Jul 14 2018
Jul 14


Drupal Developer Days Lisbon
was valuable, nicely organized, and full of energy. Two Axelerant team members attended to contribute a workshop and a session on two key topics, and they wanted to share key highlights with you, to thank the volunteers, and to encourage more developers from around the world to make it in 2019.

Lakshmi Narasimhan

So, how was it overall?

Incredible. Of course the event was highly developer focused—which is why developers from all over should make time to really commune. European agencies and the talent behind them are real powerhouses. The environment was great.

Random thoughts or new learnings?

Well, I’m always looking for conversations around DevOps solutions, and it seems like everyone and their dog has a workflow problem. They’re looking for and want to have some rudimentary CD pipeline which helps them quickly deliver. It seems that Lando adoption is obviously growing and Vagrant/VM is thinning down. I was personally happy to see a houseful K8s workshop. I initially thought that not so many people would be aware of it, but was I was proven wrong!

How were the keynotes?

The keynote by Gabor Hojtsy was excellent. One thing I realized was that there are so many initiatives in Drupal. It’s really spread its wings and grown from being a small “LAMP” flavored CMS to painting with broad strokes—API first, workflow, layouts, etc.

In all honesty, the flipside, in my opinion, is that the developer audience is not clearly defined. Is Drupal a clicky, site-builder friendly tool (with layouts, out of the box initiatives, etc) or a content management framework (composer in core initiative, config YML files)? It’s hard to ride two horses at the same time.

Here are some of the initiatives I really like. For one, the Out of the Box Experience initiative (the Umami demo), for showing off Drupal’s superpowers to prospective people making CMS decisions in an organization. Also, Admin UI JS modernization? The name says it all—awesome. Some others: composer as a first class citizen, the telemetry initiative, and using GitLab as the issue tracker for Drupal.org.

And who manages all the initiatives and makes sure they don’t step on each other? Hojtsy. Really great work.

What other sessions or talks do you remember well?

What‘s new in Drupal Commerce. I personally think Drupal Commerce is technically feasible for a large organization, as Drupal can fit the bill in terms of other aspects too, like workflow, content strategy, personalization, etc. But like any other solution, engineering finesse alone doesn’t dictate product decisions. There was a lot of emphasis on having shared marketing resources, artifacts across agencies for Drupal Commerce—like how Drupal is competing with other platforms with similar offerings.

TDD using Drupal. The session demonstrated how TDD and Drupal is possible and I’m surprised that we don’t see tests in contrib and custom modules as much as we see in core. Another good takeaway was “tests as documentation”, the idea being that you figure out how to use a module by reading the test code.

Modular software, modular infrastructure. This was an aux armes! for all DevOps folks to create shared “best practices” Docker images for Drupal. Quite an intuitive talk.

One flew over the developer’s nest. I’m usually curious about sessions alluding to movies, and this one didn’t disappoint at all. It covered the importance of people and process in an organization, and is a must watch for anyone aspiring to be a CTO or Engineering Manager. You’ll come out with a gigantic reading list from the session, including but not limited to The Phoenix Project and Modern CTO and more. I also really liked how the session flowed like a personal anecdote—nice.

Any “business” highlights?

There really wasn’t too much marketing or sales that I could see on the ground—because developers are a hard sell—though it would be a great idea to sell developer-focused tools at the event, like IDEs and certain DevOps offerings.

Any last mentions you’d like to share?

There was certainly a lot of buzz abound Drupal Europe—inviting Matt Mullenweg, and everything people like Baddy and Gábor are coordinating. It seems like it’s going to be really special.

Having a blast @drupaldevdays closing session.. pic.twitter.com/08fTMzAYHf

— Lakshmi Narasimhan (@lakshminp) July 6, 2018

 
Overall, the experience was like drinking through a firehose. We had a lot of sessions to watch and had to juggle that with Lisbon sightseeing. I’m looking forward to watching the ones I missed once they’re uploaded to YouTube.

Here’s a shout out to the organizers, with a special mention for the lunch catering; this was one of the first Drupal events where I had more choices, being a vegetarian. Thank you!

Mohit Aghera

What did you think?

Contributions was a main focus—people sprinting in the sprint room for the whole week! There’s also tons of excitement around Drupal Europe.

Contribute, contribute, contribute! Go to initiative tables and ask what you can help with! #drupaldevdays has 3 big rooms with contributions going on. Go there! pic.twitter.com/9vE7nHxaAL

— Drupal Dev Days (@drupaldevdays) July 5, 2018
 
Keynote thoughts?

Gábor Hojtsy really did a nice job with his summary of all the initiatives in Drupal 8. He also covered the status of 8.6.x, and how the process is coming along.

I’m quite impressed with these—CMI 2.0, composer initiative, Out of the Box initiative, and the significant amount of work done on the JSON API module to move it into Drupal 8 core in an experimental state.

The composer initiative, for example, is being led by Alex Pott and Fabian Bircher. We are planning to have a sophisticated configuration management system in Drupal 8 Core. You can also check out the PoC of the composer initiative here.

As a community, we have made significant progress on media initiatives as well, and they’re in good shape right now. Gabor also mentioned the security release initiative and how we are dealing with it.

Updates on media initiative at @drupaldevdays #drupaldevdays pic.twitter.com/guYqIMyl8w

— Mohit Aghera (@mohit_rocks) July 5, 2018


Rachel's
 keynote was inspiring. It covered how Drupal is making a real impact on lives, how Drupal is changing the world. She covered some good use cases of Drupal, like how Warchild UK is using Drupal to help childrens in war affected areas. She explained how Drupal helped to double the conversion rate of donors—which in turn helped Warchild UK to receive more donations for more impact. She also urged everyone to donate, volunteer, and contribute to the Drupal Association.

Wednesday! Drupaldevdays starting at the main auditorium with an amazing Keynote by @rachel_norfolk pic.twitter.com/G9lO7xMHT5

— Drupal Dev Days (@drupaldevdays) July 4, 2018

So which sessions did you attend?

Lakshmi’s for one! The Helmsman and the water drop: Running Drupal on Kubernetes.

This workshop by Lakshmi was really useful for developers who want to use Docker in their development and production environment. He covered Kubernetes and Minikube nicely, and related concepts that help get things up and running using Kubernetes and Docker.

@lakshminp explaining why we need docker.. #drupaldevdays
Join in workshop room to learn more about it @drupaldevdays pic.twitter.com/4ti8q8dTfp

— Mohit Aghera (@mohit_rocks) July 4, 2018


I attended Fabian Bircher's session too: CMI 2.0 and configuration management with contrib today. He did a helpful, quick overview of best practices in configuration management and how to implement them. He also provided some insights for CMI 2.0 to make configuration management even better.

@fabianbircher explaining about configuration management and CMI2.0 initiative #Drupaldevdays pic.twitter.com/Ioz2pe0j7r

— Mohit Aghera (@mohit_rocks) July 3, 2018

You were an active contributor. How did it go?

I was actively working with the Out of the Box initiative team to use CSV import for sample content. Thanks much to Elliot Ward for providing so much help and setting clear expectations from a ticket perspective. I spent around three days working with the team and we are currently working on this issue. (Everyone is welcome to contribute.)

The enthusiasm for contribution was clearly visible—and contagious—in the contribution room. Everyone were really helpful in contributions and other things.

A HUGE thank you to everyone that's helping out on the Out of the Box @d8initiatives (the Umami demo) at @drupaldevdays!

In fact, a huge thank you to everyone who's getting involved in making Drupal better :) https://t.co/nJyCPXAicY

— Gareth Goodwin (@gareth5mm) July 4, 2018
 
Any last thoughts?

This event was planned very well. Thank you to the awesome team who worked hard at Drupal Portugal—and to all the volunteers, speakers, contributors, sponsors, and attendees.

Jun 29 2018
Jun 29


Drupal Developer Days brings together people who contribute to the progress of Drupal from around the world. There are code sprints, workshops, sessions, BoFs, after parties (and after-after parties) and more.

What’s happening in Lisbon?

Drupal Developer Days Lisbon 2018—which begins Monday, 2nd July, and continues up to Friday, 6th July, at ISCTE (University Institute of Lisbon)—offers an opportunity for students and experienced professionals to meet and learn about what’s new in Drupal. Participants from around the world come together and seek ways to improve the Drupal platform. Attendees can attend sessions, workshops, and code sprints led by experts in the community, and build connections with professionals worldwide.

Why are we going?

Two of our team members are representing our agency by contributing a workshop and a session on two key topics. Lakshmi and Mohit are ready to learn, teach, and give back to Drupal.

Lakshmi

LAKSHMI NARASIMHAN

Workshop: The Helmsman & The Water Drop: Running Drupal On Kubernetes
When: 14:30-16:15, Wednesday, 4th July
Where: Workshop Room
Track: DevOps Beginner
Drupal.org profile:
lakshminp

Lakshmi is leading a two-hour workshop titled The helmsman and the water drop: Running Drupal on Kubernetes that will explore Kubernetes (an open-source container-orchestration system) and its uses.


“I’ve never given a workshop, and this is on the ops side of Drupal, which I have a penchant for—I’m just as interested in how to deploy an application as in writing the code and features,” he says.

Why this submission for the workshop?

“This is relatively nascent; I just want to bounce a few ideas around to see if other devs are also thinking in the same way." He’d like to gather devs together to see if there are other more optimal, easier ways to use Kubernetes. “It’s about sharing my thoughts on the subject.”

This is the first such event he’s submitted to. He chose this one because he finds that he syncs better with the dev community in particular rather than the Drupal community as a heterogenous whole.

With any tool in the dev world, abstractions come at a cost. This is true for containers as well: “Containers present with their own problems, and we have to find out how to manage them. We have to optimize the way we consume our infrastructure. That’s where container orchestration comes in,” he explains. Kubernetes helps solves the container orchestration challenge, taking care of the need to deploy different applications, so that devs can focus on writing the code alone.

At the workshop, Lakshmi plans to deploy a live Drupal 8 site on a Kubernetes cluster. “I don’t think this has ever been done before in front of a live audience.”

What’s the value of this?

“It’s exciting that code can simply be written and deployed, minimizing time and effort involved.”

Sometimes, production deployments do go wrong. As a backup, Kubernetes offers the concept of rollback, which facilitates reversion to a previous working condition.

But learning Kubernetes can feel like drinking from a water hose, says Lakshmi. “Like any new paradigm, devs can expect a lot of terms and concepts. I'll try my best to relate it to stuff you'd probably already know and keep it simple. You'll leave the workshop with a totally different (hopefully for the better) perspective on how to deploy your application,” he says.

Lakshmi is curious to see how people receive this style of deployment, and Kubernetes in general. Other sessions he’s looking forward to include the session by Mohit Aghera on Writing Dynamic Migrations, as well as a session by Oliver Davies on Test Driven Drupal (TDD)

Mohit

MOHIT AGHERA

Workshop: Writing dynamic migrations
When: 16:45-17:30, Thursday, 5th July
Where: Wunder Space (B103)
Track: Development Intermediate
Drupal.org profile:
mohit_aghera

Mohit’s session, titled Writing dynamic migrations, will show participants how to migrate from various data sources to Drupal 8.

Why this particular session topic?

“It emerged from a real end-client need,” says Mohit. Recently, in a project that he was a part of, there was a client requirement to migrate content based on user input (e.g. the user prefers a particular language, content type, etc.).

Mohit collaborated with others to find the right approach via a dynamic migration, and this solution worked. Because it was new to them initially, it look more time than expected, but now it’s easier—and Mohit hopes to share how to do these migrations even more efficiently.

Writing a migration takes two approaches: configuration, which is more-or-less steady, easy but less flexible, and user input, which is the dynamic way. A dynamic migration scales above configuration restrictions, rising above limitations. Mohit will explain the setup and then run through the migration, so attendees can experience it. He’ll also go into other relevant topics which will help to convey the concept more clearly.

Mohit feels that this particular theme, migration, is everywhere. "Migrations API helps developers and decision-makers with deciding about their next project," he says.

He first presented this session at DrupalCamp Goa and reformatted it for DrupalCamp Mumbai. This version of his session has evolved from user feedback and perceptions, and offers more context through examples, clearly conveyed and understood.

The session is meant to encourage a move to Drupal, without data loss or significant challenges—in the end, the session aims to promote Drupal adoption through clear, easy migration paths.

This is Mohit’s first DevDays event. He prefers the developer focus that DevDays allows, with prominent contributors attending and great opportunities to learn new things from fellow contributors.

He’s looking forward to the media initiative and front-end initiative sprint—he’s excited about this, and with Drupal 8 admin UI needing a ramp up, he wants to learn how to make a more impactful contribution toward this.

May 16 2018
May 16


DrupalCamp Mumbai
was held on 28th-29th April at IIT Bombay, bringing developers, students, managers, and organizations together and providing them the opportunity to interact, share knowledge, and help the community grow. 

The unofficial group photo from #DCM18. I beat @parth_gohil in posting this first. pic.twitter.com/8BPsuSIeky

— hussainweb (@hussainweb) April 28, 2018


Shyamala Rajaram
was the keynote speaker at this edition of the camp, which was focused on developers, business users and students. Hands-on Drupal training and workshops covering beginner, intermediate, and advanced Drupal topics offered developers the opportunity to learn, and the birds-of-a-feather (BoF) sessions gave them the chance to participate in some interesting conversations.

Business users had the opportunity to meet talented Drupalers as well as representatives from leading Indian companies. Students had several opportunities to learn from more experienced attendees, attend training sessions, and discover mentoring or internship opportunities. 

The #DCM18 #keynote by @shyam_raj begins. India to lead #Drupal in 2018. pic.twitter.com/GWk3x9wZKW

— hussainweb (@hussainweb) April 28, 2018


Axelerant was a Gold Sponsor at the event; 11 members of our team attended, flying in from different cities across India, including New Delhi, Jaipur, Surat, Bangalore, and Rajkot.

Since we’re a remote team, the camp was an excellent opportunity for us to hang out, exchange ideas, present and lead BoFs together, have many interesting conversations with other attendees—and of course, to just have fun together.

We'd like to thank the volunteers—without you this event wouldn't have been possible. We’re glad to have had the opportunity to meet with so many people who are also really passionate about technology, to share our knowledge with them, to be inspired by them, and to spread the love for Drupal. It was also really exciting to see the diversity at the camp—people came to attend from different cities with different kinds of expectations from the camp: Dev Engineers, QAs, Project Managers, Program Managers, CEOs, etc. 

I'm bringing stickers, badges, and patches from @DrupalConNA and various DrupalCamps to @DrupalMumbai camp tomorrow. Come pick them up from the @axelerant booth and also stop by to say hi. #DCM18 pic.twitter.com/JRxrGLkaL1

— hussainweb (@hussainweb) April 27, 2018

This was our booth!

booth

We had intentionally chosen to engage with attendees in person at the BoFs and sessions rather than at the booth. So our team members were mostly out on the floor, interacting with individuals, attending and leading sessions, and participating in meet and greets on the floor.

Our team members led three sessions.

In the Back End Development track, Mohit Aghera and Mitesh Patel led a session titled How to Write Dynamic Migrations. The session covered how migration works in Drupal 8, migration plugins, how to write Derivers for migration use cases, and how to execute migrations which are derived from Derivers.

The session was received well by an almost packed house, with a lot of questions being asked and good feedback all round! We’re looking forward to preparing more sessions for different camps in future.   

Very well explained dynamic migration @mohit_rocks @miteshmap #DCM18 @DrupalMumbai pic.twitter.com/TXMXPUP6Tx

— Siddhant Chopra (@MyDJ17) April 28, 2018

 
Check out their speaker deck here:

As part of the Front End Development track, Taher Jodhpurwala of Axelerant and Sparshi Dhiman of Srijan led a session together. It was titled Develop And Test Accessible Web Experiences. The session detailed the need for accessibility, creating WCAG compliant web experiences, testing for and fixing accessibility issues, and available tools for accessibility testing. 

@devtaher and @dsparshi explaining about developing accessible web experience. #DCM18 pic.twitter.com/GtHUpAmYSZ

— Mitesh Patel (@miteshmap) April 28, 2018


Here's their 
speaker deck.

Finally, in the DevOps track, Hussain Abbas led a session titled Static Analysis For Your Drupal Modules With CI, in which he covered automating static analysis to ensure that code is clean and follows coding standards.

We led two BoF sessions. 

See you tomorrow, @DrupalMumbai! Time for some open discussions. #DCM18 #Drupal pic.twitter.com/KoSWxQdox5

— Axelerant (@axelerant) April 27, 2018


Our CEO, Ankur Gupta, led these—talking about his own experience starting Axelerant and developing its culture over the years. Attendees opened up about their career concerns and got into interesting conversations.
 

Thanks Ankur for a very interactive session on 'will you have a successful career in drupal' @axelerant @DrupalMumbai #DCM18 pic.twitter.com/m5WHYTKeST

— Gaurav Agrawal (@ga_agrawal) April 28, 2018


And
Parth Gohil helped facilitate the Women in Drupal session, along with Shyamala Rajaram. Megan Sanicki from the Drupal Association made an appearance at the session, talking about her journey towards becoming the Director of the Drupal Association. 

Thank you @MeganSanicki for sharing your path towards success in @DrupalMumbai 2018 #WomenInDrupal session. Your words truly inspired all of us and filled us with more energy and motivation. pic.twitter.com/zNGFrg9pYG

— DrupalMumbai (@DrupalMumbai) April 30, 2018


Our team also seized the chance to go out to dinner at Mirchi and Mime, to unwind, catch up with each other, and have some fun!

DC Mumbai - Team dinner


We had a great time.

For some of us, it was our first time attending a DrupalCamp, so it was really special. Axelerant team members were able to connect with many developers and step out of their comfort zones, gain an understanding of what is happening in the community, and find ways to contribute.

We were also part of some impactful conversations with several community members and leaders. These were centered around shaping the future of the Drupal community in India and identifying the next steps in that direction. 

Day spent well with great conversations around #OpenSource, #FOSS, #Drupal, #Mozilla, #life & awesome people @siva_epari @RanjithRajV @ga_agrawal & @Kishanraval. pic.twitter.com/gPH3YELZXo

— Parth Gohil (@parth_gohil) April 29, 2018

We see what we need to improve. #Openness

There were also some challenges and some miscommunication that occurred at the event. Due to coordination issues faced by the DCM team, our BoF leaflets didn't make into attendees' kits, and many didn't know about the BoF. We’ve learned from these experiences that BoF coordination needs to be handled more prudently. 

We also realized later that it was important to have someone at our booth to guide the visitors who wanted to engage but weren't able to connect at our intended forums. And these are things we’d like to do differently next time, at the next event we’re attending. We hope to meet you there! 

Thank you @axelerant for all your support. #DCM18 pic.twitter.com/J9UmWPpBJM

— hussainweb (@hussainweb) April 28, 2018
Sep 22 2016
Sep 22

Giving back to our communities isn’t a new thing for us. And come Monday, five of our team members will be at DrupalCon Dublin. There will be plenty of Axelerant to go around. We’ve got three sessions, each in a different track, and the official event photography team will be led by Michael, our COO.

But before we get into what we’re bringing to Dublin, we should mention that we started to schedule our meet and greets. And we want you to be one of them. Let’s get together at a local brew pub and talk about Open Source problems and solutions in the community:

Let's connect at DrupalCon Dublin

Now, let’s get into what we’re up to. We’re presenting in Front-End, Project Management, and Business tracks at DrupalCon Dublin, so be sure to add them to your list.

Choosing The “Right Agile Methodology” For Your Drupal Projects

Date: 09/27/2016

Time: 14:15 to 15:15

Room: Liffey Meeting 4 | New Relic

Add this session to my schedule!

Shani and Prabhat will explore and compare different agile methodologies and share tips on how to choose the right one so you can accelerate your Drupal project. In this session, they’ll cover effective uses of CYNEFIN, a popular decision-making framework, to differentiate between Drupal projects and choosing right agile methodologies for the same.

Shani and Prabhat will cover:

  • Scrum
  • Extreme programming
  • Feature-driven development
  • Scrumban
  • Kanban
  • Lean development

Expected Takeaways:

A clearer idea of which methodology is right for each project, considering: project size, team size, iteration length, roles and responsibilities, and distributed team support. They’ll also discuss risk mitigation levels and customer interaction.

Growing Via Strategic Account Management Frameworks

Date: 09/27/2016

Time: 17:00 to 18:00

Room: Wicklow Hall 2A | Druid

Add this session to my schedule!

Piyush will take you through our Account Management practice and share some real-life case studies demonstrating how we hit target sales quota by 2-3x and achieved maximum strategic account objectives within the desired timeline.

Have you connected with Piyush yet?

Piyush will cover:

  • Customer onboarding process
  • Kickoff meetings
  • Routine engagement health check-ins
  • Invoicing and collections management
  • Satisfaction surveys and testimonials management
  • Complaint and grievances management
  • Contract renewals and extensions.
  • Opportunity exploration: researching the client, industry, references, social media, etc.
  • Evangelizing clients via social media, digital marketing, and event participations

Expected Takeaways:

  • What is Account Management?
  • What skills and talents are required to excel in Account Management specific to Drupal
  • What activities must be performed to maximize Account Management ROI?
  • What are some of the accountabilities and performance metrics used?

React Front-End For Your Drupal 8 Back-End

Date: 09/29/2016

Time: 12:00 to 13:00

Room: Wicklow Hall 2B | Platform.sh

Add this session to my schedule!

Aliya and Bassam will give a hands-on session. By the end of it, you’ll have learned how to build a decoupled website using React ecosystem on the front-end, using Drupal 8 as the content management system (and a data source).

Aliya and Bassam will cover:

  • How to configure Drupal to expose RESTful resources using Drupal 8
  • Enable CORS support for the domains/port running our React application
  • Authenticate requests using JWT
  • Consume data on front-end using Redux store
  • Pass data from Redux store React components

Expected Takeaways:

  • Be able to build a RESTful API using Drupal 8
  • Use any backend with react front-end

Covering DrupalCon Dublin

Michael has a knack for capturing Open Source events around the world as a way of giving back. He’s been leading the photography for two DrupalCons now: DrupalCon Asia and DrupalCon New Orleans.

He’s coming fully equipped to help the Drupal Association immortalize DrupalCon Dublin for all of us, and you can help. If you’d like to contribute to this process, there’s still time to join the “Official Photography Team.”

And while he’ll be running around the event like a paparazzo, Michael would still like to connect with you one-on-one to answer any questions you have about Axelerant. Be sure to take him up on the offer if there’s something you feel we can help you accomplish.

Want to chat about something? Parth Gohil

Parth Gohil

Parth is Axelerant's Community Manager hailing from Surat. He loves supporting open source communities, piloting single-engine aircraft, and being a Cha-Cha Productions actor.

May 03 2016
May 03

Despite attending conventions across India and beyond, some of this might come off as a little, well, unconventional. If I’m going to convey what I feel is wrong with the Indian Drupal Ecosystem (IDE), I’m going to need to bring some candour in here.

I’ll take this step-by-step, exploring and explaining how the Indian Drupal ecosystem works, then I’ll point out the gaps and include suggestions, from my limited perspective, as to how we can bridge these gaps together.

The Indian Drupal Ecosystem (IDE):

We know there are a significant number of local Drupal communities in India (just check out this blog by Josef Dabernig). What a lot of you might not know is how the Indian Drupal Ecosystem functions. We have about nine hyperactive Drupal communities in India (Kashmir, Delhi, Jaipur, Gujarat, Pune, Mumbai, Hyderabad, Bangalore & Chennai). And almost all of these communities have the following 10 defining characteristics:

1. At least one community lead—this person is responsible for coordinating

2. Their own Facebook page, Twitter handle, and website—run by the community lead

3. Active volunteers who take on the responsibilities of running event activities

4. Three to four supportive companies backing each event with resources

5. Thier own Drupal.org group, where people discuss the next meetup and activities

6. They don’t have a bank account for the community for event transaction purposes

7. Sponsored events by these groups are free for all to participate

8. At every camp there’s someone disappointed with management—suprise!

9. These groups depend on camp attendees, despite these being free events

10. Each community is on its own, some cross-pollinating during camps

Do you agree? I’ve found that these characteristics are the most common. Unfortunately, many of these characteristics are causing some trouble with the Indian Drupal community’s stability and sustainability. These have led to some significant gaps.

10 Gaps Within The Indian Drupal Ecosystem

Now comes the rough part… what’s wrong with it? Let’s go into how we don’t have a formal structure of doing things. Don’t worry, I write about how we might be able to fix these things too! Here are 10 areas of improvement we need to start talking about:

1. Camps aren’t being taken seriously enough—session presentations are not on par

2. Finances aren’t handled formally because there’s no official body to handle them

3. There isn’t proper archiving of camp collateral and physical materials

4. There’s no formal way of decision making—whoever shows up!

5. With no formal structure, it’s hard to understand what the community lead’s role is

6. Even though some Camps have been running for 3 years, these aren’t sustainable

7. Only a few people attend more than one camp a year (and those are the most active)

8. There are only a few companies that sponsor every camp regardless of location

9. There isn’t enough sharing across communities and there isn’t a support system

10. Distributed communities aren’t advocating Drupal adoption on a larger scale

Not too harsh, right? I’m not looking to go on a total rant or be a buzz kill. This is about how we can move to the next level. With these significant gaps in mind, now we can start focusing on solutions.

So how we can start fixing this?

Now with more clarity on the state of the ecosystem and its immediate gaps, let’s go into how we can fill these up. I’ve been talking to a lot of the community members over this past year and I’d like to share some of the conversations and potential solutions I’ve heard talked about.

Join Axelerant

Yes, the chapter.

One huge answer to many of these problems is a local Drupal Association Chapter that works along with or with the support of the Drupal Association. This would tackle:

Fund management: This would mean formalizing finances, which is one of the biggest problems within each Drupal community looking to bring forward events and other activities. With a formal Drupal Association body for India we can sort this problem with a central account.

Central Hub: Moreover, managing archival storage and keeping a centralized repository hub for events could be taken care of. This could also streamline marketing material coordination for camps.

Indian Drupal Directory: A dependable and frequently updated directory could be maintained, listing local chapters, companies, individuals, volunteers, community leaders etc. and update frequently. Essentially, an updated and comprehensive version of “Drupal India – Existing Local Chapters.”

Evangelism: This would allow for the advocation of Drupal within the Indian and the Indian subcontinent. As a recognized, centralized body this would allow corporations, governing bodies, and other large entities (like those in media publishing or education) to interact.

Ecosystem Unity: Do a country-wide event maybe one in two years (or one every year), this will give a lot of Indian Drupalers the Con experience. A country-wide event will also help consolidate a few camps that particular year, helping sponsors and attendees make a simpler choice.

Should we be considering our camps?

Another potential solution when it comes to camps, is instituting a paid structure. At the end of the day, for camps to be more sustainable, we’ll have to move to a paid structure amongst other things. Yes, we have a great audience turnout. We’re educating between 200 – 250 students about Drupal with each camp. But this isn’t going to cut it.

Download Drupal Staff Augmentation Case Study

With a paid model we ensure we have people who care about the community and are there looking to learn. This means we’d be able to provide more value to attendees with better training, sessions, hospitality, international engagement, conversations, and more. I am not suggesting a ludicrous fee, we’re talking about Rs. 500 or $8. Here are three potential effects:

1. Reduced dependence on sponsors

2. More star power—paid sessions, keynotes (these might not necessarily be Drupalers)

3. This way organisers aren’t stuck ordering food for attendees from their own pockets!

We need to identify and move to the next stage of this community maturity model provided by communityroundtable.com for creating a sustainable community. I will be reaching out to community leads in the near future to adopt this and implement for better management. Obviously, you’re free and encouraged to take it on and implement this for your local community. But since I’m a bit nosy, I’ll reach out to check either way.

What do you think?

While all of these gaps haven’t been addressed and the solutions aren’t sound or completely verified yet, let’s start talking about these things. I hope I made some sense here. I’ll be working on implementing or advocating for solutions to these in this quarter. If you’d like to discuss this or help with documentation, please email me. Let’s turn up the volume a little bit!

Are you all about the Drupal community?
May 29 2015
May 29

Last week, some colleagues from Cocomore and I attended DrupalCamp Spain 2015. Spanish Drupal community is awesome, and they have put all their efforts in making an unforgettable event again in this 6th edition (the 5th I have attended).

The event was divided into different activities for the three days: Business Day and Sprints on Friday, and sessions on Saturday and Sunday.

Starting my session.
Starting my session. Photo: pakmanlh (https://twitter.com/pakmanlh/status/602105515745910786)

I participated as speaker talking about dos and dont’s building a Drupal 8 site. We looked at our experiences with managing the project structure, the different ways of using Composer for managing your project, different merging strategies, evaluated the status of contrib and how we managed to reduce the risk of using betas by writing Behat tests and doing Continuous integration.

The topic is quite relevant, so got a lot of questions at the end and during all weekend. Keep them coming if you think I can help you!

Recording: https://vimeo.com/129005035
Slides: https://docs.google.com/presentation/d/1FPABmI1GVOUJzmS09JCXzObQuYhzU3rg...

DrupalCamp Spain is a well settled event already, so it’s attracting more and more international participants every year. Social events are well-planned and attractive, and the event is having more English sessions every year. I’m looking forward to next edition!

Visiting the tabancos.
Visiting the tabancos. Photo: juampy (https://twitter.com/juampynr/status/602192531636559872)

That’s a wrap! DrupalCamp Spain 2015 was an amazing event and I for sure will be there again next year. Thanks to the organization for their hospitality, it was real fun sharing those days with you!

Attachment Size thinking_about_a_drupal_8_project-_here_is_my_story_drupalcampspain2015_public.pdf 3.97 MB
Mar 01 2015
Mar 01

DCLondon-2015-01DCLondon-2015-01 #DCLondon 2015 was nothing short of Epic, Drupal Camp London has in its own right become a mini-Con, with community members flying in from not only across Europe but the US, India, Australia and New Zealand it is hard to call it just a London camp!

London is the centre of the multiverse!
Drupal Camp London 2015Drupal Camp London 2015 It was awesome catching up with old friends, some new ones and finding an engaging audience for my session on using Empathy maps, content touch point analysis to develop a robust content strategy.

Bummed about not being able to catchup with everyone though!!

I’d like to reiterate my two asks from the community this March:

1) Like, Follow and spread the word on Bringing Peace Through Prosperity, it goes hand in glove with our activist nature and desire to make this rock a better place today, tomorrow and beyond.

2) Drupal Camp Tunis needs our support to bring their local community into the wider fold, the organisers at DCTunis are looking for speakers and support.

And a HUGE thank you to everyone who attended my session…

See y’all at the next Camp!

One more option to look on her packing at it levitra vardenafil it of course to take not so simply because a form another and there is a wish to hold in hand her not so strongly. You can carry by me on a wide field.

Feb 26 2015
Feb 26

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Nov 20 2014
Nov 20

It's been a while since the last DrupalCamp in Melbourne, so the community came together recently to share what they know. Here's a brief wrap up of the two day event.

The Melbourne Drupal community recently gathered at our new library in Docklands. It was the first time I visited the venue, and I have to say I was impressed.  The wifi was great, the facilities were accessible, and there was such a good variety of room set ups.

The day began with a series of lightning talks.  Speakers gave a quick outline of what they planned to cover, and the full sessions were scheduled out based on how much interest there was in the topic.

DrupalCamp begins - Photo by Alexar

Check out the DrupalCamp Melbourne website to see the range of sessions that was covered on Day 1

http://melbourne2014.drupalcamp.net.au/schedule

Day 2 was Sprint Day.  I even took a moment to show some people how I navigate the issue queues on Drupal.org

Donna demos the issue queues - Photo by Justin

 

Huge kudos is due to Brian Gilbert and Stuart Clark of Realityloop, plus their team of volunteers for putting on a great camp. Thank you!

DrupalCamp Melbourne Group picture

Drupal Community
Oct 21 2014
Oct 21
img_20141001_152214-smile_0.jpg

Some weeks ago (29th Sept - 3rd Oct) Cocomore attended the European DrupalCon in Amsterdam with five colleagues: penyaskito (Christian López), kfritsche (Karl Fritsche), jsbalsera (Jesús Sánchez), LoMo (Lowell Montgomery) and Carsten Müller where there, and we also attended to the extended sprints before and after the Con. The numbers of this Drupalcon are impressive: more than 2300 attendees from over 64 countries. There were more than 100 sessions so, either if you came or not, you will find the link to all the DrupalCon Amsterdam sessions handful!

Diary

Saturday - Getting there

On Saturday we travelled to Amsterdam. It’s like always an exciting day, looking forward to see again not only friends from the community and new people to know, but also being able to reunite again coworkers who live almost 2000 kms away. And when you get into the airport you start recognizing people from other events, or only because we all wear Drupal t-shirts!

Sunday - Extended Sprints

The extended Sprints were hosted at Berlage Meet & Workspace, an amazing place just near to the Centre Station. There was plenty of space there to sit and help working in Drupal 8 core. As always is great to work with all the people from the community.

Monday - Sprints and Community Summit

On Monday the Sprints moved to the conference venue, Amsterdam RAI. The place there was even bigger for all the sprinting people (around 180 sprinters) and you could see people working not only in Drupal Core but also in important projects like Drupal Commerce or Drush. Karl joined the Community Summit and participate in the group about training experiences.

Tuesday - Start of Sessions

There were 120 sessions this year. so it was a really hard decision to choose between them. You can access to the complete program including links to the recorded videos at the DrupalCon Amsterdam website. The Opening Session, or prenote, was mostly a history of DrupalCon told by people which lives were changed there. Some histories were fun and some others were beautiful, but there were time to include some jokes and fun parts with a curious recreation of some events. Then came the Keynote by Dries Buytaert, and the Drupal 8 Beta One was announced! The keynote was a discussion about how to make the Drupal project development sustainable, by making the contribution more attractive to people and organizations. After that the traditional Group Photo was taken.

As you can see, tons of people :-)

15399906982_2ee1d506c1_o_0.jpg

Wednesday

On Wednesday the beta was finally released, so everyone could just download and install it, and make all the needed testing. This day’s Keynote was delivered by Cory Doctorow, science fiction writer and the co-editor of Boing Boing, among other achievements. You can access to the Wednesday schedule and access to all the sessions descriptions and videos. But this day was also strange, because all the Spanish community, with ours Christian and Jesús among them, looked really agitated. As we knew the day after they were invited to assist to a secret meeting by the Drupal Association, because the city selected to held the next DrupalCon was Barcelona, and they should know in advance.

Thursday

On Thursday there wasn’t a Keynote, but instead a number of small but interesting Drupal Lightning Talks. We want to remark the Console module, based in the Symfony Console Component: a CLI tool that helps creating new modules, controllers, etc automatically. And the #D8in8 initiative looks like a great way to involve a company into learning and contributing in Drupal 8. Lowell made a awesome job summarizing the Q&A with Dries that we can only recommend you to read, although you can also hear the audio. Again, the schedule is available online with links to the sessions descriptions and videos. At the end there was the Closing session, where they talked about future events like DrupalCon Bogotá and DrupalCon Barcelona was unveiled. That same night we assisted to the Trivia Night, hosted by the Irish group. It was tons of fun, but really hard. Our team was named 1396891800, because the timestamp when Heartbleed was announced, and thanks to Christian we won the prize to the best handwriting!

Friday - Mentored Core Sprints

Fridays was all about sprinting. Karl and Christian worked as mentors helping people, and Carsten, Jesús and Lowell were sprinting.

Saturday - Extended Sprints

On Saturday we went back to Berlage Meet & Workspace, so we were sprinting again.

Sunday - Goodbye Amsterdam

At the end all the good things have to end, and we had to get into the airport and travel back to our respective cities, Christian and Jesús travelling to Sevilla and Carsten, Karl and Lowell to Frankfurt. It was a really great DrupalCon, but we expect Barcelona to be even better!

Sessions

We attended to a bunch of a great collection of sessions, so we want to recommend some of them that we found really interesting:

What's next?

DrupalCamp Berlin

There is the DrupalCamp Berlin happening at the 15th and 16th of November in our capital. We are looking forward to meet you there again.

DrupalCon in Barcelona!

The next european DrupalCon will happen in Barcelona. We are happy about the decision made by the Drupal Association and we are looking forward to see you all again next year in the sunny city of Barcelona!

Thanks!

So it was a great DrupalCon. We can only say thank you to the organizers, the mentors, the local group and all the outstanding people that are part of this amazing community. We are proud to be part of it. img-20140928-wa0001_0.jpg
Sep 10 2014
Sep 10

We were going DrupalCon Amsterdam 2014.There is the European DrupalCon happening from Sept. 29th to the Oct. 3rd in Amsterdam and a team of Cocomore - as one of the biggest Drupal shops in Germany and Spain - will of course attend. Christian López Espínola (penyaskito - https://www.drupal.org/u/penyaskito), Jesús Sánchez Balsera (jsbalsera - https://www.drupal.org/u/jsbalsera), Karl Fritsche (attribdd - https://www.drupal.org/u/kfritsche) and Carsten Müller (Carsten Müller - https://www.drupal.org/u/carsten-müller) will join the Drupal community for code sprinting, networking, socializing and naturally help working on the new Drupal 8 version.

We will arrive to Amsterdam on Saturday 27th to attend the Pre-DrupalCon Extended Sprints and we will also be at the Post-DrupalCon Extended Sprints. During the Con we will mix participating in the sprints with attending the amazing sessions and BoFs scheduled. Our team will work on the initiatives we've been contributing lately, mainly D8MI (Drupal 8 Multilingual Initiative, led by Gábor Hojtsy- http://hojtsy.hu/) issues, but with an eye in the critical and beta blockers issues, and to the Migrate in core initiative. Together with all the other awesome Drupal developers we will try get Drupal 8 ready for usage. The main goal is to achieve some good progress on Drupal 8 which will be a huge improvement in web development with Drupal. Who didn't watch Dries keynote at DrupalCon Austin yet – it is really worth to spend the hour and have a look at the big aims set on Drupal 8.

One whole week of sprints, meetings, discussions and socializing with the Drupal community – it will not be only great fun, but also lots of stress - but it is worth every minute. I think everybody who ever attended a Drupal event like a camp or con would agree. If you are still unsure about your participation – here you have the possibility to meet over 2000 members of the Drupal community. There will be all the roles involved in a Drupal project, from backend developers to the themers / frontend developers, designers, managers, architects, devops and more, who help to improve Drupal day by day. You can meet mostly everybody in one place and ask all the questions you might have. And, in comparison to other IT trainings or developer events, it is very cheap. If you‘re looking for a new job you can also contact all the Drupal shops there. By the way, Cocomore is also always looking for good developers, so maybe we can meet and talk about your future. Just send us an email (http://drupal.cocomore.com/contact) or contact us via Twitter (@cocomore_drupal) and we can drink something together. You can also do so if you are not looking for a new job but just want to share your time with us ;-)

We are looking forward for a great DrupalCon in Amsterdam, for amazing sessions, meeting old and new friends, the exchange of knowledge and the hopefully good progress on Drupal 8. See you there!

Jun 20 2014
Jun 20
Our Cocomore software developer Jesús Sánchez Balsera, is the new president of the Drupal Spanish Association (AED). He was elected during this year's Drupal Camp in Valencia, functioning volunteering at least to the camp in 2015. The AED has made the promotion of the project Open-Source-CMS Drupal within Spain to its mission. In addition to numerous smaller events, the lining up of the annual Drupal Camp is one of the main tasks of the non-profit organization. As president Jesús will act primarily as an intermediary between various working groups. From now on he ensures that each party knows about its operational procedures and responsibilities, all tasks are accomplished on time and the focus is never lost sight of. "My first concern as president of the AED is to allow anyone who wants to support the Spanish Drupal Association and participate with us an easy start," comments Jesús Sánchez Balsera on his new role. Within the next year it will show up for Jesús, if he can be set up again for the next election of the President. The dedicated Cocomorie loves working for the community and looks forward to his upcoming term.
Jun 02 2014
Jun 02

DCon-Amsterdam-logo

DCon-Amsterdam-logo

DrupalCon Austin 2014 is in full swing as of tomorrow,  my attendance is restricted to watching live feeds of the keynotes and the session recordings on Drupal Association’s Youtube channel … having not made it to the North American Con (again!)… thought I’d put the little down time between contracts to prepare for DrupalCon Amsterdam, on what I propose to share in two sessions freshly submitted.

Both in the business track;  one more a workshop than a traditional session… am quite excited at the prospect of having one if not both selected (fingers crossed). The first one I have proposed is a more indepth version of my ‘Practical Agile Product Development’ session recently delivered at Drupal Drupal Camp Yorkshire 2014 Agile Product Development

Drupal Camp Yorkshire 2014 Agile Product Development

Camp Yorkshire. Its 16 years of experience of delivering products, projects and transformation programs using various flavours of Agile, from James Martin’s RAD (Rapid Application Development) for getting products out of the door in their minimum viable form to giving the chaos structure using Dynamic systems development method (DSDM) to falling in love with the simplicity of SCRUM and then the combination of SCRUM and KANBAN: SCRUMBAN. From the beginning to date the challenge remains selecting which flavour of Agile is best suited for the engagement… and more challenging still occasions when the herd is convinced on not using Agile at all and its my job to swing the Jury in the opposite direction, this happens more so on the non-tech elements of a transformation program than the tech aspects of course.

Agile Digital Consultancies Vs the Big 4

Agile Digital Consultancies Vs the Big 4

The second session I have proposed is about getting agencies of all sizes in the community better tooled up to face off  Tier 1 & 2 consultancies and systems integrators who are increasingly and rapidly developing their Drupal capabilities given the size and scale of the opportunities in the Enterprise space. What started of as a niche platform has gone mainstream and with it has brought the big full service firms in to Drupalverse, which folks is a great thing for all involved in Drupal, FOSS and Enterprise!

Then there is the wider shift of agencies moving in to digital consulting since many of the Tier 1’s have historically lacked the depth agencies have built up over the years in the digital realm. So my second proposed session ‘Understanding your prospects, clients, stakeholders (Jury) and end users‘ is an in depth look at three models, my current favorites; Empathy maps to better understand the actors in your ecosystem, HotHousing  an exploration framework that mixes creative design thinking options with agile delivery outcomes, and Jobs-To-Be-Done framework (JTBD) a way to understand customer’s needs, motivations and behaviours. All three together are a powerful toolkit for any engagement be it tactics to approach a new prospect, running productive workshops with clients or ascertaining the ‘true’ needs of end users and facilitating them to articulate them and then co-designing options for fulfilling them.

Fingerscrossed I’ll get to share my knowledge and experiences on both Agile and Digital Consulting, however if there could be only one… I’d jump on the opportunity to tool up the community to better understand and engage with their prospects, clients, stakeholders (Jury) and end users.

Drupal Give back

Drupal Give back

For the curious this post is called Give back  for it is exactly that, back in 2012 in Munich I shared the challenges I was facing bringing peripheral communities into the fold with the global community, who in turn rallied to my aid and between Munich 2012 and Austin 2014 me and a few local hosts have kicked off four 1st ever Camps in 4 cities in two countries and been an inspiration for another two. Sharing what many of my peers in the consulting space prefer to keep to themselves as their magic models, I would like to believe sharing them with the community is my own personal give back, a huge thank you of sorts. Gondor returning the favour to Rohan if that’s your thing… or Lannisters paying a debt if you are so inclined!

Jun 01 2014
Jun 01

The community in the North… is quite hospitable and the Camp in the North was fantastic :)

:)


Drupal Camp Yorkshire 2014

Drupal Camp Yorkshire 2014

Back at Drupal Camp London Paul Driver invited me to Drupal Camp Yorkshire to deliver a session at the Camp. Drupal Camp Yorkshire 2014 was the 2nd Camp up in Leeds I am told, but from the experience I had for the short while I was there it could have been the 10th… it was  very well organised camp no doubt and next time round I will have to make sure I juggle my diary to be able to stay for the entire weekend.

Its been 6 or 7 years since I have been up to Leeds, driven past many a times but did not have an excuse to stop over, Drupal Camp is probably up there in the top 5 excuses to stop over or visit… but before I jump into the details I must mention another community who like myself had taken the Saturday off to take part in a very different but essential sort of activism.

2014-05-31 13.46.51

2014-05-31 13.46.51

On the train up to Leeds I met with a couple of ladies heading up from London, volunteers who were much like our own community giving up their Saturdays to give back.

Did’nt quite catch their names but they were activists heading up to Newark to give them folks from UKIP a hard time and to help the community there see UKIP  true ‘far right’  colours. I would like to thank folks like them who keep Britain grounded and heading in the right direction, giving geeks like me and others the ‘space’ to build, focus on and be part of other communities that rely on a certain kind of society to keep looking ahead and progressing in the right direction… probably not as eloquently put as I could.. but I am going to blame the beautiful sunny Sunday that it is right now!

Ok, back on topic, My session was on ‘Practical’ Agile product development and you can watch the video below to understand what I mean by that.

[embedded content] You can view/download the slides from Slideshare.com.

Lastly I must mention the venue, Electric Press at the Carriageworks Theatre in Leeds was by far the most picturesque of Drupal Camp venues I have have been to so far, over looking the Millenium square which given the weather was bursting with life and an open air concert set the scene up for a community event quite well.

Excellent job done by the organisers, a huge thank you to everyone who attended my session and apologies to a few friends I could not see or spend time with… for I dashed in and dashed out but will make it up to them at the next Camp or at the Con in Dam.

“Communication leads to community, that is, to understanding, intimacy and mutual valuing.”
Rollo May

May 20 2014
May 20

Last weekend three of us from Cocomore attended to DrupalCamp Spain 2014. This year it was held in the beautiful city of Valencia, at the East Coast of Spain, full of magnificent buildings and the land of Paella and Horchata. Because we know of the importance of these events, this Drupalcamp was sponsored by Cocomore.

badge02_imgoing_orange.png

The Spanish Drupal community is well known around Europe (and probably the world) as one of the funniest, enthusiastic and noisy ones, and their own main event was of course really interesting, with great sessions among party and laughes.

On Friday there were three main activities: a Business Day, where CEO's and CTO's where talking and sharing experiences and ideas; some trainings about beginning with Drupal 7 and about Test-Driven Development and, of course, a code sprint to help bring Drupal 8 closer to release that continued all the weekend.

dc2014.jpg

On Saturday the sessions and workshops started with the welcome session. There were all kind of topics so everyone could find an interesting session to attend, including the one held by Christian about Migrate in core. We were lucky to have really amazing people sharing their experience, including people that came from places like Sweden, Finland or Switzerland, and people that don't work with Drupal but want to share their experiences in topics like Agile processes or UX. And we have to mention the great paella that we had for lunch.

paella.jpg

At the end of the day the traditional socializing event in the amazing location of L'umbracle gave us the posibility to meet, talk and have fun with all the attendees.

On Sunday there were a lot of sleepy faces, but also four hours of interesting sessions to attend. I presented one about View Modes and Field Formatters, and you can find the slides at http://jsbalsera.github.io/modes_and_formatters/

Sessions were recorded, so videos of every session should be available soon in the Spanish Association video channel on Vimeo. Some sessions, as the one held by Christian, were presented in English, so you can check in the schedule which ones will be available in English.

We want to thank to the local community in Valencia, they did a gorgeous job organizing the event. We are really looking forward to see you all again, maybe in Amsterdam in the DrupalCon or maybe in the second and developer focused event organized by the Drupal Spanish Association (AED) in Bilbao in November.

Apr 24 2014
Apr 24

Drupalcamp Spain 2014 will be at Valencia on May 16-18th, and we will be there.

If you are attending, you will probably know that there will be sprints during all the camp, and you may want to sign up to the Valencia sprints. We will have tasks for everybody, no matter if you never contributed before or if you are not even a developer, so don't be shy and join us.

badge02_imgoing_orange.png

And if you haven't decided yet to come, you should have a look on the proposed sessions. There will be high-quality content for every role involved in Drupal projects, with a touch of Symfony too, so it's definitely worth to come.

We at Cocomore have proposed several sessions:

Modes and Formatters Jesús Sánchez (jsbalsera on Drupal.org) wants to talk about coding modes and formatters in Drupal 7, and how to organize how your fields are shown in your site in a organized manner Migrate in core Christian López (penyaskito on Drupal.org) wants to talk about the Migrate in Core initiative, and how you will be able to upgrade from Drupal 6 and Drupal 7 to Drupal 8, or how do you need to write your own migrations. Drupal 8 core is more multilingual than Drupal 7 with all of contrib Christian López (penyaskito on Drupal.org) wants to talk about the Drupal 8 Multilingual initiative, and how you will have better support than ever for multilingual sites, even without the need of installing contributed modules. OOP in Drupal 7, old news. Christian López (penyaskito on Drupal.org), together with Mateu Aguiló (e0ipso on Drupal.org) from Lullabot want to talk about how you can write OOP code in Drupal 7 projects, and how it will help migrating your modules to Drupal 8 easier.

We are looking forward to the final program, and hoping to see you there!

Apr 01 2014
Apr 01

The last week three of us from Cocomore went to the little town of Szeged in Hungary, around 175km south east of Budapest.

The DevDays were all about developing Drupal 8 further and enhance drupal.org. The only topic was contributing to Drupal in the one way or the other. Whatever you are, either a developer, a themer, a site builder, a devop or a business man, everyone has his/her part in this amazing community and everyone found a spot where he/she could help to foster Drupal further.

GroupPhoto

All the week there were sprints and mentors around if you needed to get started and from Thursday till Saturday there were a lot of very interesting sessions. While the Cons are heading more and more to be business orientated lately and the camps are mostly for the local communities, the DevDays are a community event, where everything centers on contributing. Core committers around the world joined this event and some received a scholarship, so that they had the opportunity to be there, too.

It was a very successful and exhausting week for all of us. We had a great time, met a lot of people and for sure had the one or other drink with them. A lot of things got done. Drupal 8 is now a big step further to becoming a beta and drupal.org will have a responsive design. Much of work for that was done in this particular week. And all of this couldn't have happened without the outstanding work of the organization team. So a very big kudos to them!

Organization Team

And now get some good impressions of all the stuff in form of some cool pictures and tweets from the last week by Gábor Hojtsy

[embedded content]

Also don't miss out of the Drupalfolk Song!

[embedded content]

Drupalfolk from Rafa Terrero on Vimeo.

Thanks to everyone who made this happen and everyone who attended the week, which made this time just so amazing!

See you all next year again at the next DrupalDevDays, where ever they will be or at any other upcoming DrupalCamps (like Frankfurt, add Spain here?) or Cons (like Amsterdam).

Jan 28 2014
Jan 28

On January 25th and 26th, for the first time in Sevilla, the local community took part of the Drupal Global Sprint Weekend , a worldwide event where people join together and contribute back to Drupal. We are very proud for having hosted this event, which filled our office with a group of 20 individuals willing to contribute and mentor contributors.

Drupal Global Sprint Weekend Sevilla Group PhotoDrupal Global Sprint Weekend Sevilla Group Photo

You can see the tasks we worked on by searching the issue queues with the tag D8SVQ and all the issues of the global spring using the tag SprintWeekend.

Not only local Drupaleros joined, but some of the more brilliant Drupal devs in Spain traveled to Sevilla for joining the fun and helping with the mentoring. A big hug for all of you and all the participants and hope you had a great time here and you visit us again!

Sharing their passion for Drupal and the Drupal Community there made that some people convinced to register to Drupal Developer Days in Szeged and they booked in site! You should do that if you haven’t already!

Druplicon CookiesWe had Druplicon cookies. Thanks @jlbellido for baking them

We want to thank the Spanish Drupal Association, which sponsored the event by providing budget for snacks, food and drinks for keeping people focused and caffeinated on work. Thanks also for Forcontu, lead company on Drupal training in Spanish, which sponsored with a Drupal 7 Expert book for raffling between those who finished a patch on Saturday in his first contributing experience.

We really enjoyed the experience so much and we are looking forward to host and participate in other Sprints quite soon… Keep in touch!

Dec 05 2013
Dec 05

November was huge for the Open Source community in Middle Earth, Those who attended Drupal Camp Karachi on 2nd November and Dubai on the 30th of November 2013 made history. I shall get to Karachi later, this post is about Dubai Camp, challenges of organising it and the outcome of the journey that started in June 2013.

BaY96-QIQAAQ_I3

BaY96-QIQAAQ_I3

As organisers our focus was both quality and quantity of course; share best practises, tools and knowledge with as many as possible! though we did not get the quantity, 80+ were invited 55 were expected and the campers peaked at lunch with a turn out of 45… and for the last session and closing we had 20.

Organising Dubai camp was a challenge for the organising committee… though committee sounds grand! there was me, Ahmed Koshok and Massoud Al-Shareef, with two regionals on board you might expect things to be easier but with no boots on the ground mobilisation of the community, securing the venue, putting the logistics in place was always going to be a challenge! but planning for it made it that tad bit easier.

DCAE_Email_Volume_2013

DCAE_Email_Volume_2013

At first there was just me (and making very slow progress), then Ahmed came on board and both of us dragged the vision of Dubai camp a fair distance but nowhere close to the starting line… then in Massoud we found a regional champion and a reliable network on the ground to go through the red tape… that was Hani Hejazi; and securing the venue was Hani’s feat. From start to finish organising Dubai camp took 6 months!

DCAE_pic_4_2013

DCAE_pic_4_2013

DC Dubai had a strong contingent of local/regional Drupal rockstars in attendance and that was the magic sauce in Dubai camp, from a total of 16 speakers/trainers we had 9 local/regional speakers/trainers and that was a coup for any first camp I have attended or been a part of in Middle Earth.

At Dubai camp there were many firsts! the faculty was not just curious but participatory and super supportive, Professor Jassim Jirjees the program director for MLIS was in attendance and his staff ensured everything ran like clockwork!

To top it all Professor Muthanna G. Abdul Razzaq the president of AUE announced a full scholarship for anyone applying from within the Drupal community… we shall get the details for application, prerequisites etc and post them on our Facebook page.

A super supportive and involved institution, local rockstars in attendance, informed and engaging speakers, an awesome regional community to network with and a tasty lunch… made it epic.

From Ahmed Koshok, Massoud Al-Shareef and me a huge thank you shoutout to:

And I would not have been able to co-organise Dubai Camp had it not been for Ahmed Koshok, Massoud Al-Shareef, Jihan Al-Shareef, Hani Hijazi  and Marwa Ezzat – we made an awesome team folks! thank you and lets get going for the next one!

For session slides please follow the DrupalCamp Dubai twitter account and we shall be releasing the slides as and when we receive them from the speakers, a few are already up on Twitter.

Looking forward to hearing about meet-ups in KSA, UAE, Bahrain, Egypt, Jordan and beyond!

Nov 19 2013
Nov 19

Christian Lopez (Penyaskito) representing Drupal in the EBE13 CMS round table.

Penyaskito, aka Christian Lopez, Drupal developer at CocomoreThis past weekend was a busy one for some of our developers who attended EBE13, a major Spanish conference for digital marketing, blogging, social media, and online communication, held annually in Seville, not far from our Cocomore in Spain, which drew over 1000 developers this year. Christian Lopez (aka Penyaskito on Drupal.org and Twitter), participated as an expert panelist representing Drupal in a "round table" moderated debate, lending much credibility to our favorite popular open-source CMS and Web application framework. He spoke about typical use cases for Drupal, as well as some unusual places he has seen Drupal in action, such as in a POS system in McDonalds, among other odd uses. He was joined by Isidro Baquero, representing Joomla, and Rafael Poveda, representing Wordpress. The debate was moderated by Agile trainer and coach, Jeronimo Palacios.

What they learned was that, in the end, everyone who actively contributes to open-source is a winner, regardless of the technology! The benefits of being a part of a great open-source community turned out to be the most compelling reason for using each of these projects. Of course there are other strong reasons we, at Cocomore, favor Drupal, but involvement with a greater development community is a good way to become an expert in the CMS you use. So if you work with Drupal (or Wordpress or Joomla or any other open-source CMS), finding ways to contribute will help you grow as well as improving the code base that you use.

Oct 27 2013
Oct 27

Drupal

Drupal

There were four drupal camps  for 2013 on my radar… three firsts in Lahore, Karachi, Dubai and Islamabad’s second camp, and as with most plans.. things got skewed after Lahore!

Back in March at Drupal Camp Lahore we had the unpleasant experience of an individual announce himself as a contender for  ‘douche of the community’ award!  spewing out bigoted, racist opinions about fellow community members  from Bangalore whilst we had the Bangalore community with us over Skype…  you can read the details here. Unfortunately that was not the last we heard from the ‘Douche’, instead of apologising and seeing the errors of his ways the ‘Douche’ having been taken to task by several members of the local community announced his own camps in Karachi and Dubai soon after, with dates to coincide to those organised by ourselves. So we called it a day in the summer and postponed Drupal Camp Karachi to November and Dubai thereafter. Yes… I am venting, am a little annoyed for there has been malice at work from the very start to sabotage the efforts to nurture a single cohesive community in Middle Earth.

Being the first in Karachi or Dubai was not the objective, doing it right was and remains! now on to the upside! Having my summer schedule blown wide open was great! I spent August in the high Atlas in Maroc, summited Tizi Agouri and M’Goun and came back rested and with fire in’me belly for the fall camps! 

DrupalCon_Prague_Logo_2013

DrupalCon_Prague_Logo_2013

September was Drupal Camp Belgium in Leuven and then of course the highlight of all things OS for the year DrupalCon Prague and catching up with friends from all over the rock and making some awesome new ones!

October has been a month of careful planning and absolute frenzy! all good though.

DCPKHI_Logo

DCPKHI_Logo

For Drupal Camp Karachi  the local organising committee and I roped in [email protected] and together they have worked tirelessly to ensure Karachi camp would be worthy of  Karachi’s Drupal Community and the awesome city Karachi is (the economic hub of Pakistan and the third most populated city proper on the rock). The venue is the Institute of Business Administration (IBA), folks at IBA jumped on board with epic enthusiasm from the get go! Karachi camp has a little under 400 delegates registered, 13 speakers from 11 different countries! Karachiites have been awesome! and the credit goes to [email protected] and the local organising committee. I have no doubt Karachi Camp will be epic in proper Karachi style.. on the 2nd of November 2013.

With Karachi sorted, well almost sorted it was time to turn my attention to Dubai, and little surprise the Douche was all over D.O with a Drupal camp in Dubai and had it been properly executed I would have conceded that my job has been done and any further efforts to that end redundant, but that was hardly the case. So Ahmed from Acquia and I ignored the meetup dressed up as a camp and ploughed ahead with Drupal Camp Dubai.

facebook_page

facebook_page

Once again the credit goes to local community members Massoud Al-Shareef, Hani Hejazi, Marwa Ezzat from KnowledgeWARE Technologies who have been epic! with neither Ahmed or me on the ground in Dubai the team from  KnowledgeWARE came to our aid and stepped in where we physically could not! thank you for making it happen! Drupal Camp Dubai is scheduled for the 9th of November at the American University in the Emirates with a strong contingent of local Drupal rockstars and international speakers!

Stay tuned…

Oct 15 2013
Oct 15

Drupal Public Sector Exchange

Drupal Public Sector Exchange

Though DPSX has been a tad bit quite since July we did kick up a mini-storm in Prague at DrupalCon last month! The BoF was a hit with relevant attendees from Belgium, Britain, Finland, France, Netherlands and Slovakia represented on the table. in majority the attendees other than Steve Purkiss and myself were from the public sector which was a result!

DrupalCon Prague BoF Drupal Public Sector Exchange

DrupalCon Prague BoF Drupal Public Sector Exchange

The discussions centred around:

  • The political challenges of having a single platform in government
  • options of multisite Vs Domain access and of course creating distributions
  • Managing diversity in government
  • Selling by building business cases
  • When Open becomes closed and proprietary

The audio from the BoF can be downloaded from here.

Looking ahead we are planning on one more DPSX meet up in Blighty prior to Christmas, so if you are interested please drop us a line or comment on D.O.

Oct 03 2013
Oct 03

DrupalCon_Prague_Logo_2013

DrupalCon_Prague_Logo_2013

Coming up to a week  since DrupalCon Prague, caught up with my girls, emails, calls, follow ups and all else… time to reflect.

I stand by my verdict of the 26th of Sept: @drupalcon #Prague No #Munich but No #Croydon either but an informative fun week. That is to some annoyance of a few fellow community members and possibly some folks at DA… folks there was and is no offence intended, someone has to lay it out as it is and I did share the feedback in person with DA and not just tweeted it on my way to the airport HA!

The host city was awesome, the venue was well their congress centre (the best they had to offer I suppose) but the connectivity there sucked! the food though not that important could have been much better, the sessions that I have been catching up on line were good though more diversity is key for the future… representation across the continents please! BoFs were super useful no doubt and some of the SWAG was nice, some just awesome – Acquia and Deeson win the SWAG award!

DrupalCon_Prague_201325 11.51.49

DrupalCon_Prague_201325 11.51.49

Having said all of that the most awesome thing about DrupalCon Prague was the connectedness! on that note Prague won hands down! out did Munich too!

I am going to be at DrupalCon Austin which will be my first DrupalCon across the pond and knowing how conferences go over the Atlantic am sure it will be mind blowing and if not you will hear about it in person. As for DrupalCon Amsterdam… it can be nothing short of epic! but then most peeps who have been to the Netherlands would say that!

It was great seeing old friends and making new ones and looking forward to the next Cons and upcoming Camps across the third rock.

Sep 30 2013
Sep 30
We were at DrupalCon Prague 2013.

Last week (23.-27.09.) Cocomore attended the European DrupalCon in Prague with three colleagues penyaskito (Christian López Espínola), jsbalsera (Jesús Sánchez Balsera) and kfritsche (Karl Fritsche). We also attended the extended sprints before and after the Con to contribute to Drupal 8 Core.

Like on all the other Cons there were a lot of interesting sessions, BoFs and discussions with other Drupalists. If you couldn't make it to the DrupalCon you can watch most of the session records at the YouTube channel from the Drupal Association.

group picture by @schnitzel

Extended Sprints

The extended sprints were at the Hub Praha the weekend before and after the Con, which was located some tram stops away from the conference center. Everybody had enough space here to help working on Drupal 8 core. The hub had three conference rooms for the "Hard Problems" discussions. We used our experience with Drupal to help the Drupal 8 Multilingual Initiatives (D8MI) to make Drupal 8 the best multilingual CMS! Also all the other core initiatives and core committers attended these sprints, so patches could be committed fast. It is always a pleasure and a good experience to work with all the people from the community.

Sprinting in the Hub Praha - Karl, Jesús, Christian

Sessions

The Con was located in the conference center in Prague next to the Vyšehrad. From here you had a good view over Prague, while contributing to Drupal 8 in the Coder Lounge. So at least everybody had something from the beautiful town of Prague.

Coder Lounge.jpg

It was hard to pick a sessions with nine parallel tracks (115 all in all). You can read the complete program including links to the recorded videos at the DrupalCon Prague website. I strongly recommend the keynotes from Dries about "State of Drupal" and Aral Balkan about "Experience Driven OpenSource". In advance I recommend the following sessions:

  • From Not-Invented-Here to Proudly-Found-Elsewhere: A Drupal 8 Story from Alex Pott (D8 Core Committer) about the possibilities and advantages from moving to already existing frameworks.
  • Standardization, the Symfony way from Fabien Potencier (Project-Lead Symfony) about the philosophy and concepts of Symfony.
  • Translation Management from Michael Schmid and Christophe Galli (Maintainer TMGMT) about the Translation Management Module. It was amazing to see what they did in the last two years and that they are already working on a Drupal 8 version. A must see if you have to translate a lot of nodes.
  • There were more good sessions but I tried to keep this short.

Outside the sessions

In the Coder Lounge next to the session rooms you had the time to contribute and test on Drupal 8. There were always a lot of people there so you could get help quickly. I think some of them have never seen a single session. Also the hard problems discussions were continued there.

by Gábor Hojtsy - "Busy in field translation/language discussion to make field DX better than D7. Fields/entity and multilingual! #d8mi"

In the day you had the sessions and at the night we went to the 24th floor of the Corinthia Hotel to continue sprinting with others all night, which led to a high shortfall of sleep but was really funny. For the dinner there was a nice social event "Cheap Frosty Beverages & A Killer View" in a beer garden in Prague, for all who found it. On Thursday the last day of the all the sessions the Drupal Trivia took place in the Hilton Hotel. It was a big fun and the team "Create Table" (Nathan Haug, Jen Lampton, Florian Weber, Vijaya Chandran Mani, Tobias Stöckler, Karl Fritsche) won in a three team tie against "Breaking Head" with Gabor Hojtsy and Cathy Theys and Acon Armada.

For everybody who wanted to contribute on Core but never did, there was an introduction to all community tools on Friday and 50 volunteer mentors (amongst others Karl Fritsche) to help everybody to get more contributors. This is a good example to see how helpful and welcoming the Drupal community is. A big thanks to Cathy Theys (YesCT) to organize this event in Prague.

Another good example how amazing the Drupal community is happened this week too. In under 24 hours yched's project on DrupalFund.us reached its goal. Now he can contribute to Fields API more powerful. Congratulations!

Next Drupal Events

It was a nice DrupalCon. Thanks to all organizers, sponsors and volunteers who made this happen. I'm excited about the next events, even if I now have to make up a lot of sleep.

next_0.jpg
Jul 31 2013
Jul 31

On Saturday 20th, Jesús and I visited Santander for attending the Drupal Day. The Drupal Day is an itinerant event organized by the Spanish Drupal Association with a local Drupal community.

Around 80 drupalistas were there, and we had very interesting session, mostly centered around the new things that are coming with Drupal 8. Is a great thing that more and more people in the Spanish community is getting involved in core contributions and attending international events, and IMHO this is making Spanish events more interesting every time.

Drupal Day Spain Santander Group Photo

For trying to attract more contributors, we celebrated a short sprint the evening before, and some new people were introduced about core development workflows, but could have been better if we could have spent more than just two or three hours. We should iterate on improving that for next events, but was nice anyway.

Sessions were recorded, so videos of every session should be available soon in the Spanish Association video channel on Vimeo.

Drupal Day Santander Logo

We want to thank to the local community in Santander, they did a gorgeous job organizing the event and innovating with Drujitos (a blue version of mojito) for the party. And of course, thanks Cocomore for sponsoring our assistance there!

May 12 2013
May 12

Drupal Public Sector Exchange

Drupal Public Sector Exchange

Our second event adopted an alternative format not by design but its usefulness has us thinking it may well be the way to go!
Speaker at the seond DPSX event:
Mark Smitham  – Cabinet Office (G-Cloud) A huge thank you… Mark, we appreciate? the knowledge shared; old hats, newbies and the curious, we all took away a lot from the discussions.
And the key points shared and discussed:
+ G-Cloud is about engaging the SME sector – it is access to the eco-system #GCloudJoinin
+ has delivered the equivalent of £180m+ in savings; introducing innovative SME enterprises into the eco-systemDrupal_Public_Sector_Exchange_meetup_2_May_2013_1

Drupal_Public_Sector_Exchange_meetup_2_May_2013_1


+ G-Cloud is about greater transparency: there are 29,000 Govt. customers on G-Cloud – the access to opportunities for the SME sector is unparalleled  Drupal_Public_Sector_Exchange_meetup_2_May_2013_2

Drupal_Public_Sector_Exchange_meetup_2_May_2013_2


+ The new G-Cloud Store interface by the way is a sight of relief! job well done. Note: G-cloud is a non transactional store but a marketplace for Govt. customers to have access to selected SME suppliers that they can engage with
+ on the CloudStore good old SEO is handy for searchability and visibility
+ There are challenges to getting the critical mass from the Govt. customers… SMEs could assist and inform their clients and prospects of the G-Cloud route to product/service acquisition.
+ a short guide to understanding Impact levels and Pan-Govt accreditation

some useful links:
G-Cloud
CloudStore
if you are a buyer
if you are a supplier

if you are not on the G-Cloud as a supplier  and as a Customer/buyer
LocalGov Digital ?

The next meet-up for Drupal Public Sector Exchange will be held next month and stay tuned on our Twitter account DPSX ?@DPSXchange

DPSX: @Alanpeart @Calert @Greenman @Kubair @MarcDe_ath @shaunwilde
#Drupal #PublicSector #Innovation #G_Cloud_UK #LocalGovDigital

Apr 18 2013
Apr 18

It's the year 2013 and here at Cocomore we are looking forward to the future of Drupal and the release of Drupal 8.

With the release of Drupal 8 the official support for Drupal 6 ends. At the latest from this event the use of Drupal 7 should be planned. There is still some time left, but a migration does not happen during overnight. And no one wants to run a system that is not supported any more and where no security updates are available. Even http://drupal.org will soon be migrated

On February 13th 2008 Drupal 6 was published. One year later in August 2009 Cocomore started to publish its own Drupal Core because there were several problems with the official Drupal 6 core. In all these years we started to love Drupal 6 - we had 5 really good years together.

Since Drupal 7 was published we started to use it for our new projects. Recently we neglected our Drupal 6 core because we do not have many Drupal 6 sites left. So we think now it's time to say "Bye, Bye Drupal 6". We had a good time with you, but now it's time to move forward. Drupal 8 is coming. We will stop supporting Drupal 6 and we will not publish any new updates for our Drupal 6 core.

Everybody who does not want to resign the Drupal 6 core we recommend to have a look at the repository of Markus Kalkbrenner (Bio.logis) - https://github.com/mkalkbrenner/6. This Drupal 6 Core is based on the Cocomore core and contains the same modifications. So, a change without problems is possible.

We want to thank everybody who helped to work at the Drupal 6 core and even on the huge amount of modules. You have done a very great job. Thank you all!

Apr 08 2013
Apr 08
xml3d rubick

The XML3D Module provides a simple and easy way to integrate the XML3D models and applications into Drupal. The current 7.x-1.x version allows to simply enter the XML3D code into a Long Text field that has the XML3D Input Field formatter. The content will then be displayed on the page in the form of an iframe having the same size as the XML3D application.

We added this module to the blog and added a field with a XML3D example, see it at the end of this Article in action.

Requirements

The module has the following requirements:

  • Drupal 7
  • the field, field_ui, libraries modules
  • a browser with Web GL support (currently, Firefox and Chrome)
    • if you have a Intel GPU Chip and are using Chromium/Chrome on a Linux based OS, try to enable "Override software rendering list Mac, Windows, Linux, Chrome OS" under chrome://flags
  • the js library files (xml3d.js and camera.js) must be located in the corresponding folder in the libraries directory (the current version of the module uses XML3D version 4.3):
    xml3d library files structure

Adding the Field Type

After having installed and enabled the XML3D module, you must create a field of the Long Text type by going to Structure -> Content types -> Manage Fields:

xml3d add field

Then you must assign the XML3D Input Field formatter to the field by going to Structure -> Content types -> Display Fields and select it from the Format drop-down list.':

xml3d manage display

In order to add/modify your XML3D content you just need to go to your content type that contains a field with the XML3D formatter and paste the content into the field (you can grab the code from one of the examples available: http://xml3d.github.com/xml3d-examples/):

xml3d add content

The content is supposed to have one tag containing the rest of the content.

After performing all the step correctly, you should be able to see your XML3D content visualized:

xml3d rubick

As mentioned above, the XML3D element will be presented as an iframe that will have the size of the content inside (the width and height parameters of the element will be used for this). By default, the iframe has neither borders nor scrolling. That can easily be changed via the CSS file in the module ([modules folder]/xml3d/css/xml3d.css). The iframe has a class named "xml3d_frame" that you can use for styling it.

Global Integration into Drupal

While working on the module we met some obstacles. The major obstacle was the requirement to use the MIME-type application/xhtml+xml for the pages that have XML3D content. Moreover, the page must start with:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<html xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml">

The problem is that a standard page in Drupal is not of application/xhtml+xml type and it has the following header (doctype) element:

<!DOCTYPE html PUBLIC "-//W3C//DTD XHTML+RDFa 1.0//EN"
  "http://www.w3.org/MarkUp/DTD/xhtml-rdfa-1.dtd">
<html xmlns="http://www.w3.org/1999/xhtml" xml:lang="<?php print $language->language; ?>" version="XHTML+RDFa 1.0" dir="<?php print $language->dir; ?>"<?php print $rdf_namespaces; ?>>

The header is hard coded in the html template file (modules/system/html.tpl.php) and is not/or hardly editable from within a module (it could be overridden by a theme, though). Thus, the first attempt to set the MIME type with php and change the header in the template file manually failed (it worked in Chrome only).

The second attempt to build in an iframe and put the content using JavaScript on the fly failed as well. It worked neither in Chrome nor in Firefox. Different techniques have been used here: starting from contentDocument.open('') (or contentWindow.document) with different MIME types including 'application/xhtml+xml' and finishing with '...src="http://drupal.cocomore.com/blog/xml3d-and-drupal/data:application/xhtml+xml...."'.

At the end, an iframe referring to a separate page (generating the content for a certain field) was decided to be used. The page must receive four arguments: entity type, entity id, field name and delta. For example: http://example.com/xml3d/iframe/node/18/field_testxml3d/0

To Do

The current version of the module is aimed to present a simple integration of the XML3D technology into Drupal. Thus, the content to be inserted is not supposed to be very long.

As an alternative option to the currently implemented variant could be uploading a file (or files) with the content to be inserted or selecting from a predefined list of content residing on the same or a third-party server. It would make the integration process of large pieces of code easier for the end user.

Example:

Mar 31 2013
Mar 31

Am back in Islamabad after two very long and tiring days to Lahore and a full on Camp!  details to follow, this is abridged version for the experience!

Drupal Cam Pakistan in Lahore was a strange affair, all in all a great experience, met all my objectives of promoting Drupal and the power of OS in creating jobs, opportunities and prosperity… introduced Drupal to a small army of students,  but could not quite understand the industry representatives in Lahore! of the 60 odd registered from Industry only 20 odd showed up… total count on the day was about 70+ of which the majority were students – which was great but would have been better for the industry to turn up to network and guide the local student population!

Stranger still was discovering that a perfectly normal Drupaler I know in the community in Pakistan turned out to be a bigoted, racist ignoramus! not so nice known ya fella’

We linked up with the Drupal Community in Bangalore and this guy went off on a nationalistic ignorant rant with them on Skype! of course I used my 6’3 110kg mass to push him aside and apologised for giving the podium to a bigot!

Any hoo… the Camp was great, we trained 41 newbies in Hello Drupal and expect the vast majority to keep at it… we linked up with the Faculty lead on relations with industry and convinced Bilal Arshad from UCP to introduce Drupal in their end of year projects for students.

The next camping trip for Drupal Camp Pakistan is in August to Karachi and then I am off Camping in Dubai to build links with the community in the GCC region…

As for right now… am off to host the inaugural 9others meal in Islamabad… more on that later.

Mar 31 2013
Mar 31

Drupal CampKick off for Drupal Camp Pakistan in Lahore was a strange affair! unfamiliarity with the local culture of the metropolis meant we went through a steep learning curve in the morning!

Registration opened at 0900 and by 1000 only half a dozen people had turned up! We were told by the University reps none of the students would be turning up till 1130 – there were classes going on but did not expect industry to be sleeping in!

The few locals who did turn up on time, near on time were quite relaxed… ‘this is a Saturday in Lahore’ we were told, relax.. ‘you said 0930 reg closes right, so they’ll be running an hour late for sure’. All but one took kindly to the norm of his city folk, we ended up getting blame for not organising things properly! I guess the expectation was that we ought to either kick off on time with 8 people in a room that accommodates 100 or to go around waking people up, dressing them, feeding them and bringing them to the camp! WTF!

UNhappy DrupalerOur sincere apologies to Ali Ahmed for deciding to wait for the masses before we kicked the camp off. As forecasted by the locals the Lahoris started trickling in past 1000 and we kicked off at 1015 with a call to Jacob Singh across the border in Bangalore. Jacob had arranged for us to connect with a Bangalore Drupal meetup over Skype (Thank you) and that got me super excited… the prospect of connecting the two neighbouring communities is on every doves mind! this was going to be awesome… well it was until we introduced a local Trainer to the group in Bangalore! and in the interest of politeness I will not name this individual but he really f**ked it up!  This bafoon went off on an idiotic nationalistic rant as far removed from the spirit of community as pluto is from the third rock! it took him 15 seconds to sabotage what was going to be a historic moment for the two communities! It took me a moment to step in and push the fool aside and try and recover from it, 40 local Drupalers and me were in a total state of shock! The look on everyones faces called for a public lynching! I and the 40 odd Pakistani Drupalers in the room have to hand it to the guys in Bangalore for their maturity for brushing aside the idiots comments, thank you Anil and the Bangalore meet up group! I guess every community has an idiot amongst them.

Having been taken off guard, felt like I’d been thrown out of a plane without a parachute, I cut the call with the Bangalore Drupalers short and it was time to set some freaking ground rules!
I took the fool to task as did all the locals. I did not travel 6000+ KM from London to Lahore via Dubai and Islamabad, running on less the 8 hours of sleep over the last 72 hours…. for this! What was heartening was the audience in mass was was calling for blood! LOL letting him know publicly that he is a racist, the fool tried to recover with stupid logic that only a fool can conjure up! The positive from the drama was a racist fool was unveiled and now the local community knows who to avoid like the plague.

Enough of the fool,  rest of the session was spent on a very constructive discussion on borderless communities, OS playing its part to transcend differences of all sorts… and why complete strangers were taking time off from London, Gent, Brighton, Bangalore to Helsinki on a Saturday to share their experiences, and how grateful the locals were for it. It was time to move on…. it was pleasant to hear in a room of 50 odd people by now no one else shared the bigot’s views.

If you are reading this post you know who you are, climb out of your cave of ignorance fella’

Drupal Camp

Fouad Bajwa – innovation is driven from within

Our next speaker was a local open source advocate, Fouad Bajwa who adapted his discussion well to pick up where I left off.. on individual mind-set and culture being the biggest barriers to innovation and growth.

I would have gone into a live commentary of every session as I did from the Islamabad camp but we were not provided wifi access,  bandwidth had been dedicated for the Skype calls… the submarine cable issue under the Suez Canal had not been sorted out, connectivity though fair still wasn’t it’s awesome self and it was more important for our speakers to have all the bandwidth dedicated to the calls…  reporting back to the community could wait till I was back in Islamabad!

Jennifer Tehan's session on backend usability was the most popular session amongst the advanced track

Jennifer Tehan’s session on backend usability was the most popular session amongst the advanced track

Given a late start we had to shuffle things around, by lunch time we had 70 folks in attendance as opposed to the 118 registered for it! and in majority it was the industry that failed to show up! as classes finished more and more students came around to the camp, few already dabbling with Drupal, most plain curious.

Drupal Camp Kubair Shirazee

Me being my Evangelical self

Post lunch we broke off to separate tracks, I went on evangelising and fielding some tough questions on why Drupal from a very informed bunch of CS students near graduation, the advanced tracks did not see the numbers for the industry failed to turn up! the training sessions were well attended and about 40 odd students went through the Hello Drupal sessions.

Amar Mahboob from Kubaku Tech - Flown in from Karachi to attend

Amar Mahboob from Kubaku Tech – Flown in from Karachi to attend and speak at the Camp

All in all Drupal Camp Pakistan in Lahore was a mixed bag… as far as our objectives went, we ticked the introduce Drupal to students box, we ticked the train upwards of 30 students box (we trained 41 to be precise), we ticked the get academia involved box but failed to get the industry to turn up in mass and network with potential future Drupalers!

The most interesting conversations I had was with a number of Professors and associate professors who turned up to feed their own

Deen of IT dpeaking to the mostly student audience - make the most of what the industry shares with you

Deen of IT (Dr Abdul Aziz) speaking to the mostly student audience – make the most of what the industry shares with you

curiosity, of them one needs a special mention Bilal Arshad, who is spearheading the university’s links with industry and has invited us back to the university to evangelise about Drupal and other emerging technologies on a regular basis. This part of the rock certainly needs more folks like Bilal to align the academic curriculum to the practical needs of the industry as well as global demand for talent and skills.

Our closing was spectacular, the Deen for IT from the university turned up impromptu to talk to what was in majority his students and big up our efforts for bringing the camp to his school and insisted that students drink deep from the Drupal spring and maintain contact with those they met from Industry on the day.

Lastly acknowledgements!

Thank you Fida, Atiq, Khurram, Umair and Ahmed from team ikonami for their hard work in organising the camp, its site and everything else before, on the day and after! excellent show cranes – mighty proud of the team. Thank you to our project managers for allowing the team to take time off to organise  the Camp.

Thank you Jennifer, Stefan, Aaron, Dominique, Jacob, Ronald, Fouad, Amar, Anil Sagar (and the Drupalers in Bangalore), Shakeel and Atta for taking time out on a Saturday to share your knowledge and experiences with the community in Lahore! we all appreciate it immensely! it was a shame Mr Purkiss had to cancel bu Steve had a good reason for it.

Thank you Acquia, AberdeenCloud, Kubaku and ikonami for supporting the Camp with their sponsorships.

And lastly, thank you Dr. Muhammad Iqbal, Bilal Arshad, Armaghan and the IT department at University of Central Punjab for hosting the camp and their assistance on the day!

Mar 29 2013
Mar 29

An evangelist’s log: Star date – 28th March

Drupal Camp

0730 –  landed in Islamabad, 30 minutes in the immigration queue, walked to the carousel and my luggage is right there! out by 0815 – has to be a new record flying coach! Straight to the Crane’s nest, up since 0700 the day before, Bialetti on the stove, quadruple espresso and the world starts making sense again!

0930 am informed by one of our crane also a trainer for DrupalCamp that there has been a slight oversight on his part for the 30th March camp… it also happens to be the day his sister-in-law is getting married! in all the excitement of the Camp it slipped his mind that his attendance at the wedding is not optional! a key crane has to be excused, but an ex-crane steps in to save the session!

0940ish Asif our network ninja informs me that the net speed in Pakistan is not running at its best because of a damaged submarine cable! but the powers that be are working around the clock (somewhere under the Suez canal) on fixing it asap! I get online, start streaming off Vimeo and yes the speed sucks!

1000ish Fida our organiser supremo informs me that Campus at University of Central Punjab has a fantastic mega fat pipe line… the submarine cable damages comes to mind!

1200ish Atta sends me an article from the Guardian – Cyberbunker is kicking Spamhaus’s behind and the end users are paying for it with reduced speed! the Rock’s largest DNS attack is in play! and the net speed in Blighty is suffering! a three word expression come to mind!

But it would be no other way, the camp is going to Lahore home to the not so famous Lollywood, where the action movies would send Action Jackson cowering; featuring horses and Drupal Campriders who can cover great distances in a flash… from Times Square NYC to Lahore Central in less time than it takes for a villain to pull off the distressed damsels veil, XXXL heroines doing Shakira numbers and heroes who would scare the pants of Jet Lee, guns that never need reloading, heroes who can spill more Red than the Red sea and still manage dialogues and live to fight another few dozen baddies in the next 30 seconds, actors with phenomenal stamina to shout out dialogues over 2+ hours!… and directors who evidently compete on how absurd a movie they can make!

There has to be drama involved! this is LAHORE not Sparta!

#Drupal #DrupalCamp #EmergingTechnologies

Mar 03 2013
Mar 03
Modules of the month story banner illustration.

Well, February is always a short month, but this year it seemed like it passed in just a couple of weeks… and now it’s already March and I’m only finally getting around to putting the final touches on this posting for the January “Modules of the Month”. How did that happen? Well, I won’t try to bore you or make excuses. It’s just been one of those months. I’m going to try to keep up my current momentum and evaluate and write up my favorites from February now… hopefully finishing that in the next week or so. If it’s not done by the 15th, it won’t be done till April since I’ll be taking off for my first trip to India in the middle of this month.

But I’m not here to write about myself. This is about some modules which I found might be worthy of notice… specifically those released in January 2013. It’s interesting to see the evolution of a Drupal version and what kinds of modules are being released these days. Almost no modules are being released for Drupal 6 and Drupal 8’s developer API is still far enough from maturity that there are very few modules being released for it, so almost all the focus is on Drupal 7. Almost anything really critical has already been done, so most modules now fit into areas of workflow improvement, integration of third-party libraries, developer tools, and addressing the needs of an increasingly mobile audience (responsive design). There are a lot of new modules for image display, for keeping a closer eye on site administration issues, creating better e-shops, deploying content from one site to another, and managing caching, among other trends. It’s clear that Drupal 7 is a mature product serving the needs of an extremely diverse community and it’s exciting to see all the new ways that, each month, developers encounter new needs and find inventive ways to further extend on the feature-set. So read on to see what new and fun stuff we got in January… (and I promise to try to get February’s review done in the next week or so).

*/ Access denied backtrace

The Access denied backtrace module helps track down the point where access rights are denied.How many times have you had to try to sort out access issues on a Drupal site? Sometimes this can be a pain, but the module, by Eduardo Garcia of Anexus IT, promises to help put an end to this senseless suffering; it helps track down the exact point at which a particular role is denied access for a particular node or path. Perhaps the screenshot here is a bit contrived; the only reason the basic "authenticated user" cannot create a new node of type "Article" is that they don’t have the appropriate permission checked. In a more complex site with lots of custom content and custom user-access code, this could be very useful. (My primary work is on a team where the access model for all content types and users would require a full article to explain.)

Status: There is a stable release available for Drupal 7.

Advanced help dialog

The module, by Dan Polant of Commerce Guys, allows developers to extend the popular Advanced Help module. By implementing the provided hook, you can add a link to the "Help" region of specific paths; the link opens a modal box with the relevant "advanced help" content. Nice.

Status: There is a development release available for Drupal 7.

Anonymous Redirect

The module, from Michael Strelan of Glo Digital, redirects anonymous users to another domain, but visitors can still reach /user or /user/login to authenticate. After logging in, users have normal access. This can easily be configured to limit access to a staging server and redirect users to your production site, the most typical use case for the module.

Status: There is a development release available for Drupal 7.

Boost Custom Expire Rules

The module, authored by Zyxware Technologies, allows setting different expiry times for content cached with Boost. Complex rules can be configured to fine-tune how long various content on your site is cached. Older nodes can have a longer cache lifetime, for instance. Rules can be configured for the URL path, node type, age, etc. This definitely looks like a must-have for sites which use Boost, especially if they actively add new content on a regular basis and retain older content.

Status: There are stable releases available for both Drupal 6 and Drupal 7.

Block Up Down

The Block Up/Down module allows you to easily disable or move blocks within a region without going into block administration.The module, coded by Pol Dell'Aiera of Trasys, is dead simple. Just activate it and you get three new contextual links on blocks so you don’t need to go into the block administration page just to disable a block or move it up or down within a region. I think this is great, since probably most of the time I go into the block administration page, which can take a while to load on a complex site with a lot of blocks and regions, moving one block up or down (or disabling a block) is all I really want to do, so allowing administrators to manage this from within the front-end is a really sweet feature.

Status: There is a stable release available for Drupal 7.

CKEditor Link File

The CKEditor Link File module, created by Devin Carlson, integrates (and requires) the CKEditor Link and File entity modules so that editors on your site can easily add links to existing files on your site. This definitely looks useful for sites which use CKEditor.

Status: There is a stable release available for Drupal 7.

Combined Termref

The module, written by Girish Nair, allows you to address up to three different vocabularies with one term-reference field; obviously only one vocabulary in the group can take “free tagging”. If new terms are added, they go into the first of the vocabularies selected for the Combined Termref field. There can be good reasons that you need different vocabularies, but the purpose can stay behind the scenes; content creation can be simpler by allowing entry with a single field. I think this looks cool.

Status: There is a beta release available for Drupal 7.

Commerce Cart Message

The Drupal Commerce Cart Message module displays a message in the cart.The module, authored by Aidan Lister, provides an option to add rules for displaying messages on your Drupal Commerce cart. This definitely looks useful.

Status: There is a stable release available for Drupal 7.

Views Contextual Range Filter

The module, written by Rik de Boer of flink, provides a Views plugin that allows you to filter views based on a range of values for any field where this might make sense. For instance, you might want to filter by price range, age range, etc. This kind of search is a pretty common use case, so I suspect this will become quite popular.

Status: There is a stable release available for Drupal 7.

Creative commons field

The module, by Ben Scott, defines a field type for attaching Creative Commons licence types, so you can add CC licences to files or any entity type. There are other modules which can add a CC license, but they only work with nodes; files are likely a most common use case. Cool!

Status: There is a stable release available for Drupal 7.

Entity Extras

Categories: Utility

The module, coded by Dave Hall, provides extra utility functions to extend the Entity API module. The idea is to share useful functions here and improve on them before proposing them for inclusion in Entity API or Drupal core. If you aren’t a developer, you’ll probably only enable this if another module requires it, but if you write your own modules which use the Entity API, this is probably worth taking a look at.

Status: There is an alpha release available for Drupal 7.

Facebook Album Fetcher

The module, written by Kaushal Kishore of OSSCube, allows you to import your Facebook albums and photo galleries. You can also import the images from your friends’ accounts, too, but be sure you ask your friends if it’s okay. Personally, I only allow friends to view my Facebook account, so people like me might be annoyed if the images they shared on Facebook were pulled into a public-facing album without their consent. That said, companies with a Facebook presence might like to pull the images from their Facebook galleries into a gallery on their main website, and I’m sure there are many other good use cases for this module.

Status: There is a stable release available for Drupal 7.

Field Collection Deploy

The module, created by Robert Castelo of Code Positive, provides a way to deploy content from the Field Collection fields from one site to another. It extends (and requires) Features, Field Collection (of course), UUID, Node Export, and Entity API. Getting this to work is clearly non-trivial, but if you need this functionality, you’ll be happy to find this module.

Status: There is a beta release available for Drupal 7.

File Entity Preview

Categories: Media

The module, contributed by Graham Bates of Catch Digital, provides a widget for file fields with previews of uploaded files, as configured with File Entity. It otherwise works like the “core” File widget.

Status: There is a stable release available for Drupal 7.

Graphviz

The module, written by Clemens Tolboom, renders a Graphviz text file for further processing; it hooks into Graph API to provide Views integration and can output an image file using the Graphviz Filter.

Status: There is a development release available for Drupal 7.

Graph Phyz

Graph Phyz helps display a nice relationships graph. is another graph-related module contributed by Clemens Tolboom. It renders an interactive graph using Graph API. Pretty cool, if your site calls for this, and I can think of at least one project where this might have saved some custom coding.

Status: There is a development release available for Drupal 7.

Hide PHP Fatal Error

The module, by B-Prod of MaPS System, redirects users to a configurable error page whenever a fatal error is thrown in PHP. Of course the error is also logged into the watchdog so you can work on eliminating the error for the next user. Nice.

Status: There is a stable release available for Drupal 7.

Hierarchical taxonomy

The module, by Marcus Deglos of Techito, is a developer module (you won’t need this, as a non-coder unless another module requires it) which provides a simple hierarchical_taxonomy_get_tree() function which renders an array of a vocabulary’s hierarchical structure. This should probably be in “core”.

Status: There is a development release available for Drupal 7.

Image Zoomer

The Image Zoomer module integrates various Javascript libraries for getting a closer look at an photo.The module, contributed by Tuan, integrates two image zoom-related JQuery plugins; Power Zoomer and Featured Zoomer and the developer of this module is adding support for other modules which provide image zooming. This could be cool for online “catalog” images or for commercial photography sites who want to provide a closer look at an image without making it too simple for users to download a higher-resolution version.

Status: There is a stable release available for Drupal 7.

Image Focus Crop

The module, contributed by Nguyễn Hải Nam of Open Web Solutions, helps find the focal center of an image you are scaling and cropping and includes advanced facial recognition algorithms. This looks interesting.

Status: There is a stable release available for Drupal 7.

Image formatter link to image style

image_formatter_link_to_image_style.pngThe module, developed by Manuel García, provides an additional formatter for the core image field so that you can create, for instance, a “thumbnail” which links to a larger, watermarked version of the image. This seems like a common enough need that this kind of functionality should probably be added to core. Until then, there’s this.

Status: There is a stable release available for Drupal 7.

jQuery UI Slider Field

The Jquery Ui Slider Field module provides a simple way “slide” between a range of integer values.The module, developed by Sina Salek integrates the jQuery UI Slider plugin so you can easily allow users of your site to utilize a graphical slider to quickly enter an integer value in a field. This looks handy, especially for users accessing your site without a normal keyboard.

Status: There is an alpha release available for Drupal 7.

Juicebox HTML5 Responsive Image Galleries

The Juicebox integration module for Drupal helps you display a beautiful responsive image gallery.The module, written by Ryan Jacobs integrates the beautiful Juicebox HTML5 responsive gallery library into your Drupal site. There’s a lot to this module; probably enough to have a whole article dedicated to ways you can use it, but it definitely looks nice if you want to provide image galleries that render well on a wide range of devices. Like many other such modules that integrate third-party code, it requires Libraries and adding the Juicebox code to your sites/all/libraries directory. We should note that there are both Lite (free) and Pro (commercial) versions of Juicebox (you’ll need to decide which is more appropriate for your use case) and the maintainers of this module are not affiliated with the developers of Juicebox, itself. This module will work to integrate either version of Juicebox.

Status: There is a beta release available for Drupal 7.

Lazy Entity

The module, written by James I. Armes of AllPlayers.com, allows field values for Drupal entities to be lazy-loaded rather than loaded at the time the entity loads, so can provide a boost to performance and memory usage. This module is for developers, so will not be useful to you unless you are a coder who needs to lazy-load fields. Otherwise you would only enable this module if another module requires it.

Status: There is a development release available for Drupal 7.

Linked Data Tools

The module, by Chris Skene of PreviousNext, is a developer module to help retrieve, cache, and work with linked data sources. It depends on EasyRDF and X Autoload and Guzzle is also recommended.

Status: There is an alpha release available for Drupal 7.

Library attach

The module, written by Dave Reid of Palantir.net, adds a Library reference field type so that libraries can be attached to individual entities when rendered, thus saving your site from loading lots of unnecessary Javascript for every page. It also adds an option to the Views UI so allows adding libraries for specific Views displays. This is a great idea!

Status: There is an RC release available for Drupal 7.

Lorempixel

The module, written by Fredric Bergström of Wunderkraut, provides “dummy images” which it fetches from the very slick lorempixel.com web service. Oh, and the module can also be used to get the placeholder images added to content by Devel generate.

Status: There is a development release available for Drupal 7.

MD WordCloud

The MD Wordcloud displays a cloud of all terms in a vocabulary, sized according to frequency of their use.The module, written by Neo Khuat, creates a block with a “cloud” of terms from a taxonomy. You’ll need to download and add some Javascript files to the module’s “js” folder. So you don’t need to save and replace the Javascript files, it might be better to symlink them to a directory in sites/all/libraries.

Status: There is a stable release available for Drupal 7.

Multisite wizard

The module, written by Alex Posidelov, helps simplify the process of converting a single site Drupal installation to multisite. A lot of the work is done for you with just one click of a button and it helps lead the administrator through the rest of the requirements. It depends on the Backup and Migrate module.

Status: There is a stable release available for Drupal 7.

Notify 404

, by teknic of Appnovation Technologies, provides a means to send notification emails to a site administrator when a configurable volume or frequency of 404 (page not found) errors have occurred.

Status: There is a stable release available for Drupal 7.

Photobox

The Photobox module integrates the jQuery-powered Photo-box gallery as a display format for images.The module, developed by Andrew Berezovsky of Axel Springer Russia, adds an Image field formatter for viewing images in a Photobox image gallery. You’ll need to use the jQuery Update module since Photobox requires jQuery 1.8. This does look nice.

Status: There is a development release available for Drupal 7.

RecommenderGhost

The Recommenderghost module integrates the free external recommender service to help show users other content of interest on your site.The module, coded by hhhc, integrates the free recommender services hosted by RecommenderGhost. It makes it easy to display recommendations for “other visitors bought…”, etc. This is much simpler than installing and integrating a separate server.

Status: There is a stable release available for Drupal 7.

Reference helper

Categories: Fields

The module, created by Kevin Miller of Cal State Monterey Bay, is a helper module for displaying recent or most relevant entities under an entity reference field and was a winner of the Module Off challenge. It definitely sounds useful.

Status: There is a development release available for Drupal 7.

Regcheck

The module, produced by Tobias Haugen of Wunderkraut, adds a hidden checkbox to your site’s registration form; if checked, the registration process is aborted. “Robot” users tend to check the box, so it can be a simple way to eliminate at least some of the unwanted registrations used for spamming your site or other nefarious purposes. There are other modules which help with protecting forms like this, but a wide variety of spam prevention methods are useful for keeping a step ahead of the bot coders.

Status: There are stable releases available for both Drupal 6 and Drupal 7.

Simple hierarchical select

The module, written by Stefan Borchert of undpaul, defines a new form widget for hierarchical taxonomy fields so you can simply navigate the structure of the taxonomy and select a term.

Status: There is a stable release available for Drupal 7.

Site Disclaimer

The module, by Ilya I, can add “Terms of Use”, “Privacy policy” or other agreements to the registration form. Visitors who want to register on your site need to agree to the terms of the “disclaimer” in order to register.

Status: There is a stable stable release available for Drupal 7.

Tablesorter

The Tablesorter module integrates a jQuery plugin to allow standard tables to be sorted by any column.The module, coded by Shoaib Rehman Mirza of Xululabs, integrates the tablesorter jQuery plugin so that any standard HTML table with THEAD and TBODY tags can be turned into a sortable table without even requiring a page refresh. Of course it’s not helpful if the data is paginated, but for normal tables with all the data on one page, this could be useful. Of course you need to download the Javascript libraries and install them in your sites/all/libraries directory, and of course that means this depends on Libraries API.

Status: There is a stable release available for Drupal 7.

Taxonomy Protect

The Taxonomy Protect helps prevent users with some administration rights from deleting vocabularies.The module, contributed by Jay Beaton allows administrators to select certain taxonomy vocabularies and prevent them from being deleted. That way, even if some users who need to be able to administer taxonomies don’t fully understand the system, they won’t make the mistake of deleting a critical vocabulary.

Status: There is a stable release available for Drupal 7.

Topbar Messages

The module, created by Mark Koester of Int3c.com: International Cross-Cultural Consulting, allows you to add a message in the top of your Drupal pages. The message can be dismissed with a click on a “close” link and can include links and other formatting. There are other such modules, but this one might be the best fit for your use case. It does look useful.

Status: There is a development release available for Drupal 7.

Views Ajax Fade

The module, authored by Thomas Lattimore of Classic Graphics, is a Views plugin which allows you to add a fade in/out effect for Ajax-enabled Views displays. This would be nice for some use cases.

Status: There is a stable release available for Drupal 7.

Webform Countdown

Categories: Content

The module, by Andrew Lindsay provides a textarea component for Drupal webforms which includes a configurable, Twitter-style dynamic word or character count to limit the length of submissions. Of course it requires the Webformmodule and Libraries module (as well as the word-and-character-counter.js in sites/all/libraries.

Status: There is a beta release available for Drupal 7.

Webform Postal Code

Categories: Content

The module, is another Webform-enhancing module contributed by Andrew Lindsay. It adds strong, configurable postal code validation which can even be set to handle multiple countries simultaneously. In addition to the obvious dependency on Webform, this also requires the Postal Code Validation module.

Status: There is a beta release available for Drupal 7.

Jan 11 2013
Jan 11

Listen online: 

In this episode, our first in 2013, Addison Berry has gathered Lullabots Kyle Hofmeyer, Joe Shindelar, and Juampy Novillo Requena to chat about some big news items in the Drupal world from 2012, and take a look at what may lay ahead in 2013.

Podcast Notes

If you want to suggest ideas for podcasts, or have questions for us to answer on a podcast, let us know:
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Release Date: January 11, 2013 - 10:47am

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Length: 50:48 minutes (29.44 MB)

Format: mono 44kHz 81Kbps (vbr)

Jan 02 2013
Jan 02
Modules of the month story banner illustration.

Closing out the year 2012 with a bang, December brought us quite a number of new modules which look promising enough to cover; a few that I’m covering this time are far from ready or even only at the “concept” stage and normally would not be included, but they seemed particularly interesting or unique, and I want to see how they develop. Anyway, this month there were quite a few modules released for mobile support/responsive content. There were also several search-related modules, anti-spam modules, a couple of novelty modules, some interesting commerce-related releases, a number of Features package modules customized for various special-purpose distributions, lots of new “Third-party Integration” modules, theme enhancements, and more… I only wish I had more time so I could actually try out more of them, but there are several I do plan to get back to.

As usual, this post is sorted alphabetically and only covers modules which had their first release, or at least a new project created, in December. Selection for the Modules of the Month is a completely arbitrary process, but normally excludes common or niche items like a new payment method for Commerce that provides connections for a payment system used in, e.g. Romania. We also don’t normally include commercial service integration modules (unless the service looks really cool and is reasonably priced).

Anyway, it seems like only last week that I was putting the final touches on the November “Modules of the Month” story… oh wait, it was only last week: nine days ago, as I write this. Well I promised to try to get December’s published in early January, so I pushed some days around to make this happen. Let’s take a look at the modules, then, shall we? …

*/ Activation Code

The module, brought to us by prolific über-contributor Bryan Ollendyke of Penn State University, provides a fieldable “activation_code” entity type with a number of fields for an ID, creation timestamp, redemption timestamp, username, etc. It’s used by the Course Information System distribution as another method for authorizing access to online course materials, etc, but for those who don’t need the module on their site, it could still provide a useful example for how to build a fieldable entity.

Status: There is a development release available for Drupal 7.

Apachesolr Link

Categories: Search

The module, produced by Michael Prasuhn of Shomeya, enables indexing a Link field’s “target”, along with the entity it is attached to, in the Apache Solr search index. It might be obvious, but this module depends on Link and Apache Solr Search Integration; the Apache Solr Attachments module will also be useful if some of the links you wish to index are to PDF files or other “non-plain-text” results which you wish to index.

Status: There is a development release available for Drupal 7.

Are You A Human PlayThru Are You a Human Playthru login

The module, written by Chris Keller of Commercial Progression, provides a more simple, fun, and intuitive means for a user to prove they are human than typical CAPTCHA options. It uses game mechanics which a user interacts with rather than having users try to interpret text in graphics. CAPTCHA fields can be frustratingly and tedious, so it’s nice to see people are working on interesting alternatives. Cool! I often skip over commercial third-party integration modules, but this seems interesting enough not to pass up, and they do provide free options which might be adequate for many sites.

Status: There is a beta release available for Drupal 7.

Backstretch Formatter

The module, written by Yannick Leyendecker of LOOM GmbH, provides a field formatter for jQuery Backstretch - A simple jQuery plugin that allows you to add a dynamically-resized, slideshow-capable background image to any page or element. Once you have everything (JavaScript libraries and the module, etc) correctly installed, if you select “Backstretch” as field formatter for an image field which allows more than one image you will get a slideshow. If your slideshow needs don’t require anything too fancy, this could be the ideal module to implement it. Cool!

Status: There is a development release available for Drupal 7.

Badbot

Because we wouldn’t want one CAPTCHA alternative to be lonely… the module, developed by Yuriy Babenko of Suite101, provides another method of CAPTCHA-free spam-prevention; it is currently limited to the user registration form, but comment forms are in the works. Visitors must have JavaScript enabled in their browsers for this system to work; it displays an error if JavaScript is disabled. Since spam bots generally do not parse JS, this helps avoid the need for CAPTCHAs, which are often solved by low-paid workers these days, anyway.

Status: There is a stable release available for Drupal 7.

BetterTip

The module, produced by Shoaib Rehman Mirza of Xululabs, is a lightweight jQuery plugin for clean, HTML5-valid tooltips which can provide a richer user experience than default tooltip text.

Status: There is a stable release available for Drupal 7 (and the project page includes a pledge to provide a Drupal 6 version).

Breakpoint Panels

The module, developed by Daniel Linn of Metal Toad Media, adds a Panel style called “Breakpoint Panel”. When selected, it will display checkboxes next to all of the breakpoints specified in that module’s UI. Unchecking any of these will “hide” it from that breakpoint. If you are lost by this description of the functionality, it probably helps to understand that “breakpoints” define different display-width ranges so that you can determine layout for content on different width devices or even eliminate some content from being displayed on, e.g. devices less than 480 pixels wide. Of course it depends on the Breakpoints module, whose functionality is going into Drupal 8 “core”, and Panels, but you’ll also need to download some Javascript files and enable them with Libraries. See the project page for further details, but this could definitely help improve mobile/responsive content and the roadmap looks good, too.

Status: There is a stable release available for Drupal 7.

Christmas Lights

The module, created by Andrew Podlubnyj, is, depending on your use case, of course, probably just a novelty module, but one that might be fun to enable in the right season. It adds decorative “Christmas lights” for you and your users to enjoy.

Status: There is a stable release available for Drupal 7.

CKEditor for WYSIWYG Module

When Nathan Haug of Lullabot-fame releases a new module, it’s always GoodStuff™, so it’s no surprise that there are already hundreds of sites using the after just one month. It provides a WYSIWYG editor (surprise, surprise!) using the CKEditor library (surprise, again!). This project aims to combine some of the best of the Wysiwyg-module integration with CKEditor with the best of the standalone CKEditor-integration module, with support for the Drupal Image and Drupal Image captioning plugins, compatibility with other WYSIWYG editors integrated through the Wysiwyg module, and no inline styles inserted into HTML… among other nice features either already implemented or in the “roadmap”. It requires the Wysiwyg module and is incompatible with the normal CKEditor integration module (which must be completely removed before using this module).

Status: There is a development release available for Drupal 7.

Coins wallet

The module, authored by ssm2017 Binder, is a Bitcoin wallet system to be used with a devcoin-compatible daemon. This module is a complete rewrite for Drupal 7 of the never-released original Drupal 6 version discussed here and uses the bitcoin-php library. While I confess that I’m a bit leery of how this all works, I’m also fascinated by the idea of alternative currencies which aren’t controlled and manipulated by bankers and other “white collar criminals”, so while the optimist in me is curious to see how this works, the pessimist in me worries that between human greed and governmental attempts to rein this in, well… interesting work, in any case.

Status: There is a stable release available for Drupal 7.

Collapsible fieldset memory

The module, written by David Herminghaus, solves a nice little UX issue for Drupal. If you have ever worked on a project where you had to enter content into Drupal forms with fieldsets which needed to be uncollapsed to access required fields, or where closing fieldsets to get them out of your way is part of your workflow, you might like this module. It allows everyone, even anonymous users, to have stored defaults for any Drupal form with collapsible fieldsets, so if a fieldset on a form was uncollapsed when you last used it, it will start out that way the next time you do. Nice! Of course it requires Javascript (as do collapsible fieldsets). The developer is open to feature requests and issues, so pitch in if you use this module and help make it better. There’s a bit you should know about before implementing it on your site, so be sure to peruse the project page.

Status: There are alpha releases available for both Drupal 6 and Drupal 7.

Commerce Check

Status: There is an alpha release available for Drupal 7.

Commerce Message

The module, produced by Bojan Živanović of Commerce Guys, provides Commerce-specific Message integration, including some default message settings for common order states, such as “order paid”, “product added to cart”, “order confirmation”, etc. It looks like a pretty well-thought-out module to help provide automated or custom messages to clients at appropriate stages in their order process. It’s integrated with Commerce Backoffice and Commerce Kickstart v2, so is already in use on quite a number of sites.

Status: There is a beta release available for Drupal 7.

Commons Polls

The module, by Ezra Barnett Gildesgame of Acquia, and the primary maintainer of Drupal Commons, integrates Drupal’s “core” Poll module as a group-enabled content type in Drupal Commons 3.0.

Status: There is a development release available for Drupal 7.

Content callback If you register a content callback via hook_content_callback_info() it will be available in the Content callback field options.

—Project description excerpt

The module, developed by Jasper Knops of Nascom, allows you to return any renderable array, created in code, via a field; it also contains a sub-module which provides a searchable Views display, as well as a context condition, among other features you should check out on the project page. If it’s not clear, though, I might mention this is not a simple add-and-enable module; it provides some tools for coders and advanced site builders.

Status: There is a stable release available for Drupal 7.

Context Breakpoint

The module, developed by Christoph, helps bridge Context and Breakpoints so that you can alter a page based on the visitor’s screen resolution, browser window size, or aspect ratio. Installing it adds a context condition for “Breakpoint”. This could definitely be useful, especially if your site already uses Context. Of course it’s a bit complex, so please see the project page and the module’s README file for information about how to install, configure, and make use of this.

Status: There is an alpha release available for Drupal 7.

Context code

The is another module by Jasper Knops of Nascom. It provides “a new context condition plugin which allows you to trigger contexts from code”. It should probably go without saying that it requires the Context module and is a module developed for other developers. See the project page for implementation examples, but I think this looks very useful, at least for advanced Drupalists and coders.

Status: There is a stable release available for Drupal 7.

CP2P2: Content Profile to Profile2

The module, written by Damien McKenna of Mediacurrent, is an add-on for Profile2 to convert Content Profile content types into Profile types. Note that there is no admin user interface for this; all functionality is provided by Drush commands run in the terminal, so this module is targeted toward experienced Drupalists and coders.

Status: There is a beta release available for Drupal 7.

Create and continue

The module, written by Dominique De Cooman of Ausy/DataFlow, simply adds a button to node forms which saves the current node and opens node/add/CONTENT_TYPE to create another instance of the same node type and help streamline the content creation process.

Status: There is a stable release available for Drupal 7.

Crossdomain

Categories: Media

The module, written by Adam Moore of Stanford Graduate School of Business, simply creates a crossdomain.xml file at the root of your Drupal site and provides configuration setting for which domains should be included. This is useful for certain web services which may require different domains to have access to your site content.

Status: There is a stable release available for Drupal 7.

Currency for Drupal Commerce

The module, produced by Bart Feenstra replaces the native currency-based price display in Drupal Commerce with locale-based display, using the Currency module. Because proper display depends on locale (language and country) and not on currencies, this module helps ensure that users see prices in a format they are used to.

Status: There is a beta release available for Drupal 7.

Field Quick Required

The module, written by Jelle Sebreghts of attiks, provides a simple overview of which field are required for a given content type, without having to enter the settings for that field. You can also change the “required” setting for any field. Nice! It does this by adding an extra column to the “manage fields” overview for your content types, e.g. for /admin/structure/types/manage/article/fields, where you would normally have columns for “Label”, “Machine name”, “Field type”, “Widget”, and “Operations”, you would also have a column labeled “Required” with a checkbox that can easily be changed if you decide a certain field should (or should not) be required for a particular content type. This could be especially useful during the initial phases of designing a site’s content types and logic.

Status: There is a stable release available for Drupal 7.

"File Metadata Table" Field Formatter

Categories: Fields

The module, written by Jeremy Thorson, with support from Derek Wright, looks interesting. It’s still in development, but it provides a customizable “File Metadata Table” field formatter for file fields. All of the options are a bit much to list here, but given the profiles of these two super-contributors, I think this will be an interesting module to check back on. I’m expecting something awesome here!

Status: There is a development release available for Drupal 7.

Foresight Images

The module, developed by Graham Bates of Catch Digital, provides a field formatter which integrates the foresight.js library to display image fields. Images are requested and generated at the exact size required. As with other such third-party Javascript library integrations, this will require Libraries and you install the additional JavaScript code in sites/all/libraries. I’m not convinced that this module offers enough benefits to select it rather than one of the other more-established responsive image modules; I’m also not convinced otherwise and the Foresight Images project page includes a list of other “similar” responsive images modules and some brief notes about how the approach or features differ from those provided by Foresight Images. So this project page could be worth looking at if you need an overview to help choose the appropriate module(s) or approach for your next project.

Status: There is a stable release available for Drupal 7.

Forum notifications

The module, created by David Snopek, extends the Notifications module to add some nice UI improvements for notifications involving forums based on the “core” Forums module. If you have a site with forums and wish to have a nice user experience for “subscribing” (and “unsubscribing”) to forums or individual threads, this module could help.

Status: There is a development release available for Drupal 7 and a beta release available for Drupal 6.

htaccess

The module, coded by giorgio79, autogenerates a Drupal root htaccess file based on your settings, including such configuration settings as automatic insertion of Boost htaccess settings, whether or not to use “www”, Followsymlinks or SymlinksIfOwnersMatch, etc. You simply configure these settings at /admin/config/system/htaccess if this module is enabled and of course you could only enable this module when upgrading Drupal, to replace the default .htaccess with one based on your settings. I don’t think it should be so dangerous to try this, but you might want to make your own backup copy of your current .htaccess file, just in case anything goes wrong (in theory, this module should also make a backup copy of your existing .htaccess file).

Status: There is a stable release available for Drupal 7.

Image optimize effect

The module, yet another contributed by Peter Droogmans of Attiks, adds two new image effects to optimize image files to reduce your average page size. Most websites do not have very well optimized images and images can be substantially reduced in size, even without noticeable change in quality. This module uses pngquant to optimize png files and imgmin, which can work on various formats, but is best for JPEG files. Of course it depends on the relevant libraries (see the project description). For more information, see this recent article on the Performance Calendar blog: Giving Your Images an Extra Squeeze

Status: There is a stable release available for Drupal 7.

Image Style Pregenerate

The module, developed by Gabor Szanto, helps you to generate all the images for a new image style before enabling the style; it’s designed for bulk image generation on production sites where the performance hit of switching the image style in your field formatter without already having the new images in place, could result in issues. It relies on Views Bulk Operations (VBO) and File Entity.

Status: There is a development release available for Drupal 7.

Insert image with text

Categories: Content

The module, developed by Esben von Buchwald of Reload!, extends the Insert module to modify the image markup to include caption text below the image. I don’t know how this compares to other methods of adding an image caption, but if you are already using Insert, and you want a simple way to include image captions, this module could be useful.

Status: There are dev releases available for both Drupal 6 and Drupal 7.

Joyride

The module, written by Mark Koester of Int3c.com: International Cross-Cultural Consulting, integrates the Joyride plugin to provide a simple way to give a tour of features or information on your Drupal-based site. This looks pretty cool. Of course you need to download the Javascript and install it in your sites/all/libraries directory… and of course that means it also requires the Libraries module.

Status: There is a development release available for Drupal 7.

jQuery Tabs Field

The module, contributed by Varun Mishra, allows you to create up to seven tab fields, each with a “body” and “tab title” on any node where this field is part of the content type. On viewing the node, the module will format the output to display each as horizontal tabs, which can make for more attractive output. This is relatively simple compared to options where you could have a number of fields in each tab, but if it fills the requirements of your use case, this simplicity would be ideal. There are already quite a few sites using this and it should become much more useful when the “body” of each tab supports HTML formats (currently it only accepts plain text, but the first issue for this module has elicited a promise to get HTML support in there.)

Status: There is a stable release available for Drupal 7.

Kazoo API

The module, contributed by Bevan Rudge of Drupal.geek.nz, integrates the Kazoo REST API telecommunications platform into Drupal-based sites. This is fairly complex and the use cases for this are somewhat limited, so I’m not going to bother going into great detail, but it’s interesting to know about, nonetheless.

Status: There is a development release available for Drupal 7.

Kim Jong-filter The Kim Jong filter is used to highlight specified words or phrases within content

The module, coded by the prolific Peter Lieverdink of Creative Contingencies, provides an input filter that wraps all occurrences of names of great leaders in a <span> element with a suitable class for easy highlighting. Of course you could use it for other purposes, so this might be more than an odd novelty module.

Status: There is a development release available for Drupal 7.

Language fallback

The module, written by Peter Droogmans, a very active contributor who has done a lot for multilingual functionality in Drupal, allows you to specify a fallback language for each language on your site, so if a string is found untranslated in the preferred language, you can get the next closest language translation file. Example use cases are for regional variants of a language, so if there is no translation in “nl-be” (Belgian Dutch), it would default to a translation found in Netherlands Dutch “nl-nl” and finally default to a standard translation found in “nl”, if available. This could certainly be useful and I believe this is a backport of functionality that’s already been built into Drupal 8 “core” (if not, I suspect it will be ported to Drupal 8 as a contrib module).

Status: There is a stable release available for Drupal 7.

Layouter - WYSIWYG layout templates The Layouter module helps create templates within content to facilitate columns or other layouts.

The module, from Alexander of ADCI, LLC, provides a simple way to select a particular “layout” (e.g. columns) for content. It already integrates with the CKEditor and the developer plans support for other popular editors, but it can apparently be used without a WYSIWYG editor, too.

Status: There is a stable release available for Drupal 7.

Lazyloader filter

The module, authored by Derek Webb of CollectiveColors, provides an input filter for lazy loading images as they may appear in textareas and relies on the Lazyloader project for the actual lazy-loading of images. This module only provides a filter that renders <img> tags in a manner consistent with the needs of the Lazyloader module, while allowing you to theme the image output to your liking and preserve original image attributes. This looks useful.

Status: There is a stable release available for Drupal 7.

Leaflet MapBox

The module, contributed by Jaime Herencia of WebPartners, provides integration between another Drupal contrib module, Leaflet (which integrates the Leaflet JavaScript mapping library), and MapBox. The Leaflet module’s project page actually links to an example which uses Mapbox: The Intertwine, which documents trails in the Portland-Vancouver metropolitan region. This site really looks cool, so if mapping functionality is important for your site, this might be useful for you.
Caveat: Mapbox is not a free service, but is reasonably priced and includes some pretty cool tools and features, not to mention distributed map hosting.

Status: There is a stable release available for Drupal 7.

Link CSS

The module, created by Graham Bates of Catch Digital, allows you to add CSS files using the <link> element instead of @import. This is useful for live refresh workflows such as CodeKit which do not support files loaded with @import.

Status: There is a stable release available for Drupal 7.

Local Foodhub Local Foodhub defines the commerce functionality to support a foodhub in a community, where producers and consumers attend a regular collection day where ordered products can be collected. Foodhubs are a convenient way to provide local produce for people in the community while giving producers more regular orders.

—Project description

The module, developed by Paul Mackay, is a project description which definitely looks interesting, although there is, as of this time, no code released. Normally I don’t include modules in this column if there aren’t at least some Git code commits, but there is enough information already, and I like the idea well enough that I’m making an exception here. We need to have more local food production and distribution… and infrastructure to support this if we want to live in a future with more environmentally sustainable practices, so on behalf of my future children and grandchildren, I give thanks for people working on projects like this.

Status: Check back. Currently no project code.

Mobile Switch (Varnish version)

The module, developed by Paul Maddern of ITV, provides a simple automatic theme switch functionality for mobile devices, utilising Varnish for detecting the user-agent and providing proper cacheable pages using the same URLs per mobile device group. This helps avoid bootstrapping Drupal while still presenting the appropriate, cached content for each device type. Nice! Of course getting this all right is not simple, so be sure to peruse the project page for more complete implementation details.

Status: There is a stable release available for Drupal 7.

Moodle Connector

The module, produced by Pere Orga, aims to provide a common interface for modules that integrate Drupal with the open-source Moodle e-learning system. It does not provide any end-user features and the initial release simple adds an admin configuration page for you to enter Moodle credentials, but there are plans for some other appropriate features. If you have a site that bridges Drupal and Moodle, this could be a worthwhile module for you.

Status: There is a stable release available for Drupal 7.

Multilingual Panels

The module, created by Valeriy Sokolov, provides support for making Panels panes translatable, which could definitely be useful for multilingual sites which make use of Panels.

Status: There is a development release available for Drupal 7.

Organic Groups formatters

The module, produced by Eric Mulder of LimoenGroen, extends Organic Groups by adding additional field formatters for the “Groups Audience” field. The “Group delimited list” formatter allows you to display Group names (labels) as a delimited list. Other formatters may be added if requested in the issue queue.

Status: There is a stable release available for Drupal 7.

Panels Image Link

The module, authored by Nick Piacentine of the Mars Space Flight Facility at Arizona State University, provides a simple Panels content type to display an uploaded image and link it to a provided url/path. There are already quite a few sites using this, considering its very recent release, so I suppose this could become quite popular for sites using Panels.

Status: There is a stable release available for Drupal 7.

Pants

The module, produced by Angie Byron of Acquia, is an actual module instead of just code used in a tutorial demonstration, but the purpose is the same. The previous version of the Pants “module” (not actually released) was for Drupal 5. This project updates it to Drupal 7 code and may be used as part of Angie’s DrupalCon Sydney core conversation presentation about “Upgrading your modules”, which will cover getting Drupal 7 code ready to run in Drupal 8.

Status: There is a development release available for Drupal 7.

PDF Forms API

The module, authored by Kevin Kaland of WizOne Solutions, is an API module which you should only install if another module requires it or if you are a developer and want to use its functions, which are initially focused on PDF form functionality.

Status: There is a development release available for Drupal 7.

Pinterest Verify Website

The module, written by Peter Lieverdink of Creative Contingencies, simplifies the verication process for pinterest by adding a verification tag or page to a Drupal site.

Status: There is a development release available for Drupal 7.

Polychotomous Keys

The module, written by Ed Baker of the Natural History Museum, “allows you to build polychotomous keys using Views”. At least that is the “project description”, but currently there is not even a single code commit. While that would normally mean I’d skip the project for inclusion here, I’m interested in modules being developed for academics and there could be a lot of use cases for such a module. I’m looking forward to seeing it in action.

Status: Check back. Currently no project code available.

Prelaunch

The module, written by Dominique De Cooman of Ausy/DataFlow, allows you to set one page of a Drupal site as “prelaunch page”. An example use case might be to display a webform to collect emails to notify interested parties when your site is launched, or page with information about what’s coming. Your site can essentially be “offline” without using maintenance mode; it prevents users from accessing any part of the site besides the prelaunch page (although assigned roles can access other areas). This definitely sounds useful.

Status: There is a stable release available for Drupal 7.

Pushtape Admin

is actually a Drupal distribution for musicians, which was initially released about 18 months ago. So why am I including it here? Well, I’m not really, but there are five new Features package modules which were released in December which are all geared toward improving support for building sites with Pushtape and which might be useful even if you aren’t using the distribution. All of the following modules were contributed by Farsheed of Zirafa Works:

  • contains admin views and menus.
  • adds a simple file field to the Track content type to allow uploading mp3 files.
  • configures an event content type, view, and menu link.
  • creates a news content type, view, and menu link.
  • creates a simple photo-set to share a group of photos. Content type, views, and menu link are bundled; this also uses Colorbox.

Status: For each of these modules, there are development releases available for Drupal 7.

Radix Layouts

The module, produced by Arshad Chummun, provides responsive panels layouts set to work with Panopoly and the Radix theme (also contributed by Arshad Chummun). If you are using Panopoly, you might like Radix and if you are using Radix, you might like this module, especially if you need responsive layouts for mobile devices.

Status: There is a development release available for Drupal 7.

Restaurant

is a new distribution, also developed by Arshad Chummun, which is based on Panopoly and designed to simplify hosting websites for restaurants. Several supporting modules were also released in December:

  • provides base configuration and structure.
  • adds a blog system.
  • provides structure for creating and managing events.
  • provides structure for creating and managing menus.
  • provides structure for creating and managing slideshows.
  • adds theming helpers.

Status: There are development releases available for Drupal 7 for the Restaurant distribution and each of the listed supporting modules.

Search API Stanbol

The module, written by Stéphane Corlosquet and Wolfgang Ziegler provides Drupal integration with Apache Stanbol, a new and exciting search technology for extracting information from “unstructured” text content. Getting into the full details of how this works is well outside the scope of this column, but this definitely does look interesting. This module requires the Search API and RDF Extensions modules.

Status: There is an alpha release available for Drupal 7.

Single Image Formatter

Categories: Fields

The module, created by Federico Jaramillo of SeeD, exposes a formatter that displays one image from a multi-value image field. It allows the same options as the original image formatter, but adds an option to choose which image to display. For some use cases, the Field multiple limit may be more suitable, but the Single Image Formatter might be more efficient for situations where there are many values in a multi-value image field.

Status: There is a stable release available for Drupal 7.

Sky field

The module, created by Leonid Mamaev and Alexander of ADCI, LLC, is sort of a new, improved version of the Node field module released a few months back by the same developers. It allows you to add unique custom fields to any single Drupal entity (node, user, comment, etc). You can add text fields, long text fields, links, radios, select, checkbox, taxonomy terms, among others and includes an API to add support for additional field types. This could be very useful for sites where an occasional instance might benefit from an extra field that isn’t normally used for that content type.

Status: There is a beta release available for Drupal 7.

Twitter Web Intents

Categories: Views

The module, developed by Francisco José Cruz Romanos of Hiberus, integrates Twitter’s Web Intents system to add extra Twitter links for replying, retweeting, adding to favorites, following, etc, into a view of Twitter messages. This allows users to interact with Twitter content from within the context of your site, without needing to leave the page or authorize an app just for this interaction.

Status: There is a stable release available for Drupal 7.

Twysi

The module, created by Tony Star of Acronis, is “an amazing Twitter Bootstrap WYSIWYG HTML5 editor”, at least that’s what the project description says. But it might be a bit early to tell about the module, itself. Currently, if I install the wysihtml5 library, I can select it as the editor for a given text format, but no buttons are present and no editor shows up on a text area. That said, this does sound like a project worth checking back on.

Status: There is a development release available for Drupal 7.

URL token URL token is an API module that provides token-based authentication for other modules, where the token can be used in URLs without requiring a Drupal user. Tokens can also be limited to a set number of uses or a fixed period of time.

—from the project’s README.txt

The module, by Marcus Deglos of Techito, is “an API module to make token-based access control simple”. Normal users should only install this module if another module requires it. Developers might want to take a look at the project page for some decent code examples of how to request a token and check that a token is valid. Note: in case this is not obvious, this module has nothing to do with the Token module. “Token”, in this context, is simply an access key.

Status: There is a development release available for Drupal 7.

Views OG cache

The module, from long-time contributor Amitai Burstein of Gizra, adds a Views time-based cache, configurable per group; uses OG-context to identify a group’s view to cache; includes OG-access integration: if the group is private, caching is done per-user instead of per-group… among other listed features. This definitely looks like it could be useful for sites using both Organic Groups and Views.

Status: There is a development release available for Drupal 7.

Welcome

The Welcome module displays a custom message when users log in.The module, from Blair Wadman displays a simple, configurable welcome message when a user logs in. Simply enable it at admin/config/people/welcome, and yes Token support is included. The example message displayed at left uses Tokens for both the site-name and username. (Of course the “Swachula” username is courtesy of “Devel generate” and “d7test” is my local Drupal 7 testing environment.)

Status: There is a development release available for Drupal 7.

Yet Another Yellow Box This is mostly being used to announce weather-related school closings on sites where I've been using it.

—from the project description

The module, authored by Micah Webner of Access-Interactive, provides a simple way to add a prominent “announcement” block of filtered text to any pre-configured region. The contents and visibility of the announcement block can then be managed by users who may not otherwise have permission to manage blocks. If you have a site where staff may need to make emergency announcements, this could be a useful module to set up. See the project page for further information about how to get everything working.

Status: There is a development release available for Drupal 7 and a stable release available for Drupal 6.

Zoundation Support

The module, written by Jeff Graham of FunnyMonkey, is designed to work with the responsive HTML5-based zoundation theme and its sub-themes. It provides custom menu builder functions and blocks for menus, a foundation navbar and topbar, a custom field formatter for orbit slideshow integration, improved placeholder integration for elements, and “other minor UI improvements” that work better in this module than in the zoundation theme, itself.

Status: There is a development release available for Drupal 7.

Dec 23 2012
Dec 23
Modules of the month story banner illustration.

November 2012 was a busy month for a lot of people involved in Drupal contribution. It was the final weeks before the “feature freeze” for Drupal 8, so a lot of the focus was on new features for the next great release of Drupal. Many of the “new projects” were simply “namespace reservations” for new core modules or planned contrib modules which relate to Drupal 8; most of which had no project code committed at all (for some, presumably, it’s all in the main Drupal 8 repository). But there were also a number of new feature-enhancing modules released for Drupal 7 (and a few for Drupal 6), several which improve search functionality, a few for delivering mobile-friendly content from a Drupal site, some for commerce, others designed to help manage Drupal sites and ensure that nothing slips through the cracks when moving from “development” to “production”, among other new gems.

It’s fun, too, that we got a couple new “novelty” modules in November: one, Driesday, puts a “Happy Driesday!” message on your site every November 19th; another is a bit more insidious, with a fully-disclosed dependency on Bad judgement: Feature creep allows you to nostalgically hang onto the “good old days” when Features had a few more quirks. So if you want to remember that fun, just turn this module on and, as the module description says, “every time that you export or update a feature the Feature creep module will randomly add an extra component to your feature, what fun!”

Before we get into the module descriptions, of course, I should acknowledge the very late arrival of this month’s release of this column. It’s been one of those months… again. But let me try to hold onto my optimism that I’ll be seeing you with December’s write-up in just a couple weeks. I’ll be aiming for the first week of January. Now let’s have a look at the “new” modules.

*/ Apache Solr Term Proximity

The module, coded by the prolific Chris Pliakas of Acquia fame, should be of interest for sites using Apache Solr. It boosts the relevancy of documents in which the search terms appear closer together. In other words, if I’m searching for “data migration”, a document which has these two words together should rank higher than another document where they are separated by a few words, which should rank higher than one where these words appear in different paragraphs. Nice!

Status: There is an RC release available for Drupal 7.

bigint

Categories: Fields

It’s always nice when developers share modules which help to get around some of the native limits in Drupal. One such limit is the lack of a proper “BigInt” integer type, which might not be needed for most sites, but is certainly a limitation that developers have to work around for some use cases. The module, by Ryan Coulombe of NewMedia!, provides a true BigInt field, thus saving site builders from having to find creative ways to handle text or decimal values that they really want to be an integer. Cool!

Status: There is a stable release available for Drupal 7.

Block Group

Categories: Utility

An example “block group” to display the “user blocks”The module, by znerol, provides a taste of Drupal 8-like layouts by extending the Drupal block system with “block groups” which can be placed like a normal block, are nestable, and can have regions within them. A simple use case might be that you want all of your user-related blocks to be kept together in one “user blocks” block group, which you can then put into whatever theme region you wish, without having to always fix their order when adding them to a different theme or reorder them if you change the region. Very handy!

Status: There is an alpha release available for Drupal 7.

Book Touch

The module, which requires the Thumbnav module, is another innovation from Bryan Ollendyke of Penn State University, who has been contributing loads of great modules in recent months. It provides gestures and touch events for mobile navigation of an online book to help replicate the experience of a touch-sensitive e-book reader. Most awesome!

Status: There is a beta release available for Drupal 7.

Bounce reasons

The module, produced by Alexander of ADCI, LLC, may or may not be a good idea. It pops up a Webform in an overlay, when your site visitors attempt to close a window, where you can ask why they are leaving. Personally, I think I would just find this annoying and might likely avoid following future links to the site, but that’s just my initial reaction; maybe I’m not the typical web user and it’s possible that in some cultures people wouldn’t mind a site preventing a window from being closed to ask them why. That said, maybe it would be better to provide an “opt-in” for such an “exit poll” feature, i.e. ask visitors when they arrive to your site if they wouldn’t mind being asked about their experience when they leave. But perhaps you have a client who has asked you to build exactly this functionality? If so, rather than argue with them about why this might not be a good idea, you now know “there is a module for that”. And maybe using this for a while would help them improve their site. The project description page doesn’t specifically mention it, but it would seem to depend on Webform… and possibly also Bad judgement. Hmmm…

Status: There are stable releases available for both Drupal 6 and Drupal 7.

ckeditor_syntaxhighlighter

The module, by Jason Xie of VicTheme, integrates syntaxhighlighter into the CKEditor module by loading another yet another JavaScript project, ckeditor-syntaxhighlight. It depends on the CKEditor and SyntaxHighlighter modules, as well as the JavaScript libraries they require, installed in sites/all/libraries per installation directions (and the Libraries module, of course).

Status: There is a stable release available for Drupal 7.

Commerce Backoffice

The module, by Bojan Živanović of Commerce Guys, provides administration enhancements for Drupal Commerce and is already in use on over 2,000 sites less than a month after its release (perhaps largely since it’s a component of the latest release of the Commerce Kickstart distribution). It includes three sub-modules, each of which have a number of dependencies and the project page does a good job of explaining everything, so I won’t say more than this: if you are using Commerce and aren’t using the Kickstart distribution, you will probably benefit from adding and configuring this module.

Status: There is a stable release available for Drupal 7.

Commerce Price Extra

The module, from Marc ElBichon, adds extra features based on the price component in Drupal Commerce, including allowing ordering of price components in the cart pane, printing discounts on their own line, and other nifty features.

Status: There is a stable release available for Drupal 7.

Commerce Rules Extra

The module, also developed by Marc ElBichon, is a library of Rules events, conditions, and actions to support Drupal Commerce site building.

My wish is to merge all modules based on Rules and Drupal Commerce in a single one. It forks the apparently-unmaintained Commerce Extra Rules Conditions module. See the project page for more information about what this module already supports or to suggest additional features.

Status: There is an alpha release available for Drupal 7.

Commerce Search API

Categories: Search

The another module, contributed by Bojan Živanović of Commerce Guys, provides Commerce-specific Search API integration and fulfills a feature request that dates back to the early days of Commerce. It was covered on Commerce Module Tuesday and is part of the latest Commerce Kickstart, so is already used by many sites. If you don’t use Kickstart, and want improved search functions for your Commerce-based site, this is a good module to consider.

Status: There is an RC release available for Drupal 7.

Context Block Visibility

The module, coded by Peter Berryman, provides context for block visibility using the normal block admin page. This could be handy for certain use cases.

Status: There is an alpha release available for Drupal 7.

Dictionary Export

The module, coded by Ed Baker of the Natural History Museum, provides support for Microsoft Office-compatible dictionaries in (*.dic) format for any vocabulary on your site.

Status: There is a stable release available for Drupal 7.

Download Userpoints

The module, by Eugen, provides a way for you to allow access to private files via user points. This looks useful for communities which provide points for contribution and require points for downloads of community-contributed files (as one example use-case). It requires the Userpoints module.

Status: There is a beta release available for Drupal 7.

Drifter

The module, produced by Peter Anderson of PackWeb, allows fields to be floated to the left or right of content. While this kind of layout is normally provided by theme CSS, it can be useful for it to be theme-independent.

Status: There is a stable release available for Drupal 7.

EasyRdf

The module, from Chris Skene of PreviousNext, provides Libraries API compatibility for EasyRdf, which, in turn requires Libraries . It should only be installed if other modules require, but definitely looks useful.

Status: There is an alpha release available for Drupal 7.

Entity reference multiple display

The module, written by Jean Valverde of Linagora, provides a new field formatter for Entity Reference that let you configure different view modes for each referenced entity, for instance if you want the first elements to be displayed in full and subsequent elements to be displayed as teasers, this module could be your friend.

Status: There is a stable release available for Drupal 7.

Entity Reference Views Formatter

Categories: Fields

The module, authored by Maxim Podorov, provides a Views-based entity reference field formatter which allows you to use any view to show entity reference field value(s). It’s based on the Entity Reference View Field Formatter (sandbox) project from Katherine Bailey.

Status: There is a development release available for Drupal 7.

Facebook Autopost

The module, written by Mateu Aguiló Bosch of Human Bits, provides simple configuration to allow your site to automatically post to designated Facebook Pages. It includes a good developer API, integrates with Rules and the Entity API and includes Libraries integration for the Facebook Developer PHP SDK. It includes a Facebook app, which you authorize to make posts on the designated accounts’ behalf. There is a detailed video tutorial on the setup process linked on the project page.

Status: There is an alpha release available for Drupal 7.

Field Formatter CSS Class

The module, by Christian Zuckschwerdt, is perhaps a bit similar to the aforementioned Drifter module; it adds a CSS selector for fields so that you can select to, for example, use a class which floats an element left or right on a per-node basis. Of course you need to set up your theme for the classes and configure your fields, so it’s not a simple “add-and-activate” module, but it should give content authors a bit more control of display for individual nodes. The author invites the community to request additional features, so I think this will definitely be useful for a lot of sites (and there are already quite a few using it). Nice!

Status: There is a stable release available for Drupal 7.

Final Polish

Categories: Utility

The module, by Yannick Leyendecker of LOOM GmbH, helps take care of some of the last steps that are often forgotten when launching a Drupal site. It allows you to disable access to paths like /node, /rss.xml, etc; it uploads a “touch icon” to be used by mobile devices; it verifies the existence of /favicon.ico, /apple-touch-icon.png, etc, so that you don’t get a plethora of 404 errors in the logs, and the author invites input for additional features, but already has a nice development road-map to include checking recipients for Webform emails, checking the site email address, redirecting to the front page on errors (access denied / not found), etc. This can definitely streamline the last steps of getting our sites ready for use, so I’ll definitely be giving this a try.

Status: There is a development release available for Drupal 7.

Gumroad

The module, from Eric Peterson of Tableau Software, helps use Gumroad to sell products on a Drupal website. I normally skip over modules which integrate commercial services, but what Gumroad offers and what they charge for their services seems like a good deal. So if you want to, for instance, sell your self-produced music and don’t want to spend a lot of time (and/or money) building up e-commerce infrastructure, handling payments, and all that, this can be a simple way to collect a reasonable percentage of the incoming revenue, and start making sales, without a ton of work. Of course, if you have more involved needs for e-commerce functionality, you’ll probably want to use Drupal Commerce, but I think this module should be attractive for a lot of creatives who simply want to focus on the “fun stuff” and just sell a few things from their sites.

Status: There is a development release available for Drupal 7.

Hackpad

The module, contributed by Andrew Berry of Lullabot, integrates Hackpad into a Drupal site. Hackpad is a hosted service, based on Etherpad (but with a lot more cool, more modern features), which allows collaborative editing of documents; it’s very cool, fun, and can be used for a lot of purposes for teams, so I think the interest in Hackpad will definitely grow, as will the features supported by this module which is still new enough that the API for it has not yet been documented, but with Lullabot behind its development, you know it will be awesome!

Status: There is a development release available for Drupal 7.

Image Combination Effects (ICE)

The illustration image from the ICE project page with three pictures placed on an easel.The module, by Guy A. Paddock of Red Bottle Design, is too complex to succinctly summarize, but if you are building an image-centric site (e.g. a site to display your photography), this looks very useful for combining image effects or displaying multiple images at the same time (as one image), i.e., like “spriting” icons, but with larger images. It was designed to reduce the number of requests necessary for loading a slideshow, where they still wanted the client to be able to add new images or adjust the display order, but it looks like there could be a lot of potential use cases. It looks like this offers some pretty cool features that you might want to consider if image display is an important part of your planned site. I’ll certainly be playing with this.

Status: There is an alpha release available for Drupal 7.

jQuery Placeholder

An example of HTML5 placeholder text in a formThe module, written by James Silver of ComputerMinds, integrates the HTML5 Placeholder jQuery Plugin to provide backward compatibility, using a Javascript-only method, for older browsers which don’t support the HTML5 placeholder attribute. For those not so up on HTML5 attributes, the “placeholder” attribute provides the “placeholder text” you see in a form field before you click on it to, e.g. enter your name, but until HTML5-support improves, we need some fallbacks, so this looks like a useful module.) It requires jQuery 1.6+ and the Elements module.

Status: There is a beta release available for Drupal 7.

Legal Extras

Categories: Content

The module, contributed by Rafal W., adds additional features to the Legal module, including the option to allow a registered user to access your site with reduced permissions if they reject the “terms of use”, display the date each user accepted the terms of use, and a number of related features to help manage those annoying legal issues that might be a headache for you, too. I hope I won’t have to use this anytime soon, but it’s nice to know this module exists.

Status: There is a development release available for Drupal 6, but I suspect a Drupal 7 port will be in the works.

Mass Password Reset

The module, written by Mark Shropshire of Classic Graphics, allows a Drupal site administrator to reset the password on all user accounts (except user/1) and then notify all users. It’s good to know this module is available if there’s ever an emergency situation where we might need it.

Status: There is a stable release available for Drupal 7.

Meta tags: Panels

The module, contributed by Diogo Correia of DRI, extends the Meta tags module with support for Panels pages. It also has Features integration, so that if you export a panels page, the meta-tag configuration is exported with it. Cool!

Status: There is a beta release available for Drupal 7.

Mobile Switch Blocks

The module, written by Siegfried Neumann, extends Mobile Switch, a module contributed by the same author, to provide block visibility control for mobile devices. This sounds useful.

Status: There is an alpha release available for Drupal 7.

OG homepage

The module, produced by enzipher, allows you to configure an Organic group’s front-page as the default “home” for logged in members of the group; it also includes options to determine how a user is redirected if they belong to more than one group, among other nifty features. This could be useful for a lot of Organic Groups -based sites.

Status: There is a stable release available for Drupal 7.

Performance and Scalability Checklist

The module, contributed by Travis Carden, is similar to the popular SEO Checklist module, which he also helps maintain. It provides an interactive, step-by-step checklist to help manage the common tasks involved in launching or administering a Drupal site; in this case where it comes to optimizing your site’s software stack, from Apache to your Drupal theme.

The Performance and Scalability Checklist module interface for Drupal 7.

This module is still new and the topic it attempts to cover is so broad, that the module is sure to change and improve in time, but it already looks pretty darn useful. The author is actively seeking suggestions in the Performance and Scalability Checklist issue queue, so please give it a try, then add your 2¢ to help improve this module. Enabling this module requires the ChecklistAPI module.

Status: There is a beta release available for Drupal 7.

Performance data

The module, by Nathaniel Catchpole of Tag1 Consulting, is envisioned to be a UI for viewing and analyzing performance data that you’ve recorded and saved using other tools. When a key core maintainer starts a new project, there’s usually reason to take notice and expect there might be great things coming. That said, according to the project page, this is still in the early stages of development, so unless you have an interest in assisting the development process, you might want to wait a while to try it out.

Status: There is an alpha release available for Drupal 7.

Print Anything

The module, coded by Chris Desautels of R2integrated, helps you configure special rules for generating print-friendly output for any path. There is some work to getting it all working, but it has some nice features and helps you handle a lot of content that isn’t otherwise simple to print, as well as helps maintain your brand visibility by including your logo in the output, among other features.

Status: There is a stable release available for Drupal 7.

Quo.js

The module, created by Bryan Ollendyke of Penn State University, integrates the Quo.js mobile event library into Drupal. As with other such modules, you’ll still need to download and install the JavaScript code, separately. It provides a number of features, including environment detection, and event detection, such as reading “tap”, “hold”, “pinch”, “rotate” and other such mobile gesture events. It integrates well with, and enhances, the other modules recently released by the same prolific contributor, including the aforementioned Book Touch and Thumbnav modules, so it certainly looks useful and I expect it will grow in use as more sites start providing mobile-specific features.

Status: There is a beta release available for Drupal 7.

Search API Page Block

Categories: Search

The module, produced by Tobby Hagler of Phase2 Technology, uses the Search API Page module to perform a search using the currently viewed node’s title as keywords, displaying the results in a block, so you can direct users to related content.

Status: There is a beta release available for Drupal 7.

Simple Anti-Spam

Simple Anti-Spam user interface for Drupal 7.The module, by xandeadx, adds two new elements to designated forms: one checkbox, labeled “I’m not a spammer” and a hidden checkbox, “I’m a spammer”. If user does not check the first or (is a bot which) has checked the second checkbox, the form is not submitted and displays a warning message.

Status: There is a development release available for Drupal 7.

Simple Table of Contents

Categories: Content

The module, coded by Devin Carlson of Ontario’s Ministry of Northern Development and Mines, automatically adds a table of contents to all of your node content, as long as the content is within the node’s “body” field. It’s a simple add-and-enable module which presumably depends on normally-structured content (with headings, etc.)

Status: There is a stable release available for Drupal 7.

Speedboxes - Fast checkbox handling

The module, produced by Manuel Pistner of Bright Solutions GmbH, provides a Javascript-based method to easily check, uncheck, or invert the current setting of a selected range of checkboxes in a grid, e.g. the Drupal permissions page; simply click and drag over a selection of checkboxes and a toolbar appears which allows you to modify the state of all the selected checkboxes. Too cool!

As an alternative to the module, the Bright Solutions blog also includes post about how to use speedboxes as a browser plugin so you can benefit from this feature on any page you visit with your browser.

Status: There is a stable release available for Drupal 7.

Thumbnav

The module, yet another module produced by Bryan Ollendyke of Penn State University, provides a mobile-friendly framework for using a website on touch-driven devices, with support for a variety of navigation methods and an API for developers. It includes support for Quo.js, but doesn’t rely on Quo. See the project page for links to some nice demonstrations, but if you are looking for ways to improve your site’s mobile support, this could definitely be worth checking out.

Status: There is an alpha release available for Drupal 7.

Unit Conversion Formatters

The module, developed by Tony Rasmussen of Metal Toad Media, provides formatters for number fields to convert values between any unit supported by the Units API module. This could certainly be useful for some sites.

Status: There is a stable release available for Drupal 7.

Views Drupal 7 to Drupal 8 upgrade

Categories: Views

BACK UP YOUR DATABASE BEFORE ATTEMPTING TO USE THIS MODULE FOR AN UPGRADE. Really. We're not kidding.

—from the module’s project page description

The module, written by Jess of University of Wisconsin-Madison, a major force behind getting “Views in core” in Drupal 8, helps migrate Drupal 7 Views data to Drupal 8. It’s nice to see work on this is this far along.

Status: There is a development release available for Drupal 7 (really a Git repository you can check out).

Wunderstatus connector

The module, from Henri Hirvonen of Wunderkraut, sends information about installed modules as a JSON to a central service. This could be useful for monitoring a group of sites your company maintains, so I look forward to giving this a whirl and seeing how it develops.

Status: There are alpha releases available for both Drupal 6 and Drupal 7.

XSL Formatter

The module, developed by Dan Morrison of Sparks Interactive, provides a field formatter to process XML content through a defined XSL stylesheet for rendering. If that sounds useful, it’s probably best you just look at the well-written project page, because there is quite a lot of information there, which runs well outside the scope of this column.

Status: There are dev releases available for both Drupal 6 and Drupal 7.

Nov 23 2012
Nov 23
Modules of the month story banner illustration.

October 2012 brought us a nice batch of interesting new modules. Of course I wanted to tell you all about them weeks ago, but without going into excuses and details, I’m afraid getting this published didn’t go as planned. I’d like to get back on schedule to release the next installation of this series in early December, though. Anyway, it’s great to see all of the innovations that have been introduced in the past month. You can tell that Drupal 7 has truly reached maturity by the kind of modules that are being released now. Many, if not most, of the new modules integrate with and extend the functionality of other contributed modules—for example, there are three new modules which provide plugins for the Facet API—or integrate exciting new jQuery plugins to bring a bit of sizzle to your site.

As usual, the list is in alphabetical order and I haven’t tried all of these modules (although I have experimented with quite a few of them and even eliminated a few from consideration since they seemed a bit too “broken” at this point.) Some of these modules might not be ready for use yet, but just show good promise and look worth keeping an eye on. Creating this monthly list is as much for me as it is for you, but I do hope that the modules I select work well for you, if you give them a try, and I look forward to seeing your comments about any of these modules.

*/ Adminimal Administration Menu It adds a nice and simple minimalist look and provides some tweaks to improve your Drupal administration experience. The menu hierarchy is now simpler and easier to understand […] The shortcuts fit nicely and have a small icon that separates them from the normal admin menu links.

(Adminimal Administration Menu project description)

The module, by Andonis Ratsos, changes the style of the popular module’s menu bar.

The adminimal_admin_menu look and feel

Whether or not you like the way it restyles the Admin menu is likely a matter of personal taste, but I do observe that even with only the default shortcuts in the menu (no custom shortcuts added) the larger font of the menu makes it take up a lot space at the top of the window and it starts to wrap to a second line if the window is narrower than about 1,100 pixels, so it’s possible that people administering Drupal sites from smaller devices (netbooks or tablets, not to mention smartphones) might find this modification less appealing. On the other hand, the larger links should make easier targets for a finger-tip… six of one, half a dozen of another.

adminimal_menu shortcuts

Personally, I like the theme change and I like the Adminimal Adminimal Theme admin theme, too, so for my personal testing sites, I’ll go ahead and leave these active. I’m hoping to see some simple customization available in the future… I think I would want to see that before recommending it for client sites.

Status: There is a development release available for Drupal 7.

Autocache

The module, by Teemu Merikoski of Wunderkraut simplifies caching of Views and Panels and has some support for appropriate clearing of Varnish caches, too. It’s still new and the roadmap is perhaps a bit longer than the current features list, but I’m sure that this will be worth keeping an eye on.

Status: There is a development release available for Drupal 7.

Bootstrap optimizer

The module, by Maslouski Yauheni, has only been released for a couple of weeks and there are already over 150 sites using it, so it must be worth a try! On the other hand, if you don’t “improperly delete” modules, perhaps it’s not so useful for you. It appears that its primary functionality is to remove modules from the system table which no longer exist in the modules directory, so if all your sites are well-maintained, this might not do much for you. It looks like Drupal 8 should hopefully resolve this issue. But until this is really fixed in core, there is a place for modules like this, especially for older projects that might not be very actively maintained and might have had some modules deleted over the time. For such sites, this module claims to provide a several-fold increase in the bootstrap time, and provides screenshots as evidence.

Status: There is a beta release available for Drupal 7.

Bulk User Delete

The module, produced by Mark Theunissen of Four Kitchens, provides with a text area where you can enter a list of email addresses for users you wish to “bulk delete”. Normally, it’s probably easier to simply check the boxes next to the names of a group of users you wish to delete and select the action “Cancel the selected user accounts”. But I can imagine scenarios, especially scripted ones, where using this module might be a simpler solution, e.g. when creating a number of test users en masse, users with various combinations of roles and/or other custom relationships, and then removing them after the tests have been run. This could be useful if you want to run such tests on a busy production site without needing to take special care that you select only the right users for deletion or when you have so many test users that they wouldn’t all be visible on one page of users.

Status: There is a stable release available for Drupal 7.

Cache Lifetime Options

The module, from giorgio79, provides additional cache-time options which can be selected on admin/config/development/performance, with cache lifetimes up to a year. This is especially useful for sites with a lot of static content. Boost is a recommended companion.

Status: There is a stable release available for Drupal 7.

ceaZine

The module, written by Carlos Espino Angulo, allows you to display PDFs in a Colorbox overlay with “page flip” effects and everything. If you want a nice effect for showing off your books, this is a great module. Setting it up is a bit involved, though, so be sure to check the project page for full details. It requires a few of jQuery libraries, and (of course) a recent version of the Libraries module, Views (for an included display of all your online magazines, if you wish to use it), and PDF to ImageField which, in turn, requires ImageMagick, but it uses only CSS, JS, and HTML—no Flash. Nice!

Status: There is a stable release available for Drupal 7.

CkEditor Plugin: Google Doc embedded iframe

The module, authored by Sergio García Fernández, is an extension for the popular CKEditor module, which provides a simple editor button for easily embedding Google Docs iframes in your content.

Status: There is a stable release available for Drupal 7.

Cloze

The module, written by Sivaji Ganesh of KnackForge, provides Cloze question type for the Quiz module. Cloze questions are the type of question where blanks are inserted in the middle of questions, a question type commonly used in language assessments.

Status: There is an alpha release available for Drupal 6.

CodeMirror editor

The module, developed by Darren Mothersele, adds syntax highlighting directly to your Wysiwyg editor experience, using the Codemirror Javascript library, among other nice features. If you have a site where writing and displaying code is important, this could well be useful. It doesn’t even require WYSIWYG (although there are, perhaps, more fully developed alternatives if you simply want syntax highlighting for code entered in a basic text area), much less any particular editor. It’s still under active development, but the plans look interesting, so this is definitely worth keeping in mind for projects which involve presenting code.

Status: There is a development release available for Drupal 7.

Collapsible comment threads

The module, developed by Manuel Garcia, uses jQuery to collapse and expand comment threads, thus helping remove the “visual noise” of deeply threaded comment conversations. This could be especially useful for sites with a forum or very active discussion in blog comments.

Status: There is a beta release available for Drupal 7.

Content Access Admin

The module, by Peter Lieverdink of Creative Contingencies, lists all node grants in a simple table. This is especially handy since special access grants, provided by the Content Access module, are otherwise only visible on the individual nodes.

Content Access Admin displays a table with some filters to see just what you want to, with links on each node title to help you jump right to each node and manage the access.

Status: There is a development release available for Drupal 7.

Date Facets

The module, contributed by Chris Pliakas of Acquia, provides date range facets similar to major search engines so that you can look for search results within a defined date range. Too cool! It integrates with the range of search modules available for Drupal, including Apache Solr, among others. Of course it’s search technology, so implementing it is not as simple as activating the module.

Status: There is a beta release available for Drupal 7.

Dates

The module, created by Chris Charlton of XTND.US, is not actually part of the Date module, but provides a range of additional advanced date formats. This could be especially handy, but beware that disabling or uninstalling this module does not remove the packaged date types and formats which are stored in the Drupal database when the module is enabled.

Status: There is an alpha release available for Drupal 7.

Devel Input Filter

The module, contributed by Garrett Albright of PINGV, aids development of input filters; it provides a page where you can enter test input to see filtered input, without caching. It’s really only for developers who are debugging text filters.

Status: There is a development release available for Drupal 7.

Email Log

The module, authored by Mikael Kundert of Wunderkraut, allows site maintainers to get email notification when there are critical log entries. Log entry tokens would need to be supported for this to be done by Rules, but even so, it greatly simplifies staying on top of important site updates. The user interface and options are almost exactly the same as the Watchdog Digest module’s, except that this module will send you an alert whenever there is a watchdog entry of a given severity level, so you might wish to send only the most critical alerts with this module and use Watchdog Digest to send an email which includes all the other log entries in one email.

Status: There is an RC release available for Drupal 7.

Entity Translation Tabs

The module, contributed by Ryan Weal of Kafei Interactive, gives site editors an edit tab for each enabled language. For the time-being, it only supports nodes, but the roadmap includes support for other entity types, e.g. taxonomy and user entities, among others. This should be great for multilingual sites! It is currently in active development, so I won’t list the potential caveats. Please see the project page for recommended usage.

Status: There is a stable release available for Drupal 7.

Facet API Collapsible The search facet links from Facet API Collapsible

The module, by Peter Droogmans of Attiks, is a “full project” release of a sandbox project created by Acquia’s Katherine Bailey. If the name doesn’t make things especially clear, it probably helps to understand that the Facet API is another Drupal project, which this one extends (although the project description leaves that part out). Faceted search (e.g. searching within a range of pre-selected terms or dates) is what the Facet API does and this widget provides a slick interface for single-click searches.

Status: There is a stable release available for Drupal 7.

Facet API tabs

Categories: Search

When it rains facets, it pours facets. The module is another widget for the Facet API, written by Erno Kaikkonen of Exove Ltd in Finland. It allows you to display search facets in tabs and the project description indicates you’ll want to do “some CSS work to style the tabs”. If a sidebar isn’t what you need, this might be the ticket.

Status: There is a beta release available for Drupal 7.

Field collection feeds

The module, contributed by Howard Ge, provides feeds integration for field collections and also requires Feeds. This could well be useful.

Status: There is an alpha release available for Drupal 7.

Field Collection Tab formatter

Field Collection Tab Formatter imageThe module, written by Lee Rowlands of Australia’s PreviousNext gives us a nifty output for field collections in a tab-set. I can think of at least one place I’d personally like to use this and apparently I’m not the only one since there are already more than 50 sites using the module, barely a month after its release… a pretty solid start! Of course it requires the Field Collection module.

Status: There is a stable release available for Drupal 7.

Field formatter conditions

The module, written by Kristof De Jaeger of Wunderkraut, adds conditions to field formatters. The “Manage Display” tab for each entity type provides per-field configuration of field conditions. It supports fields from the Field API and Display Suite with a number of included conditions and it requires Field formatter settings

Status: There is an alpha release available for Drupal 7.

Flipcard - nodes made into flashcards

The module, by Hugh, helps you create node-based flashcards where the node title is the “answer”. Users can sort based on custom taxonomies and can record whether they knew the answer to each card, so questions they are still having trouble with will show up more often. I used to cut up index cards to make actual paper flashcards to study for exams and more recently, but still some years ago, made them to study on an old Palm device, with great success, so I know the usefulness of flashcarding, but this even offers jPlayer support to use automatically-played audio recordings for the questions. Very cool! You can see the demo site, where you can also learn a bit of Thai, to get an idea of the usefulness this module already offers. There are always new things I’m trying to memorize, so I’ll be a likely candidate to give this module a try. The only thing I’m really hoping it will offer (that I didn’t notice in the demo) is the ability to use the “question” as the “answer” (i.e. to practice both directions), but I doubt that would be too hard to manage. The demo site already offers the option to “view words” (clicking on each word in English takes you to the audio recording of its equivalent in Thai, whereas in practice mode, you hear the word and check to see if you know what it means). Personally, I think the current mode is better for the initial phase of passive comprehension, but for learning to actively speak a language, it’s better to work from “mother tongue” to “other tongue”. So ideally, the module should support working in both directions and keeping track of your answers in both directions, too, but maybe all this is already in the development roadmap.

Status: There is a development release available for Drupal 7.

Invites

The module, developed by Raz Konforti of Linnovate, allows you and/or your site members to invite new members to your site and includes an OG module to provide for inviting people to a particular group; it provides for the creation of a custom, fieldable Invites type and for custom invitation emails with Rules integration, among other interesting features. Google has proven the power of viral campaigns to build a community around a new product with “invitation-only” access… so this could definitely be a good idea for your community site, too. Note: Administrators of OG sites might, alternatively, wish to use the OG Invite People module, which eliminates the registration process for invitees.

Status: There is an alpha release available for Drupal 7.

jQuery selectBox Styles of SELECT element provided by the jQuery selectBox module.

The module, produced by Henry Umansky, provides multiple Javascript-enhanced styling options for SELECT elements. It integrates Cory LaViska's selectBoxjQuery library plugin, so like most such integration modules, it requires the Libraries module as well as the afore-mentioned and eponymous selectBox jQuery library installed in sites/all/libraries, according to the nicely detailed directions on the project page. The selectBox demo is really freakin' cool! There are various options for slick effects in addition to the various ways of building a SELECT box for improved UX.

Status: There is a beta release available for Drupal 7.

JS Watchdog

The module, coded by Bevan Rudge provides Drupal.watchdog() in Javascript to log errors to the database. It’s really mostly a developer tool for people working on Javascript code, but this should be useful. It provides a number of nice features, though, so if you are working on JS code, you might want to take a look at this. Unfortunately, there isn’t a Drupal 7 version (yet), but according to the project page, creating one should be “trivial”, so hopefully we’ll have a nice D7 version ready for use before long, too.

Status: There is a beta release available for Drupal 6.

Leaflet Widget for Geofield Simple geometries supported by the Leaflet Widget

The module, developed by Tom Nightingale of Affinity Bridge, a Geofield widget that provides a Leaflet map and uses the Leaflet widget plugin to work with geometries, making it possible to, for example, mark up web-based maps with the outline of a real estate propery or city district. Of course it requires Libraries and configuring any kind of mapping is never as simple as just activating a module, so be sure to check the project page for more details.

Status: There is a beta release available for Drupal 7.

Logo Block

The module, authored by Kristofer Tengström, provides flexibility in how you display your site logo, including applying an image style, and provides a block you can place anywhere, thus circumventing the limitations of the Drupal logo configuration.

Status: There is a stable release available for Drupal 7.

MC Hammer

The module, written by Nils destoop of Wunderkraut, provides tools and templates for sending sophisticated email newsletters from your Drupal site. There is only a development release, so far, but it already has an impressive feature-set, so if you plan want to produce a newsletter, this could be a great tool to look at, and with Wunderkraut behind this, we can bet this will develop nicely.

Status: There is a development release available for Drupal 7.

Nice Date This is the kind of date display provided by Nice Date

The module, written by Nicholas Thompson of Turner Broadcasting Systems, provides a nicely formatted date to display the publication date of nodes, e.g. blog posts, and comments. It uses a CSS Sprite with all the months, days and years to generate a 41x40px block with the date in it.

Status: There is a stable release available for Drupal 7.

Node Display Field

The module, contributed by Christian Biggins of PreviousNext, provides an alternative teaser display mode which can be enabled for any node, e.g. a “promo” mode. This could be useful.

Status: There is a development release available for Drupal 7.

No term pages

The module, written by Gaël Gosset of Insite, provides an extra option for a vocabulary which blocks the terms in that vocabulary from ever being displayed as a page. With all the different ways that terms are used in a typical Drupal site, not wanting term pages for some vocabularies is a pretty common use case, so now you know—there’s a module for that! This functionality should probably be in “core”.

Status: There is a stable release available for Drupal 7.

OG Invite People

The module, developed by Aleš Rebec, has some features in common with the previously-mentioned Invites module, but it’s only for Organic Groups. One interesting feature of this module is the complete elimination of the registration process. A user entity is during the invitation process and the invitees receive a one-time login link in their invitation emails.

Status: There is a development release available for Drupal 7.

Panels Content Cache

The module, developed by Graham Taylor of Capgemini, provides a content-aware cache plugin which supports caching Panels and other Ctools displays, until their content changes. Isn’t that how caching should work? Caching strategies and the technologies that support them are not trivial and there are a number of options, but this module looks promising for those who are working with Panels content.

Status: There are dev releases available for both Drupal 6 and Drupal 7.

Permissions Grid The simple permissions UI provided by the Permission grid module Links to the Permissions grid on the general permissions page.

The module, by Joachim Noreiko, provides a per-role grid of permissions for modules which declare structured permissions. These permissions can be viewed, on a separate page for each role, with the entity types in rows and permission verbs in columns. Of course it doesn’t eliminate the normal sea of permissions… but for the basics related to your site content, this helps simplify things. This is very nicely done and I’ll be sure to use it.

Status: There is a stable release available for Drupal 7.

Retina Images

The module, contributed by Michael Prasuhn, provides the option for core image styles to output a high resolution version of images for high DPI or retina displays. It can be used to return high resolution images for all devices. There can be very little difference in file-size between a low-resolution, high-quality image and a high-resolution, low-quality image. But the high-resolution image will work better on high-resolution devices and still look fine when scaled down for display on a normal-resolution monitor. This module already has a strong user-base, considering its recent release and the developer seems to be doing a great job managing the issues, so if improving mobile UX is important for your site, this module might well be worth considering.

Status: There is a beta release available for Drupal 7.

Rich Snippets

The module, developed by Chris Pliakas of Acquia, enhances the search results to provide nicer “snippets” of content returned in search results, much like those displayed by major search engines. Instead of just displaying the teaser or first characters of an article, it displays that with ellipses and the user’s search term within the context of the content. Very nice! Caveat: Be sure to read the “Usage” and “Gotchas” on the project page. Configuring a perfect site search is a non-trivial task, but this definitely looks helpful and works with core search and Apache Solr.

Status: There is a development release available for Drupal 7.

Role memory limit The simple configuration for the role_memory_limit module.

The module, developed by Kevin Yousef, is a small module which allows you to configure separate PHP memory limits, per role. For normal users, the memory limit could be set to 128MB, while the admin interface, which can require much more memory, can be allocated what it needs. Of course you need access to change the memory limit in your php.ini file. Since the memory limit is set per-user and this often has to be higher than normal for a Drupal site, just because of the greater needs for the site administrator, logical configuration with this module could, in theory, dramatically improve the number of concurrent users your site can handle. I’ll certainly be giving this a try.

Status: There is a stable release available for Drupal 7.

Scoville

The module, produced by Garrett Albright of PINGV, which gets its name from the “hotness” scale used for describing a variety of chili pepper’s level of spiciness, helps you easily display a block or page of your site’s “hottest” content. For more complicated use cases, you’ll probably want to use the Radioactivity module, instead, but since configuring it can be a bit of a chore, people who just want to get a basic “hot content” block into their site might want to give this one a try.

Status: There is a development release available for Drupal 7.

Search API Taxonomy

Categories: Search

The module, developed by Steven Jones of ComputerMinds, adds some extra features for integrating taxonomy into the Search API, including indexing the taxonomy term parents and display of a facet (using Facet API) for top-level terms. It’s still in development, so additional features could well be added, but this already looks very useful.

Status: There is a development release available for Drupal 7.

Taxonomy Freetag Detection

The module, by Leigh Morresi, extends Term reference fields of type Autocomplete term widget (free tagging) with an option to add a button to scan other fields (e.g. your node “body”) to and add words which it finds which match existing terms in that vocabulary. Of course you might need to eliminate any terms it adds, e.g. a word in your document might match an existing term, but have the wrong context for the meaning of the term (e.g. “Features” is a taxonomy term here on the Cocomore Drupal site, but if I simply talk about the features of a module, I’m not going to tag the article with that term). This looks pretty simple and very useful, especially if your site uses the standard autocomplete “tagging” widget, which is the only widget this module complements. See the project page for configuration tips.

Status: There is an alpha release available for Drupal 7.

Twitter Profile The Twitter Profile module in demo use.

The module, created by Rishikesh Bhatkar, provides a nice, very configurable, Twitter profile block which can show any or all of: your Twitter profile info, counts for Tweets, Favorites, Listed, Followers, and Following, and avatars for your Followers and Following, with a configurable size and number of avatars displayed. It also includes some theming presets for the block. This is much more configurable than many of the other Twitter blocks. What would be nice for community sites would be allowing each user to display their Twitter profile on their user profile page, but it looks like the block only supports one Twitter account.

Status: There is a stable release available for Drupal 7.

User Pic Kit

The module, written by Daniel Phin, allows your site’s users to choose a user image (avatar) to represent their account, from any of a number of providers, while still supporting a Drupal core image upload option. Each user can choose which provider they wish to use. The included third-party image host providers include Gravatar (which requires the Gravatar integration module) and Robohash, but with the add-on User Pic Kit Extras! module, you can add Twitter, Facebook, and other avatar hosts. You can also locally cache the remote pictures (such as Gravatar) and use Drupal image styles on the downloaded pictures! There is even a documented API which allows you to implement other image hosts. This looks like fun and can certainly improve the user experience for configuring a new user account profile for users who already have an established online persona.

Status: There is an alpha release available for Drupal 7.

User Search to People Administration

The module, developed by Benjamin Melançon of Agaric, removes the user search functionality from your site (for normal users) and moves it into /admin/people/search (a tab on the /admin/people). Most sites probably have no need for visitors to search user accounts, but administrators can still find such a search useful. By moving the user search tab into the “admin realm”, this also opens up the option of allowing people to view user profiles without also providing the “search users” functionality (since, by default in Drupal 7, if you want to block access to /user/search for a particular role, you need to leave the permission to “access user profiles” unchecked. So in addition to moving the user search functionality into a tab where it’s convenient for site administrators, it also breaks this unnecessary relationship between access to user profiles and to using the user search feature. This looks useful for many common use cases, perhaps even more ideal for most sites than the Drupal default.

Status: There is a stable release available for Drupal 7.

View mode per Role

The module, developed by Edouard Cunibil allows site administrators to set a view mode for content depending on the user role, with configuration in the content type edit form. This can be useful when you want your content to be displayed differently, to different user roles, but do note that this is not a content access module, so if you must prevent certain roles from being able to gain any kind of access to certain fields, you should consider the Field Permissions module.

Status: There is an alpha release available for Drupal 7.

Watchdog digest

Configuration for the Watchdog digest module.The module, created by Edgár Prunk-Éger, sends watchdog entries by email in a digested format, so you don’t get a separate email for each entry (of a type where you might want to send a message to a site administrator). This looks very useful, but the current project page is very lacking in detail and there is no link to the configuration, so it took looking at the code to figure out where to adjust settings for this. It adds a fieldset to the “Logging and errors” configuration page (/admin/config/development/logging), where you can configure the number of messages per e-mail, the e-mail address(es), and the severity level threshold, which can be set anywhere between “debug (all)” and “emergency”, although probably for anything that extreme you might want a Rules-triggered action to immediately email the site administrator.

Status: There is an alpha release available for Drupal 7.

WYSIWYG Configuration with TinyMCE and Shortcodes

The module, coded by Jurriaan Roelofs, is a Features-generated module which helps streamline a particular Wysiwyg configuration which is rather sophisticated. If it happens that you want all the features included here, it could be a nice way to get it all configured. But if you want something simpler or wish to use a different editor, etc, this is probably not for you. It includes Media integration and all kinds of things that a lot of sites won’t use, but which are notoriously tricky and time-consuming to work out, so if this kind of rich configuration is what you want, then all you need to do is download all the dependencies (see the project page, there are a ton!) and then simply enable this module to have it automatically enable and configure all its dependencies. This looks very useful if it happens to be exactly what you need; if not, it could be also be useful as a quick route to experimenting with a lot of modules and features that you might want to use.

Status: There is a beta release available for Drupal 7.

Oct 11 2012
Oct 11
Modules of the month story banner illustration.

Once again, I’ve surveyed the looong list of modules from the past month (September 2012). This article highlights and summarizes the features of some I found most notable. As usual, the selection and any opinions are my own and the order of appearance here is strictly alphabetical. Category terms are links to Drupal.org projects categorized with the terms. I’ve added terms for modules whose description lacked appropriate categories or might have been missing categories I thought were appropriate.

This month, while we didn’t get any new novelty modules which require bad judgment, there was one which I thought was funny and which otherwise serves no real purpose, other than perhaps to provide an example of object oriented PHP design with interfaces, etc: the module, written by Jess of University of Wisconsin-Madison and Drupal.org’s reigning IRC queen. Its very short (non)description is sure to make you smile:

Q: You’re a vegetarian; why do you get to have the blt project namespace?

A: The BLT is actually a base implementation; a properly architected interface does not mandate bacon.

Now let’s get on to the serious modules…

*/ Apache Solr Exclude Node

Categories: Search

The module, by Jens Beltofte of Propeople, helps to exclude individual nodes from Apache Solr, which can be useful when you have indexed a specific content type, and want to exclude a few nodes of that type. A checkbox, “Exclude from Apache Solr” is added to the node edit forms for selected content types. It requires Apache Solr Search.

Status: There are stable releases available for both Drupal 6 and Drupal 7.

Apache Solr Field Collection

Categories: Search

The module, created by David Rothstein of Advomatic, allows content stored within a Field Collection to be indexed by Apache Solr search as part of the entity that the field collection is attached to. Enabling the Facet API module allows fields attached to the field collection to be available to add as search facets.

Status: There is an alpha release available for Drupal 7.

Architecture

The module, by Sheldon Rampton of DrupalSquad, provides reports documenting how your Drupal site is architected. These reports include “Site Entities”, which lists all content types, taxonomies, and other Drupal entities that have been defined for your website with a list of all fields for each fieldable entity; “Site Taxonomies” lists all taxonomies and their associated terms; and “Site Variables” lists all variables and their values. The purpose of this module is to provide some easy-to-read documentation of how your site is put together.

It looks like there are a number of other interesting features in the development roadmap, but this already looks very useful for documenting the way a complex Drupal project is put together.

Status: There is a development release available for Drupal 7.

Attribution

The module, written by Marcus Deglos of Techito, adds configurable attribution text at the bottom of your site content’s body field, so that if it’s scraped, attribution will normally be included.

Status: There is a development release available for Drupal 7.

Better 404

The module, contributed by Yvan Marques, is based on an article from A List Apart. It aims to provide more useful information when a visitor reaches your 404 page.

Status: There is a stable release available for Drupal 6. This looks very promising, so I’m hopeful there will also be a Drupal 7 release and that perhaps functionality like this could be part of Drupal 8 “core”.

Commons Like

The module, by Ezra Barnett Gildesgame of Acquia, allows users to “like” content and comments using the Commons “Like” widget and the Rate module and VotingAPI and has a stated goal to be expanded to be useful on sites that are not on the Drupal Commons distribution.

Status: There is a development release available for Drupal 7.

Commons Radioactivity

The module, also contributed by Acquia’s Ezra Barnett Gildesgame provides integration with the Radioactivity module to help identify the most active content and includes Views displays to accelerate the site-building process.

Status: There is a development release available for Drupal 7.

Conditional Flags

The module, coded by Sebastian of Taller, provides additional API features for the Flag module, for custom conditions between flags, so that logically, if, when one flag is set, another flag should be unset, this can be done automatically. There are also plans to build a user interface for site builders.

Status: There is a beta release available for Drupal 7.

Content Tab

The module, coded by Ashish Thakur of Srijan Technologies, India, makes it easy for site administrators or other users with appropriate permissions to view the content written by a particular user; it provides a page with sub-tabs for each content type created by a given user and a tab on each user page which lists all content written by that user and eliminates the need to build up this kind of functionality with Views. It also provides a admin UI to configure various display options, among other features lacking in the core “Tracker” module.

Status: There is a stable release available for Drupal 7.

Context Get

The module, created by Peter Vanhee of Marzee Labs, provides a Context condition plugin for $_GET arguments. It allows you to activate contexts with arguments like local?context=home or local?context=pro and was created to fill a feature request for Context.

Status: There is a stable release available for Drupal 7.

Deploy Services Client

The module, by David Rothstein of Advomatic, provides a Services client which communicates with Deployment endpoints and helps perform other operations on the content which the Deployment module does not directly support such as deleting or unpublishing content on an endpoint. Note that this is an API for developers only; there is no user interface.

Status: There is a beta release available for Drupal 7.

Drush Permissions

Categories: Drush

The module, created by Klaas Van Waesberghe of dotProjects, enables Drupal site administrators to easily query user permissions from the command line. It can display reports of all permissions with module and role filters, identify if a user has a given permission, or list all roles a permission is assigned to. It is not actually a module (but I’ve included it here since, like Drush, it’s on Drupal.org as a module and looks pretty darn useful). It should not be installed as a module, but as a Drush plugin, i.e. use drush dl drush_permissions to install, but from outside a Drupal root directory.

Status: There is a development release available for Drupal 7.

eKaay - QR Code Login

The module, written by Daniel Wehner of erdfisch, allows users of a Drupal website to log into their accounts by scanning a QR code on the PC screen with a smartphone, thus streamlining the login process for users on devices where entering username and password tends to be less convenient.

Status: There is a development release available for Drupal 7.

Facetapi Multiselect

Categories: Search

The module, another contribution from David Rothstein, provides a multiselect widget plugin for the Facet API module which allows faceted searches to use a multiple select dropdown for drilling down into the search results. It’s primarily designed to help integrate faceted search with JavaScript plugins such as the jQuery UI MultiSelect Widget (where this module has primarily been tested), jQuery UI Multiselect, and Chosen.

Status: There is a beta release available for Drupal 7.

Field Orbit

The module, coded by Elliott Foster of Four Kitchens, provides an Orbit slideshow display mode for image fields and field collections with images and much of it is a Drupal 7 port of the Field Slideshow module.

Status: There is a stable release available for Drupal 7.

Field UI permissions

The module is yet another coded by David Rothstein. It provides independent permissions for managing fields attached to each type of entity so that you could, for example, give an “administrator” role permissions like “administer users” and “administer taxonomy” but reserve the rights to modify the underlying field structure for a “developer” role. This could certainly be handy for complex use cases.

Status: There is a beta release available for Drupal 7.

Godwin's Law

The module, by Tobby Hagler of Phase2 Technology, is helpful for managing online forums and allows you to automatically moderate threads and close the discussion when certain keywords are found. By default, the module is set to close comments when Godwin’s law is invoked, but other keywords can also be used as triggers.

Status: There is a stable release available for Drupal 7.

Hide Site

The module, developed by Barry Fisher of Real Life Design, provides a way to practically hide a particular version of a site from search engines even though it’s on a publicly-available development server without needing to patch your .htaccess or robots.txt files. Getting into the particulars of how it works is beyond the scope of this article, but it’s fairly simple to configure and should help keep a site out of the public eye until you are ready to officially release it.

Status: There is a beta release available for Drupal 7.

highlight js

The module, contributed by Juned Kazi of ICF International, integrates the highlight.js library to provide language-appropriate syntax highlighting for code examples on your site. It automatically detects the language, but you can also set the language for any block of code to ensure correct behavior. Of course it depends on the Libraries API highlight.js library, installed per the directions in this module’s README.txt file.

Status: There is a development release available for Drupal 7.

Image Field Cross Slide Slideshow

The module, created by David Whitchurch-Bennett of Drupology allows images uploaded into an image field to be displayed with the jQuery Cross Slide plugin as a display formatter for the image field within the “Manage Display” settings of your content type.

Status: There is a development release available for Drupal 7.

Image link to preset

The module, written by Gabor Szanto extends on the two core-provided options for setting link for an image field (i.e. “link to content” and “link to file”) to also allow you to link to any image preset for the image. It requires the Field formatter settings API module and definitely looks useful for many use cases involving sites with images.

Status: There is a development release available for Drupal 7.

Image or Video field formatter

The module, developed by Chris Cohen of Tigerfish Interactive, adds a field formatter for a media field that can either be an image or a video and allows for separate thumbnails depending on whether an image or a video is displayed, e.g. so that you can show a “play icon” over thumbnails for video. The shadowbox Javascript library is used to display the full image or video when the thumbnail is clicked. The media module is normally used in conjunction with this, but other configurations are possible. Setting this up is non-trivial and the full details from the module description and README file should be consulted.

Status: There is a stable release available for Drupal 7.

Live Feedback

The module, written by J. Renée Beach of Acquia, is similar to Google+’s feedback system; it leverages the html2canvas library to allow users to quickly report issues to site maintainers from within the context of the page where the issue occurred. By making it easier for users to report issues with all the detail needed for developers to replicate and resolve them, this module helps ensure that issues do get reported and resolved.

Status: There is a development release available for Drupal 7 and given that Acquia is behind this work, we can hope that Drupal 8 might actually include such functionality in core.

Masonry

Masonry is a dynamic grid layout plugin for jQuery. Think of it as the flip-side of CSS floats. Whereas floating arranges elements horizontally then vertically, Masonry arranges elements vertically, positioning each element in the next open spot in the grid. The result minimizes vertical gaps between elements of varying height, just like a mason fitting stones in a wall.

The module, written by Peter Anderson of PackWeb, makes the jQuery Masonry plugin available to Drupal as a library. It contains sub-modules for integrating with fields and Views; its field formatter allows you to display multi-value fields in a Masonry grid layout and integrates with existing formatters so existing formatter-specific options, e.g. Colorbox settings, are retained. It currently supports the field types: image, “long text” and “long text with summary”, and like most modules which integrate a Javascript library, it relies on the Libraries module. The Field formatter settings module is also required for the Masonry field formatter and of course Views is required for Masonry views. Add the Masonry javascript and configure according to the directions on the project page.

Status: There is a development release available for Drupal 7.

Memory profiler

The module, written by Tim Hilliard of Acquia, logs peak PHP memory usage to the Drupal watchdog and is light-weight enough it shouldn’t add to the memory errors you would be trying to resolve when you activate it. It can be used in a production environment, where enabling Devel would not be appropriate. Knowing this is available when we need it will make all Drupal developers sleep easier.

Status: There is a stable release available for Drupal 7.

Mobile Switch Block

The module, coded by Siegfried Neumann, extends the Mobile Switch module with a theme switch block with links to manually switch between your mobile or desktop theme and is compatible with Mobile jQuery. Of course it requires Mobile Switch (version 7.x-1.4+) and Respond.js is recommended. The block could be especially useful for people testing the site, but can also provide better options for users of mobile devices who might, for whatever reason, prefer to use your site’s desktop theme rather than the automatically-selected mobile theme.

Status: There is a beta release available for Drupal 7.

Mozilla Persona

The module, coded by Daniel Pepin of Digital Bungalow, adds Mozilla Persona functionality to your site so users with a Persona account can authenticate without need for a site-specific password; you can still require registration. It should nicely enhance the usability of most sites which require login. It depends on the Session API module.

Status: There is a beta release available for Drupal 7.

Panels Ajax Tabs

The module, developed by Patrick Hayes of HighWire Press / Stanford University, provides the ability to have a tabbed panel-pane that displays mini-panels within it and allows you to pass context from the “master” panel to the mini-panels via AJAX.

Status: There is a development release available for Drupal 7.

Password Field

Categories: Fields

The module, created by James Sinclair of OPC IT, provides for creating fields that store passwords, stored in encrypted format and (by default) will not display them on the website. This is useful, for example, if you are creating a website that integrates with other services and you would like users to be able to store their password more securely than using a text field, so could certainly be useful in unusual use cases. That said, the module description also bears a strong reminder not to use this module if you have any alternative.

Status: There is a beta release available for Drupal 7.

Passwordless This is still an experimental module, and using it on production sites is not recommended.

The module, written by Antonio Savorelli of Communikitchen, provides a replacement for the standard Drupal login form to allow logging in without using a password. Instead, every login is done via a “one-time login” link, as if the user had forgotten their password. This could be useful on sites where users are not expected to log in very often, but there are still a few things about the way this works that makes me nervous; e.g., currently you need to confirm a change of email address at the new address, but not at the old address, which would make it simple for someone who jumps on your computer, while you are logged in and your back is turned, to take over your (Drupal site) account. That said, as it’s still considered experimental and not for use on production sites, we can hope such issues are addressed by the time this module is released as “stable”. Once that’s true, I can certainly imagine using this for some sites.

Status: There is a development release available for Drupal 7.

PDF Archive

The module, authored by Brian Gilbert of Realityloop, allows you to generate PDF archives of any entity; generation is triggered by Rules actions and you can configure the entity view mode and role of the simulated user for each rule. It includes a Feature as an example for configuration and otherwise requires the Libraries API module, with TCPDF library installed, and the Rules module.

Status: There is an RC release available for Drupal 7.

Permissions per Webform

The module, written by Daniel Imhoff of UW-Platteville, lets you set standard (normally global) Webform permissions for each individual Webform, e.g. “Access webform results”, “Edit all webform submissions”, “Delete all webform submissions”, “Access own webform submissions ”, etc. It adds a “Permission settings” fieldset tab to each Webform node.

Status: There is a development release available for Drupal 7.

PixGather

The module, developed by Mike Kadin of Merlin Education, is a Drupal Module and PhoneGap application that allows users to easily upload photos to your Drupal site. It was developed so that guests at a wedding could share their pictures, but it’s suitable for a variety of use cases. Currently, the mobile app part of this is only for Android, but an iOS version is planned.

Status: There is an alpha release available for Drupal 7.

Plugin tools

The module, written by Chris Skene of PreviousNext, allows developers to browse the various plugins provided by different modules, information normally hidden in the code. The Drupal 7 versions supports Chaos Tools plugins, but it’s possible that a Drupal 8 version will work with “core” plugins. See the project page for more details, but this definitely looks useful for developers working with cTools.

Status: There is a beta release available for Drupal 7.

Render As

The module, by Stuart Clark of Realityloop, allows you to see page elements as they will be displayed to various users or roles without needing to switch users. Using it is not easy to succinctly summarize, so you should check the project page for directions, but this definitely looks like a useful project for developers and site builders.

Status: There is a beta release available for Drupal 7.

Resumable Download

The module, authored by Sina Salek adds support in Drupal for resuming incomplete downloads, which could be very useful for users on slower connections or for larger downloads and provides a number of useful configuration options.

Status: There are beta releases available for both Drupal 6 and Drupal 7.

Session Cache API If you are not a Drupal programmer, then you may stop reading now. Just enable this module if another module tells you to.

The module, written by Rik de Boer of flink, is a simple two-function API for programmers to cache and retrieve pieces of user/session -specific information, and works well even with anonymous users in a cached environment. It is not for caching large amounts of information or content, nor should it be used for anything sensitive, but definitely looks interesting as a replacement for the $_SESSION variable, which may not an option with Varnish or similar caching engines. Developers who find this short summary of interest should definitely read the directions on the project page because using this is not exactly trivial.

Status: There is an alpha release available for Drupal 7.

Session cookie lifetime

The module, created by Kornel Lugosi of Pronovix, provides an admin interface for setting the lifetime of the session cookie. This could definitely be useful for sites where convenience is more important than absolute security.

Status: There is a stable release available for Drupal 7.

StatsD

The module, developed by Owen Loy of Acquia, provides Drupal integration for StatsD and is intended for sites that have an existing StatsD / Graphite setup. It’s preconfigured to send statistics for Watchdog entries, user logins, page views, and active user sessions, but developers can also configure it to send custom statistics. It definitely looks useful.

Status: There are beta releases available for both Drupal 6 and Drupal 7.

Suggested Modules

The module, written by Kevin Quillen of Inclind allows module maintainers to enter a “suggests” property to their module info file, with a link to a relevant module project page. This is a step down from “required” modules; it simply suggests other modules one might normally wish to use in conjunction with your module. Of course, for this to work, modules both need to have “suggests” entries on their .info pages, and users need to have this module installed and enabled. I think this is a great idea and could well be an improvement in “core”; otherwise, until it’s widely used by both site builders and coders, it won’t be very useful. Actually, combining this with Module supports (which still needs a Drupal 7 release) is a more likely future development; in any case it would be helpful if we got such functionality into Drupal core.

Status: There is a stable release available for Drupal 7.

System Status AJAX

The module, contributed by Chris Pliakas of Acquia, a small module which loads the system status check via AJAX so that the admin/config page is rendered more quickly, even when some of the status checks are delayed. Nice! I’m hoping this functionality is going into the System module in Drupal 8; in the meantime, this should definitely improve the user experience for Drupal 7 site administrators.

Status: There is a stable release available for Drupal 7.

Textbook

The module, coded by the prolific Bryan Ollendyke, of Penn State University as part of the ELMS Initiative, provides Features which include CSS styles, WYSIWYG settings, and CSS3 page templates to help any theme provide consistent textbook styling for the production of online course materials. Users don’t need to be expert in CSS / HTML, but even experts should find this helps streamline their development. If you are producing an online learning site, this module, along with many others by this fine contributor, should be very useful.

Status: There is a beta release available for Drupal 7.

Timezone Picker The timezone picker module from Nate Haug.

The module, written by Nathan Haug of Lullabot, provides a JavaScript-based timezone picker to replace the default Drupal timezone list with a clickable world map to select a user’s timezone and Geolocation support for compatible browsers, so setting a timezone is greatly simplified. Enabling it replaces the default timezone list on the site’s “Regional settings” page and user profile pages. All Javascript is included; no libraries need to be downloaded and quicksketch also wrote this to be mobile-friendly. Very cool!

Status: There is a stable release available for Drupal 7.

Typo The Typo module’s user interface

The module, developed by Roman Arkharov, provides a simple way for site visitors to report typographical errors in your site content; all they need to do is select text which includes a typo and press Ctrl + Enter to automatically notify the site administrator. It includes preset Rules events you can use, as well as Views for administrators to see a list of reported typos, among other useful integrations. This could definitely be worth checking out.

Status: There is a development release available for Drupal 7.

Views fields combine

The module, contributed by Stefan Borchert of undpaul, allows you to combine the output of Views fields, separated by any desired custom text. Normally you would do this with "Global: Custom text", however if one field is optional, your output would include an unwanted separator. Once this module is enabled, you’ll have access to a new field type, "Global: Combined fields", where you can select the fields you would like to combine.

Development on Views fields combine is sponsored by undpaul.

Status: There is a stable release available for Drupal 7.

Weather block

The module, developed by Antti Alamäki of Soprano Brain Alliance, provides blocks and pages in which you can display forecasts from Yahoo Weather, World Weather Online, or weather.com and may include additional future service integrations. Drupal 7 needed more support for weather forecast integration, so it’s good to see this and I’ll certainly be giving this a try on sites where I might want a Weather block.

Status: There is a stable release available for Drupal 7.

Sep 12 2012
Sep 12
Modules of the month story banner illustration.

There are tons of new Drupal modules that got released in August; almost 200 module project pages were created. Some of them aren’t listed here because they currently have no release; some don’t even have code (yet). But a lot of very promising modules were released in August, perhaps due to the extra community involvement around DrupalCon Munich. There were even a couple novelty modules, good for a laugh if not much else: the Honey Badger module (“Honey badger don't care. Honey badger always clears cache.”), contributed by Camilla Krag Jensen of the Danish news site, Dagbladet Information, is one such module worth looking at if you need something to make you smile. The module, by Sally Young of Lullabot, “randomly swaps values of the variable table around.” Well, maybe it would if there were actually any code behind the project. Both require Bad Judgement. I suppose the latter project page could have been created for a new Lullabot training, but I’m curious what inspired Ms Jensen. Anyway, the women of Drupal came through with some laughs.

A more useful looking set of modules was also released in August by French developer, Guillaume Viguier-Just: The module is required for any of its related modules, which include Base Page, Base Article, Base Link, Base Media, and Base Apps. These modules are “… meant to be a set of features that will provide the "lowest common denominator" for building Drupal apps and distributions.” The Base modules depend on Apps Compatible, another new module from August which I think will be in very wide use before long (Apps Compatible is covered below). There are also a couple new modules for the Spark distribution (listed below), several new Drush extensions, and a number of other modules which look good for boosting developer/themer productivity.

As with previous editions of this article, all modules are listed in alphabetical order. If categories were missing on the Drupal.org project page, I’ve added appropriate categories. Additional caveat: I have not tested all of these modules and have not fully tested any of them. They are new modules and some come with new bugs, so beware.

*/ Anonymous login

The module, authored by Mike Stefanello and sponsored by Workout Spots, provides a login page with redirect to the originally requested page if an anonymous visitor to your site follows a link which requires higher privileges. The example use case is your site sends out emails with links which require a user is logged in; but subscribers to your email list get an “Access denied” when following the links (if not already logged in); a usability nightmare. Anonymous login to the rescue! Very nice.

Status: There is a stable release available for Drupal 7.

Apps compatible As well as providing methods for shared components, Apps compatible includes a collection of methods handy for developing interoperable features and apps.

The module, by Nedjo Rogers, is already reported in use on 278 sites, which shows there must be a use case for this module that was only released a month ago; I anticipate a lot more sites will be using it shortly. It helps alleviate compatibility issues between different Apps and Features caused by conflicting dependencies, etc.

Status: There is an alpha release available for Drupal 7.

Backup and Migrate SFTP

The module, by Chad Robinson, extends the very popular Backup & Migrate module with SFTP, instead of simply FTP when setting up “Destinations”. This is a GoodThing™ for security. I’ll definitely be keeping an eye on this.

Status: There are dev releases available for both Drupal 6 and Drupal 7.

Better Statistics

The module, authored by Eric Peterson of Tableau Software, extends the core Statistics module and collects additional data such as cache status and user agent without adding a lot of extra performance overhead. This could certainly be useful.

Status: There are stable releases available for Drupal 6 and 7.

Block Upload

The module, created by Alexander of ADCI, LLC, provides a simple block with an uploader for the node being viewed, so users who don’t have full “edit” permissions for the content can still upload files and images (or if all you want to do is upload a new attachment, you don’t need to open the content in edit mode). Cool!

Status: There are stable releases available for both Drupal 6 and Drupal 7.

Book Title Override

The module, written by Bryan Ollendyke of Penn State University, allows you to change the titles displayed in Drupal’s “Book” navigation so they don’t have to be an exact match to the constituent node titles. This eliminates one limitation that many might have been frustrated by.

Status: There are beta releases available for both Drupal 6 and Drupal 7.

Chamfer defaults

The module, also by Bryan Ollendyke maintains the default settings for the Chamfer theme, an Omega sub-theme with full HTML5 adaptive theme originally used for presenting online courses on the Penn State site (and another contribution from Ollendyke). It allows you to easily move defaults or your settings from one site to another.

Status: There is a beta release available for Drupal 7 and a development release available for Drupal 6.

Close Block

Categories: Content

The module, is another contribution by Alexander of ADCI, LLC. It allows users to close any block configured to be user-closable. Blocks can be configured to stay closed or reopen the next time a page with that block is displayed, be displayed a certain number of times before closing is permanent, or re-appear after a period of time. There are global settings, per-theme settings, and settings in the configuration for each block.

Status: There are stable releases available for both Drupal 6 and Drupal 7.

Configuration Interchange and Management

The module, coded by Thomas Fini Hansen of Reload!, is the first module I’ve seen which works with the new Drupal 8 Configuration Management system. Of course it’s still early for Drupal 8, so it goes without saying that all features are experimental, but this is intended to provide a simple way to save snapshots of configuration settings, roll back to snapshots, and deploy snapshots from one site to another. This could find a place in core by the time of “feature freeze”.

Status: There is a development release available for Drupal 8.

Cron Cache

The module, written by Will Vincent of Marker Seven, allows individual caches to be cleared at configurable intervals.

Status: There is a development release available for Drupal 7.

CSS Flipper

The module, written by Tsachi Shlidor, can automatically create and maintain a “flipped version” of any RTL or LTR CSS code, which can greatly streamline developing and maintaining themes. Nice!

Status: There is a beta release available for Drupal 7.

Dev Tools

The module, produced by Yuriy Babenko of Suite101, is “a collection of PHP classes and functions which help with and simplify Drupal module development”. From the looks of things, this could well be useful, perhaps especially for debugging.

Status: There is a development release available for Drupal 7.

Disable "Language neutral"

The module, written by rysmax, allows you to show only a sub-set of otherwise-allowable language options for each content-type, which means you can remove such nonsense as “language neutral” from the selectable languages for a Blog entry… Nice and simple, and most content types on most multilingual sites would probably benefit from this.

Status: There is a stable release available for Drupal 7.

Dismiss

The module, produced by Chris Ruppel of Four Kitchens, allows you to “click away” Drupal messages so that they are out of your way without a page refresh. It’s a simple module with no configuration, but it could be handy for when you are documenting the steps of a process and end up with Drupal messages displayed that might distract from a screenshot.

Status: There is a stable release available for Drupal 7.

Drupal-up

The module, written by Kosta Harlan of DesignHammer, is “a Drush extension that facilitates building virtual machines for local development of Drupal sites.” It includes blueprints for virtual machines for hosting Drupal 6–8 -based sites. Looks interesting.

Status: There is a beta release available “for Drupal 7” (presumably, like Drush, the Drupal version is not really applicable).

Drush Hosts

The module, written by Christopher Gervais of Koumbit.org, provides Drush commands for managing /etc/hosts, so you can easily add and remove entries. This definitely looks useful.

Status: There is a stable release available for Drupal 7.

Drush Issue Queue Commands

The module, produced by Greg Anderson, is a Drush extension which includes commands which help manage a Drupal project issue queue, making things simpler for beginners and faster for everyone. I’m sold!

Status: There is a stable release available for Drupal 7.

Entity RDF

The module, developed by Stéphane Corlosquet, the primary maintainer of Drupal’s core RDF, is a replacement for Drupal core RDF, which provides tight integration between the RDF mappings and Entity API and attempts to solve shortcomings of the Drupal 7 core RDF module. This is worth keeping an eye on.

Status: There is a development release available for Drupal 7.

Feeds YouTube Fetcher

The module, contributed by Travis Tidwell of AllPlayers.com and sponsored by Anglican TV, is a YouTube feeds fetcher which is able to overcome the situation where feeds are paginated, thus getting all of the videos in a feed rather than just the first 50. This could well be useful.

Status: There is a development release available for Drupal 7.

Flag expire

The module, by Joachim Noreiko, can use either the Date or Time period module to create flags which can be active for a preset period of time or which begin/end at specified times.

Status: There is a beta release available for Drupal 7.

Flatfish

The module, developed by Mike Crittenden of Drupal Connect, uses the Ruby gem, Flatfish, to help scrape HTML data and import it into a Drupal site, useful, for instance when migrating an older website into Drupal. It includes other code to help with the migration of the data. I know there are other popular modules for this kind of task, but this could also be worth keeping in mind.

Status: There is a beta release available for Drupal 7.

Icon fonts Icon Fonts can easily be changed for color, size, drop-shadows and other effects

The module, created by Gábor Hojtsy of Acquia as part of the Spark distribution definitely looks interesting. Icon fonts allow you to easily change size, shape, color, strokes and other attributes. See this CSS Tricks post about icon fonts for an example of how useful they can be as a replacement for standard icons.

Status: There is an alpha release available for Drupal 7.

Image CAPTCHA Refresh

The module, produced by Dmitry Drozdik of VolcanoIdeas, helps with one of the problems of Captcha; if the image is “too easy”, bots can parse the Captcha—too hard and humans have a hard time and might need to refresh the page a few times, which can be a real hassle if they have completely filled out a form. This brings in a feature that is missing in some Captcha plugins: the ability to get a new Captcha without refreshing the whole page and should result in less frustration for users and a lighter load on your server.

Status: There is a stable release available for Drupal 7.

Leaflet More Maps The Stamen watercolor effect and Thunderforest cycling maps are both options with Leaflet Maps

The module, created by Rik de Boer of flink, expands your mapping horizons beyond Google maps, allowing you to include maps from a variety of alternative map providers, such as the watercolor-effect maps from Stamen or the trail and cycling maps from Thunderforest. As its name implies, it also depends on the Leaflet Javascript library.

Status: There is a beta release available for Drupal 7.

LGP

The module, which stands for “Lazy Guinea Pig”, created by develCuy and sponsored by dilygent, is another developer toolset which will help you debug your Drupal code. It can write to a temporary log file, works in places where Devel’s dsm() won’t, and has a number of other features that make me think this is worth knowing about. It also includes a number of Drush commands.

Status: There are development releases available for Drupal 7 and Drupal 8.

Logic Block

The module, produced by Pat Lockley, provides a number of configuration options for blocks to allow site administrators to easily perform such actions as merging blocks, replacing one block with another in particular circumstances (e.g. if one block is empty or based on language, role, user ID, etc), and other nifty tricks. I’ve only just experimented with it a bit, but it definitely looks useful.

Status: There is a stable release available for Drupal 7.

Mobile friendly navigation toolbar

Categories: Mobile

The module, produced by Gábor Hojtsy of Acquia, is another module developed and released as part of the Spark distribution. As the name implies, it provides a better toolbar for mobile navigation. Like the rest of Spark, it provides a way for us to test and use awesome new Drupal 8 features in our Drupal 7 projects. Very nice!

Status: There is an alpha release available for Drupal 7.

Module configure links Module configure links opens the config page for a newly enabled module

The module, by Brad Erickson of ChapterThree, helps solve a typical Drupal problem, especially common when working on sites with a lot of modules: you enable a new module, but then need to search around to find its configuration page. This module presents obvious links for configuring any modules activated, for a smoother Drupal site-building workflow. If only one module is activated, it automatically redirects you to the configuration page for that module. I’ve tried it, I like it, and I’ll definitely be using it on more than just my local “module testing” site.

Status: There are stable releases available for both Drupal 6 and Drupal 7.

OpenFolio Features OpenFolio is a distribution for photographers or other visual artists who want to create a web portfolio of their work.

The module, developed by Ted Bowman of Six Mile Tech, was released as part of the OpenFolio distribution, also released by Mr Bowman in August. it contains no custom code, but handy exported content types, Views displays, Panels, and other useful bits to help streamline the process of creating an online portfolio site to display visual art. Of course it depends on Features.

Status: There is a development release available for Drupal 7.

OpenLayers Filters

The module, by Pol Dell'Aiera, provides a text filter which replaces a token representing any OpenLayers map preset with the map, right within your content.

Status: There is a stable release available for Drupal 7.

Override css

The module, authored by Wim De Craene of Jeugdwerknet vzw, provides a simpler alternative to Sweaver or Livethemer which allows a client/administrator to make simple changes to site CSS, e.g. changing the color of H1 and H2 headings, through a simple UI, without even having to know any HTML or CSS.

Status: There is a development release available for Drupal 7.

Panels Extra Styles

The module, coded by Sean Dunaway provides additional region and pane styles for Panels with full HTML5 support. Since users are also encouraged to contribute their own styles, the options should increase with time. This looks well worth trying out if you are using Panels.

Status: There is a stable release available for Drupal 7.

Pathinfo

The module, authored by Cameron Tod of NBC Universal, is a Devel plugin which displays useful information about which module and function is responsible for the page you are viewing. It links the appropriate Drupal API pages, where applicable, and displays full Krumo output for page arguments. This looks handy for those times you need to fix some issues in a Drupal site, but have no idea where things are coming from.

Status: There are beta releases available for both Drupal 6 and Drupal 7.

Required by role Required By Role checkboxes on the Tags field configuration

The module, written by Alejandro Tabares, simply adds some extra checkboxes to each field configuration form so that you can not only specify that a field is required (for all roles), but can instead specify that a field is required only for particular roles. I suppose the use cases for this are not so common, but I’m sure I’ve had at least one situation where this would have been useful.

Status: There is a stable release available for Drupal 7.

Resolve IP

The module, by Yannis Karampelas of Netstudio, is simple, but very useful for understanding what’s going on in the system log (Watchdog) entries: it resolves the hostname for each IP address so you see (for example) crawl-66-249-66-212.googlebot.com alongside the IP address.

Status: There is a beta release available for Drupal 7.

Responsive Background Images

The module, is yet another contribution in the same vein as other modules recently released by Daniel Honrade of Promet Solutions. It provides a range of rules for background image sizes, which it loads based on the size of the browser window. Phones get a smaller background image than iPads, which get a smaller image size than a full-size browser window on an HD monitor. This, of course, helps conserve mobile bandwidth which helps make your whole site more “responsive”.

Status: There is a development release available for Drupal 7.

Search API Extended String Filter Did you ever want to be able to search partial string using the search API from within views, now you can, supports all the regular (exposed) filters and also 'Starts with', 'Contains', …

The module, contributed by Jelle Sebreghts of Attiks, enables searching for partial strings with the full Views search filters.

Status: There is a stable release available for Drupal 7.

Search API stats

The module, authored by Brandon Stone of ImageX Media, provides a block which allows users to see your site’s top search phrases. Of course there is a bit more to getting this working than simply adding and enabling the module, but for a search-related module, this looks relatively easy to get working.

Status: There is a stable release available for Drupal 7.

Searchcloud Block

The module, developed by Fabian de Rijk of Finalist, is similar to Search API Stats (above). Instead of a block with a simple list of most-searched terms, it provides a block with a “cloud” of those search terms.

Status: There is a development release available for Drupal 7.

Services Entity API

The module, created by Pedro Cambra of Commerce Guys, provides integration of Services and Entity API. It was developed with the needs of Drupal Commerce users in mind, but can be used for any Drupal entities.

Status: There is a development release available for Drupal 7.

Setup

Categories: Utility

The module, developed by Stuart Clark of Realityloop, gives developers and “adventurous site builders” a way to create a script for a client with a series of steps to enter their personal data (e.g. social networking accounts, Google Analytics tracking codes, etc); information which might not have been available during the development process.

Status: There is a beta release available for Drupal 7.

Simple Editor

The module, contributed by Ki H. Kim of Urban Insight, provides an almost-completely pre-configured WYSIWYG editor, based on TinyMCE. The aim is to give users a Wordpress-like, “ready-to-use”, editor, and not to be super-flexible, but if the common use case assumed applies to you, this could be a great time-saver.

Status: There is an alpha release available for Drupal 7.

Simple oEmbed

Categories: Media

The module, also by Ki H. Kim, integrates a simple setup of oEmbed with the Simple Editor, to make it easy to add videos and other rich media to content. Like the Simple Editor, it assumes a lot of the configuration, so for less typical use cases, you might want to use the full oEmbed project, which provides additional configuration options.

Status: There is a beta release available for Drupal 7.

Taxonomy Group Fields

, by Chris Albrecht of the National Renewable Energy Lab, is a taxonomy selection “widget” intended for larger vocabularies, currently those with two levels of hierarchy (parents and children, but no “grandparents” or “grandchildren”), however the project page indicates that there is an interest in expanding to multiple hierarchy levels, among a number of other useful features. Currently, if a parent is selected, all of its children are automatically included (parent acts as “select all” for children), but the developer also indicates he would like to provide this behavior as an option, rather than as the “only way”. This module is similar to one of my favorite, not-yet-for-D7 taxonomy selection/management tools, Taxonomy Super Select. What TGF lacks (a feature in TSS) is the ability to add new terms; I think it would be cool if it supported adding a new term into any group (with role-based limits on adding new terms). But there are so many use cases for Taxonomy widgets that it’s probably best to just create a limited module that does one thing well rather than trying to be everything for everyone.

Status: There is a development release available for Drupal 7.

Taxonomy Orphanage

The module, coded by Elliott Foster of Four Kitchens, is a module that helps resolve a rather painful bug in Drupal core. If you delete a taxonomy term, references to it still are retained in entities which used it. Taxonomy Orphanage provides interfaces for cleaning up such references. Nice work, Elliott!

Status: There is a stable release available for Drupal 7.

Theme Hider

The module, authored by Victor Quinn, provides a method for site administrators to hide particular themes on sites where users are allowed to select their preferred theme. Some enabled themes might only be for admin or for special purposes, so this is a good thing to have if you want your site to be displayed nicely for everyone.

Status: There is a stable release available for Drupal 6.

tinynav.js

The module is another contribution from Bryan Ollendyke. It integrates the tinynav.js jQuery library, which converts a typical list-based menu into a select-list drop-down if the browser window is narrow (e.g. on smaller displays). It’s extremely light-weight at only 362 bytes (minimized and gzipped). This module provides a number of configuration options and was designed for use with the Chamfer theme, but also should work well with other Omega-based themes (what it’s been tested with) and possibly other themes. Looks good!

Status: There is a beta release available for Drupal 7.

URL Alias Permissions

The module, written by Justin Phelan of Blackwood Media Group, “allows site administrators to set permissions to create and edit url path settings by content type”. This is certainly useful for particular use cases.

Status: There is a stable release available for Drupal 7.

User Import Framework Plus

The module, written by Deji Akala of JB Global, extends the User Import Framework to allow importing more than just the basic three fields (email, username, password) the UIF supports. This certainly looks like it could be useful.

Status: There is a development release available for Drupal 7.

Visual select file

The module, coded by Rudie Dirkx of ezCompany, is simpler than Media and easier to extend, plus it includes visuals (thumbnails) to help you select files. It uses Views and FileField Sources to help it work its magic. Nicely done!

Status: There is a beta release available for Drupal 7.

Webform Email Raw Emailing raw, unfiltered (filter_xss) data from a Webform submission can be risky, so only use this module if you absolutely require this behavior and understand the risks.

Categories: Mail

The module, contributed by Robert Bates of Phase2 Technology, provides a solution for sending raw, unfiltered XML from Webform submissions.

Status: There is an alpha release available for Drupal 7.

Webform Serial

Categories: Content

The module, developed by Peter Lieverdink of Creative Contingencies, simply “provides an auto-incrementing number field for webforms.”

Status: There is a development release available for Drupal 7.

WireDocs … a large legacy of documents in proprietary formats, such as MS Word or Excel, may discourage from moving to an online editor. Additionally, legal issues might arise if confidential files are hosted by a third party service provider.

The module, from Gottfried Nindl of OSCE, allows your Drupal site to host files in various office formats which can be opened (seamlessly downloaded and opened by a native, local application), edited, and saved (seamlessly uploaded back to the server) with a Java applet that bridges the gap between Drupal and the client operating systems. This looks like a pretty cool alternative to third-party document-hosting systems.

Status: There is a beta release available for Drupal 7.

Sep 07 2012
Sep 07

Drupal 8 Multilingual Initiative Code Sprint weekend

I took a train from Frankfurt (Germany) down to Munich the Saturday before the DrupalCon. When I joined the Multilingual Sprint on Sunday morning, many of them had already been sprinting for a full day and a number of issues were ready for review, so I dived in, observing the behavior of Drupal 8 before and after applying patches, proof-reading the patches for anything odd (e.g. typos in the documentation), discussing the issues in comments and in IRC with people who were sitting just across the room (other times actually speaking in person). By the end of the day, instead of the dozen or so people that Gábor Hojtsy, the Multilingual Initiative team lead, had expected, there were close to 50 people at the location, some joining us in the work on Multilingual issues, some working on other Drupal 8 tasks, and some who were just arriving in Munich and followed the Tweets to where we were. Luckily, the location rented for the Saturdays and Sundays before and after the DrupalCon week was big enough to accommodate all the extra arrivals.

While on the topic of the venue we used for those weekends, I’d like to personally thank Stephan Luckow and Florian (“Floh”) Klare of the Drupal-Initiative e.V. for all that they did to find a nice place that would still leave us with a budget for food and for their valiant work on stretching the food budget while still serving up excellent fare, in keeping with the fantastic meals we enjoyed the rest of the week. Instead of ordering delivery, they prepared almost everything themselves, including beautiful open-face sandwiches, fruit platters, and lovely grilled specialties at a club we went to where you can barbecue in the Biergarten.

…thanks for the huge help to the local organizers, especially Florian Klare and Stephan Luckow. They helped us manage collecting and spending sponsor money wisely with the Drupal Initiative e.V, prepared great sandwiches and fruit plates for us and even organized a sprinter party night with grill food. It was amazing to work with such helpful and flexible local organizers.
Gábor Hojtsy, September 5, 2012

Luckow and SirFiChi of the Drupal Initiative, organized the location and made us great food!

Since people were “fresh”, I think a lot of work got done on the first weekend and the Monday before the conference (more than 50 people joined us and worked on various core initiatives on Monday in the room we later used for core most conversations at the Sheraton), which also meant that issues were still fresh in our minds while we had days of sessions and conversations, so when we started sprinting again on Friday we had lots of new ideas for the tasks we were still working on. Friday’s sprints were at the Westin Grand, where there was great attendance both upstairs in the main room as well as a large room downstairs from it, where Drupalize.me hosted a core contribution workshop to ease people into the process of contributing to core. I decided to go to that workshop since I’m still pretty new to it all and found a few people sitting nearby who were I was also able to interest in some Multilingual tasks, so while the main group sprinted upstairs, we also worked downstairs. Later on, I came upstairs, and since there were not a lot of simpler tasks for “core newbies”, like myself, I took some time to sprint on a module I contributed some time back, before there was much of anything for Drupal 7 in the area of “multilingual”… and tried to make my module more multilingual-friendly. I got a few good commits and a new release out for Internal Links and also recruited a colleague to look at the code with me, provide some ideas, and become another maintainer. So I personally found Friday quite productive.

*/ First off, a sprint on this scale would not be possible without sponsors and significant on-site help. DrupalCon provided us with space on Monday and Friday, and some great food on Friday. The rest of the days would not have been doable without comm-press, dotProjects.be, Open8.se, OSINet and Acquia. The [ … ] financial sponsorships they provided paid for our weekend venue [ … ].

I continued sprinting with the Multilingual initiative at the Film Coop Saturday and Sunday, leaving mid-afternoon on Sunday to get back to the train station. When I left the other sprinters, Webchick was only finally getting some rest after her trip home and we had about 20 issues that were marked “RTBC”. In all, there were dozens of issues tackled over the weekend. For a complete overview of all the issues we made progress on, see Gábor’s post about the sprints, where you can also check out his excellent DrupalCon core conversation presentation, “Drupal 8’s Multilingual Wonderland”. There is still a lot to do in the time between now and the “feature freeze” deadline, but we made good progress in the DrupalCon sprints, so hopefully we can push on and get the rest of the critical tasks done in the time remaining.

One of the less trivial tasks I took on during the final sprint weekend was documenting the new language_select field type, which involved checking out the Drupal API (documentation) project, updating the Form API table to include a new Element column (language_select) and Property row (#languages), as well as information about these (below the table) and linking them in all the appropriate places. Currently, updating this page is a bit of a pain, but hopefully we will move to a better system for maintaining this information, perhaps even automated generation. While I’d worked on other Drupal documentation pages before, this was the first time I’d actually contributed patches to update the API, so it was a good learning experience.

If you’d like to help out with the Multilingual initiative or other core contribution, you might first want to take a look at the Drupal 8 Initiatives page, where announcements about coming IRC meeting can be seen. This page also has links to the news, roadmaps, filtered issues, and other pertinent information. Drupalladder.org is also a great place to go for lessons to help you work through the steps of being ready to contribute to Drupal core.

I look forward to seeing you all in IRC and in coming code sprints.

Sep 07 2012
Sep 07

I started writing this post at the DrupalCon and then continued work on it on the train back home after a long week, last Sunday after the code sprints—even now, more than a week later (after being ill for a week—I think I was burning the candle at both ends for a bit too long), it’s hard to believe that it’s finally over. I arrived the weekend before to participate in the pre-con code sprints and stayed for the Friday–Sunday after the conference to continue that effort. I’ll write about the sprints in another post. This one will cover the highlights of the actual DrupalCon, what I think worked well, and recommendations for those attending their first DrupalCon; with two new continents getting a ’con this year, I think there will be more than a few at their first.

The food at DrupalCon Munich was great

For me, one of the major highlights of this conference was the outstanding food quality. It was so good I was distracted enough I never pulled out my camera to take photos of i, but it was attractive, gourmet, and delicious and there was something for everyone, even a fantastic salad buffet as well as more desserts than anyone could try… and hot dishes with plenty of options for both vegetarians and omnivores, alike. In the closing plenary, it was revealed that the catering costs for the event were about €352,000 for the 1800+ of us in attendance; not surprising for the quality and abundant variety of fare they served us. Food service tables were put in place in all areas of the conference so that there was no crowding into one area and the same dishes were provided at both the Sheraton and the Westin Grand, which were a few minutes’ walk away from each other. The conference occupied the three conference center floors of the Westin Grand and a few smaller rooms in the Sheraton, which were primarily “core conversations”. One might think I would gorge myself, but most days I had simple salad items, walnuts, and seeds… and gave myself a break before finishing with some fresh fruit and a light mousse from the dessert buffet. Despite the fact that the days were hot and many of the rooms weren’t well conditioned, people were alert and in good spirits and I think the food had more than a bit to do with that.

To continue a moment in the vein of “food”, since I really do think it was notable at this DrupalCon, I hope this reflects some new recognition of the importance of good sustenance when organizing a successful event like this. And I hope that future Drupal events will also place emphasis on food quality. That said, I also think that the community would pull together if we had commercial kitchen space and quality ingredients—we could prepare similar gourmet meals without quite the budget we used for catering at this conference; on the other hand, such a model might work better at one of the large DrupalCamps (a few hundred attendees) than at a huge (North American or European) DrupalCon. Of course preparing our own food would provide another place for people to connect (food preparation and more volunteer service), which I think would offset the downsides (not being able to be someplace else whenever you have “kitchen duty”).

The Venue

munich_olympic-park.jpg

Munich is a beautiful city I’d never really visited before the DrupalCon. Public transportation was not too expensive, but I got to see a bit more of Munich by walking almost everywhere, so my walks back from the pre-conference sprints and out to dinner (beer) in the evening were mostly through parks where I got to see the huge Olympics installation and unusual sights like Munich’s famous river surfing.

Surfers have a man-made wave on the Eichbach

Sessions and participation

Choosing sessions

This was my second time attending a DrupalCon and I decided I wanted to primarily attend the “core conversations” track (with a few exceptions). For those who don’t know, the “core conversations” sessions are where plans for the future of Drupal are presented, discussed, and refined. It’s truly an amazing experience to sit in a room with dozens of top-notch developers as they hash out the architecture for new Drupal features or present the innovations they have already completed. Of course participating in the Drupal 8 (Multilingual initiative) sprints in Barcelona (a couple months ago) and before and after the DrupalCon session days probably also spurred my interest in the areas being covered by other initiatives, but it is definitely an interesting track if you are not sure what to attend. In the past, core conversations were often not fully recorded, another reason I chose to attend this track, but it looks like you can view most core conversations pretty well now, online. If you missed them and are interested in the future of Drupal (i.e. Drupal 8), there are many that you might want to watch.

Volunteering

Another first for me was helping the DrupalCon staff as a volunteer, mostly monitoring the rooms I was in and taking a head-count in mid-session. Other activities of a room monitor included being a bit early and making sure the speakers had everything they needed; I got to loan out a display adapter for one session and was prepared with multiple power adapters if anyone happened to be missing a way to plug in—we also tried to make sure that questions were recorded in session audio (either by having those with questions come to a microphone or the speaker repeating the question). I found volunteering rewarding and I thank Adam Hill, the DrupalCon Munich volunteer coordinator, for being a great guy to work with.

DrupalCon Munich Volunteers

Drupal 8 will be great!

Angie Byron’s current overview of Drupal 8 (aka “”) had not changed a lot since I last saw her similar presentation at the “Developer Days” in Barcelona a couple of months earlier, but it filled the largest session room, so there may have been close to 1,000 in attendance. Some features are more polished, some of the features are not yet written, but are better conceptualized than they were a couple of months ago, but the general ideas are mostly the same so in a presentation providing an overview of Drupal 8, while much has changed, it wasn’t much that affected the presentation. I’ve take the liberty to add a few specifics which were actually covered in separate sessions (sessions which covered each core initiative, for example), just for the sake of brevity and consolidation of information.

Webchick presents an overview of Drupal 8 features and initiatives

One key point that was made by all Drupal 8 core initiative leads is that we are only 3 months away from “Feature freeze” for Drupal 8 (December 1st, 2012), so it’s time to pitch in and try to help get all the great planned features into Drupal 8. All of the major initiatives need help and have areas where they are behind schedule as far as being ready for the freeze deadline with all the features the community would like to have in core.

Key Drupal 8 initiatives and components

- This finally ends the problem of having an evolving set of configuration on the development/staging sites which needs to be moved to production… but can’t be since the configuration (in Drupal 6 and 7) tends to be all over the place. Having a set of YAML documents stored in your sites “files” directory is a good way to manage and deploy common patterns to multiple sites, update configuration on production sites, etc. And it gets around the issue that pushing a database update from a development/staging server to production might overwrite actual content. So we now have a working configuration management system based on YAML files and a developers’ API, but no user interface for adjusting configurations; the UI still needs to be written. We also need ways to determine if configuration has been changed on the production server, have a range of multilingual configuration issues to still resolve, and performance issues, among other outstanding tasks. Join the #drupal-cmi IRC channel during the CMI meeting times and work on the issue queue if you want to help get the CMI full-featured for Drupal 8. Most active work is in the CMI sandbox repository.

deals with helping sort out inconsistencies and inflexibility in the core blocks functionality. It’s been described as, “Like panels in core, only better”… well at least that’s the goal. Everything on a page has context and is a block or layout/nested layout. Since blocks are rendered independently, caching is well-supported. A responsive layout designer from Spark can allow you to figure out your layouts for different screen sizes without a ton of divs complicating their HTML. If you would like to help with improving Drupal 8 layouts, there are office hours every Friday in Drupal IRC in the #drupal-scotch channel and you can read more about their current issues by looking at the “sandbox” project for the Drupal 8 Blocks and Layouts Everywhere initiative (it is not yet in the 8.x master branch of Drupal).

features will be in core and better than ever before. Interface translation, content translation, base language functionality and language configuration are all being greatly simplified so that it can all be in core with a nice, normal workflow. A lot of the real “pain points” with multilingual sites (or even simply non-English ones) have already been addressed and there is a ton that’s been done, but there is still a lot more to complete in the next three months if we want to really consider this a success. A lot of great progress was made during the code sprints before and after the conference. If you would like to help improve the Multilingual workflow in Drupal 8, there are lots of ways for anyone new to Drupal core development to still pitch in. There many open issues and many ways to move them forward without even writing a single patch. The best place to find active issues is probably to look at Gábor Hojtsy’s “focus issues” list. You can join the Drupal Multilingual initiative meetings in IRC (#drupal-i18n). See the meeting schedule on the main Drupal 8 initiatives’ help page.

is one of the biggest initiatives in terms of importance to Drupal 8’s success… ensuring that a site is responsive to the display size and has toolbars which nicely resize for device type is one of the major aspects of this work. We need good front-end performance for running on smaller, lower-powered devices; we need good, solid, clean, uncomplicated HTML5 code, and we need to be able to support easily using Drupal as a back-end for native mobile apps, purely responsive web design, web apps, or anything in between. There are some big parts of this which are not far along yet, so this is a great place for front-end developers and others interested in Drupal 8 mobile experience to get involved. One current obstacle to the Mobile initiative achieving its goals is greater completion of the Web Services initiative (WSCCI) also achieving its goals. Otherwise, John Albin Wilkins, the Mobile initiative project lead indicated two other areas which need a lot of work: front-end performance and the Drupal 8 mobile admin interface, likely designed with Spark’s Responsive Layout Builder. There are regular meetings on IRC (see meeting schedule on the mobile initiative’s official Drupal Groups page) and the Drupal 8 issue queue has a tag for "mobile" so it’s easy to jump in and help make mobile support rock in Drupal 8. You don’t need to be a rocket scientist to help move the issue queue along. As Dries and others have indicated, this might be the primary initiative for determining Drupal’s future success, given current trends.

: One of the highlights of DrupalCon Munich sessions certainly had to be Angie Byron and the Spark team’s presentation of all the awesomeness that comes from the Spark-distribution modules. Spark is only still in “alpha”, but you can already tell how amazing the features are. The idea is that while they design the perfect authoring experience for Drupal 8, the community can use, test, and help to refine the new functionality (in Drupal 7 via the Spark distribution) so that the feature-set will be well-tested and as awesome as possible when Drupal 8 is launched. Spark allows you to simply edit content, in-place (via the Aloha editor used by the Edit module) and also has a number of nice tools for designing responsive layouts, and has a tool palette which pulls out from the side and responsively adapts to the device. The goal is for the editor system to output only clean code without a mess of ugly divs and inline styling… and the editor is already living up to most of that promise. Words don’t really do Spark justice, so rather than take my word, you can try the demo. Note: Since anyone can make changes to the demo site that might be a bit weird, if things are really messed up, you can check back later. And of course reviewing patches in the Spark issue queue and creating new issues, where applicable, can help smooth the way to getting the envisioned “perfect” content authoring experience into Drupal 8.x core.

The Aquia Spark team prepare their presentation at DrupalCon Munich.

: Theming/Templating improvements in Drupal 8 include the use of Twig, a templating system also designed by Fabien Potencier of Symfony. It eliminates PHP from the theming layer for simpler code and removal of many security threats. The work on Twig does figure heavily into some of the initiatives, but is not an official core initiative on its own. Work is being done in a Twig sandbox led by Andreas Sahle of Wunderkraut. If you are interested in helping build this up, you can check out this sandbox and assist with the issues.

: Drupal 7 was released in January 2011, but it took over a year before there were enough of the important contrib modules ready enough for it that Drupal 6 was finally surpassed (in terms of numbers of Drupal 7 installations). Getting Views into core will hopefully help boost the uptake of Drupal 8 use as soon as it’s released. This will be a lot of work and there is a fund to help pay for development time. A lot of Drupal 8 Views features actually already work. Major parts of cTools are now in core. There is a funding request for getting Views into core (I threw 10 € into the donation box at the DrupalCamp in Barcelona), and the more we can donate, the more the Views team can allocate paid developer time to ensure that Drupal has a nice version of Views available when it ships. Of course you can also help with the Views for Drupal 8.x issues.

in core (only better). There is still a lot to do, but the idea is that the site can take any kind of request and send appropriate responses without a lot of headache. A lot of Symfony components being brought into Drupal are especially important here. Symfony integration helps bridge a gap between ours and the also-dynamic PHP-based developer community around Symfony, so should help provide a lot more experienced developers for Drupal. There is still a lot to do here; you can check out the current status via the WSCCI sandbox and help with the issue queue. See the core initiatives overview page for IRC meeting times and details. If you weren’t there for Larry Garfield’s Munich presentation, Web Services and Symfony Core Initiative, you can still watch it to get a good overview.

Automated testing in Drupal 8 is much faster and the Symfony components also help allow us to have more modular modules… ones which can more easily be unit-tested. In Drupal 8, PHPUnit will replace Simpletest although the latter may remain in core for a transition period.

The social side of the DrupalCon

What happens between sessions is the real reason that most of us go to DrupalCons. There is nothing quite like participating in code sprints with Webchick sitting across the room, committing the patches you’ve just been helping with. And of course you can take your favorite Drupal developer out for a beer or something. It’s great to be in an atmosphere where there are thousands of people who actually have an idea what you are talking about when you tell them your occupation—and of course it’s nice, for a change, to be able to leave out any explanation of Drupal. If you go to a DrupalCon, it’s a given that you will leave having made new friends—new friends who will feel a bit more like “old friends” the next time you see them.

More DrupalCons in the coming year than ever before

If you have never been to a DrupalCon, there are more DrupalCons coming in the next year than we’ve ever had in a year period, before. Granted, the two new (Australia / South America) cons are planned as smaller events that would actually be dwarfed by some of the larger DrupalCamps, but this is all a sign that Drupal is growing, world-wide. Note that the U.S. and European DrupalCons are both being held a bit later than in previous years. I look forward to seeing you all at a coming DrupalCon.

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About Drupal Sun

Drupal Sun is an Evolving Web project. It allows you to:

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