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Apr 08 2020
Apr 08

COVID-19 has fueled, among many things, a hefty appetite for data and analytics.

Having witnessed a rapid-fire evolution from a few, isolated cases in another corner of the world, to a pandemic that has the globe in its grips, data visualizations are now helping to tell the story and reveal the kinds of big data insights that are now possible. 

Near the top of the list of data visualizations that are providing an updated perspective on the Coronavirus is the Johns Hopkins University interactive global map, which offers a global view of the pandemic, along with the ability to drill down for a closer look at the spread of the virus within specific countries and regions. 

Johns Hopkins University COVID-19 Map

A screen shot of the Johns Hopkins University Covid-19 MapThe above screen from the the Johns Hopkins University interactive COVID-19 map is from April 8, 2020, and is among the images on the site that depicts the global spread of the pandemic.  

 

Tracking Movement Via Cell Phone Data 

An April 2, 2020 article in an online edition of the New York Times, offered another angle from which to view the response to the Coronavirus in the United States. Using mobile phone GPS data, a color-coded map of every county in the United States, depicted miles traveled for the week of March 23, as an indicator of the degree to which people were adhering to shelter-in-place recommendations or orders.
 

A screen shot from a New York Times online article of a county-by-county map of the U.S. and movement over a weekend based on cell phone data.GPS data provided insight on a county-by-county basis into the degree to which mobility and travel had been impacted by the recommendations to stay home. 

Modeling Steps to Curtail the Spread

This third example is from a March 14, 2020 article in an online edition of the Washington Post.designed to demonstrate the impact of various degrees of social distancing. The article entitled, “Why outbreaks like coronavirus spread exponentially, and how to ‘flatten the curve,’” included animations of dots that demonstrated the impact of various levels of human contact on the spread of a hypothetical virus.

Screen shot from a Washington Post article that shows 4 models of the spread of a disease resulting from varying levels of social distancing. The four images above represent the outcome of the different degrees of response designed to mitigate against a rapid spike in the spread of the virus.

Untapped Potential

While big data is fueling insights, that would have been difficult to fathom as recently as a decade ago, a depth and breadth of analytics and actionable data are within closer reach than many realize.  

Potentially rich data sources that too often go underutilized include:

  • Google analytics,
  • A/B testing,
  • Sales tracking, 
  • Live chat,
  • Customer surveys,
  • Heat mapping of visitors’ website activity, and 
  • Competitor assessments 

At Promet Source, we are passionate about helping clients to uncover and unlock the full potential of their data and analytics. We are also experts at creative visualization strategies that help clients and constituents to clarify complexities and understand information from new angles. 

Interested in igniting new data- and analytics-driven possibilities? Contact us today.

Mar 31 2020
Mar 31

Recent challenges sparked by widespread work-at-home mandates are revealing an essential need to ensure productivity and engagement for remote meetings.

Many of us are familiar with the internet meme video, A Conference Call in Real Life.  It may resonate as all too real (but still very funny!). 

With the right approach, however, remote meetings can be productive, engaging, and spark creativity. 

                  Register for a Free Webinar: Design Thinking for Optimal Online Collaboration

Since distributed teams and remote work environments are how we’re already accustomed to working here at Promet Source, we’ve been able to adapt many onsite Design Thinking meeting techniques, using Human-Centered Design activities and adjust them to a virtual format. We often accommodate remote teams who have attendees in varying areas throughout the globe that find it impossible to all get together for an onsite meeting, but still need to put their heads together to define an organization’s priorities or innovate together toward common goals.

On many levels the uncertainty and upheaval of our recent change in workplace environments represents limitation, but one of the main principles of design thinking is that creativity thrives in an environment of time constraints and limitations, which provides the opportunity for innovation and creativity when a few key guidelines are followed. 

Planning and Facilitation

A productive meeting has an agenda. Create a written agenda and share it with participants prior to the remote meeting, as well as at the beginning of the meeting itself. Be sure to include time slots for each discussion item, even if it is only 10 minutes.

Follow the agenda items closely and assign someone the “time keeper” function to give a 2-5 minute warning before the planned agenda item is due to time out and stick to it! 
 

Use Interactive Tools for Alignment

Oftentimes, the loudest voices in the meeting or those of upper management are the only opinions that get heard. Utilize online tools to facilitate discussions and to ensure every voice and opinion can be shared, regardless of hierarchy and position.   

Interactive tools can also help document what is being discussed in real-time without “note taking” so attendees can see what is being discussed and agreed upon. 

Creating an interactive forum also allows open discussion, presentation of ideas, and collecting maximum input from participants. If the users can contribute anonymously to the meeting, it allows for critical evaluation of ideas as a neutral and anonymous format.

Interactive tools we like to use during online meetings include:

FunRetro

  • Originally a Sprint Retrospective board we have co-opted for interactive meetings.

Google Sheets & Docs

  • Allows multiple users in a document at the same time for meeting collaboration.

InVision

  • In addition to a good design and prototyping tool, InVision also has a great virtual whiteboard that allows multiple people to draw on the whiteboard at the same time.

Prioritize & Gain Consensus

Working with the group to prioritize items that come up during the discussion helps to gain group consensus. Act as a facilitator for the meeting, listen to what is being said, and put your opinion aside in order to encourage participation and optimize input. Create follow-up activities for what the group sees as most important and assign next steps assigned to team members. Let them come up with a solution and present it back to the group in this or a future meeting.

Remember, online meetings can be productive and innovative when we allow the space for people’s ideas to be heard and thrive. Leveraging the right tools along with an intentional focus on connection and engagement sets the stage for memorable meetings that get participants to perk up and be on their A Game.

Design Thinking offers a whole new perspective on running a meeting. Engagement and connection are a particular imperative in the current environment and never has there been a better time to put design thinking to work. 

               Register for a Free Webinar: Design Thinking for Optimal Online Collaboration

[embedded content]

Design Thinking for Optimal Online Collaboration

When:

Tuesday, April 14, 2020    12 p.m. CST

In this webinar you will learn to:

  • Leverage interactive, online tools for meeting facilitation
  • Adapt design thinking techniques for the virtual meeting environment
  • Facilitate team activities that enhance online engagement
  • Understand the core of design thinking to facilitate more successful ideas
  • Implement a meeting format that sparks creativity and accelerates the evolution of ideas from good to great
  • Develop a process for creating joint ownership of ideas
  • Apply key steps for ensuring follow up and accountability

Interested in starting the conversation now? Contact us today to learn more about how you and your team could benefit from a Human-Centered Design / Design Thinking Workshop facilitated by Promet.
 

Mar 04 2020
Mar 04

Promet Named Acquia Growth Partner of the Year Award AND the Most Wins of the Year for 2019 in the Americas

Recognized Based on Business Performance

We are pleased to announce today that Promet Source has been selected for two Acquia Awards for Growth Partner of the Year Award AND the Most Wins of the Year for 2019, given for its superlative performance during the past year. Promet is being honored with overall business growth and having the most client wins with Acquia.

“We delivered measurable results by leveraging Acquia's Lift platform, which facilitated website personalization that served to optimize customer experiences,” said Andy Kurcharski, CEO at Promet Source. “We leveraged Acquia Site Factory, along with Acquia's entire, client-centered suite of products, enabled successful client partnerships and brand-building migrations that drove high-performance, personalized, and expectation-exceeding websites.”

Acquia recognized 15 partners across five global regions based on their overall revenue performance, overall growth with Acquia, and number of new customers secured last year.

“Promet Source is to be commended. 2019 was an incredible year for Acquia and our partners, with demand for our world-class digital experience solutions driving significant growth,” said Joe Wykes, SVP, global channels and sales, at Acquia. “2020 promises to be another amazing year, and together we’ll help our customers set the bar for delivering impactful customer experiences across channels.”

Leaders in digital experience delivery, Acquia partners support the world’s leading brands in facilitating amazing customer experiences. A full list of Acquia Partner Award winners can be seen here. 

Contact Promet today to explore how a partnership with Promet and Acquia can produce a high-performance, personalized, and expectation-exceeding website for your organization.

Promet Source Winner: Public Sector Growth Partner of the Year by Acquia
 

Promet Source Winner: Public Sector Most Wins of the Year by Acquia

Jan 21 2020
Jan 21

Just because a website is required to follow WCAG 2.1 accessibility guidelines doesn’t mean it can’t have a great design. Sometimes this misconception can frustrate designers before they even begin to understand the accessibility guidelines and the reasons they exist.

Get our 12 Point Design Checklist for Accessibility

Great design that is accessible can actually ensure a better user experience and result in an expanded customer base, a better brand image, superior SEO rankings, and reduce the risk of an ADA lawsuit.

At Promet Source, our designers are guided by the following quote.

“The enemy of art is the absence of limitations.” -- Orson Wells

Too often the WCAG guidelines are viewed as design limitations, but it is within limitations that creativity can best thrive.

We are not designing within a vacuum or to impress ourselves and other designers. We practice Human-Centered Design for people who have distinct objectives, and often they have limitations that include physical and cognitive disabilities. It is our responsibility as designers to build an inclusive experience for everyone. Creating an accessible website is not just the right thing to do, or an ADA Section 508 legal mandate, it’s good business.

Consider: There are 7 million people in the United states with a visual disability.1 One in four U.S. adults is living with a disability,2 and the total disposable income for U.S. adults with disabilities is estimated at $490 billion, with $21 billion in discretionary income.3 The web is where many connect and conduct business, and if people with disabilities can’t access the websites we are creating, we are all at a disadvantage.

In other words:

When UX doesn’t consider ALL users, shouldn’t it be known as 'SOME User Experience' or… SUX? -- Billy Gregory, Senior Accessibility Engineer

How do we ensure that online experiences are inclusive? ADA Section 508 provides the mandate for accessibility and WCAG 2.1 provides the guidelines. But while WCAG 2.1 AA guidelines are an essential framework, creating a truly accessible and user-friendly site involves more than checking off boxes. 

To create true usability, Human-Centered Design and usability testing incorporate the essential component of empathy to ensure that the humans, for whom the site is designed, can successfully engage and complete the tasks they set out to accomplish. 

To date, usability testing and research has tended to overlook the needs of people with disabilities. A true commitment to accessibility requires upfront user testing, the assurance that developers are deploying accessible code, collaboration among stakeholders, manual and automated audits, and perhaps most importantly, an empathetic understanding of how and why the humans for whom the site is designed will engage with it. 

Promet Source has created this essential 12 Point Design Checklist for Accessibility for designers to help meet WCAG 2.1 guidelines and develop accessible online experiences. Click here to get the checklist.

Contact us today for further information on implementing WCAG 2.1 guidelines for your site and to find out how we can help ensure more user-friendly and accessible online experiences. 

Sources:
1. National Federation for the Blind
2. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention
3. American Institutes for Research
 
Jan 08 2020
Jan 08

2019 set the stage for a new decade of innovation driven by open source, design driven by insight into how humans interact with technology, and digital accessibility driven by high court decisions and consumer demand. Throughout the year, we at Promet Source reached out every week with updates and insights.  

We’ve now taken stock of nearly 50 blog posts contributed by the full slate of talent that passionately serves our clients. 

Here are the posts that had the highest readership.

1. Supreme Court Marks New Era for Web Accessibility

By Andrew Kucharski, President, Promet Source

Andrew wrote the year’s most-read post immediately following U.S. Supreme Court’s decision to not review, the Ninth Circuit Court’s ruling in Robles v. Domino’s Pizza, LLC. His post pointed out the significance of this development, which signaled a long-anticipated answer to to the question of whether Title III of the 1990 Americans with Disabilities Act, applies to an organization’s online presence. The answer is yes and the result is an anticipated acceleration in the pace of lawsuits pertaining to web accessibility.

2. Better Instructions for Your Drupal Content Types

By Cindy McCourt, Training Instructor, Promet Source

Our roots are in Drupal. Last years’ posts that focused on Drupal best practices, how-tos, or the scheduled June 2020 release of Drupal 9 consistently drew in a lot of interest and attention. Topping the list of Drupal posts in terms of readership: Better Instructions for Your Drupal Content Types. This Drupal how-to covered four Drupal 8 default features that provide instructions for content authors.

3. Great Websites Are Created before the First Line of Code is Written

By Mindy League, Director of User Experience and Design, Promet Source

This post reflected a breakthrough approach to web design and development that Promet Source adopted with the 2018 acquisition of the DAHU Agency. DAHU's team of UXperts and design thinkers have advocated for the application of human-centered design principles to web development, fueled from a foundation of:

  • collaborative problem solving, 
  • elimination of  assumptions,
  • deeper knowledge transfer, 
  • empathy for users, 
  • early stakeholder alignment, and 
  • excitement about what’s possible.

The result: deeper engagements, more fun, and superior outcomes.

4. A Marie Kondo Inspired Guide to Content Migration

By Chris O'Donnell, Business Development, Promet Source 

Chris O’Donnell, Promet’s entertaining and wickedly smart business development lead, had an epiphany in 2019 that content migrations would be well served by following the principles supported by anti-clutter enthusiast, Marie Kondo: tidy up, follow the right order, and discard what no longer serves.  

Onward to 2020!

Consistent outreach contributed to a significant growth in readership last year and we are committed to continuing that trajectory. With our talent base of experts and writers, we are tapped into a wide spectrum of expertise and insights. Contact us with your thoughts concerning what you want to read more about this year. 

Oct 14 2019
Oct 14

There’s no question that literacy in the 21st Century is a multi-faceted concept that extends far beyond books on the shelves.

The American Library Association not only gets it, it’s embracing the evolving role of libraries, by driving a wide range of programs designed to spark excitement about STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math) careers among youth, and more specifically Computational Thinking. Recently, the ALA Ready to Code site, which was largely funded by a grant from Google, has raised the bar even further.

Libraries Ready to Code grew out of a conviction that helping youth to become comfortable with technology is key to the mission of libraries in the current climate. 

Resources on the Drupal 8 site are aligned with the ALA’s emphasis on inclusivity. Engaging exercises are targeted toward ages that range from preschool to early teen years, and the intention is to reach children as young as possible -- before stereotypes concerning who could or should pursue technology careers begin to take hold. 

The ALA has been developing resources designed to help librarians prepare youth to succeed in the high-tech future for many years. Ready to Code has leveraged an amazing collection of educational assets to create an inviting and visually appealing learning path.

Discovery Journey

While Computational Thinking is required for 21st Century literacy, ALA leadership is well aware of the fact that coding expertise has not traditionally been something that librarians learned while studying for a degree in library science. At the same time, there was a recognition that the interests and inclinations of librarians, tend to gravitate more toward literature and content than technology. 

As such, the objective of the site was not for librarians to actually teach coding to youth or to learn how to code themselves. Instead, the site was designed to help librarians who have varying comfort levels relative to tech to:

  • Understand what Computational Thinking is all about, 
  • Get on-board with the idea of libraries taking a lead in teaching youth about it, and
  • Facilitate programs that broaden perspectives. 

Multifaceted Mission

Having developed Drupal websites for the ALA prior to this project, Promet Source had an established relationship and was thrilled to step up to the role of designing and developing Ready to Code. Working with both Google and the ALA was a huge inspiration for us, as their intentional and well-organized programs for youth were very thought provoking. The content organization on the site was a creative challenge as we serve up relative content to users based on their experience level and interest in certain topics. In addition to the UX and UI design of the site, Promet designers also developed branding for the site, providing a new logo and style guide for the newly established ALA Ready to Code which became the initiative’s brand. 

Once the site went live, the response exceeded expectations on every front. The primary objective was for librarians to embrace the site and actively introduce youth to all that Ready to Code has to offer. That objective has been boosted by a steady stream of awards. Key among them is the American Association of School Librarians’ 2019 Best Websites for Teaching & Learning. Since this award is very much on the radar of librarians, it has added validity to the site and accelerate its adoption. 

Two additional and prestigious awards:

And then there’s the input from ALA clients, such as this review on the Clutch website:

"They (Promet Source) masterfully took our ideas and translated them into specific pieces of the website."
      -- Marijke Visser, Senior Policy Advocate, American Library Association

Among those of us at Promet Source who were engaged with ALA leadership from the very outset and took a personal stake in the success of Ready to Code, this ongoing validation that the site is achieving what it set out to accomplish has been the gift that keeps on giving. 

Interested in collaborating on big ideas that stand to make a big difference for igniting digital possibilities? Contact us today

Aug 26 2019
Aug 26

Promet Source is humbled to announce that this summer, two websites that we designed and developed for our clients have won three prestigious awards. 

2019 is the 25th year in which the widely recognized Communicator Awards have recognized “work that transcends innovation and craft” -- work that stands to make a “lasting impact.” The Communicator Awards receive more 6,000 entries and is sanctioned and judged by the Academy of Interactive & Visual Arts, an invitation-only group consisting of industry-leading professionals from media, communications, advertising, creative and marketing firms. AIVA also judges the W3 Awards, and the Davey Awards.  

The American Association of School Librarians’ 2019 Best Websites for Teaching & Learning rankings are peer reviewed and awarded based on the following criteria: innovation, creativity, active participation, collaboration, free to use, user friendliness, and encouraging for a community of learners to explore and discover. 

Awarding Endeavors

At Promet Source, the satisfaction of a job well done and a client whose expectations have been exceeded is the award we seek and the primary driver of creative solutions, collaborative passion, and constant dedication to staying on top of our game. 

Occasionally, though, there’s another level of achievement and recognition -- prestigious awards in which third parties evaluate our work and judge it to be at the leading edge of the rapidly evolving marketing and media landscape.

Both of these award-winning websites represented a labor of love for both Promet Source and our clients. Ready to Code was sponsored by Google and stemmed from a longstanding collaborative effort between the American Library Association and Google. The depth and breadth of resources available on the site are designed to empower librarians to advance computational thinking among children and teens of all backgrounds as an essential component of 21st Century literacy.

The Martin County Florida website served as an opportunity to optimize a utilitarian user experience that streamlined access to the full range of county services, updates, news, and social media connections, while strengthening civic pride with a visually engaging site that leveraged images of the county’s spectacular natural beauty and stunning infrastructural achievements.   

For Martin County, knowledge that their website has received recognition and attention on an international scale has compounded the impact of key objectives: heightened civic pride and greater awareness of a centralized location for conducting all county business.

For the American Library Association Ready to Code site, the recent ranking from the American Association of School Librarians represents a stamp of approval that has served to advance the mission of the site by increasing its credibility and magnifying its objectives, according to Marijke Visser, associate director and senior policy advocate for the American Library Association.

Why Awards Matter

In the rapidly evolving digital landscape, pushing the bounds of possibilities is an essential success factor. Leaning on what passed for innovation last year is the path toward tired solutions that don’t resonate with clients and constituents. That’s why we at Promet Source take awards such as these seriously and are honored to be in the company of agencies that share our dedication.

Ultimately, websites win awards because they work. They are built upon a deep level of inquiry that leads to extreme empathy for what users need and what they are hoping to accomplish when they visit a site. 

Users are bombarded every day with messages, media, and technologies that confuse and get in the way. The websites that win awards offer a surprisingly delightful experience in which extra effort and expertise on the part of designers and developers translates into streamlined simplicity -- a breath of fresh air within a cluttered and complex world.

Interested in the calibre of design and web development that wins awards while driving big-picture goals? Contact us today.

Aug 09 2019
Aug 09

At Promet Source, conversations with clients and among co-workers tend to revolve around various aspects of compliance, user experience, site navigation, and design clarity. We need a common nomenclature for referring to interface elements, but that leads to the question of who makes this stuff up and what makes these terms stick?
 
I asked that recently, during an afternoon of back-to-back meetings. In separate contexts, “cookies,” “breadcrumbs,” and “hamburgers” were all mentioned as they pertain to the sites we are building for clients. But I got to wondering: what is it about the evolving Web lexicon that seems inordinately slanted towards tasty snacks?
 

One Theory

As we all know, devs and designers work very hard, with incredible focus for long hours at a stretch. Are we trying to inject some fun language that evokes touch, taste, and smell to a web that can feel rather flat sometimes when we are in the trenches?


I couldn’t help but wonder about a potentially unifying theme to cookies, breadcrumbs and the buns that provide the top and bottom horizontal lines of the increasingly ubiquitous hamburger icon. That sparked my curiosity and a bit of research.

Data/Cookie Jar

Let’s start with cookies -- a term that refers to the extraction and storage of user data such as logins, previous searches, activity on a site, and items in a shopping cart.  Almost all Websites use and store cookies on Web browsers.

a stack of chocolate chip cookies

Generally speaking, cookies are designed to inform better and more personalized Web experiences, but they do, of course, give rise to all sorts of privacy and security concerns. 
 
Potential cookie constraints for Websites developed in the United States for a U.S. audience are moving in an uncertain direction. Up to this point, it’s essentially been the Wild West, with few restrictions governing their usage. 
 
In the European Union, it’s a different story. Assorted rules and regulations, collectively known as the “Cookie Law,” have been in place for nearly a decade -- forbidding the tracking of users’ Web activity without their consent. 
 
As is the case with U.S.-based Websites that need to ensure accessibility, compliance with the Cookie Law can be complicated -- requiring rewriting and reconfiguration of code, followed by careful testing to ensure that the site’s code, server and the user’s browser are aligned to prevent cookies from tracking user behavior and collecting information. And another issue that accessibility and cookies have in common: there’s more at stake than compliance. To an increasing degree, users avoid engaging with Websites when they believe that their activity is being tracked by the use of cookies and there’s no question that overall levels of trust appear to be on the decline as privacy concerns increase. This is among the reasons why many websites are starting to give users the option of just saying no to cookies and still allowing them access to the site.

Connecting the Crumbs

Considerably newer to the Web lexicon than cookies, a breadcrumb or breadcrumb trail is a navigational aid in user interfaces designed to help users track their own activity within programs or websites, providing them with a sense of place within the bigger picture of the site. 
 
Breadcrumbs can take different forms. Generally speaking, a breadcrumb trail tracks the order of each page viewed, as a horizontal list below the top headers. This provides a guide for the user to navigate back to any point where they’ve previously been on the site. Think about Grimms’ story of Hansel and Gretel.
 
Breadcrumbs can be very helpful on complex, content-heavy sites. Who among us hasn’t found themselves frustrated in an attempt to navigate back to a page that seems to have temporarily disappeared?

On the Table

Unlike cookies, which for better or for worse, are stored behind the scenes and consumed in a manner that’s usually not known to the user, a breadcrumb trail is out in the open -- right upfront for the user to see and follow. Breadcrumbs are designed solely to enhance the user experience, functioning as a reverse GPS on complex Websites.  
 
As more and more users come to count on breadcrumbs as a navigational aid, we can expect that the demand for them will increase. At the same time, we can expect that usage of cookies will come under increased scrutiny along with a trend toward escalation of privacy concerns and a growing skittishness about how personal information is being shared. At Promet, we consider cookies to be a must-have on any site.

Time for Some Protein

As for the third item in our list of tasty Web terms, the hamburger is essentially all good. This three-line icon that’s started to appear at the top of screens serves as a mini-portal to additional options or pages.

Actual hamburger on the left. A web hamburger icon on the right.

What’s not to love about this feature that takes up so little space on the screen, but opens the door to a trove additional navigation or features for apps and Websites? Fact is, UX/UI trends are constantly evolving, and users vary widely in the pace in which they pick up what’s new and next. The hamburger icon has a lot going for it and it’s not going away.

 

Meet the Search Sandwich

There’s a item on the table and we were just introduced to it by one of our UX savvy clients. As far as I know, it doesn’t have an official name yet, so we affectionately refer to it as the “search sandwich.” It’s an evolved hamburger combined with a search icon to indicate to users that both the navigation menu and the search bar can be accessed from this icon. It looks a bit like a ham sandwich with an olive on top and might make an appearance on a website soon. Stay tuned.
 
So there you have it. Key factors in our Web design world. -- possibly a reflection of a desire to take our high-tech conversations down a notch, with these playful metaphors for elements that we must all learn to identify with whether a designer, developer, or just a web user. They remind us that the Web is a rapidly evolving environment of UI/UX trends -- created and consumed by humans. 
 
Interested in serving up a tasty web experience? Contact us today

Aug 09 2019
Aug 09

At Promet Source, conversations with clients and among co-workers tend to revolve around various aspects of compliance, user experience, site navigation, and design clarity. We need a common nomenclature for referring to interface elements, but that leads to the question of who makes this stuff up and what makes these terms stick?
 
I asked that recently, during an afternoon of back-to-back meetings. In separate contexts, “cookies,” “breadcrumbs,” and “hamburgers” were all mentioned as they pertain to the sites we are building for clients, and I got to wondering: what is it about the evolving Web lexicon that seems inordinately slanted towards tasty snacks?
 

One Theory

As we all know, devs and designers work very hard, with incredible focus for long hours at a stretch. Are we trying to inject some fun language that evokes touch, taste, and smell to a web that can feel rather flat sometimes when we are in the trenches?

And then, I couldn’t help but wonder about a potentially unifying theme to cookies, breadcrumbs and the buns that provide the top and bottom horizontal lines of the increasingly ubiquitous hamburger icon. That sparked my curiosity and a bit of research.

Data/Cookie Jar

Let’s start with cookies -- a term that refers to the extraction and storage of user data such as logins, previous searches, activity on a site, and items in a shopping cart.  Almost all Websites use and store cookies on Web browsers.

a stack of chocolate chip cookies

Generally speaking, cookies are designed to inform better and more personalized Web experiences, but they do, of course, give rise to all sorts of privacy and security concerns. 
 
Potential cookie constraints for Websites developed in the United States for a U.S. audience are moving in an uncertain direction. Up to this point, it’s essentially been the Wild West, with few restrictions governing their usage. 
 
In the European Union, it’s a different story. Assorted rules and regulations, collectively known as the “Cookie Law,” have been in place for nearly a decade -- forbidding the tracking of users’ Web activity without their consent. 
 
As is the case with U.S.-based Websites that need to ensure accessibility, compliance with the Cookie Law can be complicated -- requiring rewriting and reconfiguration of code, followed by careful testing to ensure that the site’s code, server and the user’s browser are aligned to prevent cookies from tracking user behavior and collecting information. And another issue that accessibility and cookies have in common: there’s more at stake than compliance. To an increasing degree, users avoid engaging with Websites when they believe that their activity is being tracked by the use of cookies and there’s no question that overall levels of trust appear to be on the decline as privacy concerns increase. This is among the reasons why many websites are starting to give users the option of just saying no to cookies and still allowing them access to the site.

Connecting the Crumbs

Considerably newer to the Web lexicon than cookies, a breadcrumb or breadcrumb trail is a navigational aid in user interfaces designed to help users track their own activity within programs or websites, providing them with a sense of place within the bigger picture of the site. 
 
Breadcrumbs can take different forms. Generally speaking, a breadcrumb trail tracks the order of each page viewed, as a horizontal list below the top headers. This provides a guide for the user to navigate back to any point where they’ve previously been on the site. Think about Grimms’ story of Hansel and Gretel.
 
Breadcrumbs can be very helpful on complex, content-heavy sites. Who among us hasn’t found themselves frustrated in an attempt to navigate back to a page that seems to have temporarily disappeared?

On the Table

Unlike cookies, which for better or for worse, are stored behind the scenes and consumed in a manner that’s usually not known to the user, a breadcrumb trail is out in the open -- right upfront for the user to see and follow. Breadcrumbs are designed solely to enhance the user experience, functioning as a reverse GPS on complex Websites.  
 
As more and more users come to count on breadcrumbs as a navigational aid, we can expect that the demand for them will increase. At the same time, we can expect that usage of cookies will come under increased scrutiny along with a trend toward escalation of privacy concerns and a growing skittishness about how personal information is being shared. At Promet, we consider cookies to be a must-have on any site.

Time for Some Protein

As for the third item in our list of tasty Web terms, the hamburger is essentially all good. This three-line icon that’s started to appear at the top of screens serves as a mini-portal to additional options or pages.

Actual hamburger on the left. A web hamburger icon on the right.

What’s not to love about this feature that takes up so little space on the screen, but opens the door to a trove additional navigation or features for apps and Websites? Fact is, UX/UI trends are constantly evolving, and users vary widely in the pace in which they pick up what’s new and next. The hamburger icon has a lot going for it and it’s not going away.

 

Meet the Search Sandwich

There’s a item on the table and we were just introduced to it by one of our UX savvy clients. As far as I know, it doesn’t have an official name yet, so we affectionately refer to it as the “search sandwich.” It’s an evolved hamburger combined with a search icon to indicate to users that both the navigation menu and the search bar can be accessed from this icon. It looks a bit like a ham sandwich with an olive on top and might make an appearance on a website soon. Stay tuned.
 
So there you have it. Key factors in our Web design world. -- possibly a reflection of a desire to take our high-tech conversations down a notch, with these playful metaphors for elements that we must all learn to identify with whether a designer, developer, or just a web user. They remind us that the Web is a rapidly evolving environment of UI/UX trends -- created and consumed by humans. 
 
Interested in serving up a tasty web experience? Contact us today

May 21 2019
May 21

When you’re surrounded by a team of awesome developers, you might think that a statement such as, “Great Websites are Created before the First Line of Code is Written,” isn’t going to be met with a lot of enthusiasm.

As it turns out, our developers tend to be among the greatest supporters of the kind of Human-Centered Design engagements that get all stakeholders on the same page and create a roadmap for transformative possibilities. 

The point of the above statement, which is also the title of a presentation that Promet’s Chris O’Donnell has been delivering at DrupalCamp events all over the country, is not to downplay the importance of the impeccable coding that makes great websites work. No one doubts that. Our point is that when web development is fueled from a foundation of: 

  • collaborative problem solving, 
  • elimination of  assumptions,
  • deeper knowledge transfer, 
  • empathy for users, 
  • early stakeholder alignment, and 
  • excitement about what’s possible,

everyone benefits and work is a lot more fun.

Getting it right at the start makes sense for a lot of reasons. Teams are happier and work proceeds with a higher degree of efficiency. At the same time, the impact on cost is a factor that is seldom acknowledged to the degree that it needs to be. Consider the following observation from noted software engineer Tom Gilb:

“Once a system is in development, correcting a problem costs 10 times as much as fixing the same problem in design (concept). If the system has been released, it costs 100 times as much…”

The Luma Institute graphic below powerfully illustrates the difference in the relative cost of getting it right in the concept phase, vs. fixing during the build phase, vs. fixing after release.

Pyramid that depicts the cost difference between getting software right during the concept phase vs. making a change during development vs. making a change once it has hit the market

Human Centered Design vs. Agile Development

Questions concerning “agility” frequently emerge in our conversations with clients, and offer an excellent opportunity to clarify some important issues. Human-Centered Design initiatives focused on getting it right, right from the start, are in no way at odds with the idea of agile development. 

The clear vision and collaborative energy that emerges from Human-Centered Design activities often helps to inform and enhance agile development. 

An all-to-common misunderstanding about agile development is that it’s about avoiding the discipline of an actual plan. Not true. Agile development is a real-world development methodology that does not close off the possibility for mid-course refinement. An agile plan plays out within a series of sprints. Each sprint is reviewed before moving on to the next one. If the review reveals an oversight or issue, it can be quickly addressed. 

Prioritization is key with Agile for sprint planning, and Human-Centered Design helps gain consensus on what is important.

The world’s most agile process, however, is up against an uphill battle in trying to reset the course of a project that was based on inadequate or faulty information from the start. Ensuring that projects get off to an excellent start is at the core of what Human-Centered Design is all about.

Going Wider, Digging Deeper 

The activities within a Human-Centered Design workshop continuously build upon knowledge collected and insights gained for purposes of:

  • Identifying stakeholders
  • Prioritizing stakeholders
  • Identifying strengths, problems, and opportunities in current system
  • Grouping strengths, problems and solutions within agreed-upon categories 
  • Identifying solutions 
  • Prioritizing solutions

Let’s take a look at a few components  of a Human Centered Design workshop.

Stakeholder Mapping

Stakeholder mapping results in what is essentially a network diagram of people involved with or impacted by the website. Typically, there are a lot more stakeholders than the obvious end users and stakeholder mapping evaluates all the possible users of a system to then identify the key target audiences and prioritize their needs and expectations. 
 
Stakeholder mapping is an excellent activity for:

  • Establishing consensus about the stakeholders,
  • Guiding plans for user research, and
  • Establishing an empathetic focus on people vs. technology.
An illustrated example of stakeholder mapping for a Drupal siteAn example of a stakeholder mapping exercise for Promet's upcoming web redesign illustrating people with an interest in the project.

Persona Development

The next step following stakeholder mapping is the creation of persona information in order to understand the range of differing needs from the site for purposes of tailoring solutions accordingly. 
 
Defining the distinct personas for whom the website is being designed serves to clarify the mindset, needs and goals of the key stakeholders. Giving each persona group a name provides a quick reference of key stakeholders and serves as a constant anchor for conversations moving forward.

Drupal-Specific Rose-Thorn-Bud

Adopted from a Luma Institute collection of exercises, the goal of Rose-Thorn-Bud is to quickly gather a significant amount of data in response to a specific question or the current system in general. During a Rose-Thorn-Bud activity every individual’s opinion ranks equally as responses are gathered on colored Post-it Notes for labeling attributes as positive (rose), potential (bud), or problems (thorns).

The Post-it Notes are gathered and grouped on a white board according to identified categories. The collection and organization of large amounts of data in this manner serves to highlight prevalent themes and emergent issues, while facilitating discussion. 

During Chris O’Donnell’s “Great Websites are Created before the First Line of Code is Written” presentation at Drupaldelphia, attendees were invited to respond to the following problem statement: 

Drupal 8 as a viable CMS for small business / small organization needs.

Each participant was encouraged to contribute ideas to 10 Post-its -- within any of the three color categories. All of the contributions were then  “voted up” in order to poll attendees and achieve a level of consensus among the group. Results of that exercise can be found here

Drupal-Focused Statement Starter

Statement Starters are evocative phrases to ignite problem solving within teams and challenge teams to restate the problem from differing perspectives within a framework of “We could …” and “We will …” 
 
The way a statement starter is worded is important. It needs to be an open-ended question that requires more than a yes or no answer. Effective statement starters such as, “How might we…”, “In what ways might…”, “How to…”, and “What might be all the …” help to encourage the generation of explicit problem statements.
 
Conversely, closed-ended statement starters such as: “Should we…” and “Wouldn’t it be great if… tend to yield a yes or no answer” or less specific responses.

The statement starter presented to attendees at the Promet-led Drupaldelphia event, was:

How can we increase Drupal 8 adoption outside of the “enterprise” space?

Their responses are recorded here.

Importance / Difficulty Matrix

Inevitably, some of the ideas that emerge will spark excitement for the strategic leap forward that they could represent. The required time and resources to move forward with them, however, might exceed current capabilities. Other ideas might fall into the category of Low Hanging Fruit -- initiatives that can be achieved quickly and easily.

Plotting every idea on an Importance / Difficulty Matrix is an essential group activity that sparks conversation and accountability concerning Who, How, and When -- transforming good ideas into action items.

Illustration of an Importance/Difficulty Matrix


Why Human-Centered Design?

In the current environment, organizations tend to be defined by their digital presence. The stakes for getting it right are high and the margin for error is low. Optimizing ideas and perspectives at the outset, and continuing to iterate with feedback creates a strong starting point that serves as a superior foundation for web solutions that are capable of heavy lifting over the long haul. 

Interested in learning more about the possibilities for a Human-Centered Design workshop in your organization? Contact us today.

Apr 26 2019
Apr 26

At DrupalCon2019 earlier this month, Promet Source tapped the collective brainpower of attendees with a Human-Centered Design activity that asked this question:

“What are the key advantages, the main challenges, and the emerging opportunities of Drupal as an Information delivery platform?”

Within the context of a Human-Centered Design workshop, big questions such as this one are positioned within a “Rose-Thorn-Bud” framework. Participants are given brightly colored Post-It notes and asked to write everything that they view as an advantage or a plus on a pink (Rose) Post-It. Challenges or downsides are to be written on a blue Post-It (Thorn). Green Post-Its are for collecting input on potential or emerging for opportunities (Bud). 

15 Minutes of Focus

A setting such as DrupalCon, in which participants are needing to constantly shift their attention as they take in tons of information from all sides, is vastly different from a Human-Centered Design Workshop, in which the attention of all participants is laser-focused on a series of activities that build upon the insight and information gathered. DrupalCon, however, represented such a high degree of energy and enthusiasm, that we were able to count on considerable contributions throughout the event. 

The first phase of the Rose-Thorn-Bud activity is simply collecting input. The next phase, called “Affinity Clustering,” is for purposes of reordering and analyzing the input according to agreed-upon groupings. The use of different colored Post-Its is particularly useful in revealing that within a particular category there might be a mix of Roses, Thorns, and Buds, or primarily one or the other, or in some cases, participants may differ as to whether the same issue constitutes a Rose, a Thorn, or a Bud. 

This is an excellent exercise for revealing patterns, surfacing priorities, bringing order to disparate complexity, and sparking productive conversation.

DrupalCon Participants Rank Drupal

Let’s look at the input gathered during the first phase of this activity where we collected responses to the question concerning of key advantages (Rose), main challenges (Thorn), and emerging opportunities (Bud) of Drupal as an information delivery platform.

Rose Thorn Bud Ease of development Documentation (2 Post-Its) Templates for quickly building mini-sites Ease of extension (modules for everything) Too many options Migration to D8 Cutting edge Security is really hard for small projects Decoupled architecture opportunities Connecting and referencing data and content with Taxonomy Admin UI is not intuitive to content editors Accessibility! Adoption of Symphony Admin UI Improving documentation Lots of interchangeable pieces/modules Composer vs. Tar install; mismatched workflow Media integration Flexibility (3 Post-Its) Scattershot dev -- unified direction GraphQL in Core Accessibility out of the box Address low-hanging fruit (media integration) Menu System APIs Content modeling Media integration JSON API with Content Moderation Trusted information can be pushed out programmatically and systematically Content Editor Experience Layout Manager Simple to use Layout tough to perfect   Drupal makes information pretty Flexibility   Allows for all sorts of content types High Learning Curve                (3 Posts-Its)   Quick publication of new information Drupal requires a lot of back-end work to make performance better. It’s heavy and slow.  

 

Next Step: Affinity Clustering

Without context and categorization, excellent input tends to never make it beyond words on a page -- or Post-Its. That’s what Affinity Clustering moves us toward. This is a visually graphic exercise that allows for the assimilation of large amounts of information.

Affinity Clustering is a collaborative activity, that occurs within a facilitated Human-Centered Design Workshop, with all participants contributing their thoughts on how and where to categorize the Rose-Thorn-Bud input. Since it was not feasible to move to this phase from the confines of the Promet Source booth at DrupalCon, we sought the expertise of our in-house Drupal experts and came up with the following categories

Back End Front-End Design Content Ease of development - Rose Accessibility out of the box - Rose Connecting and referencing data and content with Taxonomy - Rose Ease of extension (modules for everything) - Rose Lots of interchangeable pieces/modules - Rose Content modeling - Rose Adoption of Symfony - Rose Flexibility (2 Post-Its) Rose Quick publication of new information - Rose Simple to use - Rose Drupal makes information pretty - Rose Content Editor Experience - Thorn Trusted information can be pushed out programmatically and systematically - Rose Allows for all sorts of content types - Rose Flexibility - Thorn Documentation - Thorn (2 Post-Its) Layout tough to perfect - Thorn High Learning Curve - Thorn Too many options - Thorn High Learning Curve - Thorn Admin UI is not intuitive to content editors - Thorn Security is really hard for small projects - Thorn Templates for quickly building mini-sites - Bud Admin UI - Thorn Composer vs. Tar install; mismatched workflow - Thorn Layout Manager - Bud JSON API with Content Moderation - Bud Scattershot dev -- unified direction - Thorn Accessibility! - Bud   Address low-hanging fruit (media integration) - Thorn Menu System APIs - Bud   Media integration - Thorn     Improving documentation - Bud     Migration to D8 - Bud     High Learning Curve - Thorn     Cutting edge - Rose     Drupal requires a lot of back-end work to make performance better. It’s heavy and slow. - Thorn     Decoupled architecture opportunities - Bud     Media integration - Bud     GraphQL in Core - Bud    
Three groups of pink, blue and green post-its to illustrate affinity clustering


 

To summarize, the front-end category had a lot of roses indicating that the overall sentiment is positive, despite a few challenges. This is the kind of revelation that would be readily apparent to participants in a Human-Centered Design workshop -- simply due to a preponderance of pink Post-Its. The content category, on the other hand, was dominated by thorns. In a workshop, the majority of blue Post-Its would quickly clarify the relative dissatisfaction concerning content. The back-end category resulted in a true mix of Roses, Thorns, and Buds, a fact that would certainly spark continued conversation among participants.
 

This is just a start! 

For those of you who were not able to attend DrupalCon 2019, or who did not make it over to the Promet Source booth or who have had new thoughts subsequent to your participation:

  • What would you add to the above Rose-Thorn-Bud list? 
  • Are there categories that you would like to add to the Affinity Clusters? 
  • How does the above align or not align with your experience?

Indicate your comments below or contact us today for a conversation about leveraging Human-Centered Design techniques to Ignite Digital Possibilities within your organization. 

Apr 25 2019
Apr 25

At DrupalCon2019 earlier this month, Promet Source tapped the collective brainpower of attendees with a Human-Centered Design activity that asked this question:

“What are the key advantages, the main challenges, and the emerging opportunities of Drupal as an Information delivery platform?”

Within the context of a Human-Centered Design workshop, big questions such as this one are positioned within a “Rose-Thorn-Bud” framework. Participants are given brightly colored Post-It notes and asked to write everything that they view as an advantage or a plus on a pink (Rose) Post-It. Challenges or downsides are to be written on a blue Post-It (Thorn). Green Post-Its are for collecting input on potential or emerging for opportunities (Bud). 

15 Minutes of Focus

A setting such as DrupalCon, in which participants are needing to constantly shift their attention as they take in tons of information from all sides, is vastly different from a Human-Centered Design Workshop, in which the attention of all participants is laser-focused on a series of activities that build upon the insight and information gathered. DrupalCon, however, represented such a high degree of energy and enthusiasm, that we were able to count on considerable contributions throughout the event. 

The first phase of the Rose-Thorn-Bud activity is simply collecting input. The next phase, called “Affinity Clustering,” is for purposes of reordering and analyzing the input according to agreed-upon groupings. The use of different colored Post-Its is particularly useful in revealing that within a particular category there might be a mix of Roses, Thorns, and Buds, or primarily one or the other, or in some cases, participants may differ as to whether the same issue constitutes a Rose, a Thorn, or a Bud. 

This is an excellent exercise for revealing patterns, surfacing priorities, bringing order to disparate complexity, and sparking productive conversation.

DrupalCon Participants Rank Drupal

Let’s look at the input gathered during the first phase of this activity where we collected responses to the question concerning of key advantages (Rose), main challenges (Thorn), and emerging opportunities (Bud) of Drupal as an information delivery platform.

Rose Thorn Bud Ease of development Documentation (2 Post-Its) Templates for quickly building mini-sites Ease of extension (modules for everything) Too many options Migration to D8 Cutting edge Security is really hard for small projects Decoupled architecture opportunities Connecting and referencing data and content with Taxonomy Admin UI is not intuitive to content editors Accessibility! Adoption of Symphony Admin UI Improving documentation Lots of interchangeable pieces/modules Composer vs. Tar install; mismatched workflow Media integration Flexibility (3 Post-Its) Scattershot dev -- unified direction GraphQL in Core Accessibility out of the box Address low-hanging fruit (media integration) Menu System APIs Content modeling Media integration JSON API with Content Moderation Trusted information can be pushed out programmatically and systematically Content Editor Experience Layout Manager Simple to use Layout tough to perfect   Drupal makes information pretty Flexibility   Allows for all sorts of content types High Learning Curve                (3 Posts-Its)   Quick publication of new information Drupal requires a lot of back-end work to make performance better. It’s heavy and slow.  

 

Next Step: Affinity Clustering

Without context and categorization, excellent input tends to never make it beyond words on a page -- or Post-Its. That’s what Affinity Clustering moves us toward. This is a visually graphic exercise that allows for the assimilation of large amounts of information.

Affinity Clustering is a collaborative activity, that occurs within a facilitated Human-Centered Design Workshop, with all participants contributing their thoughts on how and where to categorize the Rose-Thorn-Bud input. Since it was not feasible to move to this phase from the confines of the Promet Source booth at DrupalCon, we sought the expertise of our in-house Drupal experts and came up with the following categories

Back End Front-End Design Content Ease of development - Rose Accessibility out of the box - Rose Connecting and referencing data and content with Taxonomy - Rose Ease of extension (modules for everything) - Rose Lots of interchangeable pieces/modules - Rose Content modeling - Rose Adoption of Symfony - Rose Flexibility (2 Post-Its) Rose Quick publication of new information - Rose Simple to use - Rose Drupal makes information pretty - Rose Content Editor Experience - Thorn Trusted information can be pushed out programmatically and systematically - Rose Allows for all sorts of content types - Rose Flexibility - Thorn Documentation - Thorn (2 Post-Its) Layout tough to perfect - Thorn High Learning Curve - Thorn Too many options - Thorn High Learning Curve - Thorn Admin UI is not intuitive to content editors - Thorn Security is really hard for small projects - Thorn Templates for quickly building mini-sites - Bud Admin UI - Thorn Composer vs. Tar install; mismatched workflow - Thorn Layout Manager - Bud JSON API with Content Moderation - Bud Scattershot dev -- unified direction - Thorn Accessibility! - Bud   Address low-hanging fruit (media integration) - Thorn Menu System APIs - Bud   Media integration - Thorn     Improving documentation - Bud     Migration to D8 - Bud     High Learning Curve - Thorn     Cutting edge - Rose     Drupal requires a lot of back-end work to make performance better. It’s heavy and slow. - Thorn     Decoupled architecture opportunities - Bud     Media integration - Bud     GraphQL in Core - Bud    
Three groups of pink, blue and green post-its to illustrate affinity clustering


 

To summarize, the front-end category had a lot of roses indicating that the overall sentiment is positive, despite a few challenges. This is the kind of revelation that would be readily apparent to participants in a Human-Centered Design workshop -- simply due to a preponderance of pink Post-Its. The content category, on the other hand, was dominated by thorns. In a workshop, the majority of blue Post-Its would quickly clarify the relative dissatisfaction concerning content. The back-end category resulted in a true mix of Roses, Thorns, and Buds, a fact that would certainly spark continued conversation among participants.
 

This is just a start! 

For those of you who were not able to attend DrupalCon 2019, or who did not make it over to the Promet Source booth or who have had new thoughts subsequent to your participation:

  • What would you add to the above Rose-Thorn-Bud list? 
  • Are there categories that you would like to add to the Affinity Clusters? 
  • How does the above align or not align with your experience?

Indicate your comments below or contact us today for a conversation about leveraging Human-Centered Design techniques to Ignite Digital Possibilities within your organization. 

Apr 06 2019
Apr 06

Having engaged in Human-Centered Design Workshops for web development with amazing clients from every sector, our overarching discovery is this: great websites are made before a line of code is ever written.
 
Human-Centered Design work lays the groundwork for a vast expansion of transformative possibilities.

In its simplest terms, Human-Centered Design is a discipline directed toward solving problems for the people who actually use the site. The focus on the end user is a critical distinction that calls for everyone on the project to let go of their own preferences and empathetically focus on optimizing the experience for the user. 
 
When we engage in Human-Centered Design activities with clients, it becomes very clear very early into the process that getting rid of assumptions and continuous questioning about users and their needs, eliminates blind spots and opens doors with new insights about the concerns, goals, and relevant behaviors of the people for whom we are developing sites. 

And while Human-Centered Design is generally viewed as a discipline for solving problems, we find it to be much more of a roadmap for creating opportunities.
 
Here’s our 7-step Human-Centered Design process for creating optimal web experiences.

1.    Build empathy with user personas

The first and most essential question: For whom are we building or redesigning this site? We work with clients to identify their most important personas. Each persona gets a name and that’s helpful in keeping us constantly focused on the fact that real people will be interacting with the site in many different ways. 

Following the identification of the key persona groups, we proceed to dig deep, asking “why” and “how” concerning every aspect of their motivations and expectations.

2.    Assess what user personas need from your site

Understanding of and empathy for user personas dovetails into an analysis of how they currently use the site, how that experience can be improved, and how enhancing their experience with the site can drive a deeper relationship. 

We continue to refine and build upon these personas during every phase of the development process, asking questions that reflect back on them by name as we gain an increasing level of empathy. As a result, our shared understanding of the needs and concerns of our persona groups helps to direct development and design with questions such as:

  • “Will this page navigation be clear enough for Clarence?”
  •  “How else can we drive home the point for Catherine that we are an efficient, one-stop-shop for the full spectrum of her financial needs? 

This level of inquiry at the front end might feel excessive or out of sync with what many are accustomed to. Invariably, however, establishing a shared language streamlines development moving forward, while laying the groundwork for solutions that meet the needs of users. 


As Tom Gilb, noted in Principles of Software Engineering Management, getting it right at the beginning pays off. According to Tom, fixing a problem discovered during development costs 10 times as much as addressing a problem in the design phase. If the problem is not discovered until the system is released, it costs 100 times as much to fix. 

3.    Map their journey through the site to key conversions

Just as your user groups do not all fit the same mold, what they are looking for from your site will vary, depending on what phase they are in relative to their relationship with your organization – what we refer to as the user journey. 

Too often, website design focuses on one aspect of the user journey. It needs to be viewed holistically.

For example, if the purchase process is complicated and cumbersome, efforts to successfully provide users with the right information delivered in the right format at the start of their journey runs the risk of unraveling. 
 

4.    Identify obstacles in their path

Next step: identify challenges. We map user journeys through every phase, aiming for seamless transitions from one phase to the next.

This step calls for continuous inquiry along with a commitment to not defend or hold on to assumptions or previous solutions that may not be optimal.

  • What have we heard from clients? 
  • Where have breakdowns occurred in conversions and in relationships?
  • How can we fix it with the messaging, design, or the functionality of the website?  

 

5. Brainstorm solutions

Participants are primed at this point for an explosion of ideas. Mindsets are in an empathetic mode and insights have been collected from multiple angles. 

Now is the time to tap into this energy.

We Invite all participants to contribute ideas, setting the basic ground rules for brainstorming. 

Good ideas spark more good ideas and spark excitement about new possibilities.

6. Prioritize Solutions 

No bad ideas in brainstorming, but in the real world of budgets and time, questions such as “how,” “what’s the cost,” “where to begin,” and “what will have the best impact,” need to be considered. 

As ideas are synthesized, these answers will begin to take shape.  

Real world prioritization happens as we clarify whether a client’s objectives will be best met with the development of a new site or revisions to an existing site. Do we want to move forward with “Blue Sky” development that is not grounded in any specific constraints, or a “Greenfield” project that it not required to integrate with current systems?

What does the playing field look like?


7. Create a Roadmap for Development

Too often, web design and development begins at this step. 

With Human-Centered Design many hours, if not days, of research, persona development, empathetic insights, journey mapping, solution gathering, collaborative energy, and excitement about what’s to come have already been invested when we get to this point. 

As a result, clients have the advantage of moving forward with a high degree of alignment among stakeholders, along with a conviction of ownership in an outcome that will be new, and enhance both the experiences and relationships with the humans who rely on the site. 

Want to ensure that humans are at the center of your next design or development project? That’s what we do (among other things). Contact us today

Better yet! If you are at DrupalCon this week, come over to booth 308. We'll be engaging in a human-centered design activity and you'll have the chance to witness human-centered design in action. I look forward to meeting you!


 

Mar 05 2019
Mar 05

Promet's acquisition of a team focused on user experience and strategy, has sparked a new spectrum of conversations that we are now having with clients. 

The former DAHU Agency’s Human-Centered Design expertise has given rise to many questions and within a relatively short span of time, has driven the delivery of expectation-exceeding results for clients from a range of sectors. 

As the name suggests, Human-Centered Design occurs within a framework for creating solutions that incorporate the perspectives, desires, context, and behaviors for the audiences that our clients want to reach. It factors into every aspect of development, messaging and delivery, and calls for:

  1. A deep and continuous questioning of all assumptions,
  2. A willingness to look beyond the “best practices” that others have established,
  3. An eagerness to find inspiration from anywhere and everywhere,
  4. The involvement and ideas of multiple stakeholders, from different disciplines, along with a process for ongoing testing, iterating and integration of feedback, and
  5. Constant emphasis on the concerns, goals and relevant behaviors of targeted cohort groups.


Within less than a year, this specialized approach has become fundamentally integrated into the ways that Promet thinks, works and engages with clients. We intentionally practice design techniques that combine inputs from our UXperts, the client, and the end user--bringing empathy and human experience to the forefront of our process.

How Does this Approach Differ?

In contrast to traditional product-centered design, where the appeal, color, size, weight, features and functionality of the product itself serves as the primary focus, Human-Centered Design creates solutions that understand audiences from a deeper perspective.  We try to meet more than the basic needs of a captivating design. To do this, we must fulfill greater and more engaging purpose and meaning expressed within the designs we create.


Among the approaches that we’ve found particularly useful is that of Abstraction Laddering, in which we guide interdisciplinary teams through the process of stating a challenge or a goal in many different ways, continuing to answer “how” and “why” for purposes of advancing toward greater clarity and specificity. 


Human-Centered Design fuels simplicity, collaborative energies, and a far greater likelihood that launched products will be adopted and embraced. When practiced in its entirety it helps to ensure success. As such, it benefits everyone and is perfectly aligned with Promet's User Experience (UX) Design practice.

Design that Delivers

As we engage with clients in the process of deepening our understanding of their customers, we draw upon the expertise of our highly skilled and creative team members, and leverage expertise at the leading edge of the digital landscape.


The addition of this new Human-Centered Design team to the Promet Source core of web developers has helped us to proactively approach new websites with a holistic mindset combining our technology expertise with great design and function, along with an essential empathy of how humans interact with technology.  

Contact us today to schedule a workshop or to start a conversation concerning Human-Centered Design as a strategy to accelerate your business goals. 

Mar 05 2019
Mar 05

Promet's acquisition last year of a team focused on user experience and strategy, has opened an exciting new sphere for the types of conversations that we are having with clients. 

The former DAHU Agency’s Human-Centered Design expertise has sparked a many questions and within a relatively short span of time, has driven the delivery of expectation-exceeding results for clients from a range of sectors. 

As the name suggests, Human-Centered Design occurs within a framework for creating solutions that incorporate the perspectives, desires, context, and behaviors for the people whom our clients want to reach. It factors into every aspect of development, messaging and delivery, and calls for:

  1. A deep and continuous questioning of all assumptions,
  2. A willingness to look beyond the “best practices” that others have established,
  3. An eagerness to find inspiration from anywhere and everywhere,
  4. The involvement and ideas of multiple stakeholders, from different disciplines, along with a process for ongoing testing, iterating and integration of feedback, and
  5. Constant emphasis on the concerns, goals and relevant behaviors of targeted cohort groups.


Within less than a year, this specialized approach has become fundamentally integrated into the ways that Promet thinks, works and engages with clients. We intentionally practice design techniques that combine inputs from our UXperts, the client, and the end user--bring empathy and human experience to the forefront of our process.

How Does this Approach Differ?

In contrast to traditional product-centered design, where the appeal, color, size, weight, features and functionality of the product itself serves as the primary focus, Human-Centered Design creates solutions that understand audiences from a deeper perspective.  We try to meet more than the basic needs of a captivating design. To do this, we must fulfill greater and more engaging purpose and meaning expressed within the designs we create.


Among the approaches that we’ve found particularly useful is that of Abstraction Laddering, in which we guide interdisciplinary teams through the process of stating a challenge or a goal in many different ways, and continuing to answer “how” and “why” for purposes of advancing toward greater clarity and specificity. 


Human-Centered Design fuels simplicity, collaborative energies, and a far greater likelihood that launched products will be adopted and embraced. When practiced in its entirety it helps to ensure success. As such, it benefits everyone and is perfectly aligned with Promet's User Experience (UX) Design practice.

Design that Delivers

As we engage with clients in the process of deepening our understanding of their customers, we draw upon the expertise of our highly skilled and creative team members, and leverage expertise at the leading edge of the digital landscape.


The addition of this new Human-Centered Design team to the Promet Source core of web developers has helped us to proactively approach new websites with a holistic mindset combining our technology expertise with great design and function, along with an essential empathy of how humans interact with technology.  

Contact us today to schedule a workshop or to start a conversation concerning Human-Centered Design as a strategy to accelerate your business goals. 

About Drupal Sun

Drupal Sun is an Evolving Web project. It allows you to:

  • Do full-text search on all the articles in Drupal Planet (thanks to Apache Solr)
  • Facet based on tags, author, or feed
  • Flip through articles quickly (with j/k or arrow keys) to find what you're interested in
  • View the entire article text inline, or in the context of the site where it was created

See the blog post at Evolving Web

Evolving Web