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Aug 25 2021
Aug 25

With the Drupal 8 end of life in a little over two months and Drupal 10's release next year, this is the time of transitions again at Drupal. However, while Drupal 7 to 8 (or 9) was a big move, the transitions from 8 to 9 and 9 to 10 are much smaller and mostly automated.

Drupal 10 is planned to be released in June, August or December 2022 and the tools are getting ready to support that. The two key tools will be the same as the previous upgrade: Upgrade Status and Drupal Rector.

Matt Glaman has been doing amazing work recently in the underlying components of both tools. Thanks to his work on updating phpstan-drupal for Drupal 10 support, Upgrade Status checks deprecated API uses on Drupal 9 too. Since my last update on that, I added reporting of deprecated modules and new system requirements as well.

Ryan Aslett at the Drupal Association built the project analysis job on top of Upgrade Status and that is run on Drupal 9 projects now as well. So we have an idea of the extent of work that will need to be done for Drupal 10 compatibility. I've updated the dev.acquia.com deprecation dashboard to show Drupal 10 results. While projects should not be expected to be Drupal 10 ready at this time, the dashboard helps us prioritise work on certain parts of the tooling to help the ecosystem upgrade.

To support that, Palantir.net has been sponsoring Matt Glaman to also bring Drupal Rector up to date for Drupal 10 readiness. The results are already outstanding! Today, of the 22204 Drupal deprecated API uses identified in Drupal 9 compatible projects. These are green and purple on the chart below. Drupal Rector has automations to fix 95% of them (green). There are a further 5391 non-Drupal deprecated API uses (yellow) including Symfony and PHPUnit deprecated APIs. Those themselves have third party rectors, so the coverage will further improve by including those. That is in the works.

Image showing the current state of Drupal 10 readiness of Drupal 9 compatible contributed projects

The drupal.org Project Update Bot resolves rectorable deprecated API uses (green) and info/composer issues (blue) when posting patches, so this means that it will be able to resolve most deprecated APIs in its suggested fixes already and we expect it will improve more with third party rectors added.

Drupal 10 itself is a moving target, the branch will be open around October/November so the above does not mean that the tools are complete, but we are significantly further ahead this time compared to the Drupal 8 to 9 transition, making the upgrade to Drupal 10 smoother for everyone.

With the Drupal 8 release, we decided upgrades must be easier going forward and thanks to the fantastic work of contributors and sponsors, we are doing it again.

Aug 25 2021
Aug 25

A few core modules are being deprecated in Drupal 9 for removal in Drupal 10. There are a variety of reasons for their removal, but in each case we think moving to a contributed project would serve users better.

To support the continuous upgrade path and provide stability for Drupal 9 users moving to Drupal 10, we are looking for potential maintainers and co-maintainers to keep security support and ensure stability of the codebases moving out from core. The initial scope of maintaining these projects is to keep the Drupal 9 core-compatible branches intact and provide security support. It would be nice if the new maintainers also improve the projects further but that is not part of the initial scope.

QuickEdit module is being moved to a contributed project and is seeking maintainers.

Lee Rowlands stepped up to maintain Forum and HAL modules moving to contributed projects, but co-maintainers would be welcome. Lee Rowlands and Andrey Postnikov plan to maintain Aggregator as a contributed project.

Additionally there is discussion about removing the RDF module too, feedback welcome. This is not yet at a stage where we need maintainers, although it may be there in the future.

Jun 16 2021
Jun 16

What’s new in Drupal 9.2.0?

The second feature release of Drupal 9 helps keep your site even more secure, and comes with increased visitor privacy protection, improved migration tools from Drupal 7, enhancements to the Olivero frontend theme and early support for the WebP image format.

Download Drupal 9.2.0

Security and privacy improvements

Critical security advisories and public service announcements will now be displayed on the status report page and certain administration pages for the site's administrators. This helps prepare site owners to apply security fixes in a timely manner. For increased privacy protection of your site visitors, Drupal 9.2.0 now blocks Google Federated Learning of Cohorts (FLoC) cookie-less user tracking by default.

Better building blocks out of the box

The Olivero theme, soon to be Drupal's new default frontend theme, has dozens of major improvements in this release, including a new form design and various accessibility fixes. The built-in Umami demo is now also more flexible with a built-in editor role and more versatile Layout Builder demonstration.

On the way to Drupal 10

In preparation for Drupal 10, all Symfony 5 and and several Symfony 6 compatibility issues have been resolved. As part of modernizing the frontend of Drupal 9, core's Tour feature now uses ShepherdJS instead of jQuery Joyride. This significantly improves accessibility of tours and removes one more reliance on jQuery.

Other improvements

The already stable migration path from Drupal 7 is now expanded with migrations for user settings, node/user reference fields and other previously missing pieces.

Drupal's GD toolkit integration, and, therefore image styles, can now manage WebP images. There is more to do for complete WebP support. Stay tuned for improvements in future releases.

Sneak peek at future core features

The upcoming core CKEditor 5 upgrade is being worked on in a contributed project. Progress has been made on various aspects of the roadmap, and the project is near to completing all issues identified as requirements for tagging a beta release. Core inclusion is expected in Drupal 9.3.0, but contributed projects are requested to build compatibility ahead of that.

The Automated Updates Initiative has been very active in the repositories under https://github.com/php-tuf building a PHP implementation of The Update Framework (TUF) with Typo3 and Joomla developers to provide signing and verification for secure PHP application updates. Results will be included with later Drupal releases.

Check out the initiative keynotes from DrupalCon North America 2021 on what else is in the works.

What does this mean for me?

Drupal 9 site owners

Drupal 9.0.x is now out of security coverage. Update at least to 9.1.x to continue to receive security support.

Drupal 8 site owners

Update to at least 8.9.x to continue receiving bug fixes until Drupal 8's end of life in November 2021. The next bug-fix release (8.9.17) is scheduled for July 7, 2021. (See the release schedule overview for more information.) Versions of Drupal 8 before 8.9.x no longer receive security coverage.

With only five months left until the end of life of Drupal 8, we suggest that you upgrade from Drupal 8 to Drupal 9 as soon as possible. Upgrading is supported directly from 8.8.x and 8.9.x. Of the top 1000 most used drupal.org projects, 94% are updated for Drupal 9, so the modules and themes you rely on are most likely compatible.

Drupal 7 site owners

Drupal 7 is supported until November 28, 2022, and will continue to receive bug and security fixes throughout this time. From November 2022 until at least November 2025, the Drupal 7 Vendor Extended Support program will be offered by vendors.

On the other hand, the migration path for Drupal 7 sites to Drupal 9 is stable. Read more about the migration to Drupal 9.

Translation, module, and theme contributors

Minor releases like Drupal 9.2.0 include backwards-compatible API additions for developers as well as new features.

Since minor releases are backwards-compatible, modules, themes, and translations that supported Drupal 9.1.x and earlier will be compatible with 9.2.x as well. However, the new version does include some changes to strings, user interfaces, internal APIs and API deprecations. This means that some small updates may be required for your translations, modules, and themes. Read the 9.2.0 release notes for a full list of changes that may affect your modules and themes.

This release has further advanced the Drupal project and represents the efforts of hundreds of volunteers and contributors from various organizations. Thank you to everyone who contributed to Drupal 9.2.0!

Jun 16 2021
Jun 16

What’s new in Drupal 9.2.0?

The second feature release of Drupal 9 helps keep your site even more secure, and comes with increased visitor privacy protection, improved migration tools from Drupal 7, enhancements to the Olivero frontend theme and early support for the WebP image format.

Download Drupal 9.2.0

Security and privacy improvements

Critical security advisories and public service announcements will now be displayed on the status report page and certain administration pages for the site's administrators. This helps prepare site owners to apply security fixes in a timely manner. For increased privacy protection of your site visitors, Drupal 9.2.0 now blocks Google Federated Learning of Cohorts (FLoC) cookie-less user tracking by default.

Better building blocks out of the box

The Olivero theme, soon to be Drupal's new default frontend theme, has dozens of major improvements in this release, including a new form design and various accessibility fixes. The built-in Umami demo is now also more flexible with a built-in editor role and more versatile Layout Builder demonstration.

On the way to Drupal 10

In preparation for Drupal 10, all Symfony 5 and and several Symfony 6 compatibility issues have been resolved. As part of modernizing the frontend of Drupal 9, core's Tour feature now uses ShepherdJS instead of jQuery Joyride. This significantly improves accessibility of tours and removes one more reliance on jQuery.

Other improvements

The already stable migration path from Drupal 7 is now expanded with migrations for user settings, node/user reference fields and other previously missing pieces.

Drupal's GD toolkit integration, and, therefore image styles, can now manage WebP images. There is more to do for complete WebP support. Stay tuned for improvements in future releases.

Sneak peek at future core features

The upcoming core CKEditor 5 upgrade is being worked on in a contributed project. Progress has been made on various aspects of the roadmap, and the project is near to completing all issues identified as requirements for tagging a beta release. Core inclusion is expected in Drupal 9.3.0, but contributed projects are requested to build compatibility ahead of that.

The Automated Updates Initiative has been very active in the repositories under https://github.com/php-tuf building a PHP implementation of The Update Framework (TUF) with Typo3 and Joomla developers to provide signing and verification for secure PHP application updates. Results will be included with later Drupal releases.

Check out the initiative keynotes from DrupalCon North America 2021 on what else is in the works.

What does this mean for me?

Drupal 9 site owners

Drupal 9.0.x is now out of security coverage. Update at least to 9.1.x to continue to receive security support.

Drupal 8 site owners

Update to at least 8.9.x to continue receiving bug fixes until Drupal 8's end of life in November 2021. The next bug-fix release (8.9.17) is scheduled for July 7, 2021. (See the release schedule overview for more information.) Versions of Drupal 8 before 8.9.x no longer receive security coverage.

With only five months left until the end of life of Drupal 8, we suggest that you upgrade from Drupal 8 to Drupal 9 as soon as possible. Upgrading is supported directly from 8.8.x and 8.9.x. Of the top 1000 most used drupal.org projects, 94% are updated for Drupal 9, so the modules and themes you rely on are most likely compatible.

Drupal 7 site owners

Drupal 7 is supported until November 28, 2022, and will continue to receive bug and security fixes throughout this time. From November 2022 until at least November 2025, the Drupal 7 Vendor Extended Support program will be offered by vendors.

On the other hand, the migration path for Drupal 7 sites to Drupal 9 is stable. Read more about the migration to Drupal 9.

Translation, module, and theme contributors

Minor releases like Drupal 9.2.0 include backwards-compatible API additions for developers as well as new features.

Since minor releases are backwards-compatible, modules, themes, and translations that supported Drupal 9.1.x and earlier will be compatible with 9.2.x as well. However, the new version does include some changes to strings, user interfaces, internal APIs and API deprecations. This means that some small updates may be required for your translations, modules, and themes. Read the 9.2.0 release notes for a full list of changes that may affect your modules and themes.

This release has further advanced the Drupal project and represents the efforts of hundreds of volunteers and contributors from various organizations. Thank you to everyone who contributed to Drupal 9.2.0!

Jun 16 2021
Jun 16

What’s new in Drupal 9.2.0?

The second feature release of Drupal 9 helps keep your site even more secure, and comes with increased visitor privacy protection, improved migration tools from Drupal 7, enhancements to the Olivero frontend theme and early support for the WebP image format.

Download Drupal 9.2.0

Security and privacy improvements

Critical security advisories and public service announcements will now be displayed on the status report page and certain administration pages for the site's administrators. This helps prepare site owners to apply security fixes in a timely manner. For increased privacy protection of your site visitors, Drupal 9.2.0 now blocks Google Federated Learning of Cohorts (FLoC) cookie-less user tracking by default.

Better building blocks out of the box

The Olivero theme, soon to be Drupal's new default frontend theme, has dozens of major improvements in this release, including a new form design and various accessibility fixes. The built-in Umami demo is now also more flexible with a built-in editor role and more versatile Layout Builder demonstration.

On the way to Drupal 10

In preparation for Drupal 10, all Symfony 5 and and several Symfony 6 compatibility issues have been resolved. As part of modernizing the frontend of Drupal 9, core's Tour feature now uses ShepherdJS instead of jQuery Joyride. This significantly improves accessibility of tours and removes one more reliance on jQuery.

Other improvements

The already stable migration path from Drupal 7 is now expanded with migrations for user settings, node/user reference fields and other previously missing pieces.

Drupal's GD toolkit integration, and, therefore image styles, can now manage WebP images. There is more to do for complete WebP support. Stay tuned for improvements in future releases.

Sneak peek at future core features

The upcoming core CKEditor 5 upgrade is being worked on in a contributed project. Progress has been made on various aspects of the roadmap, and the project is near to completing all issues identified as requirements for tagging a beta release. Core inclusion is expected in Drupal 9.3.0, but contributed projects are requested to build compatibility ahead of that.

The Automated Updates Initiative has been very active in the repositories under https://github.com/php-tuf building a PHP implementation of The Update Framework (TUF) with Typo3 and Joomla developers to provide signing and verification for secure PHP application updates. Results will be included with later Drupal releases.

Check out the initiative keynotes from DrupalCon North America 2021 on what else is in the works.

What does this mean for me?

Drupal 9 site owners

Drupal 9.0.x is now out of security coverage. Update at least to 9.1.x to continue to receive security support.

Drupal 8 site owners

Update to at least 8.9.x to continue receiving bug fixes until Drupal 8's end of life in November 2021. The next bug-fix release (8.9.17) is scheduled for July 7, 2021. (See the release schedule overview for more information.) Versions of Drupal 8 before 8.9.x no longer receive security coverage.

With only five months left until the end of life of Drupal 8, we suggest that you upgrade from Drupal 8 to Drupal 9 as soon as possible. Upgrading is supported directly from 8.8.x and 8.9.x. Of the top 1000 most used drupal.org projects, 94% are updated for Drupal 9, so the modules and themes you rely on are most likely compatible.

Drupal 7 site owners

Drupal 7 is supported until November 28, 2022, and will continue to receive bug and security fixes throughout this time. From November 2022 until at least November 2025, the Drupal 7 Vendor Extended Support program will be offered by vendors.

On the other hand, the migration path for Drupal 7 sites to Drupal 9 is stable. Read more about the migration to Drupal 9.

Translation, module, and theme contributors

Minor releases like Drupal 9.2.0 include backwards-compatible API additions for developers as well as new features.

Since minor releases are backwards-compatible, modules, themes, and translations that supported Drupal 9.1.x and earlier will be compatible with 9.2.x as well. However, the new version does include some changes to strings, user interfaces, internal APIs and API deprecations. This means that some small updates may be required for your translations, modules, and themes. Read the 9.2.0 release notes for a full list of changes that may affect your modules and themes.

This release has further advanced the Drupal project and represents the efforts of hundreds of volunteers and contributors from various organizations. Thank you to everyone who contributed to Drupal 9.2.0!

Mar 16 2021
Mar 16

Last week, we posted about the new starterkit custom theme creation process and base theme with the goal of replacing Classy in Drupal 10. Yesterday Lauri Eskola demonstrated the current status of the starterkit at the Drupal 10 meeting. Check out the recording and post your feedback in the issue.

Discuss in the #frontend channel on Drupal Slack too. Drupal 10 readiness meetings are every other Monday at 19:00 UTC in the #d10readiness.

Participate in the Drupal 10 readiness day at DrupalCon North America 2021 to learn even more and get mentored contributing to starterkit.

Mar 11 2021
Mar 11

Peter Weber leads CKEditor 5 integration development for Drupal 9.

While Drupal 9 already comes with CKEditor 4, that will go end of life in 2023, so we need to upgrade to CKEditor 5 to provide this replacement for Drupal 10. The target release date for Drupal 10 in June 2022 (in 15 months!). We plan to add CKEditor 5 integration to Drupal 9 even sooner though, to help the Drupal contributed ecosystem catch up and prepare in time.

There are various moving parts and several items left on the roadmap for beta level core inclusion. Peter presented a demo today to showcase where the current state stands primarily to get more feedback about the developer interface. A simple infobox CKEditor 5 plugin was also showcased to asses the integration developer experience. Check out the video recording here:

Discuss in the #ckeditor5 channel on Drupal Slack. CKEditor 5 integration meetings are every other Thursday at 15:30 UTC in the same channel.

Participate in the Drupal 10 readiness day at DrupalCon North America 2021 to learn even more and get mentored contributing to the CKEditor 5 integration.

Feb 24 2021
Feb 24

We plan to release Drupal 10 in 2022, ideally in June. That means there are 15 months left before the new major release is expected to be available. I provided an update about the initiative last time in December at DrupalCon Europe. I wanted to give a quick update on some of the highlight areas we are working on. Join the discussions and help shape Drupal 10's direction every other Monday at 19:00 UTC in the #d10readiness channel on Drupal Slack.

All work is done in Drupal 9 for now

The same way we built most of Drupal 9 in Drupal 8, we are building Drupal 10 in Drupal 9 as much as possible. There is one key exception, the CKEditor 5 project is being built as a contributed module to help test it and make it easier to collaborate on.

PHP 8 and Composer 2 support shipped

Both shipped in Drupal 9. Composer 2 support was even backported to Drupal 8, but that was not possible for PHP 8 compatibility. We plan to require PHP 8 for Drupal 10 given the end of life of PHP 7 in November 2022.

Symfony 5 support is good, Symfony 6 support in the works

One of two main drivers of the Drupal 10 timeline is Symfony 4's end of life in November 2022. We plan to update to at least Symfony 5. We did resolve all known Symfony 5 compatibility issues to date, so that looks promising.

While in Drupal 10's time, Symfony 5 will be on the long term supported 5.4 branch, that would "only" be security supported until November 2025, giving Drupal 10 a 2.5 year lifetime. To possibly expand this, we are exploring to update to Symfony 6 and resolving incompatibilities identified in Drupal 9 already. Symfony 6 development is not itself open yet, so we are only able to work on things that are already deprecated.

CKEditor 4 to 5 update needs more hands

The other big motivation behind the Drupal 10 timeline is CKEditor 4 support lasting until 2023 only. CKEditor 5 support is being worked in a dedicated contributed module for now. We are collaborating heavily with the CKSource team on runtime plugin support (Webpack DLLs), general HTML support (to avoid data loss when using CKEditor 5 on legacy content), etc. There are various great benefits of CKEditor 5 including optional collaborative editing functionality (using a paid server component).

We need more people involved in this. Dedicated CKEditor 5 meetings happen every other Thursday in #ckeditor5 on Drupal Slack at 15:30 UTC.

Starterkit theme prototype needs feedback

This is a Drupal theming paradigm shift! While inheriting from runtime base themes have served us well to avoid duplication, it causes serious problems for innovation and makes us supporting old bugs to not break live sites. So instead we aim to provide built-in support for generating a theme in core that is based off of a prepared starterkit: php core/scripts/drupal generate-theme <machine-name>. Lauri prototyped an initial solution, needs more feedback.

jQuery UI components have replacements prototyped, need reviews

Practically all of the jQuery UI components as well as various uses of Backbone.JS have replacements prototyped: dialog, toolbar, tabbing manager, autocomplete, tours, etc. All of them are in need of serious feedback though and testing.

Internet Explorer 11 support will be dropped

An agreement has been made to drop support for IE11 from Drupal 10. The official announcement is forthcoming.

Some one-off feature modules will likely be removed

We already agreed to deprecate aggregator module in Drupal 9 and remove in Drupal 10. There will possibly be other single-use core modules removed that lack maintainers and momentum. Work is underway to indicate individual module lifecycle states, although this needs more help soon for us to be able to use it to deprecate modules in time.

Drupal 10 readiness day at DrupalCon North America

The above were just some of the highlights we are working on. DrupalCon North America 2021 is online and will focus one of the days on Drupal 10 readiness. We submitted various in-depth talks to illuminate further details of the above areas and more. Join us there and use the opportunity to be at the forefront of the new version.

Jan 12 2021
Jan 12

I presented The Drupal 10 readiness initiative - here we go at DrupalCon Europe a month ago. While I published my slides with plenty speaker notes right away, the session videos just became public. While the live presentation was a month ago, most of the content is still up to date.

Drupal 9 is expected to have the shortest Drupal major release lifetime in recent history with Drupal 10 planned to be released in the middle of 2022 (next year!) and Drupal 9 end of life by end of 2023. In this session, we discussed what it takes to get from Drupal 9 to Drupal 10 and how are we going to manage this transition. We also covered what we learned from the Drupal 8 to 9 transition (so far) and how we plan to make it better for 10.

Check out the recording:

Dec 02 2020
Dec 02

What’s new in Drupal 9.1.0?

The first feature release of Drupal 9 includes the new experimental Olivero frontend theme and various additions to the Claro administration theme. Installer performance is improved 20% and full Composer 2 and PHP 8 support is available. Images with known dimensions are set to lazy-load by default to improve frontend performance.

Download Drupal 9.1.0

New experimental Olivero theme

A new beta experimental frontend theme has been added to Drupal core called Olivero. This is a new modern and clear theme that is planned to become the new default Drupal theme later (replacing Bartik). Subtheming Olivero is currently not supported, but formal support may be included in the future.

The theme is named after Rachel Olivero (1982-2019). She was the head of the organizational technology group at the National Federation of the Blind, a well-known accessibility expert, a Drupal community contributor, and a friend to many.

Key additions to the Claro theme

The experimental Claro administration theme introduces designs for various key pages: the extensions administration page, views administration, status report and media library received Claro styled designs.

Composer 2 and PHP 8 support

Drupal 9.1 is fully compatible with Composer 2. If you are using Composer 1, now would be a great time to update. Most plugins used on Drupal sites are compatible and/or obsolete with the new version. The memory and performance requirements reduced dramatically, which should improve your experience.

PHP 8 is also supported in Drupal 9.1, including all of Drupal's dependencies. There may be contributed projects that are not fully compatible though. Drupal 9 is still compatible with PHP 7.3 and newer. There are various exciting new features in PHP 8, but the JIT compiler and performance improvements are not likely to affect Drupal. Drupal 10 is planned to require PHP 8 in 2022. It is worth examining the support timelines of PHP versions to schedule your platform updates.

Other improvements

Installer performance is improved 20%, so getting a new Drupal site set up will be faster.

Images rendered by Drupal with known dimensions will be set to lazy-load automatically. This means browsers will only load them when they should appear in the viewport of the user, improving the user experience by making content appear faster.

Drupal 10 is planned for mid-2022. While Drupal 9 keeps requiring Symfony 4, Drupal 9.1 includes adjustments required to support Symfony 5 already.

What does this mean for me?

Drupal 8 site owners

Update at least to 8.9.x to continue receiving bug fixes until the end of life of Drupal 8 in November 2021. The next bug-fix release (8.9.11) is scheduled for January 6, 2021. (See the release schedule overview for more information.) As of this release, sites on Drupal 8.8 will no longer receive security coverage.

We suggest that you update from Drupal 8 to Drupal 9 though. Updating is supported directly from 8.8.x and 8.9.x. Of the top 1000 most used drupal.org projects, 85% are updated for Drupal 9, so there is a high likeliness that most of the modules and themes you rely on are compatible.

Drupal 7 site owners

Drupal 7 support was extended to November 28, 2022, and will continue to receive bug and security fixes throughout this time. From November 2022 until at least November 2025, the Drupal 7 Vendor Extended Support program will be offered by vendors.

On the other hand, the migration path for Drupal 7 sites to Drupal 9 is stable. Read more about the migration to Drupal 9.

Translation, module, and theme contributors

Minor releases like Drupal 9.1.0 include backwards-compatible API additions for developers as well as new features.

Since minor releases are backwards-compatible, modules, themes, and translations that supported Drupal 9.0.x and earlier will be compatible with 9.1.x as well. However, the new version does include some changes to strings, user interfaces, internal APIs and API deprecations. This means that some small updates may be required for your translations, modules, and themes. Read the 9.1.0 release notes for a full list of changes that may affect your modules and themes.

This release has advanced the Drupal project significantly and represents the efforts of hundreds of volunteers and contributors from various organizations. Thank you to everyone who contributed to Drupal 9.1.0!

Dec 02 2020
Dec 02

What’s new in Drupal 9.1.0?

The first feature release of Drupal 9 includes the new experimental Olivero frontend theme and various additions to the Claro administration theme. Installer performance is improved 20% and full Composer 2 and PHP 8 support is available. Images with known dimensions are set to lazy-load by default to improve frontend performance.

Download Drupal 9.1.0

New experimental Olivero theme

A new beta experimental frontend theme has been added to Drupal core called Olivero. This is a new modern and clear theme that is planned to become the new default Drupal theme later (replacing Bartik). Subtheming Olivero is currently not supported, but formal support may be included in the future.

The theme is named after Rachel Olivero (1982-2019). She was the head of the organizational technology group at the National Federation of the Blind, a well-known accessibility expert, a Drupal community contributor, and a friend to many.

Key additions to the Claro theme

The experimental Claro administration theme introduces designs for various key pages: the extensions administration page, views administration, status report and media library received Claro styled designs.

Composer 2 and PHP 8 support

Drupal 9.1 is fully compatible with Composer 2. If you are using Composer 1, now would be a great time to update. Most plugins used on Drupal sites are compatible and/or obsolete with the new version. The memory and performance requirements reduced dramatically, which should improve your experience.

PHP 8 is also supported in Drupal 9.1, including all of Drupal's dependencies. There may be contributed projects that are not fully compatible though. Drupal 9 is still compatible with PHP 7.3 and newer. There are various exciting new features in PHP 8, but the JIT compiler and performance improvements are not likely to affect Drupal. Drupal 10 is planned to require PHP 8 in 2022. It is worth examining the support timelines of PHP versions to schedule your platform updates.

Other improvements

Installer performance is improved 20%, so getting a new Drupal site set up will be faster.

Images rendered by Drupal with known dimensions will be set to lazy-load automatically. This means browsers will only load them when they should appear in the viewport of the user, improving the user experience by making content appear faster.

Drupal 10 is planned for mid-2022. While Drupal 9 keeps requiring Symfony 4, Drupal 9.1 includes adjustments required to support Symfony 5 already.

What does this mean for me?

Drupal 8 site owners

Update at least to 8.9.x to continue receiving bug fixes until the end of life of Drupal 8 in November 2021. The next bug-fix release (8.9.11) is scheduled for January 6, 2021. (See the release schedule overview for more information.) As of this release, sites on Drupal 8.8 will no longer receive security coverage.

We suggest that you update from Drupal 8 to Drupal 9 though. Updating is supported directly from 8.8.x and 8.9.x. Of the top 1000 most used drupal.org projects, 85% are updated for Drupal 9, so there is a high likeliness that most of the modules and themes you rely on are compatible.

Drupal 7 site owners

Drupal 7 support was extended to November 28, 2022, and will continue to receive bug and security fixes throughout this time. From November 2022 until at least November 2025, the Drupal 7 Vendor Extended Support program will be offered by vendors.

On the other hand, the migration path for Drupal 7 sites to Drupal 9 is stable. Read more about the migration to Drupal 9.

Translation, module, and theme contributors

Minor releases like Drupal 9.1.0 include backwards-compatible API additions for developers as well as new features.

Since minor releases are backwards-compatible, modules, themes, and translations that supported Drupal 9.0.x and earlier will be compatible with 9.1.x as well. However, the new version does include some changes to strings, user interfaces, internal APIs and API deprecations. This means that some small updates may be required for your translations, modules, and themes. Read the 9.1.0 release notes for a full list of changes that may affect your modules and themes.

This release has advanced the Drupal project significantly and represents the efforts of hundreds of volunteers and contributors from various organizations. Thank you to everyone who contributed to Drupal 9.1.0!

Nov 23 2020
Nov 23

Do you own an existing drupal.org project that does not yet have a Drupal 9 compatible release? This week would be a good time to take that step and make a Drupal 9 compatible release! I am paying for two tickets to DrupalCon Europe for new Drupal 9 compatible releases. Read on for exact rules!

DrupalCon Europe is in two weeks already! December 8-11, 2020. It offers 4 keynotes, including the Driesnote and the Drupal Core Initiative Leads Keynote (that I help coordinate), 119 sessions in five different content tracks, 4 workshops, interest group discussions, and networking. These are all included in the 250 EUR (no VAT) ticket. I would love to see you there!

Looking at Drupal 9 compatibility data, while 83% of the top 1000 projects by usage already have a release, the others do not. If we look at all the projects, 43% of them have a Drupal 9 compatible release. This is way better than with Drupal 8 was at the same time, but we can still do better! 22.5% of all projects (2177 projects in total) need an info.yml file change and a release, no other changes required. There is a good chance one of those are yours!

The rules of this giveaway are the following:

  1. The participating project must have existed before this week.
  2. The project must have its first Drupal 9 compatible release this week, before end of Friday.
  3. Selection from eligible projects is random.
  4. The lead maintainer on the winning two projects will pick who gets the ticket.
  5. In case of a pass, I draw another project.
  6. I will be using my existing script from the #DrupalCares campaign to track the newly Drupal 9 compatible projects.
  7. The script uses the official drupal.org releases dump and takes dates of releases from there.

I'll keep this list up to date throughout the week with who is in the running:

November 23

November 24

November 25

November 26

November 27

Update: Congratulations to winners: Marcelo Vani for the first Drupal 9 compatible release of CSV to Config and Daniele Piaggesi for the first Drupal 9 compatible release of Prevnext.

Nov 16 2020
Nov 16

If Drupal in Europe is important to you, we need your help! Read on to see how.

Nov 12 2020
Nov 12

DrupalCons are a great way to learn and connect, but they are especially great to meet various people leading Drupal's future direction. DrupalCon Europe in a couple weeks is no execption.

There is of course the Driesnote to get an update on where Drupal's progress is and get inspired about where its going. There is a dedicated question and answer session with project lead Dries Buytaert where you can inquire about topics not covered in the keynote.

The initiative leads provide a glimpse into their respective areas in the Drupal Initiative leaders keynote. This is a great way to get to know the leaders and learn more about their plans and where you could help.

Various initiatives have dedicated sessions: the Core Automatic Updates Initiative Update and the Configuration Management Initiative 2.0 session provides updates on the progress made and gives you a look forward. There is not one but two sessions about the new experimental Olivero frontend theme in Drupal 9.1.0: Designing for chaos: The design process behind Olivero and The Olivero theme: Genesis and Update on Drupal 9's Newest Theme.

A practically inevitable future milestone is Drupal 10. In The Drupal 10 initiative, here we go I will cover where we are in preparing Drupal 10, what you can expect and where you can be involved. On the way to Drupal 10 is our support for PHP 8. While not specifically about Drupal core's progress, the PHP 8: What's new and changing will showcase the new version of the programming language.

For the future of Drupal, the people leading and the technology being built is at least as interesting as the platform we are collaborating on. You might have heard that merge requests and issue branches became generally available on drupal.org yesterday (yes!). In Drupal.org Update - The latest collaboration tools to help you build Drupal (panel), you can learn more about the current state and future of the platform we use to build Drupal itself.

Also of wide interest is the effect of end of life Drupal versions: Jeremy Andrews and Mike Meyers will cover Drupal 7 and Drupal 8 end of life.

These were just the pre-planned sessions. The real involvement possibilities are at Birds of a Feather discussions where you can be directly involved with core discussions, see how hard problems are deconstructed and solved. Most BoF slots are still open for submission, but there will be various covering core's future. Also contribution events will happen all week where you can learn Drupal development and any other kind of Drupal contribution based on your interests. I expect contribution topic groups forming around Symfony 6 compatibility, removing jQuery UI components, CKEditor 5, the Claro admin theme and Olivero frontend themes and so on.

These are just the core focused sessions out of 119 sessions offered at the event in five tracks. Also there are even 4 in-depth workshops included with each ticket. Hope to see you there! Check out https://events.drupal.org/europe2020 for more information.

Photo credit Boris Baldinger from DrupalCon Amsterdam.

Oct 06 2020
Oct 06

Reposted from the Core group on groups.drupal.org

In preparation for the minor release, Drupal 9.1.x will enter the alpha phase the week of October 19th, 2020. Core developers should plan to complete changes that are only allowed in minor releases prior to the alpha release. The 9.1.0-alpha1 deadline for most core patches is October 16. (More information on alpha and beta releases.)

  • Developers and site owners can begin testing the alpha after its release.

  • The 9.2.x branch of core will be created, and future feature and API additions will be targeted against that branch instead of 9.1.x. All outstanding issues filed against 9.1.x will be automatically migrated to 9.2.x.

  • Once 9.2.x is branched, alpha experimental modules will be removed from the 9.1.x codebase (so their development will continue in 9.2.x only). The Config Environment module is an alpha stability module in 9.1.x.

  • All issues filed against 9.0.x will then be migrated to 9.1.x, and subsequent bug reports should be targeted against the 9.1.x branch.

  • During the alpha phase, core issues will be committed according to the following policy:

    1. Most issues that are allowed for patch releases will be committed to 9.1.x and 9.2.x.
    2. Most issues that are only allowed in minor releases will be committed to 9.2.x only. A few strategic issues may be backported to 9.1.x, but only at committer discretion after the issue is fixed in 9.2.x (so leave them set to 9.2.x unless you are a committer), and only up until the beta deadline.

Drupal 9.1.0-beta1 will be released the week of November 2nd

Roughly two weeks after the alpha release, the first beta release will be created. All the restrictions of the alpha release apply to beta releases as well. The release of the first beta is a firm deadline for all feature and API additions. Even if an issue is pending in the Reviewed & Tested by the Community (RTBC) queue when the commit freeze for the beta begins, it will be committed to the next minor release only.

The release candidate phase will begin the week of November 16th. See the summarized key dates in the release cycle, allowed changes during the Drupal 8 and Drupal 9 release cycles, and Drupal 8 and 9 backwards compatibility and internal API policy for more information.

The scheduled release date of Drupal 9.1.0 is December 2nd, 2020.

Bugfix and security support of Drupal 9.0.x, 8.8.x and 8.9.x.

Security coverage for Drupal 8 and 9 is generally provided for the previous minor release as well as the newest minor release. However, Drupal 8.9.x is a Long-Term Support release where support is provided until November 2021. Based on these the following changes are upcoming:

Drupal 8.8.x Security releases will be provided until December 2nd, 2020. Drupal 8.9.x Security releases will be provided until November 2021. Bugfix support will continue into early 2021. Drupal 9.0.x Normal bugfix support ends on December 2nd, 2020. However, security releases are provided until the release of Drupal 9.2.0 on June 2, 2021.

2021 Support Timeline

Sep 28 2020
Sep 28

Drupal 8 and 9 core were already made compatible with Composer 2 back in May. Last week the Drupal package repository (packages.drupal.org) rolled out full support for Composer 2 as well. While Michael Anello did Drupal vs. Composer 2-alpha2 benchmarks in July and Malabya also did an even more detailed benchmark in July, various things have been improved in Composer 2 since July and the packages.drupal.org improvement should also show.

Inspired by numbers posted by Konstantinos Skarlatos from a simple scenario to the #composer drupal.org/slack channel today, I went ahead and attempted to produce a reproducible scenario you can also try at home. I included all commands to copy-paste. There are no external dependencies other than a PHP executable on your command line and curl to download files as used. For reference, my PHP is as follows (definitely not the latest):

$ php -v
PHP 7.3.11 (cli) (built: Jun  5 2020 23:50:40) ( NTS )
Copyright (c) 1997-2018 The PHP Group
Zend Engine v3.3.11, Copyright (c) 1998-2018 Zend Technologies

Set up the latest Composer 1 and 2 locally

First let's grab the latest Composer versions locally. This will avoid any confusion as to which version is used when.

$ curl https://getcomposer.org/composer-1.phar --output composer-1.phar
$ php composer-1.phar -V
Composer version 1.10.13 2020-09-09 11:46:34

$ curl https://getcomposer.org/composer-2.phar --output composer-2.phar
$ php composer-2.phar -V
Composer version 2.0.0-RC1 2020-09-10 15:39:45

Install Drupal 9 with create-project

Make sure that we are not using cache and ask composer to profile itself. This got me two Drupal 9.0.6 copies, again to separate our testing environments properly.

$ php composer-1.phar --no-cache --profile create-project drupal/recommended-project composer1site
[...]
[9.3MiB/41.02s] Memory usage: 9.35MiB (peak: 197.23MiB), time: 41.02s

$ php composer-2.phar --no-cache --profile create-project drupal/recommended-project composer2site
[...]
[12.5MiB/18.29s] Memory usage: 12.48MiB (peak: 13.71MiB), time: 18.29s

The time is cut in half but the peak memory usage had an even bigger drop to less than 7% of the Composer 1 memory peak with Composer 2.

Adding and removing a Drupal module

You only do site creation once for a site. Let's add and remove a Drupal module! Konstantinos tested with Metatag which sounds like a good one to do. While Metatag only has Drupal project dependencies, the savings are likely similar for projects with 3rd party dependencies.

$ cd composer1site
$ php ../composer-1.phar --no-cache --profile require drupal/metatag
[...]
[629.4MiB/65.35s] Memory usage: 629.36MiB (peak: 1557.29MiB), time: 65.35s

$ php ../composer-1.phar --no-cache --profile remove drupal/metatag
[...]
[450.9MiB/47.98s] Memory usage: 450.85MiB (peak: 1377.67MiB), time: 47.98s

$ cd ..

$ cd composer2site
$ php ../composer-2.phar --no-cache --profile require drupal/metatag
[...]
[13.7MiB/3.13s] Memory usage: 13.67MiB (peak: 14.23MiB), time: 3.13s

$ php ../composer-2.phar --no-cache --profile remove drupal/metatag
[12.1MiB/0.18s] Memory usage: 12.1MiB (peak: 12.49MiB), time: 0.18s

Ok, that is pretty jaw dropping. Adding Metatag goes from 65 seconds down to 3 seconds. Removing Metatag goes from 48 seconds to 0.18(!) seconds. Memory usage goes down to 1% (one percent!), from a gigabyte and a half to 12-14 megabytes.

What does this mean for Drupal?

Given the explicit support on drupal.org, you should be able to use Composer 2 for your Drupal site builds whenever you are comfortable, maybe already in the RC stage or later on as it gets stable. Assuming any composer plugins you need are compatible. Drupal sites are often using cweagans/composer-patches, which is Composer 2 compatible in the dev version, but did not have a release yet. You can change your composer.json to have "cweagans/composer-patches": "1.x-dev" and do a composer update to get the development version that is already compatible.

Many are not using composer at all to build their sites. However, an increasing number of drupal.org projects require external Composer dependencies to function. Based on last week's data from Ryan Aslett from the Drupal Association, 12% of drupal.org projects directly have a third-party Composer dependency. Another 6% have a Drupal dependency that in turn has a third-party Composer dependency. So even if we only look at direct and one-level indirect dependencies, 18% of Drupal.org projects require Composer to be installed properly. I also looked at various segments of projects and the ones requiring Composer are very well distributed. 15.2% of the top 500 projects (by usage) require Composer while 16.2% of the top 5000 do. So if you are not yet using Composer to build your Drupal sites, it seems to be only a matter of time. The improvements in Composer 2 should help a lot with its adoption I think.

These improvements will also be crucial for the Automated Updates initiative which has Composer 2 compatibility on their roadmap as well. Signature verification is only possible with Composer 2 and the lower memory and time requirements allow it to be run from web requests.

Finally, the downloadable tarballs of Drupal core are built with Composer 1 currently to make it easy to transition from a tarball based site to a Composer site. Allow Drupal 9 (including dev builds) to use Composer 2, part 2 is open to move that to Composer 2. Unfortunately a sizable blocker to that is Composer's "prefer-stable" setting cannot be relied on to produce a stable release. That would need more discussion and a solid resolution to move forward. There is less than 3 weeks before Drupal 9.1 is locked down, so your feedback there would be more than welcome!

Aug 17 2020
Aug 17

Last time I posted an update on Upgrade Status was four months ago. It is fair to say the Drupal contributed project landscape has changed quite a bit in the meantime and Upgrade Status should evolve too. Why? The primary role of Upgrade Status is to help get your site components updated for Drupal 9 compatibility. Most of your site components are contributed modules. In many cases, either your local copies or the remote available updates will already be compatible. 38% of Drupal 8 compatible modules are now Drupal 9 compatible (3535 out of 9258) and most others have a patch waiting to land to either improve or complete compatibility.

The changing role of Upgrade Status

Therefore the role of Upgrade Status for contributed projects is more to make you realize that you are one of (a) already compatible (b) will be compatible with an update or (c) should work with the maintainer on existing issues. As opposed to scanning for problems locally and trying to fix it for yourself. But the current 2.x version of Upgrade Status does not do the job of indicating most of these. Without running the (lengthy) scans on your projects, it does not know which local projects are already compatible. And although it has access to information about whether remote updates are Drupal 9 compatible or not, it will not display them. Look at this screenshot:

We only know the Consumers project update is going to solve your Drupal 9 compatibility issues because the maintainer kindly explained that in their Drupal 9 plan. This requires manual work and is not going to happen universally (eg. as shown below neither Chaos Tools nor Markdown specify a Drupal 9 plan). For projects like Consumers, there is not even a good reason to run our lengthy compatibility checking locally because we know the remote update is available and is going to be compatible. Plus we already know from the local info file that the local version is not yet compatible and requires that update. So if we would provide all this "new" data, the user could understand the situation and decide to not even run a compatibility scan but update the project. So the first step (hopefully) improving the Upgrade Status experience was to add more raw data about local and remote Drupal 9 compatibility. Then it looks like this:

The new "Local 9-ready" column shows if the project is already ready locally (without scanning the project, based on info files in the project). The new "Drupal.org 9-ready" column shows if the remote update is Drupal 9 compatible or not (based on information already provided to core's update module). So what we can see from this example is that Chaos Tools will be entirely resolved with an update, no need to run a problem scan locally. Markdown will not be entirely resolved but is worth updating either way because likely there will be less issues. Not all projects will specify a Drupal 9 plan to go by as discussed above. But if there was no plan specified, we could still link to the issue queue. I don't think applying issue tags consistently is possible to expect from all contributors, so we cannot link to an issue tag search. The link goes to a drupal.org issue search for "Drupal 9" issues in the project. This is the fastest way to get to a place to collaborate with the maintainers of Markdown, given no Drupal 9 plan posted.

Deciding on the next step for each project

So more raw data is great, right? Well, it probably makes the display a lot more confusing. Based on what you read out about the data you would do different things to different projects. For the 2.x version Joe at Drupalize.me published a great post about how to read the data. But what if the module would make suggestions for next steps instead of you needing to carefully examine each part of the data. We could still give users the source data, but save a lot of time to compare data points as to whether a project should be updated or needs more work, etc. Enter the next step suggestion engine I built following extensive discussions with Ofer Shaal. The possible next steps for projects are:

  1. Remove: if you have uninstalled projects on your site, there is likely no point in investing effort keeping them up to date.
  2. Update: if your project has a remote update, that is the best course of action; even if Drupal 9 compatibility is not entirely done there, it is likely improved.
  3. Collaborate with maintainer: contributed projects that are up to date could still have issues; instead of fixing locally, there is high probability that there are issues (including but not limited to from Project Update Bot) in the queue, so better start collaborating instead of fixing locally.
  4. Scan: unless your custom project's info files specify Drupal 9 compatibility already, the suggested next step is to scan them
  5. Fix with rector: for custom projects there is a 40+% likeliness that there is at least one problem we find that is rector-fixable, we suggest you use rector as your next step to avoid needless manual work (again) in this case
  6. Fix manually: if you scanned and there were no rectorable fixes, as a last resort we suggest you fix issues manually

Instead of grouping by custom/contributed and under that installed/uninstalled, the 3.x branch now groups results based on the next suggested step. The raw data is still shown and users can still do whatever they decide if they do not agree with the suggested next step.

This is the state of the module's user interface right after installation. We can already deduct a lot of information from local Drupal 9 readiness, update information and status of projects. For the single custom project in this test setup, we can only move forward with scanning it for problems. The numeric counters of problems found overall were removed, because in the current state of contributed projects rapidly getting ready, counting their individual issues together does not really inform about anything useful.

Overview of status of your site

Usage of Upgrade Status has always been a three-step process. First you need to help the module gather data (run available update checks, run scanning of projects). Second, you would attempt to fix the problems found (update modules, run rector, etc.). Then you scan again and verify compatibility improved. So instead of putting this into documentation, I designed a summary view for the top of the page, that helps you go through the data gathering, the compatibility fixing and the celebratory steps. Here is how that looks like for my test site:

  1. The data gathering steps ensure the module works with the best data possible. Having a way to accurately identify project versions is important, so projects are suggested for that (unless already installed). Having up to date available updates information is important, so it is possible to run that directly from here. There are projects where scanning on this UI is the next step to gather the required data (to move to "Fix with rector" or "Fix manually"). On this site I have one of those test modules. And finally, the UI indicates you can scan either project as you see fit.
  2. Based on the data available, the second columns shows all the next step suggestions for fixing compatibility issues. Projects to remove because they are uninstalled anyway, projects to update, collaborate on, fix with rector, and so on. If your environment is incompatible that also shows up here with a link to details.
  3. Finally there is a column to review what's ready to go. If your environment looks all good, that would show up here, as well as all the projects that are already compatible. A little circle chart shows how far along you are.

Comparing side by side

Check out the current user interface on the left and the new work in progress on the right. A summary of differences:

  1. The current UI is almost a blank slate and is not aware of project status locally or update's compatibility remotely.
  2. On the current UI to gather data you need to run the full scanner on everything. Then you need to decide on next steps based on your reading of the data.
  3. On the current UI the available updates refresh and the suggestion to improve version identification with the deploy modules is sort of hidden under "help text blindess", rather than being an active part of the UI.
  4. The new UI is actionable immediately with categories of projects by next step.
  5. The count summaries of problems found is gone, the focus is more on the projects rather than the individual problems. (Even though that data is entirely accessible).

What do you think?

I believe that more than two months after Drupal 9's release, the role of Upgrade Status is increasingly not to tell you to do fixes locally but to allow you to obtain the fixes already made and collaborate on fixes being developed for contributed projects. And for custom projects, it should suggest you the most automated way forward (rector preferred) that will result in least work to execute. These were the guiding principles of the new user interface. I built it all in the 3.x branch of Upgrade Status, and you can try it out in 8.x-3.0-alpha1. There are definitely spots for improvement and there are probably things I still did not consider. Feedback would be great either as comments here or support requests on the issue queue. Thanks for your input, it is going to help make this better!

Jul 02 2020
Jul 02

Drupal 9 was just released last month, and in less than two weeks we get together to celebrate it (again), learn, grow and plan together for the future at DrupalCon Global.

I presented my "State of Drupal 9" talk at various events for over a year now, and while the original direction of questions were about how the transition would work, lately it is more about what else can we expect from Drupal 9 and then Drupal 10. This is a testament and proof to the continuous upgrade path we introduced all the way back in 2017. Now that Drupal 9.0 is out, we can continue to fill the gaps and add new exciting capabilities to Drupal core.

DrupalCon Global will have various exciting events and opportunities to learn about and help shape the future of Drupal 9 and even Drupal 10. Tickets are $249 and get you access to all session content, summits and BoF discussions. As usual, contributions do not require a ticket and will happen all week as well, including a dedicated contribution day on Friday. Here is a sampling of all content elements discussing, planning on and even building the future of Drupal.

Sessions about the future of Drupal

First there is the Driesnote of course. Dries will share the result of the Drupal 2020 Product Survey and discuss plans for Drupal 10. There is a followup Q&A session to discuss the keynote and other topics with Dries live.

The Drupal Initiatives Plenary coordinated by yours truly is going to feature various important leaders in our community working on diversity and inclusion, accessibility, events, mentoring, promotion as well as core components like the Claro admin theme and the Olivero frontend theme. This is the best way to get an overview of how Drupal's teams work, what are their plans and challenges. Even better, the plenary session is followed by a BoF where we can continue the discussion in a more interactive form.

In Drupal Core markup in continuous upgrade path Lauri Eskola will dive into why the deprecation process used for PHP and JavaScript code is not workable for HTML and CSS. This informs the direction of where markup is going in Drupal 9 and 10 onwards.

In the Drupal.org Panel the Drupal Association team discusses how key initiatives are supported on Drupal.org including Composer, Automatic Updates and even Merge Requests for Drupal contribution and plans for the future.

Mike Baynton and David Strauss will discuss Automatic updates in action and in depth showing what is possible now and what are the future plans.

There is not one but two sessions about the new proposed frontend theme. In The Olivero theme: Turning a wild idea into a core initiative Mike Herchel and Putra Bonaccorsi discusses the whole history and future plans while in Designing for chaos: The design process behind Olivero will cover the design specifically.

Moshe Weitzman leads a core conversation to take stock of the current command line tools for Drupal and discuss what a more complete core solution would look like in A robust command line tool for all Drupal sites.

In Let’s Make Drupal Core Less Complicated Ted Bowman will propose ways to simplify Drupal core for existing uses and to achieve an easier learning curve.

Finally Drupal 9: New Initiatives for Drupal offers a chance to discuss new initiatives proposed by Dries in the Driesnote. If you are interested to join in either or discuss the plans, this is your opportunity!

Birds of a Feather discussions about the future of Drupal

Attendees with tickets for DrupalCon Global will be able to participate in live discussions about key topics. BoF submission is open, so this list will possibly grow as time goes.

Ofer Shaal leads a discussion titled Standardize Rector rules as part of Drupal core deprecations to make sure the transition from Drupal 9 to 10 will be even easier than Drupal 8 to 9 is.

Submit your Birds of a Feather discussion now.

Contribute to the future of Drupal

Just like in-person DrupalCons, DrupalCon Global contribution will be free to attend and does not require a ticket. The contribution spaces are especially good to go to if you are interested in the future of Drupal and making a difference.

If you've been to a DrupalCon or a DrupalCamp before, a contribution event usually involves one or more rooms with tables that have signage on them for what they are working on. This is not exactly possible online, however, we devised a system to replicate tables as groups at https://contrib2020.getopensocial.net/all-groups which allows you to see what topics will be covered and who the leads are. (Huge props to Rachel Lawson at the Drupal Association for building this out!)

If your topic is not yet there, you should create a group now. Groups indicate what they are working on and what skills they need from contributors. You should join groups you are interested to help and read their information for guidance. Teams will post group events to let you know when certain activities (introduction, review sessions, co-working on specific problems or meetings to discuss issues) will happen. Events will also be used to signify when you are most likely to find people working on the topics. The OpenSocial site is a directory of topics and events, contribution itself will happen on drupal.org with discussion on Drupal Slack for most groups.

There are already groups for Configuration Management 2.0, the Olivero theme, the Bug Smash initiative and Media. Stay tuned for more appearing as the event comes closer.

Jun 25 2020
Jun 25

Gábor Hojtsy

An avid open source enthusiast and contributor. I am a the Drupal 9 initiative coordinator, Drupal core product manager and initiative coordinator coordinator working with and on the open source project itself at Acquia. I am a regular Drupal event speaker and organizer and do communication and social media for various initiatives.

I used to be the Drupal 8 multilingual initiative lead and the former release manager of Drupal 6.

You can also find me passionate about singing, music and amateur acting, especially when these are all combined, however I have little time for that alongside my two adorable kids.

Head to the contact page to send a mail.

May 29 2020
May 29

I organized Drupal 9 Porting Day for April 28 as part of my #DrupalCares funding sub-campaign to help the Drupal Association bounce back from their financial losses due to the ongoing pandemic. It was a lot of fun with Lee Rowlands, Vladimir Roudakov, Adam Bergstein and Mike Lutz helping lead the contribution before and after my time of availability. 126 issues were worked on and 43 newly Drupal 9 compatible releases were made then.

Given how fun it was, with Drupal 9 coming out next week it was logical to do another event. Last Friday would have been a great opportunity in person at DrupalCon Minneapolis if not for the pandemic (again). So I decided to schedule the event for that weekend. Surabhi Gokte and Gabriele Maira helped a lot in getting the event off the ground and we announced Drupal 9 Porting Weekend for May 22-23 to accommodate people available on the workday as well as the weekend.

With more time to prepare, a lot more interested folks signed up to help lead the event in their respective timezones. 14 leads signed up and helped contributors for 52 hours, while the event lasted. Thanks Vladimir Roudakov (VladimirAus), Janna Malikova (JannaKha), Vaibhav Jain (vaibhavjain), Tsegaselassie Tadesse (tsega), Gabriele Maira (gambry), João Ventura (jcnventura), Oleh Vehera (voleger), Matthew Radcliffe (mradcliffe), Michael Lutz (mikelutz), Adam Bergstein (nerdstein), Kristen Pol, Qiangjun Ran (jungle), Jaideep Singh Kandari (JayKandari) and Digant Jagtap (digantdj), you were fantastic!

Kristen Pol and Tsegaselassie Tadesse were also very active in the planning stage, Kristen published a very detailed guide to the weekend, Tsega wrote up and posted developer tips. The Bassam Ismail posted this video based on those guides of an actual Drupal 9 project update running with Upgrade Status and Rector, ending in submitting the patch:

So with everything well prepared, Vladimir and Janna started the weekend and the leads were handing off responsibilities to each other throughout the whole event. This is how time coverage looked like for the whole 52 hours. There was not a single time when someone was not there to help:

We had a lot of fun and learned a ton from each other. While numbers will not explain the event, that is all we have after the fact to look at, so here they are:

When looking at project releases, the weekend also supported a major increase in daily newly Drupal 9 compatible releases also with several days of after-effects (I am counting these with my own script):

New releases at the weekend and shortly after included fun modules like Pirate but also seriously cool modules like the Tome static site generator, Quicklink and top 200 most used modules like Views Accordion and Schema.org Metatag.

As luck would have it Drupal 9.0.0 RC1 was also released on this weekend, which meant that people testing their updated projects also gave the Drupal 9 release candidate a test drive right away.

For me this event was amazing to organize. The results in new Drupal 9 compatible projects before the stable core release and the additional testing of the release candidate are all good material outcomes. The raised awareness around the porting process and tools as well as the know-how shared will last even longer as people use what they learned and teach others as well. Also the concentrated increased use of the tools resulted in more improvement suggestions, so we can make them even better for the next wave of porters to come.

Thanks all for your involvement, you made a lasting difference. Keep spreading your know-how and all the good things about Drupal 9!

Ps. Next up is celebrating the release on June 3rd, 2020! Post your artwork, selfies, videos and events at https://celebratedrupal.org/ and let's have some fun together.

May 05 2020
May 05

Start: 

2020-05-21 23:30 - 2020-05-24 03:30 UTC

Organizers: 

Event type: 

Join the Drupal Community in this worldwide event focusing on Drupal 9 stability and adoption across contributed projects. Over 1600 projects are already Drupal 9 compatible a month before Drupal 9's release which is unprecedented. However, there are still thousands that only need very small changes and a release made.

The first Drupal 9 Porting Day was on April 28, 2020, led by Gábor Hojtsy, Lee Rowlands, Vladimir Roudakov, QED42, Srijan, Adam Bergstein and Mike Lutz. Altogether 126 issues were worked on that resulted in 89 newly Drupal 9 compatible releases on that day and the following two days. It was not only successful but we had a lot of fun too. So we are of course here to do another one this month!

Dates

Drupal 9 Porting Weekend is on May 22-23, 2020. Friday, May 22 would have been contribution day at DrupalCon Minneapolis. We picked the dates in honour of the cancelled event.

Mentors / leaders needed worldwide

The following great people signed up so far to lead in their own timezones:

Friday leaders:

Saturday leaders:

We are looking for more leaders at various time zones to help mentor people working in that timezone. Spreading the effort to more people would help everyone's questions be answered. Contact Gábor Hojtsy if you are interested to be a mentor / leader in your timezone and we'll add you here. We are looking to cover as many time zones as possible.

How to participate

Anyone can help!

  • Let's meet online in the #d9readiness channel on Drupal slack: https://www.drupal.org/slack
  • We'll use slack threads to discuss projects and to help coordinate the work.
  • Do tag issues worked on with "Drupal 9 Porting Weekend" on drupal.org.

Tools that we'll definitely use include:

Check out Kristen Pol's post to prepare at http://www.kristen.org/content/preparing-yourself-drupal-9-porting-weekend or for a more developer focused short summary Tsegaselassie Tadesse's post at https://gist.github.com/tsega/ce47315a053f8453abcd7a289ae03500.

Help get the word out!

Excited about participating? Let your friends and colleagues know! You don't need to be a module maintainer to participate. Tweet and post on other favourite social platforms about Drupal 9 Porting Weekend using #Drupal9Weekend.

Special thanks to @surabhi.gokte and @gambry for their help to get this off the ground.

Apr 29 2020
Apr 29

When I announced the Drupal 9 module porting challenge two weeks ago, I did not fully understand what was gonna come. I offered to donate €900 to the Drupal Association #DrupalCares campaign for 100 projects newly ported to Drupal 9. Then more funders started to appear. Ron Northcutt offered another €900, Ofer Shaal put in another €450. QED42 offered to match Ron's €900. It certainly grew much bigger than I anticipated so it was time to step up the game.

So last week I announced and started organizing Drupal 9 porting day for April 28, 2020 to not let our funders keep their money. While my funds were almost gone in the first week, there was still the rest of the funds to get donated. The idea of the porting day sounded good because we raise funds for the Drupal Association, we get people together to do their first Drupal 9 releases, we help others' projects out, drive the tools to their boundaries, do Drupal 9 core quality assurance and grow the ready module pool before Drupal 9's launch all at the same time. Some people would learn how to get ready for Drupal 9 for the first time, so we would spread some know-how and confidence in the release as well. That is like a win-win-win-win-win-win.

Nonetheless I was still blown away by the interest to participate. Lee Rowlands and Vladimir Roudakov signed up to start leading porting day in Australia / New Zealand while I was still well asleep. By the time I woke up there were already various new releases and issues opened. I started providing feedback there and then worked my way through the top 50 used projects that needed info file changes and releases. I made sure to do the deepest research and support maintainers to do the next steps. I also started getting patches for my own projects and even though I did not think it would be even feasible, thanks to contributors, we made one of my projects, Upgrade Rector Drupal 9 compatible as well. I also helped fix a critical core bug in Drupal 9 that Christian López Espínola found while porting the Lingotek module suite. At least two companies, QED42 and Srijan had groups of people internally gathering to rally and contribute. In my afternoon, Adam Bergstein and Mike Lutz came in from the United States to continue leading the day onwards.

Closing for the day. We had an awesome contribution effort today. It is incredible to see so many contributors participating and making this day wonderful. ❤️ Thank you… #DrupalCares - Jaideep Singh Kandari

At the time of this writing, altogether 126 issues were worked on. According to my scripts identifying newly Drupal 9 compatible releases of projects, 43 newly Drupal 9 compatible releases were made, including top 50 projects like honeypot and adminimal_admin_toolbar and such developer modules as twig_xdebug and queue_ui. When I put this together with all the numbers in the challenge to date, it turns out these 43 projects exactly rounded out the second 100 projects. Yes I went back to double-check!

This means Ron will now donate his €900 (which will be matched by Dries and Vanessa Buytaert and Drupal businesses to €2700) and QED42 will also donate their €900, totalling to an impact of €3600 funding for the Drupal Association from this second milestone of the Drupal 9 porting challenge. (Including the first milestone's €900, the directly donated funds are altogether €2700, for a total matched impact of €6300 in the #DrupalCares campaign).

If you did not get to do a first Drupal 9 release on porting day, no problem! We made a ton of progress on projects other than the ones that got releases and that will result in more releases. Some of them could be very soon. In fact, this challenge is not over, as there are still two more days, and we just entered the final round for Ofer Shaal's fund of 50 newly Drupal 9 compatible releases (max €450) for #DrupalCares. So please keep the releases coming! Thanks all!

Ps. Kristen Pol wrote up her detailed steps of working on Drupal 9 compatibility of others' projects. I suggest reading her tips for how to ensure compatibility and work with maintainers respectfully.

Apr 23 2020
Apr 23

I launched the Drupal 9 Module Porting Challenge a week ago, and wow it is going well! I pledged to donate €9 for each newly Drupal 9 compatible drupal.org project to the #DrupalCares campaign up to a total of €900. Since then Ron Northcutt joined on April 20 with another €900 and Ofer Shaal joined on April 21 with another €450, so the challenge now goes to a total of €2250! Our donation will potentially be matched by Dries and Vanessa Buytaert and then a group of organisations will match it again for a potential total of €6750 donated.

State of the challenge

After a week, my original budget is almost spent, so I am preparing to donate it tomorrow! Let's make Ron and Ofer donate their whole pool as well! We are standing at €837 of €2250 covered by 93 newly Drupal 9 compatible projects in one week.

According to our static analysis at least, over 3600 projects only need a single line info.yml file change and a new release. It is worth checking if one of your projects are in there so we don't let Ofer and Ron keep their money either! ;)

Porting day on April 28, 2020

Some projects will admittedly not be as easy as a one line change though, so I am organising a Drupal 9 porting day for April 28, 2020. I commit to be available in European times to consult on fixing deprecation issues and would love to see you there! Let's meet online in the #d9readiness channel on Drupal slack (drupal.org/slack). We'll use slack threads to discuss projects to help coordinate the work. We may use other tools as needed to speed up the process, still exploring the possibilities. Stay tuned! For now, if you can be available for even one hour, you are welcome to join!

Jan 09 2020
Jan 09

We started the "All things Drupal 9" meetings all the way back in October 2018 to start preparing for the new major release. Now in 2020, the year of Drupal 9, it was natural to make the meeting happen every Monday given the target dates coming up fast.

Contributed project maintainers, site owners, core developers are all welcome. If you are planning a Drupal 9 project for later in the year, this is your place as well. We open the floor with equal opportunity for people to propose topics, so we can cover your pressing questions as well! Join at 7pm UTC in the #d9readiness channel on Drupal Slack any Monday. The next meeting will be on January 13th, 2020.

We've been promoting Drupal 9's June 3rd 2020 target release date a lot, but that can only happen if the Drupal 9.0.0 beta requirements are all done by the end of February 2020, which is coming up real fast. There are still a lot to do and we need your help! If that does not happen, then the release will happen in August or December. While that would give less time for Drupal 8 users to update, we cannot compromise on the stability of Drupal 9 out of the gate.

The three Drupal 9 release scenarios

Check out the detailed alternate timelines at https://www.drupal.org/core/release-cycle-overview

Jan 09 2020
Jan 09

We started the "All things Drupal 9" meetings all the way back in October 2018 to start preparing for the new major release. Now in 2020, the year of Drupal 9, it was natural to make the meeting happen every Monday given the target dates coming up fast.

Contributed project maintainers, site owners, core developers are all welcome. If you are planning a Drupal 9 project for later in the year, this is your place as well. We open the floor with equal opportunity for people to propose topics, so we can cover your pressing questions as well! Join at 7pm UTC in the #d9readiness channel on Drupal Slack any Monday. The next meeting will be on January 13th, 2020.

We've been promoting Drupal 9's June 3rd 2020 target release date a lot, but that can only happen if the Drupal 9.0.0 beta requirements are all done by the end of February 2020, which is coming up real fast. There are still a lot to do and we need your help! If that does not happen, then the release will happen in August or December. While that would give less time for Drupal 8 users to update, we cannot compromise on the stability of Drupal 9 out of the gate.

The three Drupal 9 release scenarios

Check out the detailed alternate timelines at https://www.drupal.org/core/release-cycle-overview

Apr 24 2018
Apr 24

Maybe you have seen Dries Buytaert's DrupalCon keynote and are looking forward to all the goodies coming in future Drupal 8 versions. The truth is none of those things will happen without people who want to make them happen to solve their own challenges with implementing and showcasing Drupal solutions. Are you implementing decoupled solutions and have issues you are working on? In the middle of building up a suite of integrated media solutions? These core team meetings are ideal to bring in these issues and discuss solutions and to be part of shaping up where Drupal 8 is heading. Read on for details.

  1. There is a weekly meeting on all API first work (REST, Waterwheel, JSON API, GraphQL) every Monday 2pm UTC on Google Hangouts. A link to the current hangout is posted 5 minutes before the meeting in the #drupal-wscci IRC channel.
  2. The Out of the box/demo team also meets every Monday at 3pm UTC on Google Hangouts.
  3. The Javascript office hours are held weekly in https://drupal.slack.com/archives/javascript every Monday at 4:30pm UTC. Get an invite at http://drupalslack.herokuapp.com/.
  4. The Layout Initiative meeting is on every Tuesday at 5pm UTC in https://drupal.slack.com/archives/layouts, get an invite at http://drupalslack.herokuapp.com/.
  5. The usability meeting is every week at 7:30pm UTC on Tuesday at https://drupal.slack.com/archives/ux, get an invite at http://drupalslack.herokuapp.com/.
  6. There is a media meeting every Wednesday at 2pm UTC, join at https://drupal.slack.com/archives/media, get an invite at http://drupalslack.herokuapp.com/.
  7. Wanna help with migrate? The team either meets in Google Hangouts or the #drupal-migrate IRC channel. (Discussed at the start of the meeting based on lead availability in IRC). Meetings are on Thursdays 9pm UTC and 2pm UTC on a weekly alternating basis.

Below is the calendar of all the meetings, subscribe to the Ical feed at https://calendar.google.com/calendar/ical/happypunch.com_eq0e09s0kvcs7v5...

Jul 20 2016
Jul 20

Every day, the online platforms are expanding, and we are easily forgetting that we need to consider some basic essential security tips that will help you with safe browsing as the data online is vulnerable to be accessed online. For this, it is always recommended to download the most promising security software such as McAfee via Mcafee.com/activate. It makes you feel safe by protecting your data from cybercriminals from offices, homes, or local coffee shops.

It is true to say that the cybercriminals use the internet to infiltrate the IoT along with the mobile devices that are connected. The harsh reality is hacks, phishing scams, malicious sites, malware are happening on daily basis and we need to stay aware of them. This world is hyper-connected and has left us exposed to far more vulnerabilities to get hacked. With the latest threats, the time to be proactive is about online safety. Here in this article, you will get to learn the basic essentials for safe web browsing, so lets, get started!

Mcafee.com/activate | office.com/setup

Mar 22 2013
Mar 22

As part of working on the site upgrade, our messaging and notifications system is discussed. Unfortunately we don't have a reliable number on how many people rely on email notifications from localize.drupal.org (due to automated signups) and the complexity of the upgrade process for notifications (given that we need to migrate to new modules) might set back our upgrade process even longer.

While the Drupal Association is busy with updating drupal.org itself to Drupal 7, the DA is not directly involved with the localize.drupal.org site maintenance and upgrade (similar to other subsites), so we are not tied to the main site upgrade in any way (neither do we get financing for this work).

One possible shortcut is to sidestep email notifications for the immediate upgrade and get back to the feature later. Are you heavily relying on notifications from localize.drupal.org? Please speak up at http://drupal.org/node/1392694! Thanks!

About Drupal Sun

Drupal Sun is an Evolving Web project. It allows you to:

  • Do full-text search on all the articles in Drupal Planet (thanks to Apache Solr)
  • Facet based on tags, author, or feed
  • Flip through articles quickly (with j/k or arrow keys) to find what you're interested in
  • View the entire article text inline, or in the context of the site where it was created

See the blog post at Evolving Web

Evolving Web