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Aug 04 2020
Aug 04

What’s the secret sauce to a successful website? Well, there are more than 10 factors I can think of right off the bat. Like an attractive design, page-load speed, quality of content, marketing efforts and more.  One significant yet often overlooked element for a great user experience that drives a successful website is an intuitive navigation. Drupal 8 has a great set of modules to improve the navigation structure of your website. We have curated a list of top Drupal 8 (and 9) modules that enable easy and intuitive website navigation. Read on to find out.

drupal modules


A good website navigation lets site visitors know exactly where to get their information from as soon as they land on your website. Conversely, bad website navigation damages your rate of conversions and increases bounce rates. A website with attractive design does not always mean that navigating through it is intuitive. I have seen websites with ordinary designs with great navigation structures. And I keep going back to them because I know I can get what I need without scampering all over the place. According to CrazyEgg, the thumb rule is that it shouldn’t take more than 3 clicks for your user to find what they need.

Elements for an Intuitive Website Navigation

Your website visitors should be able to navigate from one page to another smoothly without getting distracted or confused. Distracted or confused users will leave your website before you establish a connection with them. Having a great design is good but if your visitors are not able to find your contact form, there is no point, is there? So, what makes up for a good navigation structure? 

1.    Main Navigation Bars 

This is the most crucial navigation element of a website. It is a horizontal (sometimes vertical) bar that lists links to point visitors around your website. A good main navigation bar needs to be simple, short, consistent, helpful, and catchy.

main-navigation-bar


2.    Breadcrumbs

These helpful navigational aids help site visitors to identify where they exactly are. They are a trail of links that starts from the parent page and ends with the current page, usually separated with a “>” or a “/” symbol.

3.    Multi-column Menus (and Submenus)

A more complex website with tons of branches and sub-branches should use multi-column menus. Again, these menus should be simple and easy to navigate through. 

4.    Sitemaps

Often considered as just an SEO booster, Sitemaps are extremely helpful as a navigation aid as well. A typical Sitemap should display a hierarchical structure of the entire website.

sitemap


5.    CTA (Call To Action) Buttons

This is where all the action actually happens! Proper placement of these CTA buttons play an important role amongst others like color, font style, size, text, etc.

CTA Button


6.    Sidebars

This is a good place to add page-specific links to enhance the UX for your site visitors. Good sidebars should be simple, not too long, contain a CTA and be ordered appropriately.

sidebar menu


7.    Hyperlinks

Here we are talking more about internal linking than external. A hyperlink should be intuitive and lead the visitor to the page they expect (no surprises please). Although having internal links are good for SEO, don’t over-do it or you may risk losing their focus on the page.  

8.    Footers

Footers are easy to ignore and are often used only to display only copyright details. The myth that people don’t scroll till the end of a page is now busted. A typical footer should contain links that you are not able to display in the header or sidebar sections. It could also have your contact details as well as mailing list sign up mini forms.

footer

Top Drupal 8 (and 9) Modules for Intuitive Navigation

1.    Menu Block 

The Drupal 8 Menu Block module’s design follows Drupal’s standard tree navigation style but  provides more enhanced features than the ones offered in the core Menu modules. You can easily configure blocks of menu links and specify the level you want to start and end with. There is no limit to the number of levels you can display. You can choose to keep your child menu elements expanded. Some basic features of this module are ported to Drupal 8 core. The Menu block module also supports Drupal 9.

Menu Block


2.    Easy Breadcrumb

The Drupal 8 Easy Breadcrumb module works by extracting location segments from the current URL of the webpage. It offers tons of configurable options and can replace the existing Drupal breadcrumbs module. You can choose to completely hide the home page link or any other specified links. The Easy breadcrumb module supports Drupal 9 too!

Easy Breadcrumb


3.    Superfish

The Drupal 8 Superfish module is ideal when you have large and multiple layered, multi-column drop down menus. The module integrates with the jQuery Superfish plugin which is a highly versatile menu plugin that works for touchscreens, screen-readers and other keyboard interactions. It can be configured to add time delays on mouse-out, animations, hide and reveal menu links, adds arrows if submenus are detected, and much more. It is also Drupal 9 compatible.

Superfish module


4.    Sitemap

The Drupal 8 Sitemap module is simple, clean and easy to use. It can display the entire site structure in a clean hierarchical structure. You can also choose to generate and display RSS feeds for blogs and categories. The Sitemap module supports Drupal 9.

sitemap-module


5.    Menu Item Role Access

This module allows you to add access control to your menus. You can enable and disable menu items depending on user roles. The Drupal 8 Menu Item Role Access module allows you to enter the role field (optional) to the menu items. It also supports Drupal 9.

Access control module          Image source: Menu Item Role Access


6.    Cheeseburger Menu

If you thought hamburger menus were great, wait till you check out the Cheeseburger menu. The Drupal 8 Cheeseburger menu module comes with some great features and is not just limited to mobile view, it also works with desktop views and varied screen sizes as well. It gives you the flexibility to choose the menu items that you want to appear in the Cheeseburger menu and also edit the menu titles. If you’re using Drupal Commerce, you can choose to display the shopping cart or the store phone number in the menu. Taxonomies could be chosen as the structure for your Cheeseburger menu. The Cheeseburger menu module supports Drupal 9 too!

Cheeseburger Menu 
Image source : Cheeseburger menu

7.    Simplify Menu

The Drupal 8 Simplify Menu module lets you render menus in your Twig template. It allows customization of the menu markup that enables accessibility and compatible with standards. You can render your menu tree as an array in the twig template and have full control over on the menu’s array. This module does not support Drupal 9 yet.

Simplify-Menu Module

8.    Total Control Admin Dashboard

The Drupal 8 Total Control Admin Dashboard is a useful administrative navigation tool. It acts as a centralized hub for all administration tools. The dashboard displays admin panes and quick links to users, taxonomies, menus, content types, site stats, views panel panes and more. The views panel panes can be further customized. This module also works with Drupal 9.

Total Control Admin Dashboard

9.    Footermap: a footer site map

As the name suggests, the Drupal 8 Footermap module provides a sitemap for your Drupal website that can be placed in the footer block. It allows dynamic generation of a sitemap and can be easily configured to support translation and caching. You can choose the menus to display, set the menu level limit (child menus), enable menu heading, edit the CSS to match your site layout and much more. The Footermap module also works with Drupal 9.

Footer sitemap


 

Jul 24 2020
Jul 24

Today, User experience (UX) is not just about how a user feels when interacting with your website. In this world of rapidly growing interfaces and APIs, content plays a supreme role in offering your users with exceptional UX. To keep up the pace, you need to adopt hot-selling, fast-moving front-end technologies like Angular JS, React JS, etc. that can deliver your content in an application-like speed.

Headless Drupal (or decoupled Drupal) is one such approach that is gaining much popularity because of its innovative ability to deliver outstanding digital experiences. Bigwigs like Weather.com, The Tonight Show, Great Wolf Resorts, Warner Music Group and many more, have taken the headless Drupal route offering their customers with interactive and unique front-end designs and fast-loading websites. With Drupal 8's commitment to the API-first architecture, content can be used and displayed anywhere.

What is Headless CMS?

headless drupal


To go headless or not is a rather tricky decision to make in this digital world. So what’s the whole buzz about going Headless? Simply put, in a headless CMS architecture, the front-end (consumers of content) of the CMS is detached from the back-end (provider of content). This not only enables your content to be delivered anywhere, it allows you to leverage latest Front-end technologies that offer unmatched user experiences.
 

What is Headless / Decoupled Drupal ?

Conventionally, Drupal websites are meant to multi-task. Which means, Drupal manages both - the back-end content management as well as the front-end rendering of content. There is no doubt that Drupal CMS on its own can deliver a rich user experience to the end user but when it comes down to instantaneous responses for a request, delivering content seamlessly in different interfaces, it does fall short. In a decoupled Drupal architecture, instead of the Drupal’s theme layer, a client-side framework like AngularJS, React or Backbone.JS is used. A user request does not have to be processed by the server all the time, which can drastically improve the speed and UX of your Drupal website.

Drupal 8 's API-first architecture took its first step by introducing REST API in core (Drupal 8.0). However, it came with its own set of challenges (setup and usage). Since then, many improvements have been made in providing better RESTful and non-RESTful webservices like JSON-API and GraphQL.

Technically speaking, a headless Drupal website sends out data in HTTP/JSON formats. A powerful front-end UI framework renders this data and delivers the web page.

Headless-Drupal

Categorizing Decoupled Drupal

In a traditional Drupal CMS architecture, the browser invokes a request that is processed by PHP logic which then renders the HTML and sends it back to the browser. Of course, the developer can embed Javascript for some client-side improvements but this can result in a situation where different client-side frameworks are being used for different modules. Thus making it an extremely complex system.

Progressive Decoupling

If you are looking to preserve your Drupal Theme layer and yet be able to provide immediate responses to the browser, the Progressive Decoupling approach is your best move. Here you can have your cake and eat it too! The initial application state is rendered by Drupal which can be then manipulated by client-side coding. Modules can be written in PHP or Javascript while you can avail the powerful performance benefits of Drupal.

This version of decoupled Drupal allows for contextualized interfaces, content workflow, site preview, and other features to remain usable and integrated with Drupal as a whole. While content editors and site assemblers feel at home with this decoupled Drupal version, it also allows front-end developers to pursue their own velocity while keeping site assemblers unblocked, by dedicating a portion of the page to a JavaScript framework.

In short, a progressively decoupled Drupal offers an approach that does a great job in striking the perfect balance between editorial needs like layout management and developer desires to use more JavaScript.

decoupling drupal
A graph illustrating the progressive decoupling spectrum for these examples – Source- Acquia
 

Fully Decoupled Architecture

And then there’s the Full decoupling – where Drupal’s presentation layer is completely replaced with a client-side framework. This version of the decoupled CMS allows an uninterrupted workflow as the client-side framework also acts as a server-side pre-renderer. Drupal CMS is purely used as a content repository that takes care of all the back-stage jazz. When you completely ignore Drupal’s theme functionality you are also letting go of some effective performance benefits that Drupal provides. Also a lot of rebuilding would need to be done to fully decouple the administrative interface and front-end of a Drupal website. Using Javascript on the server-side also complicates the infrastructure requirements.

While a fully decoupled Drupal architecture has gained more attention in recent years with the growth of JavaScript showing no signs of slowing down, it involves separation of concerns between your content structure and its presentation. In a nut shell, creating a fully decoupled Drupal system is like treating your web experience as a separate application that needs to be served content.

Which Decoupled Drupal Solution is Best for You?

Traditionally, Drupal CMS is meant to do both – content management and rendering the front-end for the whole website. A lot of pressure, don’t you think? Drupal experts believe that Drupal’s strengths lies in the power and flexibility of its back-end and that it needs to be service oriented first instead of HTML oriented. Decoupling Drupal means letting some other system manage the front-end while Drupal takes care of the back-end system. Why is it a good idea to decouple Drupal, you ask?

If you want to adopt cutting-edge and modern front-end technologies that Drupal cannot provide you will need a powerful front-end framework like React JS or Angular JS. With a headless Drupal approach, you can have all of this and still maintain your robust backend Drupal CMS.

  • With the Headless Drupal architecture, you can “Write once and publish everywhere”. This system allows content editors, marketers and business owners to create content once and deliver it to multiple interfaces seamlessly.
  • With a decoupled CMS, detaching the front-end from the back-end content management system will allow for more flexibility and efficiency of the Drupal content model. Just like how delegating work decreases your workload and increases productivity.
  • A layered architecture promotes a more secure system. Site admins can restrict access to different areas of the infrastructure. 
  • Headless Drupal allows front-end developers to have full control over the presentation, UI design and UX of the website. The combination of a great client-side framework and a seasoned front-end developer can get you a website with a rich, faster, application-like user-experience, and seamless interactivity.
  • Integrating with third party applications is easier and more efficient with a headless Drupal model.
  • Both the front-end and back-end developers can work independently which can lead to efficient and speedy delivery of a project.
  • If you want to redesign your website, you won’t have to re-implement your Drupal CMS. Likewise, revamping your back-end system can be accomplished without having to alter your front- end.

Is headless Drupal for everybody?

Although decoupling Drupal can help you achieve your goals of an uninterrupted and application-like user- experience, it might not be a good fit for everyone. Here’s why –

  • Websites like News sites or Blogs, that don’t really need much user interactivity, will not benefit from decoupling their Drupal website.
  • When you opt for a fully decoupled Drupal architecture for your website, you are letting go of some of the top (and free) functionalities that come with the Drupal theme layer like the block placements, layout and display management, content previews, UI localization, security features like cross-site scripting (XSS), etc. Some of them cannot be replicated by a client-side framework.
  • If budget is an issue you need to keep in mind about the price you will have to shell out for experienced front-end developers. Also the cost for rebuilding a missing (otherwise freely available) Drupal feature from scratch. 

Who uses Headless Drupal?

Many top enterprises have taken the headless Drupal approach and successfully so! Their websites are fast to load and offer interactive experiences to their users in all devices and interfaces. Some examples are –

  • The Tonight Show with Jimmy Fallon – uses Backbone.js and Node.js for the front-end
  • Weather[dot]com – uses Angular.js for the front-end
  • Great Wolf Resorts – uses CoffeeScript and Spine framework
  • EC Red Bull Salzburg – uses Angular.js for the front-end
  • Warner Music Group – uses Angular.js for the front-end

…And many more on this list here.

Jun 09 2020
Jun 09

The future of the web is here. Drupal 9 has arrived, and we are more than just thrilled! All that elbow greasing that went into building Drupal 8 has finally paid off. A much more modern, reliable, compact, and revolutionary open-source CMS has emerged.

Drupal 9 promises much more than continuous innovation. Incorporating the best of open source technologies, the latest version of the CMS opens doors to many more open source communities while offering a secure and sustainable ecosystem.

It goes without saying that none of this would be nearly possible without the incredible Drupal community. I have been fortunate enough to talk about Drupal 9 to some significant Drupal contributors and community members recently. Read on for some honest and passionate comments on what are they most excited about Drupal 9.

What"s the big deal about drupal9?

Alex_Morenoto1

Alex Moreno

Technical Architect at Acquia

quotes The thing I'm more excited is that it is an uneventful event. We all know how painful it has been migrating between previous releases. We've been talking for years about migrations Drupal 8 and wrote hundreds of pages. The least exciting the better in this case. And Drupal 9 on that aspect is not exciting at all. It just works changing a switch, a label… which makes it super exciting!!

jacob

Jacob Rockowitz

Drupal developer. Built and maintains the Webform module for Drupal 8

quotesAs a developer, I am excited about Drupal 9's removal of deprecated code. Removing old code allows us to move forward with improving and extending Drupal core. For the Webform module, I have been working toward tagging a new major release that removes deprecated code, fixes some significant bugs, and improves to some key APIs. Professionally, I am most excited about using Drupal to build a headless content authoring platform. Drupal 8's API first and media initiatives were so successful, the Drupal community can now focus on improving Drupal’s content authoring experience.

jaydeep

Jaideep Singh Kandari

Senior Engineer at QED42

quotes The fact that Drupal 9 is the simplest and easiest major release in Drupal's History is exciting. The community made some great decisions in developing Drupal 8 and that laid the foundation for extending and maintaining Drupal. It is because of those decisions and community support that Drupal can be modified iteratively and can include industry's best practices into Drupal. Modifying Drupal core has never been easier. There are lots of new features which are in progress and might land soon in Drupal 9. One particular feature I'm very interested in is the Automatic Updates. With this in place, Drupal sites will receive automatic updates which greatly reduces the maintenance effort. This initiative is in the development phase and you can see lots of communication happening for this initiative. While there are many other reasons to be excited for the new Drupal 9 release, I think it’s time to thank the community who supported Drupal in difficult times and allowed a planned and timely release of Drupal 9. This shows how the Drupal community is not just engaged in consuming, but also nurturing it and growing it every day. That's why it makes me proud to be a part of the Drupal Community.

joel

Joel Pittet

Web Coder. Drupal 8 Theme System Co-maintainer

quotesI'm excited about Olivero (the new front-end theme), the upgrade transition and ease/experience.

malabya

Malabya

Open-source evangelist. Drupal Practice Head at Specbee

quotesI am excited about Drupal 9 because it's basically Drupal 8 minus the deprecations and plus upgraded dependencies which removes the dichotomy between the two version. This will help developers to stay relevant as alike modules. If you know Drupal 8 then you will know Drupal 9.

markus

Markus Kalkbrenner

CTO at Bio Logis

quotesI’m just excited about the newer Symfony version and semantic versioning. To be honest there's not too much I'm really excited about. I'm more and more concerned about the fact that "fancy" features are accepted for core. On the other hand essential backend components, for example the Form API to just mention one, aren't state of the art anymore. So while Drupal becomes more "complete" as out-of-the-box CMS it becomes less attractive as development framework.

nick

Nick Dickinson Wilde

Drupal Tech Lead at Taoti Creative

quotesWell, there is very minimal new feature wise, but all that deprecated code being gone and less excess ways to do things is nice. I guess beyond all the internal cleanup, I'm very eager on updating of all the Symfony dependencies - lets me update them for a bunch of personal projects too. Also, really keen on the new complete node migration for D7 projects to D9. That's gonna make complex site migrations quite a bit cleaner and simpler.

rachel

Rachel Norfolk

Community Liaison at Drupal Association

quotesI’d say that the most exciting thing about Drupal 9 is how we now have a far, far better way to handle the relentless pace of change in technology. For me, it is actually exciting that Drupal 9.0 brings “nothing new” over Drupal 8.9; it is simply an exercise in dropping old code that is no longer needed. It means that we can then bring great new features in 9.1, 9.2 and so on, whilst having a smaller, more modern, codebase we have to check against.

I remember thinking back to the Drupal 8 release and being a little scared at the huge change to everything. I wasn’t the only one who felt that way and we learned from that lesson. Drupal 9.0 is “no big deal” and that IS a big deal!

Renato

Renato Goncalves

Software Engineer at CI&T's Drupal Competence Office

quotesI'm very excited about Drupal 9 because it will be very important to use the new version of Symfony and Twig. Another important point is that the deprecated code will be removed, and this will make the code cleaner and more organized. Last but not least: I'm very happy because the contrib projects will work on both versions D8 and D9. This is excellent for me as I help the community and I maintain 40+ contrib projects and it helps the maintainers' job.

And Lastly....

Much gratitude to all the community members on this list for taking the time out of their busy schedules to share their thoughts with me. We at Specbee are especially thrilled about Drupal 9 because we can offer more modern digital experiences and easy migrations. We’re ready to shine with Drupal 9!

May 12 2020
May 12

Drupal 9 is just around the corner and the beta release is out to be tested already! What’s your Drupal 9 plan?  Are you still in the “Why should I upgrade to Drupal 9 after all” phase? Or are you wondering what your next steps should be for Drupal 9 readiness? We have answers to all your questions including Drupal 9 features and a quick Drupal 9 checklist on how to prepare for Drupal 9.

The best way to prepare yourself for tomorrow is to give your best today. And very apparently, the Drupal community has done just that. I know, migrating to Drupal 8 from previous versions was hard. It meant a complete rebuild of the code and a lot of learning. But once you are fully onboard Drupal 8, life gets easier. Think of it as a hard climb for a gorgeous view from the mountaintop. Truly worth all the effort, isn’t it? So, if you’re still on Drupal 7 (or 6), this is a good time to migrate to Drupal 8 and then simply upgrade to Drupal 9 from there. As you read this, modules are being ported (and made compatible) to Drupal 9 as a collective effort by the amazing Drupal community.

drupal 9 readiness

The Much-Talked-About Drupal 9 Release Date

One of the most frequently asked Drupal questions lately has been about the Drupal 9 release date. So, when is the most-awaited Drupal 9 release date? Drupal 9 is currently scheduled to release on June 3rd, 2020. The Drupal community has been successfully releasing minor versions every six months since the adoption of semantic versioning in Drupal 8. Every minor version came with several valuable new features. 

Drupal 8 extensively depends on third-party libraries like Symfony, Twig, Guzzle, CKEditor and must keep up pace with their updates as well. For example, Symfony 3 (Drupal 8’s biggest dependency) will reach EOL (end of life) by November 2021. Drupal 8 reaches end of life as well. Drupal 9 will be released with the latest Symfony 4.4 support and will not be backwards compatible with Symfony 3. 

Drupal 9         The Drupal 9 Readiness Roadmap (Image Credits – Drupal.org)

Drupal 9 Features - What’s New in Drupal 9?

Here are some key features of Drupal 9 that we will be discussing about in detail thereafter –

  • Easy to upgrade to Drupal 9 (if already on Drupal 8)
  • You get the latest of the best! (Symfony, Composer, Twig, PHP, CKEditor and more)
  • Will receive community support and security fixes after November 2021 (after Drupal 8 EOL)
  • Subsequent Drupal 9 minor upgrade versions will be backwards compatible to Drupal 9
  • Drupal 9.1 will have an all new and modern default theme called Olivero to offer 
  • Many exciting features and enhancements to look forward to, starting Drupal 9.1!

Drupal 9 is already being built within Drupal 8. Drupal 8.9 will release along with Drupal 9.0 in June 2020. This is because Drupal 9 is going to be the same as Drupal 8.9, except that it will be a cleaned-up version that is updated with support for its third-party dependencies. And hence one of the greatest Drupal 9 features is that it is so easy to upgrade!

Every new minor version of Drupal 8 saw many new features , but it also contained a lot of old code so it could be backwards compatible. This “old code” is also famously known as “deprecated code”. Because of the dependencies on third parties like Symfony, Twig, etc., Drupal 9 will incorporate updates to these dependencies. Drupal contributors and module developers are collectively making the road to Drupal 9 easier by eliminating “bad smelling code” (as Jacob Rockowitz calls it in his blog about deprecating code for his Webform module) from various Drupal 8 modules.

       Drupal 9.0 = Drupal 8.9 – Deprecated code + Upgraded dependencies

Drupal 9          What’s new in Drupal 9.0 (Image Credits - Drupal.org)

The Drupal 9 Readiness Checklist

Regardless whether you’re upgrading from Drupal 7 to Drupal 9 or Drupal 8 to Drupal 9, you will need to start planning for Drupal 9. The scheduled release is soon approaching and now is a good time to get prepared for Drupal 9. 

  • Drupal 7 to Drupal 9 Migration

If you are still on Drupal 7 and looking forward to getting onboard Drupal 9, it is not too late. Ideally, it is recommended to split this process into two parts – 1. Migrate to Drupal 8 and 2. Upgrade to Drupal 9. 

  • Migrate content and code to Drupal 8
  • Check for availability of modules in Drupal 8 using the Upgrade Status Drupal module
  • Upgrade your Drupal 7 modules to Drupal 8 with the help of modules such as Drupal Module Upgrader
  • Stay updated with the latest core releases.
  • Remove any deprecated code
  • Upgrade to Drupal 9

And as already discussed, upgrading from Drupal 8’s latest version to Drupal 9 is easy as pie. A Drupal 7 to Drupal 9 migration will take as much resource time (and resource budget) as a Drupal 7 to Drupal 8 to Drupal 9 upgrade. Drupal 7 will reach end-of-life by November 2021 and will continue to receive community support until then. For detailed instructions on how to install Drupal 9, check this article.

  • Stay Up to date with Drupal 8

With every new minor version release of Drupal 8, the benefits are not only restricted to access to new features and enhancements. It also takes you one step closer to Drupal 9. Since Drupal 8.8 is the last minor release before the Drupal 8.9 release (which also happens at the same time as Drupal 9!), it is the last Drupal 8 version to contain significant feature additions. Drupal 8.9 releases on June 3rd, 2020 and will include more stable modules (that were previously experimental) and a few UX and API enhancements. So, the best thing to do now is to keep Drupal core updated and update your website to Drupal 8.8.  

  • Weed out the Deprecated code

Make way for new and improved Drupal 9 features by removing old and deprecated code from your Drupal 8 codebase. When you keep Drupal core and contributed modules up to date, you are also embracing cleaner code. Updated versions remove usage of deprecated code and API. There are various methods to check for deprecated code. 

  • Sometimes functions are marked with @deprecated annotations that warn the developer that the following code is deprecated and what they should be using instead. 
  • Use a command-line tool like Drupal Check (by Matt Glaman from Centarro) to help check for deprecated code and other bugs. It can also be integrated in continuous integration environments.
  • Download the Drupal 8 Upgrade Status module on top of Drupal-Check for a more UI based solution. It can scan your entire Drupal project and generates a clean visual report that illustrates any compatibility issues, the need to upgrade modules to the latest version and Drupal 9 readiness. 
  • Drupal.org also offers support to check for Drupal 9 readiness and deprecation within its testing system. Like enabling static analysis with phpStan or by setting a trigger_error() when a deprecated level is reached.

    Once identified, it is time for some manual work to remove the deprecated code and refine existing codebase. Use automated tools like Drupal 8 rector to resolve some code issues, although it does need some manual intervention.

Drupal 9 Checklist                                     
                                                   Drupal 9 Checklist

About Drupal Sun

Drupal Sun is an Evolving Web project. It allows you to:

  • Do full-text search on all the articles in Drupal Planet (thanks to Apache Solr)
  • Facet based on tags, author, or feed
  • Flip through articles quickly (with j/k or arrow keys) to find what you're interested in
  • View the entire article text inline, or in the context of the site where it was created

See the blog post at Evolving Web

Evolving Web