for running local tests and builds. After mastering these tools, attendees should be able to quickly set up a new PHP library project and use it in their Drupal modules.

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Hacking Your Way to Better Security by Colin O'Dell from Unleashed Technologies

This session presented common security vulnerabilities. Namely, how they are exploited and how to protect against them. The author explored several of the OWASP Top 10 attack vectors like SQL injection, XSS, CSRF, and others. Each topic was approached from the perspective of an attacker to see how these vulnerabilities can be detected and exploited using several realistic examples. Moreover, he then applied this knowledge to see how web applications can be secured against such vulnerabilities.

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Improving Code Quality with Static Analysis by Joseph Purcell from Digital Bridge Solutions

In this session, the author looked at how to use static analysis on a project to identify incorrect code using Code Climate as an example. The main thing for this session was an understanding of static analysis and how to tie its automation into the development cycle of a project to improve code quality.

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Plugins, Composer and PHP7 OH MY! by Kris Vanderwater from Acquia

In this session, attendees dug into some serious PHP & plugin-theory, because the author discussed the benefits of adopting the new language features and compared Drupal 8's plugins with the new system.

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Realtime PHP using websockets by Jeff Kolesnikowicz from CodePoets

This session discussed some use cases for websockets as well as strategies for implementing websockets into your PHP application. It looked at the most popular websocket protocols and specifically an overview of the WAMP protocol and the PHP Ratchet library. Additionally, the talk was also about WAMPv2 and Thruway. In the end, everybody had a better sense of what websockets are, how they work, and how to use them in your application.

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Jun 20 2017
Jun 20

Last time, we gathered together DrupalCon Baltimore sessions about Front End. Before that, we explored the area of Site Building, Drupal Showcase, Coding and Development, Project Management and Case Studies. And that was not our last stop. This time, we looked at sessions that were presented in the area of DevOps.

100% Observability by Jason Yee from Datadog

In this session, the author broke down the expansive monitoring landscape into 5 categories and provided a framework to help users ensure full coverage. He also touched why these categories are important to users business and shared the top criteria to consider when evaluating the options.

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Automatic Drupal Updates using Visual Regression & Continuous Integration by Matt Cheney and Andrew Taylor from Pantheon

This session presented how to use a Continous Integration and Visual Regression solution to update a Drupal site. It seems easy at first, but when it goes down to updating, that's hard work, because you need to apply updates, test updates, and deploy updates.

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Avoid DEEP HURTING! Deployment beyond git by TEN7

In this session, the TEN7 team introduced how to augment the deployment with Ansible, laying the foundation to fully automate users' deployments with free and open source software.

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Basic DevOps Skills: Where to Start and How to Learn by Michelle Krejci from Pantheon Systems

This session started with some collective hand-wringing about what “devops” is and then decided that it is a set of skills and processes that are worth developing. Then, the author got into what is worth attendees' time and what is not (Continuous Integration ...).

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Be A Developer Experience Super Hero: Robust Dev Scripts For Peace and Joy from Dustin LeBlanc from Pantheon

This session covered a lot of rather advanced topics including containerization, continuous integration, and automated testing. Listeners must have familiarization with Docker, common PHP testing frameworks, and how continuous integration platforms work.

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Build & Launch Tools: Automating best practices for enterprise sites by Matthew Grasmick from Acquia

In this session, the attendees learned how to create a new BLT-powered Drupal 8 site, how to quickly spin up a Drupal VM, how to automate the local install process, how to validate their custom code (linting and sniffing), how to execute Behat and PHPUnit tests, and how to generate a sanitized deployment artifact.

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Captaining a container ship: Docker orchestration with Kontena by Jochen Lillich from freistil IT

In this session, the author introduced Kontena, an orchestration tool that lets you level up from plain Docker without spending days reading and banging your head on the desk.

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Death Star Security - Maintaining Agility and Security in Clustered Deployments by Chris Teitzel from Cellar Door Media and David Strauss from Pantheon

This session was for projects and teams of all sizes. It was an interactive time filled with lessons learned and examples from the real world. If you find yourself wiring together everything from Varnish to Apache to MySQL to Solr to backup storage (and especially if you're looking for answers better than just throwing it all behind the main firewall), then you have to know how to do the security part properly.

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Docksal: Better than VMs by Leonid Makarov from FFW

In this session, attendees learned more about the basics of using Docker for local development, comparing the Docker -based vs the VM-based approach, getting over the pain points that Docksal eliminates, initializing instant environments with zero configuration, getting a Drupal7 and a Drupal8 site running side by side using different stack versions, seeing how Docksal can be integrated into an existing project and the last, they saw some more advanced use case supported in Docksal (e.g. complex, production-like stacks).

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Implementing Full Stack Test Automation for Drupal 8 - From Unit to Acceptance Tests by Anastasios Daskalopoulos from Exove

In this sessions, the author discussed test-driven Development, unit test generation and execution in Drupal 8, functional test automation tools and acceptance test automation.

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Incident Command: The far side of the edge by Lisa Phillips from Fastly

In this session, Lisa Phillips from Fastly presented how Incident Command was conceived, and the protocols that were developed within Fastly to make it work. She shared a number of war stories that illustrated how Incident Command contributed to protecting Fastly as a company, its customers, and the many end users relying on the service. Examples included a major software vulnerability that affected a Linux component in common use across Fastly, as well as a large Distributed Denial of Service attack.

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Predictable Continuous Deployment: Value, Culture & Tools by Andrew Kucharski and Johnnie Fox from Promet Source

This session started with discussing why the company decided to make the investment and what are the benefits of being able to deploy with confidence. The authors touched on "configuration management" and talked through their lessons learned (Chef, Ansible), took the attendees through several iterations of their build scripts (briefly touching on Composer) for both D7 and D8. Moreover, they tackled "continuous integration" with Jenkins (vs. Travis CI) and other scroptis. They presented how they've managed to deploy to different target environments such as Pantheon, Acquia, AWS, Rackspace etc. In the end, they touched their journey of automated testing from Behat to the Robot framework.

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The future of Monitoring is now with Sensu by Howard Tyson from Zivtech

In this session, the author looked at how sensu is architected and how it removes the pain wrought by its predecessors. He reviewed writing simple plugins to monitor their own services and how everybody can connect sensu to a graphing service like graphite or influxdb and graphana to monitor the same metrics everybody are using for alerting.

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This is not a test: What you should know about containers by Michael Schmid from Amazee Labs

This session explained what makes containers so exciting and why they are seen as a revolution in computing, what new possibilities containers open up (for Drupal, for local Development, for automated Testing), why people are still hesitant on running containers in Production and where containers will bring us in the future.

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¡Viva la Revolución!- How to Start a DevOps Transformation at your Workplace by Amin Astaneh from Acquia

This presentation gave attendees an access to the tools and knowledge to start their own DevOps transformation where they work.

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Jun 14 2017
Jun 14

Last time, we gathered together DrupalCon Baltimore sessions about Site Building. Before that, we explored the area of Drupal Showcase, Coding and Development, Project Management and Case Studies. And that was not our last stop. This time, we looked at sessions that were presented in the area of Front End.

Atomic Design in Drupal 8: Isolating frontend workflow with Pattern Lab! by Anthony Simone from Elevated Third

This session reviewed the basic principles of Pattern Lab and atomic design but focused on the practical implementation of Pattern Lab in the next Drupal project.

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Back to the Basics: Best Practices for Front End Developers by Tessa Kriesel from Pantheon

This session looked at how the developers can do their very best work so that their clients are receiving a top notch website and not just a site filled with the latest and greatest libraries and frameworks.

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Beyond Screen Readers: Diverse Accessibility Needs in Custom Themes by Erin Marchak from My planet

This session explored some of the under-represented gaps in Drupal 8 accessibility and demonstrated methods for tackling these gaps with user’s custom Drupal 8 themes.

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Creating Layouts and Landing Pages for Drupal 8 by Suzanne Dergacheva from Evolving Web

In this session, the word was about different techniques for creating layouts in Drupal 8 - from how to configure landing page content using Paragraphs or Panels to implementing a grid system with users theme. So, attendees walked away with some new tips and tricks under their belt.

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Decoupled Drupal and Angular 2 by Preston So from Acquia

This session went into the undiscovered depths of Angular 2 and dived into TypeScript (including decorators), observables, Angular 2 components and services, and promise-based communication with Drupal 8.

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Demystifying Rendered Content in Drupal 8 Twig Files by Amy Vaillancourt-Sals from ThinkShout, Inc.

In this session, the author took the crowd through a brief intro into twig, the debugging process of sorting through twig variables using xdebug in PHPStorm, mentioned other helpful debugging tools at disposal, and shared common patterns she found helpful for rendering content in twig files.

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EmberJS: A Fitting Face for a D8 Backend by Taylor Solomon from Interactive Strategies

In this session, the author delved into what he and his company learned about Ember and how to structure their frontend data layer to take advantage of Drupal's features.

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JavaScript ES6: The best vanilla you’ve ever tasted by Ryan Hagerty from Chromatic

This session is an introduction to ES6. It reveals how to get started with a compiler and how to solve everyday problems while making the code easier to read and maintain for others and yourself.

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Pattern Language: Pattern Libraries in the Wild by Mark Llobrera from Bluecadet

This session looked at what Bluecadet has experienced as they shifted their design and development process to create flexible, modular sites. The author discussed tools like PatternLab, Fractal, and how he leveraged Drupal’s View Modes. He also talked about Drupal’s Paragraphs module, Drupal Shortcodes, and how to make complex, flexible, modular systems that are simple to understand and manage for content authors.

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Pinterest’s Component Based Design: Breaking down silos, saving time, and empowering content editors. by Grant Gaudet and Evan Lovely from Phase2

In this session, attendees learned about Pinterest’s new integrated design approach using Component-based libraries integrated seamlessly into the Drupal 8 platform using Drupal’s flexible Paragraph system.

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Setting up a Front End Development environment for Drupal 8 by Kristin Bradham from Hook 42

This session walked the attendees through the steps to setup their theme development environment in Drupal 8. Topics included many of the standard things that are needed to do to set up a new theming environment in Drupal 8, so users don't have to work it out themselves!

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The admin interface for an enduser by Morten Birch from Theme Machine

This session was about showing the design problems that Drupal have inherited over the years by beeing a developer -driven project, and point to a way out of this, so everybody can make Drupal pretty.

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Web Performance in 2017 by David Porter

This session covered big things to look out for in 2017. Namely, it covered general front-end performance concerns and showcase Drupal 8 projects and techniques for each particular topic area with a few turnkey options ready to go.

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Jun 06 2017
Jun 06

We hope you are informed as much as possible about Drupal things. We are trying to deliver them to you as much as possible. One of the ways is by looking at the best work from other authors from the past month. Therefore, here are the best Drupal blogs from May.

We will start our list with Improvements and changes in Commerce 2.x by Sascha Grossenbacher. In this blog post, the author focuses on explaining some of the key differences in the new version of Drupal Commerce and how they affect developers and users.

Our second choice is What makes DrupalCon different? from Dagny Evans. She explained all the reasons why she again attended DrupalCon in Baltimore, despite running a small business with no replacements to cover the work for her.

We continue with Why Drupal? from David Hernandez. This blog post is a transcript of the session he gave at DrupalCamp Spain 2017 in Madrid. The author explains the main reason why he is using Drupal, which is very much connected to his everyday non-working experiences.

But that we won't just scratch the surface, there is also a blog post that presents DrupalCon Baltimore experience from the first hand. It's DrupalCon Diaries from Leigh Bryant, who brought the atmosphere from the event right through the reader's doorstep.

Making the fifth spot was Luke Zagata with his 4 More Must-Have Drupal SEO Modules. The author upgraded his (previous) blog post with an additional 4 Drupal SEO modules, which will help you get great at SEO.

Sixth in the list was Dan Ficker with his 6 Reasons We Use Drupal 8. The author presents the main six reasons, why he and his company recommend the latest version of Drupal to their clients.

We'll conclude our list with Ivan Zugec and his Drupal 8 Debugging techniques. He explores all the options users have when debugging a site, made in the latest version of Drupal.

That's our selection for the past month. We are quite aware that not everyone is interested in everything and that some other important topics were covered as well. But as we said, that's our selection. Don't forget, we'll make a list every month so that you will be informed as much as possible. Until then, wait for our next blog post.

Jun 01 2017
Jun 01

As the time goes by, our blog activities don't rest. We have written quite a lot of blog posts about Drupal for you in the past month. Therefore, it' time to look at the topics we covered in May.

We decided that we will focus on the biggest Drupal Conference, which took place in Baltimore. Therefore, we began our month with Case studies from DrupalCon Baltimore. We looked at who had sessions in that area and what they have presented to the audience.

Since we promised that we will be more informative about where we will be and on which Drupal event we will go, we continued the month with presenting our way to Drupal Heart Camp Zagreb. The Camp was the closest Drupal event to us, so practically whole our development team went there. Our development director Bostjan Kovac also had a session about a Web accessibility in Drupal 8.

But that was not the only destination our team overcame that week. Our commercial director and our operations director (the duo that also went on DrupalCon Baltimore) went in the opposite direction towards Frankfurt, where they attended Drupal Business Days. Moreover, Iztok Smolic also had a session about Transforming an agency to a profitable business.

Our fourth blog topic was related to a project management, which we found very important to our firm. However, we explored, which sessions about Project Management were covered in DrupalCon Baltimore. We also shortly presented this talks.

We continued with DrupalCon sessions about Coding and Development. It was the first time that some of the sessions from that area were already covered in Case studies. Since there was the most talks present here, it was actually a relief that some were presented earlier.

Our sixth Drupal Blog was once again dedicated to the biggest Drupal conference. It explored sessions about Drupal Showcase. A number of sessions were once again very big. To be fair, and meaning no disrespect to the others, the funniest part of the event is gathered here. So, if you want to laugh besides learn, here is the best way to combine both.

We concluded our month with Site Building. No so many sessions on DrupalCon Baltimore were present here. Nevertheless, they were all practically based on author's experiences, which makes them very useful to the audience.

That's it. More blog posts are coming in June when we have a lot in store for you as well.

Jun 01 2017
Jun 01

As the time goes by, our blog activities don't rest. We have written quite a lot of blog posts about Drupal for you in the past month. Therefore, it' time to look at the topics we covered in May.

We decided that we will focus on the biggest Drupal Conference, which took place in Baltimore. Therefore, we began our month with Case studies from DrupalCon Baltimore. We looked at who had sessions in that area and what they have presented to the audience.

Since we promised that we will be more informative about where we will be and on which Drupal event we will go, we continued the month with presenting our way to Drupal Heart Camp Zagreb. The Camp was the closest Drupal event to us, so practically whole our development team went there. Our development director Bostjan Kovac also had a session about a Web accessibility in Drupal 8.

But that was not the only destination our team overcame that week. Our commercial director and our operations director (the duo that also went on DrupalCon Baltimore) went in the opposite direction towards Frankfurt, where they attended Drupal Business Days. Moreover, Iztok Smolic also had a session about Transforming an agency to a profitable business.

Our fourth blog topic was related to a project management, which we found very important to our firm. However, we explored, which sessions about Project Management were covered in DrupalCon Baltimore. We also shortly presented this talks.

We continued with DrupalCon sessions about Coding and Development. It was the first time that some of the sessions from that area were already covered in Case studies. Since there was the most talks present here, it was actually a relief that some were presented earlier.

Our sixth Drupal Blog was once again dedicated to the biggest Drupal conference. It explored sessions about Drupal Showcase. A number of sessions were once again very big. To be fair, and meaning no disrespect to the others, the funniest part of the event is gathered here. So, if you want to laugh besides learn, here is the best way to combine both.

We concluded our month with Site Building. No so many sessions on DrupalCon Baltimore were present here. Nevertheless, they were all practically based on author's experiences, which makes them very useful to the audience.

That's it. More blog posts are coming in June when we have a lot in store for you as well.

May 30 2017
May 30

Last time, we gathered together DrupalCon Baltimore sessions about Drupal Showcase. Before that, we explored the area of Coding and Development, Project Management and Case Studies. And that was not our last stop. This time, we looked at sessions that were presented in the area of Site Building.

Beyond the Solr Eclipse - Building blazing fast Drupal 8 search with Solr and no code by Tanay Sai and Jayakrishnan Jayabal from Acquia

In this session, the authors discussed Apachesolr - an open source search platform that can be easily integrated with Drupal 8. They did not write any code, so attendees were amazed when they saw what could be achieved using the suite of Solr modules to build a blazing fast search for their Drupal website without any coding. The session also gave a rundown of building an advanced search system using Search API suite of Solr Modules.

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Bootstrap Paragraphs by Jim Birch from Xeno Media, Inc.

In this session, attendees learned how to combine the power of the world's most popular front-end framework, Bootstrap with Drupal Paragraphs, the powerful module that allows content creators to build layouts and structured pages. With using the Bootstrap Paragraphs Drupal 8 module, attendees ought to be able to create Bootstrap features like Accordions, Carousels, Modals, Tabs, and Multi-column layouts.

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Compose your Drupal Website by Hussain Abbas from Axelerant

In this session, attendees learned how Composer workflow helps them in building and maintaining websites with relative use. It might sound intimidating and lot of work at first, not to mention you need to use the terminal. Moreover, attendees also learned how to use composer with existing templates and some helpful commands and tools to get you started quickly.

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Drupal is Changing, Quickly: How and Why by Ted Bowman from Acquia

This session let attendees know, how changes in Drupal 8 core affect users, no matter whether they are a site builder, module developer, business owner or anyone else involved with Drupal.

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Dungeons & Dragons & Drupal by Tobby Hagler from Phase2

This session covered learning Drupal 8 the Dungeons & Dragons (D&D) way, creating a D&D Player Character (PC) content type, creating custom fields for a PC data, including custom compound fields with Field API and the Paragraphs module, handling intricate entity relationships (effects of magical items on stats) ...

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Harness the Power of View Modes! by Aimee Hannaford from Hook 42

This session presents View Modes, which are the site-building glue that brings your content strategy, design, media strategy, and UX development together to actually create your web displays. They have been in Drupal for some time. The session explores, why View Modes are so powerful and why are they now even more relevant with the standardization of Entity and Field management across entity types.

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Launching Online Stores with Commerce 2.x on Drupal 8 by Ryan Szrama, Matt Glaman and Bojan Živanović from Commerce Guys

In this session, the authors present the history, architecture and features of the project (Drupal Commerce 2.x for Drupal 8, which is advancing towards a full release). They also highlight the changes that have made this version even more productive for building online stores.

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Mastering Drupal 8 Views by Amanda Marshall and Gregg Marshall from Accenture

In this session, the authors started by clarifying terminology, continued with modifying a view built into core that everyone uses. Then they have built their own simple what's new content list and next they have expanded and extended that list to create more complex displays, including maps and carousels. In the end, they looked at ways to make Views display exactly what they wanted.

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Raising The Security Bar with Guardr by Mark Shropshire from Mediacurrent

In this session, attendees learned about Guardr's philosophy, features, and how to start new projects with Guardr. They have raises the bar on Drupal security with a more streamlined approach.

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Rearchitecting for Drupal 8 by Frank Anderson from Clarity Innovations Inc.

This session showcastes one of the most complicated Drupal 7 projects and evaluation of rebuilding the project with Drupal 8. The author focused on changes in information architecture from Drupal 7 to Drupal 8.

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The Right Tool for the Job: Content Layout in Drupal 8 by Kathryn McClintock from Amazee Labs Austin

In this session, the author covered the differences, use cases, and advantages/disadvantages of a variety of layout options (Blocks, Context, Display Suite, Panels, Panelizer, Paragraphs, Twig templates and WYSIWYG / CKEditor templates)

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Webform 8.x-5.x by Jacob Rockowitz

The main purpose of this session was to get attendees familiar with the Drupal 8 version of the Webform module, inspire them to use this module to build awesome forms and to ultimately convince them to extend and contribute code and ideas back to the Drupal and Webform community.

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May 25 2017
May 25

Last time, we gathered together DrupalCon Baltimore sessions about Coding and Development. Before that, we explored the area of Project Management and Case Studies. And that was not our last stop. This time, we looked at sessions that were presented in the area of Drupal Showcase.

Ain’t No Body: Not Your Mama’s Headless Drupal by Paul Day from Quotient, Inc.

This session explores disembodied Drupal, also known as bodiless Drupal- an application that uses Drupal’s powerful framework to do things it does well while storing the actual domain data in a remote repository. Moreover, it explores applications that are both disembodied and headless - in which Drupal is the framework used to maintain data stored in a remote repository; and kiosk applications and other non-Drupal front end leverage the stored data, whether via Drupal paths or otherwise.

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Continuous Integration is For Teams by Rob Bayliss from Last Call Media and Drew Gorton from Pantheon

This session looked through the eyes of the real world at Continuous Integration. It went past the tooling hype and looked at the benefits of CI for developers, project managers, and clients. After all, a successful Continuous Integration practice makes a team work faster, safer, and more predictable.

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Extending your application to the edge: best practices for using a CDN from Fastly

In this session, attendees discussed caching strategies when using CDNs. More specifically, they covered caching long tail content, caching fast-changing content, invalidation, stale and error conditions, and best ways to interact with a CDN when it comes to cached content. The session was supported by real-world examples to showcase new ways of using a CDN as a platform that extends applications to the network edge.

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How Drupal.org Fights Spam Using Distil Networks by Dominick Fuccillo from Distil Networks

In this session, the author explored the unique challenges Drupal.org faced with spammers creating bogus accounts, the resources needed to manually remove spam content, and how fake accounts and spam were polluting the community engagement metrics.

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Scaling and Sharing: Building Custom Drupal Distributions for Federated Organizations by Alexander Schedrov from FFW and Craig Paulnock from YMCA of the Greater Twin Cities

In this session authors examined how they were leveraging open source, Drupal 8 with one of the largest federated non-profit organization in the world, the YMCA. They focused specifically on a community driven initiative, Open Y, which is a Drupal distribution custom built for YMCAs everywhere.

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Score.org: User Experience for 320+ sites on one flexible platform! by phase2

This session dug into the UX and administrative challenges that are common to large national organizations with several local chapters or offices. Moreover, it showed how these challenges can be solved by implementing a Drupal platform coupled with a robust user experience strategy.

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Security for Emerging Threats by Tony Perez from SucuriSecurity

In this session, the author looked back at various incidents in 2016, talked about what they meant to website owners, and talked about security technologies designed to help address tomorrow’s threats.

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So you want to be a "Digital Platform" Rock Star?! by David Valade from Comcast, Lisa Bernhard from PWW, Kiel Frost of Flight Center Travel Group, Brendan Janishefski of Visit Baltimore, and Subramanian "Subbu" Hariharan of Princess Cruises

In this session, attendees learned from the first-hand what it takes to be a Digital Platform Rock Star. The authors talked what inspired them, how they started, what resources they needed, what unexpected events happened, how they formed a ‘band’ from across their organization to ensure success. It was not a technical session.

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Strategy and Redesign for the U.S. Commission on Security and Cooperation in Europe by Sarat Tippaluru and Chris Jurchak from  U.S. Commission on Security and Cooperation in Europe

In this session member of U.S. Commission on Security and Cooperation in Europe explained why they have chosen Drupal. They also described the whole project and revealed the back-end development and front-end design.

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The Cure for Translation Headaches: Drupal Module Gives HID Global Pain Relief from Quality & Integration Problems by Peter Carrero from Lingotek

The session showed how the integrated translation solution provided by the Lingotek (Inside Drupal Module) quickly eliminated the company’s translation problems. It also showed how integrating translation inside Drupal had a positive business impact on the speed, accuracy, and quality of HID Global’s translations and helped free up time for their content managers and developers.

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Why Symfony, Magento and eZ Systems launched their cloud services in 2016, and why you should be using a PaaS too. by Kieron Sambrook-Smith from Platform.sh, Fabien Potencier from SensioLabs, Peter Sheldon from Magento Commerce and Roland Benedetti from eZ Systems

In this session, people from Magento, eZ Systems and SensioLabs came and talked about the Platform.sh PaaS, which enabled these new offerings. Moreover, they talked about why all these same benefits apply to a digital agency, an organisation, or a single developer.

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Note: Some of the sessions were already used in Case Studies

May 23 2017
May 23

Last time, we gathered together DrupalCon Baltimore sessions about Project Management. Before that, we explored Case Studies. We promised that we will also look in some other areas. Therefore, we will this time see, which sessions were present in the area of Coding and Development.

Code Standards: It's Okay to be Yourself, But Write Your Code Like Everyone Else by Alanna Burke from Chromatic

In this session, attendees learned both formatting standards for their code and documentation standards, as well as some specifics for things like Twig, and object-oriented programming in Drupal 8. The session was appropriate for beginners and experts of Drupal and it also covered how to implement coding standards using tools like Coder and PHP Codesniffer, and how to make the editor do some of the work for Drupal users.

[embedded content]

 

Deep dive into D8 through Single Sign-On Example by Arlina Espinoza Rhoton from Chapter Three

In this session, the author went through a single sign-on (SSO) example module, which helped everybody understand, how OOP works its magic into the modules, making them easier to write, understand and debug. In the way, they uncovered some of Drupal's design patterns.

[embedded content]

Devel - D8 release party by Moshe Weitzman from Drupal Association

The session covers a Devel project, which has been revitalized and revamped for Drupal 8. Therefore, the attendees learned about all Devel's new features and APIs.

[embedded content]

Drupal Commerce Performance by Shawn McCabe from Acro Media

This session gives an overview of performance problems with Drupal Commerce and Drupal 7 and ways to fix or mitigate them. It also touches changes coming with Commerce 2.x for Drupal 8 and how this will affect performance in Drupal, especially related to cache contexts and bigpipe.

[embedded content]

Entities 201 - Creating Custom Entities by Ron Northcutt from Acquia

This session covers code generation using Drupal Console, creating a custom module to “house” the custom entity, understanding basic object inheritance, understanding folder naming and namespace, permissions and routing and fields and database storage. With that knowledge, attendees should create a basic custom entity and custom module in under 5 minutes.

[embedded content]

Improving your Drupal 8 development workflow by Jesus Manuel Olivas from weKnow

This session will show you how to use composer to improve your development workflow and reduce project setup and onboarding time. Furthermore, it will show you how to implement automated analysis tools for code review and code coverage and finally how to build and artifact and deploy your project.

[embedded content]

Magento and Drupal fall in love: A new way to approach contextual commerce at enterprise scale by Mike DeWolf and Justin Emond from Third & Grove

In this session, authors used many Drupal and Magento integration projects and shared everything you need to know to successfully combine these two marketing-leading systems into a digital experience platform. More specifically, authors went over technical best practices for combining Drupal and Magento, shared their integration approach decision matrix, discussed how to make it scale at the enterprise level, and reviewed how to ensure outages don’t impact orders with a tool called the conductor.

[embedded content]

Masters of the Universe: Live-coding a React Application using Drupal Services by Erin Marchak and Justin Longbottom from Myplanet

In this session, authors coded live both the back- and the front-end of a decoupled React application. They used Drupal Console to generate the services, and React Scaffold to generate the components. This session is appropriate for React developers looking to dip their toes into Drupal, Drupal developers wanting to take a peek at React, and Architects looking to understand how the two combine.

[embedded content]

Migrate all the things! by Dave Vasilevsky from Evolving Web

In this session, the author talks about his experiences with several different Migrate-based workflows that he and his Evolving Web team had used before.

[embedded content]

Progressive Web Apps for Drupal - Reliable, Fast, Engaging by Ronald te Brake from GoalGorilla

In this session, attendees learned more about push notifications and how the company used this new progressive web app feature in their Drupal 8 distribution Open Social, to improve user engagement with their product.

[embedded content]

Rescue Me: Recovering a sad, broken Drupal by Matt Corks from Evolving Web

This session describes the process used to recover sites with no filesystem or database backups after a Drupalgeddon infiltration. It also describes the process used to rescue a site containing multiple major unsupported core patches. Moreover, it briefly mentions the related project management difficulties associated with having inherited a completely broken site, in particular, one belonging to an external client.

[embedded content]

Testing for the Brave and True by Gabe Sullice from Aten

In this session, the author discussed the how and the why from the get-go. He cleared as many obstacles as he could and presented his mistakes. Specifically, he thought everybody how to extend Drupal's testing classes like UnitTestCase, KernelTestBase, and WebTestBase to test everybody's custom applications from top to bottom.

[embedded content]

Understanding the Dark Side: An Analysis of Drupal (and Other) Worst Practices by Kristen Pol from Hook 42

This session is a collection of some of the worst practices that are pretty common in the Drupal world and beyond Drupal world. For example, if you don't know what "hacking core" is or why you shouldn't do it, you must listen to this session.

[embedded content]

May 23 2017
May 23

Last time, we gathered together DrupalCon Baltimore sessions about Project Management. Before that, we explored Case Studies. We promised that we will also look in some other areas. Therefore, we will this time see, which sessions were present in the area of Coding and Development.

Code Standards: It's Okay to be Yourself, But Write Your Code Like Everyone Else by Alanna Burke from Chromatic

In this session, attendees learned both formatting standards for their code and documentation standards, as well as some specifics for things like Twig, and object-oriented programming in Drupal 8. The session was appropriate for beginners and experts of Drupal and it also covered how to implement coding standards using tools like Coder and PHP Codesniffer, and how to make the editor do some of the work for Drupal users.

[embedded content]

 

Deep dive into D8 through Single Sign-On Example by Arlina Espinoza Rhoton from Chapter Three

In this session, the author went through a single sign-on (SSO) example module, which helped everybody understand, how OOP works its magic into the modules, making them easier to write, understand and debug. In the way, they uncovered some of Drupal's design patterns.

[embedded content]

Devel - D8 release party by Moshe Weitzman from Drupal Association

The session covers a Devel project, which has been revitalized and revamped for Drupal 8. Therefore, the attendees learned about all Devel's new features and APIs.

[embedded content]

Drupal Commerce Performance by Shawn McCabe from Acro Media

This session gives an overview of performance problems with Drupal Commerce and Drupal 7 and ways to fix or mitigate them. It also touches changes coming with Commerce 2.x for Drupal 8 and how this will affect performance in Drupal, especially related to cache contexts and bigpipe.

[embedded content]

Entities 201 - Creating Custom Entities by Ron Northcutt from Acquia

This session covers code generation using Drupal Console, creating a custom module to “house” the custom entity, understanding basic object inheritance, understanding folder naming and namespace, permissions and routing and fields and database storage. With that knowledge, attendees should create a basic custom entity and custom module in under 5 minutes.

[embedded content]

Improving your Drupal 8 development workflow by Jesus Manuel Olivas from weKnow

This session will show you how to use composer to improve your development workflow and reduce project setup and onboarding time. Furthermore, it will show you how to implement automated analysis tools for code review and code coverage and finally how to build and artifact and deploy your project.

[embedded content]

Magento and Drupal fall in love: A new way to approach contextual commerce at enterprise scale by Mike DeWolf and Justin Emond from Third & Grove

In this session, authors used many Drupal and Magento integration projects and shared everything you need to know to successfully combine these two marketing-leading systems into a digital experience platform. More specifically, authors went over technical best practices for combining Drupal and Magento, shared their integration approach decision matrix, discussed how to make it scale at the enterprise level, and reviewed how to ensure outages don’t impact orders with a tool called the conductor.

[embedded content]

Masters of the Universe: Live-coding a React Application using Drupal Services by Erin Marchak and Justin Longbottom from Myplanet

In this session, authors coded live both the back- and the front-end of a decoupled React application. They used Drupal Console to generate the services, and React Scaffold to generate the components. This session is appropriate for React developers looking to dip their toes into Drupal, Drupal developers wanting to take a peek at React, and Architects looking to understand how the two combine.

[embedded content]

Migrate all the things! by Dave Vasilevsky from Evolving Web

In this session, the author talks about his experiences with several different Migrate-based workflows that he and his Evolving Web team had used before.

[embedded content]

Progressive Web Apps for Drupal - Reliable, Fast, Engaging by Ronald te Brake from GoalGorilla

In this session, attendees learned more about push notifications and how the company used this new progressive web app feature in their Drupal 8 distribution Open Social, to improve user engagement with their product.

[embedded content]

Rescue Me: Recovering a sad, broken Drupal by Matt Corks from Evolving Web

This session describes the process used to recover sites with no filesystem or database backups after a Drupalgeddon infiltration. It also describes the process used to rescue a site containing multiple major unsupported core patches. Moreover, it briefly mentions the related project management difficulties associated with having inherited a completely broken site, in particular, one belonging to an external client.

[embedded content]

Testing for the Brave and True by Gabe Sullice from Aten

In this session, the author discussed the how and the why from the get-go. He cleared as many obstacles as he could and presented his mistakes. Specifically, he thought everybody how to extend Drupal's testing classes like UnitTestCase, KernelTestBase, and WebTestBase to test everybody's custom applications from top to bottom.

[embedded content]

Understanding the Dark Side: An Analysis of Drupal (and Other) Worst Practices by Kristen Pol from Hook 42

This session is a collection of some of the worst practices that are pretty common in the Drupal world and beyond Drupal world. For example, if you don't know what "hacking core" is or why you shouldn't do it, you must listen to this session.

[embedded content]

May 18 2017
May 18

Last time, we gathered together DrupalCon Baltimore sessions about Case Studies. We promised that we will also look in some other areas. Therefore, we will this time explore the sessions from Project Management.

Project Managers ARE the new Content Strategists by Lynn Winter from August Ash

The session is about Project Managers being a content strategist. They become so because nobody has money to pay for a content strategist. Therefore, a session walks you through the discovery, design, and build phases of a website redesign sharing tips, tools, and examples of steps you can take to manage the content process and provide clients with ways to create better content. Keep in mind that Project Managers are already completely busy with their normal project management duties. Audits, editorial guidelines, purging rules, tools, testing, governance ... are all covered.

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Style Guide Driven Development for managers: Why you should care by Sarah Thrasher from Acquia and Adam Weingarten

In this session, the business value of Style Guide Driven Development, which is an exciting new approach to front-end development, because front-end developers make small html models of the components of a site before applying them to Drupal, is reviewed. Moreover, the session also looks at how Style Guide Driven Development can increase the speed and quality of your project delivery.

[embedded content]

Project Management: The Musical! by Joe Allen-Black and Allison Manley‏ from Palantir

A session gives an overview of how to best manage a Drupal website design and development project from contracting to post-launch. And, pay attention, with soundtrack! Palantir shares tools and spreadsheets, outlines steps to get organized for both kick-off meetings and sprint planning, discusses the Agile process, gives techniques on how to manage team members and clients, and teaches how project managers can overcome the odds to navigate to a fantastic product at the end.

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Planning & Managing Migrations by Aimee Hannaford from Hook 42 and Ryan Weal from Kafei Interactive Inc.  

Migration projects can be lengthy. Therefore, this session helps you understand the scope of a migration project, terminology and concepts to communicate with management and development teams, practical samples of migration planning documents and lastly, how much time and money can be wasted if a migration isn’t well planned and documented.

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Agile Design by Kelly Albrecht from Last Call Media

This session uses mini case study examples to further discuss substantial design projects, which were built using agile methodologies. It also shows how the design team can fit into the process.

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Agile with a Lowercase 'a': The Art of Collaborative Project Management by Kylie Forcinito and Nick Switzer from Elevated Third

A session is about how to collaboratively plan and execute a large development project with a small team. Authors are part of a small agency, which is always striving to be more efficient and maximises the tools it has. The duo presents how they came together to produce a version of agile tailored to the world of budget constraints, short timelines, limited resources and required deliverables.

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Anti-Crash Course: How to Avoid Drupal’s Most Common Pitfalls by Ray Saltini and David Hernandez from FFW

In this session, both authors explain how to recognize if your project is on a collision course and how to steer clear of project management, architectural and development related traps. With this, your Drupal project can be successful.

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Better Agile Drupal Sprints: leverage Jira for good by Chris Urban from Acquia

A session covers the tools and techniques for a success at each stage of your Agile project. It also reviews real-life challenges and how to overcome them. The attendees walked away with an in-depth review of 12 tips and tricks to apply to their next project and help them become a Jira expert.

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How Changing our Estimation Process Took our Project Endgame from WTF? to FTW! by Ashleigh Thevenet from Bluespark

A session looks at a case, where client expectations and overall project budget were mismanaged, resulting in a failed project with an unsatisfied client. This failed project caused Bluespark to think about it and revise their project process.

[embedded content]

From Specification to Collaboration; one Agency's Move to Scrum by Stephanie El-Hajj from Amazee Labs

In this session, Amazee Labs shares their experience of adopting Scrum as an Agile development framework, which improved their development process to better match internal and external needs. They reveal what's worked, what's been hard, and what they've tweaked to work for them.

[embedded content]

Client Management: Building Happy, Healthy Client Relationships by Hannah Del Potro from Brick Factory

In this session, a Brick Factory reveals how they made sure that clients were happy with their services, while they were still fair to their employees and their firm. Attendees learned how to manage their projects more effectively, resulting in higher quality work, more satisfied clients, improved profit margins and happier internal teams.

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Biting Off Exactly What You Can Chew: How Project Size Contributes to Motivation, Better Communication and Project Success by Bjorn Thomson from Imagex Media and Jeanna Balreira from Trinity University

In this session, authors discuss several small-to-medium projects and review ways of sizing projects effectively, including real-world case studies.

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May 16 2017
May 16

In the last blog post, we revealed that our development team will be present at Drupal Heart Camp Zagreb. But that won't be the only Drupal Event, where Agiledrop will be present at the end of this week. Namely, Marko Bahor and Iztok Smolic (our Commercial and Operations directors) will attend European Drupal Business Days in Frankfurt. That means that you'll be able to talk to us in person in two different locations across Europe, practically at the same time.

From 19th to 21st May up to ten of our team member will be in Zagreb. On the other hand, Marko and Iztok will travel a little longer. They will attend the European Drupal Business Days in Frankfurt, Germany, which are back after five years (Vienna 2012). Our duo will start their journey in one of Europe's top business destinations, one day earlier, on 18th May 2017. The event will have three keynotes. Most of the sessions will be held on the second day of the event, while the last one is reserved for socialising.

 

Iztok-Drupal Camp

 

Once again the Drupal event will not be without one of ours sessions. You'll be able to learn more about Transforming an agency to a profitable business from Iztok Smolic on 18th May from 16.05 to 16.25. A 20-minute long session will be about going from a developer to a business owner, which needs a completely changed mindset. It will include all the lessons that were learned in the past 9 years of being a Drupal shop. The presentation will also highlight some of the best resources that led the team to restructure our company.

If you spot either Iztok or Marko, say hello. They will gladly have a chat with you. However, the event still deserves some words. Drupal Business Days is a gathering of CXOs, business managers, marketing managers and delivery managers as well as leaders and decision makers from businesses who use Drupal. It will take place in Radisson Blu Hotel in Frankfurt, Germany. Some of the tickets are still available and you can get them here. We hope to see you there!

May 11 2017
May 11

After a long travel to Baltimore, where two of our team members (Commercial and Operations director to be precise) attended DrupalCon Baltimore, we will have a much shorter distance to overcome this time. In fact, we'll be going to the nearest Drupal Camp possible. That's in Zagreb, where our development team will attend Drupal Heart Camp Zagreb.

Since we are located in Ljubljana, Slovenia, our nearest destination would be our coast, where there was once a Drupal Camp Alpe-Adria. But since the Camp is not taking place there anymore – we discussed that with one of its organizers Janez Urevc some time ago in the interview – our nearest Drupal Camp is this time taking place in Zagreb. And up to 10 of our team members will attend it, so Marko Bahor and Iztok Smolic will not be alone this time.

Heart Camp will be held in Croatia for the first time. It will start on 19th May in the University Computing Centre (SRCE) – that's where the name comes from because »SRCE« is a Croatian word for »Heart« – in Zagreb, the capital city of Croatia. It will last for three days. The tickets are still available and you can get them here. The camp will be filled with events, lectures and presentations. It will have four keynotes.

 

Bostjan Kovac                 Bostjan Kovac - our Development Director

 

We are proud to say that one of the sessions will be from our Development director Bostjan Kovac. In his 45 minutes long (intermediate) session, with the title Web accessibility in Drupal 8, he will first check what accessibility even means and why you should care about it. Then, he will check some stats and show you what all the different ways of accessing web pages are. He will also quickly go through a guidance from W3C to see what's most important. The listeners will see where Drupal 8 shines and where are all the areas where developers can destroy things that are already in core. The most common mistakes developers are not even aware of will be checked and in the end, he will quickly go through a couple of tools that are useful and can help you along the way. The session will be video recorded.

But the purpose of every Drupal event is also socialising, so let us finish with that part. The best way to socialise will be a Friday Night Party in The Garden Brewery with burgers and The Garden craft beer right from the source. As a Drupal Camp attendee, you will get two beer coupons for free.

Don’t forget. If you see us, talk to us, we will gladly exchange our opinions with you. Hope to see you on Drupal Heart Camp Zagreb!

May 09 2017
May 09

There was an enormous amount of sessions in the past DrupalCon. They are available online. But to make things easier for you, we'll simply group them together and add a little overview, so you'll easily pick the ones that you like. We'll start with case studies on DrupalCon Baltimore.

Building NBA.com on Drupal 8 by Tobby Hagler from Phase2 and Josh Mullikin from Turner

A session gives an overview of NBA.com, the reasons why Drupal 8 was chosen for the 2016-2017 season and how Drupal 8 interacts with other systems and stack components. Attendees learned what worked, what they should avoid and also tips and tricks for architecting a complex site build. The reasons for using Paragraphs module, Angular 2 ... were also explained. All in all, fans of the best basketball league in the world were given an exceptional game experience and were brought closer to the game.

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Cornell University Case Study - Drupal as a centrally-brokered platform for web development at the university by Josh Koenig from Pantheon and Shannon Osburn and Ryann Levo from Cornell.

In this case study, unique challenges Drupal faces in higher education are explored. Moreover, the opportunities to “do it right” by offering a complete Drupal Platform to campus are also presented. Namely, the IT web team at Cornell University has gone through the entire journey, starting with having to deal with Drupal as one of many technologies all the way to promoting Drupal. Therefore, presenting Drupal opportunity to a university audience, satisfying executive needs for security and oversight, walking the line with maintenance and support ... were covered.

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Building reusable websites on Drupal 8: lessons learned from transforming rednoseday.com by Peter Vanhee from Comic Relief.

In this case study, the process of building reusable websites in Drupal 8 is explained. To be precise, Comic Relief reveals how they rebuild rednoseday.com. The session covers test-driven development with a focus on behat tests, Comic Relief's git flow model including CI and feature preview branches, following the KISS principle at every step of the way, how Comic Relief deals with configuration and so on...

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A Case Study in Migrating Content from a Legacy.NET CMS by David Gallerizzo from Fig Leaf Software

A session is about Fig Leaf Software completing a large Drupal migration effort for the United State Bureau of Safety and Environmental Enforcement. They programmatically migrated almost the entire corpus of content from the Ektron CMS into Drupal. Therefore they presented the ins and outs of planning a migration from a .NET CMS, like Ektron, especially how to match it with its "home in Drupal". Fig Leaf Software also presented a review of the "gotchas" in dealing with a site build out and an effort to convert PDF content into 508 compliant format.

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Sierra Club Case Study - How Drupal (and BlackMesh) help us save the planet

In this session, BlackMesh and The Sierra Club, which uses Drupal for some time now, discuss migrating the Drupal 7 site www.SierraClub.org from a Windows-based platform to a fine tuned managed cloud solution with automated workflow.

[embedded content]

Forecasting Innovation: weather.com’s Emerging Technology Story by The Weather Company and Mediacurrent

This case study explores a history (weather.com was originally launched on Drupal back in 2014, was integrated with Angular 2 to its official release in September of 2016 and the team build strong connections with Google’s core Angular team, which improved each release) and ongoing efforts at driving innovation (Mediacurrent and The Weather Company are now helping push forward Drupal 8’s core initiatives), as well as the business value of investing in the exploration of emerging technologies.

[embedded content]

Multilingual in Drupal 8: A soup to nuts guide featuring VisitTheUSA.com and Habitat.org by Jay Callicott and Dan Polant from Mediacurrent

Building a Multilingual site can be intimidating, because you need to know what modules to enable and how to configure them. In this session, you are shown step by step how to configure a multilingual site, with examples from VisitTheUSA.com and Habitat.org. You are shown how to configure content types and fields, how to translate text strings, how translation providers use connector modules to integrate with Drupal and much more.

[embedded content]

BCBS.com: Pushing the Design Limits with Paragraphs by Blue Cross Blue Shield Association and Oomph, Inc.

This case study looked at how a corporate organization with widespread content owners benefitted from a flexible component-based design system combined with the power of the Paragraphs module. It also reviews the varied design patterns, show how they're implemented, and demonstrate how BCBS.com web admins control the format, placement and usage of design components on a per-page basis.

[embedded content]

Note: due to the enormous amount of sessions, some was maybe left out.

May 04 2017
May 04

Months quickly go by and it's once again time to look at the best work from other authors from the previous month. It's April's turn, so let us see the top Drupal blogs from April.

We'll start our list with Jerome Zech and his Manage your digital assets with Bynder and Drupal 8. The author reveals that MD Systems implemented a module that integrates with the Bynder DAM and lets you use its assets directly in a Drupal 8 site.

Our second choice is Tips for Setting up a Booth at DrupalCon by Brandon Williams. The author writes about his first experience in setting up a booth for any conference event and reveals what he has learned in the process. He conducted six interviews with the vendors and gathered answers about their experiences as well.

Making the third spot was the founder Dries Buytaert with his blog post Drupal is API-first, not API-only. In this blog post, the author explains, why Drupal has one crucial advantage that propels it beyond the emerging headless competitors.

We continue with Cross-Pollination between Drupal and WordPress by Mike Herchel. Drupal and WordPress are competitors, but in this case the author explains what type of things they can share between each other.

Ivan Zugec with his How to Crop Images using Crop API, Image Widget Crop and Focal Point in Drupal 8 is our fifth choice. The author guides the reader through the process of cropping images directly in Drupal with using Crop API.

We'll conclude our list with Alanna Burke who once again makes the list with her How to Avoid the DrupalFlu. The author reveals the tricks of how to avoid getting sick on a huge conference like DrupalCon, or in any Drupal event really.

That's our selection for the past month. We are quite aware that not everyone is interested in everything and that some other important topics were covered as well. But as we said, that's our selection. Don't forget, we'll make a list every month so that you will be informed as much as possible. Until then, wait for our next blog post.

Apr 27 2017
Apr 27

We are heading towards the end of our "Druplicon marathon". Besides this post, we have only one left for you. It will be hard for us not to search for any Druplicons. But until then, let’s enjoy them a little bit more. After Humans and Superhumans, Fruits and Vegetables, Animals, Outdoor activities, National Identities, Emotions, Human Professions and Hats, it’s time for Drupal Logos covered with Art.

Aztec Druplicon (Drupal Camp Mexico 2013)

Drupal Logo aztec

China art Druplicon (Drupal Camp China 2015)

Druplicon china art

Druplicon in Mesquerade costum (Drupal Camp New Orleans 2015)

Drupal Logo masquerade costum

Indian art Druplicon (DrupalCamp Chennai)

Drupal Logo Indian Art

Maya Druplicon (DrupalCamp Guatemala 2013)

Druplicon maya

Czech art Druplicon (Drupal Camp Prague 2013)

Drupal Logo Czech

We were disappointed in the past that there were areas that you did not find any of the missing Druplicons. Therefore, we were very happy that your feedback is back with Gevorg Mkrtchyan, who fund Cossack from Drupal Camp Krassnodar 2016 (shown beyond), for the blog post about Humans or Hats. We encourage you to do the same. Find any of the missing Drupal Logos in any of the areas we have covered so far, post them on our twitter account and you will be mentioned in our last blog post about Druplicons.

Drupal Logo cossack
Apr 25 2017
Apr 25

It's back! You did not really think that our Druplicon marathon was finished, did you? Well, it's not. We still have some areas to explore. After Humans and Superhumans, Fruits and Vegetables, Animals, Outdoor activities, National Identities, Emotions and Human Professions, we have seen that not all Druplicons with hats were covered. So, here are Drupal Logos with hats.

Druplicon with Santa hat

Drupal Logo with santa hat

Druplicon with snow hats

Druplicon with snow hatDruplicon with snow hat 2Druplicon snow hat 3

Druplicon with ascot hat (Drupal day Bilbao 2014)

Drupal Logo ascot hat

Druplicon with fedora (Drupal Camp Buenos Aires 2009)

Drupal Logo with fedora

Druplicon with swimming hat (DrupalCamp Colorado)

Druplicon swimming hat

Druplicon with something very similar to sombrero hat (Drupal Camp Bratislava 2010)

Druplicon bratislava

Druplicon with crown (Drupal Camp Tirgu Mures 2013)

Drupal Logo king

Druplicon with turban

Druplicon wit turban

Druplicon with fishing hat (Drupal Camp Australia 2008)

Drupal Logo with fishing hat

You may have forgotten the rules after so much time. Nevertheless, find a Drupal Logo with a hat that we did not cover here, post it on our twitter account and you will be mentioned in our next blog post about Druplicons. Yes, it's as simple as that. But be careful! Drupal Logos that we have already used in other areas of our Druplicon marathon don't count. Like, the one with a baseball hat or with the one with professor’s hat, for example.

Apr 19 2017
Apr 19

Last week we promised that from now on, we'll be more informative about where you will be able to find us. Therefore, Web Camp was our first described destination. That event is a local thing for us since our headquarters are in Ljubljana, Slovenia. Now, we are proud to say that after Web Camp we are heading towards DrupalCon Baltimore!

DrupalCon is organized by Drupal Association three times a year at three different locations. Next week, from 24th to 28th April it's time for the United States to shine. The biggest Drupal event, which brings together thousands of people from all around the world who use, develop, design, and support Drupal (also known as »Drupalistas«), will take place in Baltimore, Maryland. Drupal Community, who is at the moment experiencing a rough time, will come together and offer learning, collaboration, and networking opportunities.

 

Marko Iztok

 

We are proud to say that AGILEDROP will once again be present at the event. Our commercial director Iztok Smolic will be accompanied by Marko Bahor, our operations director. Iztok is very familiar with DrupalCons. This will be his seventh, with the first one dating back to 2009. And it was the first DrupalCon that inspired him so much that he dedicated his life to Drupal and with help from some other people formed AGILEDROP, which now exists. On the other hand, Marko is not so »experienced« with DrupalCons, but he will gladly exchange his opinions with you. So, if you spot either Iztok or Marko, catch up with them and share your thoughts. Don't wait for the next DrupalCon in Vienna in September!

The only possible downside of not catching up with our duo may be because of the size of the event. Everything became so large on DrupalCons and we discussed that problem in our interview with Janez Urevc some time ago. Nevertheless, besides learning new things, meeting up with old friends, team members, clients ... and potentially making new friends and business partners, there are also other positive things. Therefore, we have made a list of reasons why you should attend any DrupalCon.

 

DrupalCon Baltimore 2

 

If you are currently making up your mind whether you should stay a day or two after the event, you should. Visiting the city of the event is one of the reasons to go to DrupalCon and Baltimore is, with all the literary tradition and museums, not an exception. There are also some social events, which will help you enjoy the atmosphere.

One last thing. Don't forget about training and summits that happen on Monday before the conference begins. Just keep in mind that both are not included in a DrupalCon ticket. Latter is also required for some of the sprints. We hope you'll have a great time. Iztok and Marko will certainly make the most of it and are both hoping to see you there.

Apr 13 2017
Apr 13

We must admit that in the past we were not so informative about where we will be and on which (Drupal) event we will go. We promise we'll do better from now on. This means that if you would like to talk to us in person, you'll know where to find us (you can also find us in our office of course). We'll start with a Web Camp we will attend next.

A WebCamp will be held in Ljubljana on Saturday 22nd April 2017 in the Faculty of Computer and Information Science, Ljubljana. This is a place very familiar to our development director Bostjan Kovac because he got his bachelor’s degree there. An event will be for web builders, application developers and power users.

We are proud to say that besides attending we will also be sponsoring the event. Therefore, nine of us are coming to the event for certain, with two still depending on »other circumstances«. It will be a fresh wind to our face seeing the wider picture and hearing also some other things except Drupal, which we dedicate practically every minute of every day of the year. Since there will be a lot of us on a WebCamp, don't be shy to have a chat with us. We'll gladly exchange our opinions with you.

 

Agiledrop sponsor

 

But as stated in the official website of the WebCamp, we expect a high-five for sponsoring the event. Just joking! We are happy to help improving the environment around us and will do so in the future as well.

The WebCamp was, what else, prepared by volunteers, who drank around 256 cups of coffee in the preparation for the event. There will be a lot of speakers. To be precise, more than 25. Therefore, it's hard that your taste will be missed out. All talks will be in English with more than 300 attendees expected. Besides sessions, workshops will also take place.The event is free to attend, but you’ll need a ticket. Unfortunately, there are no more left, except you become a supporter. Or if you are currently a student of Faculty of Computer and Information Science.

Kids, which won’t be bored with all the chocolate waiting for them, are also welcome, so babysitting as the reason for staying home, is out of the question. Hope to see you!

Apr 11 2017
Apr 11

After our Drupal blogs from the previous month, it's always time for Drupal Blogs that were written by other authors. Here are the best Drupal Blogs from March.

We'll begin our list with Alanna Burke and Drupal 7 Features vs. Drupal 8 Configuration Management. She praised the new configuration management system in Drupal 8 as one of its best pieces and explained, how it helps developers to export configuration into code compared to the old way of Features on Drupal 7.

You can read the full blog post here.

Our second choice is Drupal Serialization Step-by-Step by Mateu Aguiló Bosch, who continued his previous blog post about serializer component. This time, the author focuses on the Drupal integration of the Symfony serializer component. He guides readers step-by-step through a module he created.

You can read the full blog post here.

Third spot is reserved for Mikael Kundert and his DrupalCamp London 2017. From the first hand, the author writes about attending, speaking and volunteering on Drupalcamp London. The event was scheduled for the fifth time and the author was once again responsible for making it run smoothly.

You can read the full blog post here.

We continue with Edward and his Using Normalizers to Alter REST JSON Structure in Drupal 8. This blog post is about normalizers that will help users alter the REST response to their liking. Namely, the REST output provided by Drupal core is in a certain structure that may not necessarily satisfy the requirements as per the structure the consuming application expects. Therefore, he looked at altering the JSON response for node entities.

You can read the full blog post here.

Our fifth choice is Our presentations at Drupal Dev Days Seville by Andrea Pescetti. The author presents both sessions from Drupal Developer Days in Seville, where he and his team sponsored the event. Both sessions are equipped with slides and all the latest updates about the modules, which were presented.

You can read the full blog post here.

Making the sixth spot was Jorge Diaz with Why is the Drupal Bootstrap Theme So Successful. As it is obvious from the title, the author presented specific technical reasons why Bootstrap is such an attractive option. He stated that as a Drupal themer, it's rare that he chooses something other than the Bootstrap base theme for a new project.

You can read the full blog post here.

We'll conclude our list with Janez Urevc and his Drupal 8 Security Features: User-submitted Data Sanitization. This was the fourth part of the blog series about the Drupal 8 security features, which concludes the series. It is once again shown how Drupal 8 protects users from some of the most common vulnerabilities on the web.

You can read the full blog post here.

That's our selection for the past month. We are quite aware that not everyone is interested in everything and that some other important topics were covered as well. But as we said, that's our selection. Don't forget, we'll make a list every month so that you will be informed as much as possible. Until then, wait for our next blog post.

Apr 05 2017
Apr 05

Our blog activities were very frequent in March. We have written many blog posts for you and now it's time to look at them, in case you have missed any.

We started last month with Drupal Logos as Fruits and Vegetables. It was the second part of our »Druplicon marathon«, where we have analysed how Druplicons can be designed as fruits and vegetables. We have immediately received the missing ones in the field of Humans and Superhumans and a Buckeye tree fruit, which was mixed with a hedgehog.

Without a hedgehog, our Drupal Logos in the shapes of Animals, were impoverished. Nevertheless, we still managed to find eight of them. Moreover, we later received a bat and an octopus as well, so the collection grew.

 

Druplicon bee

 

Our third blog topic was Drupal Logos Taking Part in Outdoor Activities. We have chosen it, because at the time, winter was gone and more activities were able to be done outside. We did not find as many Druplicons as before and also did not receive any.

We continued our month and »Druplicon marathon« with Drupal Logos representing National Identities. Every time, when we finished a blog post about Druplicons, we were sure that we hardly missed any. This time, we were for certain that we did not covered them all. Our speculations were soon confirmed, when a lot of new Druplicons representing national identities came into our twitter account. Therefore, the collection of Drupal Logos was the biggest in this area.

 

Druplicon France

 

Our fifth blog post was dedicated to Drupal Logos Showing Emotions. We were sure that we would not find many of them and also defined a task to be very hard. We were wrong, because a lot of emotions were shown by Druplicons. The feedback from the readers was also back, although only one of the missing Drupal Logos came into our twitter account.

And (finally) our »Druplicon marathon« was interrupted with Responsive Images in Drupal 8. This blog post presented a problem of how users don't want to display the same image size on a mobile and on a desktop, because a 2000px wide image is not needed on a 480px device. Therefore, Tina Panzalovic presented two modules, of which one was Responsive Image, which help you resolve the problem. With Responsive Image images are then specifically sized for the screen.

 

Druplicon professor

 

March was concluded with our last blog post Drupal Logos in Human Professions. We have promised you this blog post a long time ago, but postponed it very deep into the »Druplicon marathon«. Nevertheless, Human Professions also came to life and were very well covered, especially because no one found any of the missing ones.

That's it. More blog post are coming in April when we have a lot in store for you as well.

Mar 30 2017
Mar 30

Druplicons in Human Professions were promised a long time ago. At the very beginning of our »Druplicon marathon« to be precise. We postponed them, for some time, but after Humans and Superhumans, Fruits and Vegetables, Animals, Outdoor activities, National Identities and Emotions, it's their turn to shine. So, here are Drupal Logos in Human Professions.

Druplicon as a Miner (DrupalCamp Donetsk 2014)

Druplicon Miner

Druplicon as a Spaceman

Drupal Logo Spaceman

Druplicon as a Sailor (DrupalCamp Schwerin 2017)

Sailor

Druplicon as a Professor

Drupal Logo Professor

Druplicon as an Engineer

Druplicon Engineer

Druplicon as a Conductor

Drupal Logo Conductor

Druplicon as a Construction Worker

Druplicon Construction Worker

Druplicon as a Doctor

Drupal Logo Doctor

Druplicon as an Engine Driver (Drupal Camp Chattanooga 2016)

Drupal Logo Enginee Driver

By now, we think you already know the rules. Find any of the Druplicons in Human Professions that we did not cover here and post it on our Twitter account. If you do that, you'll be mentioned in our next blog post about Drupal Logos. Unfortunately, nobody, except drupaldrama‏, was able to find any of the missing Druplicons showing emotions. Better luck this time with Human Professions!

Mar 23 2017
Mar 23

It's not over yet. There are still Druplicons that need to be presented. After already exploring the fields of Humans and Superhumans, Fruits and Vegetables, Animals, Outdoor Activities and National Identities, it's now time to look in the field of emotions and see, which emotions are shown by Drupal Logos.

After expecting to find many Druplicons in the area of national identities, we came up with an idea of exploring something more challenging. After some thought, we decided it's time to look in the area of emotions. After all, Druplicon was designed with a mischievous smile, so it looks serious (and maybe something less pleasant as well) all the time. Despite that, it can show a lot of (other) emotions. Here are some according to Human-Machine Interaction Network on Emotion (HUMAINE), which classifies 48 emotions.

Sad Druplicon (SADCamp 2011)

Sad Druplicon

 

Hurt Druplicon

Hurt Drupal Logo

Happy Druplicon (GLAD Camp 2014)

Happy Druplicon

Relaxed Druplicon

Relaxed Drupal Logo

Angry Druplicon (BADCamp)

Angry Drupal Logo

We are aware that we already used that as a pirate, but hey, if Druplicon can have more functions, why not present them all.

Annoying Druplicon

Annoying Drupal Logo

Irritated Druplicon

Irritated Drupal Logo

You responded extraordinary last time. When we asked you to find any of the missing Drupal Logos, which represent national identities, Chimezie Chuta‏, Dragan Eror‏ and Sine informed us on twitter about Nigerian, Serbian and Polish Druplicon. Moreover, Dark Dim‏ and Chimezie Chuta‏ even found missing Drupal Logos from the field of Outdoor activities and Humans. Thank you all!

By now, we think you already know the rules. Find any of the Druplicons Showing Emotions that we did not cover here and post it on our Twitter account. If you do that, you'll be mentioned in our next blog post about Drupal Logos.

Mar 21 2017
Mar 21

We are now very deep into our »Druplicon marathon«. After already presenting you Drupal Logos in Human and Superhuman forms, Drupal Logos as Fruits and Vegetables, Druplicons in the shapes of Animals and Drupal Logos taking part in the outdoor activities, it's now time to look at Drupal Logos representing the national identities.

A sense of belonging to one nation can be very strong. National identities are therefore also present in various Druplicons. Latter mostly represent active or inactive Drupal Groups from the specific countries. These groups connect Drupalistas from that specific countries, so in most cases, Druplicons contain colours from the countries' flags. Not in all cases, of course, but mostly they do. Furthermore, national identities are also represented by some Drupal Camps. Here's what we have found.

Druplicon Bolivia

Drupal Logo Bolivia

Druplicon France

Druplicon France

Druplicon Italy

Druplicon italy

Druplicon Denmark

Drupal Logo Denmark

Druplicon Tunisia (Drupal Camp Tunis 2015)

Druplicon Tunisia

Druplicon Senegal (Drupal Camp Dakar 2011)

Druplicon Senegal

Druplicon Austria (Drupal Austria Roadshow)

Drupal Logo Austria

Druplicon Belgium

Drupal Logo Belgium

Druplicon Uganda

Druplicon Uganda

When we finish a blog post about Druplicons, we are, in practical all cases, sure that we hardly missed any. Still, we don't doubt that you will still manage to find the missing Druplicons in the specific area, so we, in every case, encourage you to find them. By now, you have proven yourself and found many missing Drupal Logos.

Well, this time, despite the research, we are almost for certain that we have missed some Druplicons, which represent national identities. So, if you find any missing Drupal Logos, which represent national identities, post them on our twitter account and you'll be mentioned in our next blog post about Druplicons. Sadly, last time, no one found any of the Druplicons taking part in outdoor activities. Better luck this time!

Mar 16 2017
Mar 16

After some time, our series of various Druplicons continue. We already presented you Drupal Logos in Human and Superhuman forms, Drupal Logos as Fruits and Vegetables and Druplicons in the shapes of Animals. Since winter is now gone for some time, more things can now be done outside. Therefore, we will look at Druplicons taking part in the outdoor activities.

Druplicon taking part in parachuting (DrupalCamp Dharamshala 2013)

Drupal Logo parachuting

Druplicon taking part in scuba-diving (Drupal Camp Florida)

Drupal Logo taking part in scuba-diving

Druplicon taking part in baseball with the hat from team Boston Red Sox (DrupalCon Boston 2008)

Drupal Logo baseball

Druplicon taking part in camping as a fire (Drupal Camp Toronto 2007 and used also on some other camps)

Druplicon fire

Druplicon using skip rope (DrupalCon Denver 2012)

Drupal Logo with a skip rope

As, now we can say, a standard practice, we last time encouraged you to find any of the missing Druplicons in the shapes of animals and share it on our twitter account. We were very pleased that you responded and delivered us some missing parts. HamzaGt informed us about another bee and an octopus, while Andrew Macpherson reminded us of a Druplicon in the shape of a bat from Drupalcon Austin 2014 (shown beyond).

Druplicon octopusDruplicon bat

If you find any of the missing Druplicons that take part in the outdoor activities (Human professions excluded, because there are still going to be published), post them on our twitter account and you'll be mentioned in our next blog post about Druplicons. Just as both authors above.

Mar 14 2017
Mar 14

Again late maybe, but besides our blog activities in February, we still owe you the work from the other authors. So, here's are the best Drupal blogs from February that were not written by us.

We'll start our overview with Tim Mallezie and his Porting Drupal 7 modules to Drupal 8. A lot has been said that many modules are not properly converted to Drupal 8. So, the author explains, how to properly import modules from Drupal 7 to Drupal 8. In addition, he explained one of his approaches which he tested on one of his modules.

You can read the full blog post here.

Our second choice is Dries Buytaert and his Sharing innovation with your competitors. The founder of the Drupal explained how many projects began to challenge the prevailing model by outsourcing their projects, so that everyone, even the competitors can see their work (code).

You can read the full blog post here.

Our third choice is Mateu Aguiló Bosch, who wrote Using the serialization system in Drupal. The blog post explains what serialization means, how it differs from deserializing, and how it is used in Drupal 8.

You can read the full blog post here.

We continue with Aiesha Hasan and her Pros and cons of using Drupal for large Ecommerce store. She tried to present the readers, why Drupal could be a right choice for their e-commerce solution. First, she explained the advantages (better scalability ...) and then the disadvantages (difficult to learn ...) of Drupal as a solution.

You can read the full blog post here.

Our fifth choice is Overview of Twig Extentions in Drupal 8 by Ashish Pandey. The author wrote about templating system Twig, which brought a big change in the Drupal community.

You can read the full blog post here.

Making the sixth spot was Dave Vasilevsky with writing Installing Drupal Console on Windows. Drupal console is a command-line tool for managing Drupal 8 sites and enjoyed a large number of downloads. However, getting Drupal Console running on Windows can be quite difficult, so the author wrote this step-by-step guide for a help.

You can read the full blog post here.

We'll conclude our overview with Ivan Zugec and his How to create Responsive Image Galleries using Juicebox in Drupal 8. The author presents, how to use Juicebox, HTML5 responsive image gallery, which integrates with Drupal with using Juicebox module. It’s not open source, but it has a free version.

You can read the full blog post here.

That's our selection for the past month. We are quite aware that not everyone is interested in everything and that some other important topics were covered as well. But as we said, that's our selection. Don't forget, we'll make a list every month so that you will be informed as much as possible. Until then, wait for our next blog post.

Mar 09 2017
Mar 09

We did not forget, don't worry. It's once again time to look at the blogs we have written for you in the previous month. So, here's what February brought to you in the field of Drupal.

The start of the month was pretty much the same. Looking back to the January, writing regular things. But, then it was time for something new. After already analysing Drupal Camps and running across so many groups, which take care of variety of different things about Drupal, we got the idea of presenting you Druplicons in all the possible shapes.

We had to start somewhere, so we decided to first explore Drupal Logos in the field of Humans and Superhumans. The visual identity of latter was, practically in all area, covered by Drupal Heroes, a group that is »keeping the Internet safe of bugs and bad programming practices«. They have designed Druplicon in the shape of a Superman, Spiderman, Loki, Flash, Batman, Catwoman, Hulk ... On the other hand, Human Drupal Logos were covered by different Drupal Camps. We found gentleman, grandfather, holidaymaker ... We also received some missing Druplicons and the ones, who posted them on our twitter account, were mentioned in the next blog posts about Druplicons as a reward.

 

Drupal Heroes 4

 

But before the next blog post about Druplicons, we concluded our February’s activity with the explanation of an open source module Context Group, developed by our Igor Curk. With this module, you handle a block layout. Our module creates groups to your reaction in context and enables you to add classes to the groups, to make styling on front-end easier. You can also add multiple groups.

That's it. More action will come in March, when we have a lot for you in store as well. Especially various types of Druplicons.

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