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Jul 16 2020
Jul 16

Baddy BreidertDuring DrupalCon Global, the members of the Drupal Community Working Group announced the winner of the 2020 Aaron Winborn Award, Baddý Breidert (baddysonja).  

The award is named after a long-time Drupal contributor who lost his battle with ALS in 2015. This award recognizes an individual who, like Aaron, demonstrates personal integrity, kindness, and an above-and-beyond commitment to the Drupal project and community. Previous winners of the award are Cathy Theys, Gabór Hojtsy, Nikki Stevens, Kevin Thull, and Leslie Glynn. Current CWG members, along with previous winners, selected the winner based on nominations submitted by Drupal community members.

Baddy has been a member of the Drupal community for over nine years, and is the co-founder of 1xINTERNET based in Germany, Iceland, and Spain. She has been a relentless force for good in the Drupal community as one of the co-organizers of Drupal Europe 2018, Northern Lights and Solstice DrupalCamps (Iceland), local and international Splash Awards, and as an extremely active member of the German Drupal community. She is also currently a member of the Drupal Association Board of Directors.  

Multiple people nominated Baddy for this award. Here are some of the things they said:

She has consistently and tirelessly worked for the good of Drupal across event organisation (Drupal Europe), in Drupal Agency life promoting Drupal to wider audiences and running an ethically grounded business (which contributes back in bucket loads).

She has been an amazing force in so many areas to even count. As a community organizer on crucial events like Drupal Europe to [foster] a contribution culture at her company. Then spreading the word about how that makes the best business sense. She cares so much for diversity and inclusion at her company and in the Drupal community as well.

This year, there were 22 individuals nominated for the award. In the coming weeks, the CWG will be contacting all nominees to let them know of their nomination and thank them for their continued work in the community.

In addition to the physical award shipped to Baddy, she was also provided with a free ticket to DrupalCon Global which she graciously donated to Surabhi Gokte. The physical award that was hand-crafted by Drupal community member Bo Shipley (simplyshipley).  

Nominations for the 2021 award will open in early 2021.
 

Seeking volunteers for the evolving structure and roles of the Drupal Community Working Group

Mar 06 2020
Mar 06
Mar 06 2020
Mar 06

The mission of the Community Working Group (CWG) is to foster a friendly and welcoming community for the Drupal project and to uphold the Drupal Code of Conduct. 

- https://www.drupal.org/community/cwg 

As the Drupal Community Working Group (CWG) moves into its seventh year, we have been thinking a lot about how we can evolve it to better serve the changing needs of the Drupal Community. 

At the moment, the four members of the CWG split our time between reactive issues (conflict resolution and Code of Conduct enforcement) and proactive issues (community health resources, workshops). While the work is often emotionally taxing, it is also often extremely rewarding. We believe the proactive work has a large impact on the community, but our time is often filled with reacting to issues in the community. 

To this end, we have been working with Tara King (sparklingrobots) on identifying new CWG roles, mainly focused on proactive tasks. These new roles will not play a part in conflict resolution matters and will not receive access to any incident reports or other confidential information that has been shared with the group, with the exception of subject matter experts, who may see some limited information when brought in to consult on specific cases. These new roles are designed for individuals to help provide insight and expertise into how we can better support and grow our community.

It is important to note that all CWG members must abide by the CWG Code of Ethics, regardless of if they consult on conflict resolution or Code of Conduct enforcement cases or not.

The list of new CWG roles follows below. In some cases, we have already reached out to individuals to fill some of the roles. Full details about the roles can be found on the Community Working Group's Community Health Team page.

  • Community health - develops and produces community health initiatives like workshops and tweaks to drupal.org processes.
  • Community event support - assists Drupal community events with Code of Conduct template, playbooks, and other resources. It is our hope that this role be filled by members of the newly established Drupal Event Organizers Group. 
  • Subject matter experts - includes individuals with knowledge of specific geographic, industry, and mental health areas. In some cases, subject matters experts will be provided with limited information about specific conflict resolution issues they have been brought in to assist with.
  • Ambassadors - coordinators between the CWG and other groups, including the Drupal Association, other open source projects, Drupal.org maintainers, and Diversity and Inclusion.

We are strong believers that the more proactive work we do, the stronger and healthier our community will be and the less reactive work we will have. 

If you, or someone you know, are interested in any of the new roles, please drop us a line at drupal-cwg [at] drupal.org. Include your name, drupal.org username and which role (or roles) you are interested in. 
 

Mental Health First Aid Training at DrupalCon Minneapolis

Feb 11 2020
Feb 11
Feb 11 2020
Feb 11

The workshop is currently on hold until the status of DrupalCon Minneapolis is resolved.

The Drupal Community Working Group (CWG) is pleased to announce that registration is now open for a full-day Mental Health First Aid workshop on Sunday, May 17, 2020 (the day before DrupalCon Minneapolis begins) in Bloomington, Minnesota. 

The workshop will be held "field trip" style; it will be held off-site, at the Health Counseling Services facility in Bloomington, Minnesota, from 8:30am-5pm. Transportation will be provided to and from a location near the Minneapolis Convention Center (the site of DrupalCon) to the workshop. Following the workshop, attendees are invited to (optionally) attend a pay-on-your-own group dinner to decompress and discuss the day's workshop.

The CWG believes that these types of proactive workshops will help improve our community's mental health literacy and awareness, as well as making it easier for us to have open, honest, and respectful conversations and potentially spotting signs of when community members are in need of assistance.

The Drupal Association is generously sponsoring the workshop by providing funding to help defer the cost of the workshop as well as providing transportation. 

From the Mental Health First Aid website:

Mental Health First Aid is a course that gives people the skills to help someone who is developing a mental health problem or experiencing a mental health crisis. The evidence behind the program demonstrates that it does build mental health literacy, helping the public identify, understand, and respond to signs of mental illness.

Mental Health First Aiders learn a single 5-step action plan known as ALGEE, which includes assessing risk, respectfully listening to and supporting the individual in crisis, and identifying appropriate professional help and other support. Participants are also introduced to risk factors and warning signs for mental health or substance use problems, engage in experiential activities that build understanding of the impact of illness on individuals and families, and learn about evidence-supported treatment and self-help strategies.

Over the past few years, the CWG has organized proactive community health events, including on-going Code of Conduct contact training, as well as previous DrupalCon North America trainings on leadership, teamwork, and communications. 

In order for the workshop to proceed, we need at least ten community members to register by April 1, 2020 at https://healthcounselingservices.com/events/adult-mental-health-first-aid-11/

When registering:

  • Choose the "Pay now" option (do not select the "Bill my organization" option.
  • Use the coupon code: MHFA30 to receive $30 off the regular price.
  • For the "Name of organization", "Name of site", "Supervisor's name", and "Supervisor's phone" fields, feel free to use "not applicable".
     

Nominations now open for the 2020 Aaron Winborn Award

Jan 23 2020
Jan 23
Jan 23 2020
Jan 23

Due to the cancellation of DrupalCon Minneapolis and the announcement of DrupalCon Global, nominations for the 2020 Aaron Winborn Award will remain open until June 1, 2020. The winner will be announced during DrupalCon Global.

The Drupal Community Working Group is pleased to announce that nominations for the 2020 Aaron Winborn Award are now open. 

This annual award recognizes an individual who demonstrates personal integrity, kindness, and above-and-beyond commitment to the Drupal community. It includes a scholarship and stipend for the winner to attend DrupalCon and recognition in a plenary session at the event.

Nominations are open to not only well-known Drupal contributors, but also people who have made a big impact in their local or regional community. If you know of someone who has made a big difference to any number of people in our community, we want to hear about it. 

This award was created in honor of long-time Drupal contributor Aaron Winborn, whose battle with Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, or  ALS (also referred to as Lou Gehrig's Disease)  came to an end on March 24, 2015. Based on a suggestion by Hans Riemenschneider, the Community Working Group, with the support of the Drupal Association, launched the Aaron Winborn Award.

Nominations are open until Monday, June 1, 2020. A committee consisting of the Community Working Group core team as well as past award winners will select a winner from the nominations. Current members of the CWG's core team and previous winners are exempt from winning the award.

Previous winners of the award are:

  • 2015: Cathy Theys
  • 2016: Gábor Hojtsy
  • 2017: Nikki Stevens
  • 2018: Kevin Thull
  • 2019: Leslie Glynn

Nominations for the 2020 award are now closed.

Announcing the 2020 series of Drupal Event Code of Conduct Training

Jan 19 2020
Jan 19
Jan 19 2020
Jan 19

The Drupal Community Working Group is happy to announce that we are once again teaming up with Otter Tech to offer live, monthly, online Code of Conduct enforcement training for Drupal Event organizers and volunteers in 2020.

During the second half of 2019, 17 Drupal community members completed the training (see full list), helping to ensure Drupal events world-wide have qualified Code of Conduct contacts. We are excited to be able to provide support for the training in 2020.

The training is designed to provide "first responder" skills to Drupal community members who take reports of potential Code of Conduct issues at Drupal events, including meetups, camps, conventions, and other gatherings. The workshops will be attended by Code of Conduct enforcement teams from other open source events, which will allow cross-pollination of knowledge with the Drupal community.

Each monthly online workshop is the same; community members only have to attend one monthly workshop of their choice to complete the training.  We strongly encourage all Drupal event organizers to consider sponsoring one or two persons' attendance at this workshop.

The monthly online workshops will be presented by Sage Sharp, Otter Tech's CEO and a diversity and inclusion leader in the open source community. From the official description of the workshop, it will include:

  • Practice taking a report of a potential Code of Conduct violation (an incident report)

  • Practice following up with the reported person

  • Instructor modeling on how to take a report and follow up on a report

  • One practice scenario for a report given at an event

  • One practice scenario for a report given in an online community

  • Discussion on bias, microaggressions, personal conflicts, and false reporting

  • Frameworks for evaluating a response to a report

  • 40 minutes total of Q&A time

In addition, we have received a Drupal Community Cultivation Grant to help defray the cost of the workshop for those that need assistance. The standard cost of the workshop is $350, Otter Tech has worked with us to allow us to provide the workshop for $300. To register for the workshop, first let us know that you're interested by completing this sign-up form - everyone who completes the form will receive a coupon code for $50 off the regular price of the workshop.

For those that require additional assistance, we have a limited number of $100 subsidies available, bringing the workshop price down to $200. Subsidies will be provided based on reported need as well as our goal to make this training opportunity available to all corners of our community. To apply for the subsidy, complete the relevant section on the sign-up form. The deadline for applying for the subsidy is end-of-business on Wednesday, July 1, 2020 - those selected for the subsidy will be notified after this date (in time for the July 8, 2020 workshop).

The workshops will be held on:

Those that successfully complete the training will be (at their discretion) listed on Drupal.org (in the Drupal Community Workgroup section) as a means to prove that they have completed the training. We feel that moving forward, the Drupal community now has the opportunity to have professionally trained Code of Conduct contacts at the vast majority of our events, once again, leading the way in the open source community.

We are fully aware that the fact that the workshops will be presented in English limit who will be able to attend. We are more than interested in finding additional professional Code of Conduct workshops in other languages. Please contact us if you can assist.

Aug 15 2019
Aug 15

Education is just like planting a seed. A seed that has different stages with significant and important roles. If any stage is missed in the entire scenario, it destroys the life cycle of the plant. 

It is not what is poured into a student that counts, but what is planted
-Linda Conway  

There is no secret to the fact that education has the power to change lives. For a successful career, every student needs to go through the learning stage of knowledge, confidence, academics and technical skills so that they can grow efficiently. A college education is one such element that contributes highly to these steps of learning. 

Therefore, to achieve these steps of knowledge, campus management software has been introduced. 

picture of a laptop which hjas book shelf in it. A degree in lying at the corner of the keyboard. A globe is lying beside the laptop.


OpenSource Campus Management solution is one such management software which has made lives easy for students, teachers, authorities and other people that follow down the chain. Such a system has brought standardization and steadiness within the organization. 

But what exactly is OpenCampus?

OpenCampus is a technical model that contributes highly to the outlook and the network of the universities. It was developed with the first open adoption solution of campus management in Drupal. 

OpenCampus is designed to cover the life cycle of students.

In Germany and Austria, more than 30 universities are using this software and it is highly contributing to their needs and requirements. 

Image that says OpenCampus in blue text with a circle logo that is on the left side of the text

With the help of OpenCampus software, you can manage everything. Starting from all the courses till recording achievements, the application does everything and is considered among the most versatile applications. It allows mapping of complex procedure which includes the allocation of the student into smaller classes in medical or dentistry programs. 

The Framework

The framework of OpenSource is based on the open source technology, Drupal, and it lets their customers create their own applications with a smooth integration of third-party products such as a moodle. 

Image of a blue platform where the text is OpenCampus framework on which threads are placed with social media logos

Features provided by OpenCampus
 

Features Benefits Application and Admissions
  • Transparent and multi-staging application process.
  • Dynamic list of view.
  • Automatic e-mail notification
  • Smart forms
Course and Event Management
  • Parallel small groups.
  • Automation of complex course sequence 
  • Uploading of documents, term papers, and personal calendar
Exam Management and validation
  • Exam questions 
  • Written tests and online evaluation
  • Seating plans
Records of Achievements
  • Easy modifications following revision of the examination.
  • Automatic generation of course certificate
  • List of synopsis 
Evaluation
  • Evaluation via app
  • Flexible configuration
  • Automatic evaluation report 
Mobile apps and Platforms
  • Integration of students and faculty 
  • Forums and online discussions
  • Attendance


Application and Admission

The process involving applications as well as admissions have been made really simple with the help of OpenCampus. The software presents the applicants with a simple tool that uploads and manages all the necessary information in one single place. 

Course and Event Management 

OpenCampus software is one of the most powerful and flexible of its kind. The module handles simple seminars with the location, automates complex courses, appointment, and lecturer. It also supports multilevel architectures with multi-language pages and directs the budget control. 

Exam management

The software is an innovative web-based solution that grants users with extensive functionalities for creating a multi-level architecture of any exam. All the aspects of exam preparation are managed seamlessly with OpenCampus ( starting from an online mock test to the seating arrangement)

Records of Achievements 

OpenCampus performance management tells the whole study achievements of the students in a clear view. The data of the other modules such as "OpenCampus Exams" and "OpenCampus event management" are also stored in this location. Easy modifications in the revision of the examination, automatically generating course certificate and the listing of synopsis are some of the features that are offered under OpenCampus

Evaluation

Continuous and seamless evaluation is the key to ensure the quality of teaching and offers that are present by a university. The user can evaluate standardized courses and receive qualitative as well as quantitative feedback on different areas of teaching. The user can benefit from simple creation option of questionaries or reports as full integration of course management is done in the system. 

Mobile Application 

The OpenCampus software has special support which is "Room Management". The users can manage their booking of event and laboratory rooms and their equipment. As the software is mobile responsive, it makes it even more efficient and handy. 

OpenCampus logo which has a two concentric circle that has a blue background and there are 14 corresponding pictures around it


The reason why customers choose OpenCampus 

Higher education institutes are bound with various responsibilities and data information that has to be managed accurately and in complete synchronization. OpenCampus here bags all the trophies by providing them with the administration of the students and faculty. There are also many reasons why OpenCampus is chosen by universities. Some of the reasons are:

  • It presents with unique processing mapping: OpenCampus is the only software that manages complex processes of the universities. 
  • It comes with comprehensive feature sets: OpenCampus software offers extensive functionalities and features to its customers. 
  • Open Adaptive System: OpenCampus is an adaptive system that has additional modules that can easily be added anytime on the openSource platform.
  • Established and Experienced: More than 25 universities are using OpenCampus that have at least 3,000 students. 

OpenCampus for Research Data Management System For Clinical Studies

Research institutes need to manage multiple studies with individual data sets, processing rules and different type of permissions. But there are no “official” or “standard” technology that presents an easy to use the environment to construct database and user interface for the clinical trials or the research studies. Thus, many software solutions were being used which were explicitly made for a specific study, to cost-intensive commercial Clinical Trial Management Systems (CTMS)

With OpenCampus Research, Open adoption software (OAS) solution provided the users with a standard environment for state-of-the-art research database management at a very low cost.

The architecture of the open adoption software (OAS) allows the user after a brief instruction to develop their own web-based data management system.

The implementation provided with the following features:

  • Basic Architecture

OpenCampus is basically three types: forms, trees, and containers. Any type of research project or clinical trial can always be mapped with this model and are fully configurable through the graphical user interface 
 

Image of a flow chart stating user, processes, trees, containers, and nodesSource: National Center for Biotechnology Information

 

  • Interoperability

There are many taxonomies that allow the user to classify content with terms gathered within the vocabularies. With the help of taxonomies, the field contents are able to store not just as text, but also as a reference that is linked to the predefined value.

  • Multicenter 

The approach of OpenCampus software works really well under this section. There is one single study administrator that assigns permissions to center coordinators. Center coordinators then independently distribute access and permissions to the data managers that are responsible for entering the data.

The multicenter concept can be extended with various additional features such as node state levels or individual data processing guidelines that ensure that certain quality management actions are executed during data processing

  • Meta-analysis

One core element of this data storage approach in the OpenCampus OAS concept is that it allows the nodes to get connected to each other. The link between these nodes is called entity reference. With the help of entity references, the data from many studies can be combined (merged), enabling meta-analysis to be executed just by creating a new output view.

  • Data Security  

The two major solution in terms of security is that the customer can fill online form or the information can be submitted on premises along with the confidentiality of doctor-patient.

Thus, with the help of OpenCampus system, a steady environment was provided to the research center and the people working in it alongside with database design and pattern design. 

Conclusion

OpenCampus is not only that software which is used for the small clerical task, but it is also beyond that as it offers three-way interactive platform for students, teachers, and parents. It not only saves the time of the administrative staff and their pupils, but it also allows them to pay fees online and makes them attentive about important information around the university. 

Opensense Labs believes that the contemporary system of education will spread a new level of superiority in the education sector. Ping us at [email protected] to know more about OpenSource campus management. The services provided by our organization would help you solve all your queries.

Aug 15 2019
Aug 15

The Drupal Community Working Group is happy to announce that we've teamed up with Otter Tech to offer live, monthly, online Code of Conduct enforcement training for Drupal Event organizers and volunteers through the end of 2019. 

The training is designed to provide "first responder" skills to Drupal community members who take reports of potential Code of Conduct issues at Drupal events, including meetups, camps, conventions, and other gatherings. The workshops will be attended by Code of Conduct enforcement teams from other open source events, which will allow cross-pollination of knowledge with the Drupal community.

Each monthly online workshop is the same; community members only have to attend one monthly workshop of their choice to complete the training.  We strongly encourage all Drupal event organizers to consider sponsoring one or two persons' attendance at this workshop.

The monthly online workshops will be presented by Sage Sharp, Otter Tech's CEO and a diversity and inclusion leader in the open source community. From the official description of the workshop, it will include:

  • Practice taking a report of a potential Code of Conduct violation (an incident report)
  • Practice following up with the reported person
  • Instructor modeling on how to take a report and follow up on a report
  • One practice scenario for a report given at an event
  • One practice scenario for a report given in an online community
  • Discussion on bias, microaggressions, personal conflicts, and false reporting
  • Frameworks for evaluating a response to a report
  • 40 minutes total of Q&A time

In addition, we have received a Drupal Community Cultivation Grant to help defray the cost of the workshop for those that need assistance. The standard cost of the workshop is $350, Otter Tech has worked with us to allow us to provide the workshop for $300. To register for the workshop, first let us know that you're interested by completing this sign-up form - everyone who completes the form will receive a coupon code for $50 off the regular price of the workshop.

For those that require additional assistance, we have a limited number of $100 subsidies available, bringing the workshop price down to $200. Subsidies will be provided based on reported need as well as our goal to make this training opportunity available to all corners of our community. To apply for the subsidy, complete the relevant section on the sign-up form. The deadline for applying for the subsidy is end-of-business on Friday, September 6, 2019 - those selected for the subsidy will be notified after this date (in time for the September 9, 2019 workshop).

The workshops will be held on:

  • September 9 (Monday) at 3 pm to 7 pm U.S. Pacific Time / 8 am to 12 pm Australia Eastern Time
  • October 23 (Wednesday) at 5 am to 9 am U.S. Pacific Time / 2 pm to 6 pm Central European Time
  • November 21 (Thursday) at 6 pm to 10 pm U.S. Pacific Time / 1 pm to 5 pm Australia Eastern Time
  • December 4 (Wednesday) at 9 am to 1 pm U.S. Pacific Time / 6 pm to 10 pm Central European Time

Those that successfully complete the training will be (at their discretion) listed on Drupal.org (in the Drupal Community Workgroup section) as a means to prove that they have completed the training. We feel that moving forward, the Drupal community now has the opportunity to have professionally trained Code of Conduct contacts at the vast majority of our events, once again, leading the way in the open source community.

We are fully aware that the fact that the workshops will be presented in English limit who will be able to attend. We are more than interested in finding additional professional Code of Conduct workshops in other languages. Please contact us if you can assist.
 

2019 Aaron Winborn Award Winner: Leslie Glynn

Apr 19 2019
Apr 19
Jan 05 2019
Jan 05

The Drupal Community Working Group is pleased to announce that nominations for the 2019 Aaron Winborn Award are now open. This annual award recognizes an individual who demonstrates personal integrity, kindness, and above-and-beyond commitment to the Drupal community. It will include a scholarship and stipend to attend DrupalCon and recognition in a plenary session at the event.

Nominations are open to not only well-known Drupal contributors, but also people who have made a big impact in their local or regional community. If you know of someone who has made a big difference to any number of people in our community, we want to hear about it. The winner of the award will receive a $1200 USD DrupalCon travel stipend as well as a ticket to DrupalCon. 

This award was created in honor of long-time Drupal contributor Aaron Winborn, whose battle with Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) (also referred to as Lou Gehrig's Disease) came to an end on March 24, 2015. Based on a suggestion by Hans Riemenschneider, the Community Working Group, with the support of the Drupal Association, launched the Aaron Winborn Award.

Nominations are open until March 1, 2019. A committee consisting of the Community Working Group members and past award winners will select a winner from the nominations. Current members of the CWG and previous winners are exempt from winning the award.

Previous winners of the award are:

2015: Cathy Theys
2016: Gábor Hojtsy
2017: Nikki Stevens
2018: Kevin Thull

If you know someone amazing who should benefit from this award you can make your nomination here.
 

Jan 05 2019
Jan 05

A scientist can be rewarded a Nobel prize for some amazing scientific breakthrough made in his or her research. Most often than not, the leading scientist is backstopped in the research by a team of hugely talented assistants.

Lemur sitting near a wood


Talking about backstopping, you do need something as a backstop even in the digital landscape. When you make an alteration to your website, you have to be sure if it is devoid of unintended side effects. This is where BackstopJS comes into light. As an intuitive tool, it enables swift configuration and helps you get up and rolling quickly.  Before we look at how it can be leveraged with Drupal, let’s dive deeper into visual regression testing and BackstopJS.

Traversing visual regression testing and BackstopJS

Visual regression testing emphasises on identifying visual alterations between iterations or version of a site. In this, reference images are created for every component as they are created which enables a comparison over time for monitoring alterations. Developers can run this test on his or her local development environment after the alterations are performed to make sure that no regressions issues transpire because of the changes.

Visual regression testing emphasises on identifying visual alterations between iterations or version of a site.

Visual regression testing is hugely beneficial in enabling the developers to get a test coverage that is more than what they could do manually thereby ensuring that alterations do not cause regression impact on other components. It has the provision for enhanced detail comparison than what you would get while reviewing the site manually. Even without a full understanding of the project, developers know what the website should look like before the alterations.

Logo of BackstopJS with graphical image of lemur and backstopjs written below


BackstopJS, an open source project, is a great tool for performing visual regression testing. It is leveraged for running visual tests with the help of headless browsers to capture screenshots. It was created by Garris Shipon and was originally ran with the help of PhantomJS or SlimerJS headless browser libraries. It supports screen rendering with Chrome-headless and you can add your own interactions using Puppeteer and ChromyJS scripting.

BackstopJS is leveraged for running visual tests with the help of headless browsers to capture screenshots

It offers an excellent comparison tool for identifying and highlighting differences and lets you set up several breakpoints for testing responsive sites. Moreover, it utilises simple CSS selectors for identifying what to capture. It provides in-browser reporting user interface like a customisable layout, scenario display filtering, etc.  Furthermore, it comes with integrated Docker rendering and works superbly with continuous integration and source control. Also, it gives you CLI and JUnit reports.

Workflow and installation

It’s pretty easy to install and configure BackstopJS which involves:

Installation (global): npm install -g backstopjs
Installation (local): npm install --save-dev backstopjs
Configuration: backstop init (creates backstop.json template)

Following is the workflow of BackstopJS:

  • backstop init: A new BackstopJS instance is set up by specifying URLs, cookies, screen sizes, DOM selectors, interactions among others
  • backstop test: By creating a set of test screengrabs and comparing them with your reference screengrabs, you can check the alterations that show up in a visual report.
  • backstop approve: If all looks fine after the test, you can approve it

BackstopJS with Drupal

A Drupal Community event in 2018 talked about a Drupal 8 module called Backstop Generator for creating backstop.json configuration files on the basis of site’s unique content.

[embedded content]


This Drupal 8 module exposes an administrative configuration form to create a BackstopJS visual testing profile on the basis of Drupal website’s content. It assists you in creating backstop scenarios from Drupal pages and defining random pages for including as scenarios. You can toggle on and off viewport sizes. It results in a backstop.json file that requires you to place that into a backstop directory and the existing backstop.json file is replaced. It requires the services of Serialisation, HAL and REST modules. It is worth noting that this module is not covered by Drupal’s security advisory policy.

Backstop Generator can do a lot more. You can contribute towards building more interesting features and join the issue queue on Drupal.org to submit a patch or report a bug.

Conclusion

Deploying frontend alterations can be troublesome. Visual regression testing software like BackstopJS ensures that our changes are accurate and contained and can be great for Drupal sites.

We have been offering a suite of services to help digital firms fulfil their dreams of digital transformation.

Contact us at [email protected] and let us know how you want us to be part of your digital transformation plans.
 

Jun 06 2018
Jun 06

The Drupal Community Working Group (CWG), with support from the Drupal Association, organized and held the first-ever Teamwork and Leadership Workshop at DrupalCon Nashville on April 10, 2018. The goal of the three-hour workshop was to explore teamwork, leadership, and followership in the context of the Drupal community as well as to help provide support and resources for people in the Drupal community who work alongside others in teams and/or may find themselves in positions of responsibility or leadership. Additionally, we hoped to expand the base of people who can step into leadership positions in the Drupal community, and to help those who may already be in those positions be more effective.

The workshop was led by Drupal Association board chair Adam Goodman, who generously donated his time. Adam is the head of Northwestern University’s Center for Leadership, and he works as an executive coach and advisor to senior executives and boards of directors at dozens of companies and organizations around the world. 

As part of the planning for the workshop, Adam asked us to enlist a number of facilitators to help with the various workshop exercises. In addition to three CWG members (Jordana Fung, George Demet, and Mike Anello), the following community members also facilitated: Donna Benjamin, Shyamala Rajaram, Gábor Hojtsy, Angie Byron, and Tiffany Farriss. The facilitators met with Adam prior to the workshop to understand what would be expected of them. 

We wanted to make sure that we invited a diverse range of people to the workshop who are doing awesome work with Drupal around the world, including those whose efforts may not be as well-known or recognized (yet).  We set an internal goal of at least 50% of attendees to be from populations historically underrepresented at DrupalCon, including those who self-identify as women, non-gender binary, people of color, and/or people who are not from Europe, the United States, or Canada.. To this end, prior to the public registration period, we sent out invitations to 64 community members, 75% of whom were from an under-represented cohort. We invited people who are involved in all aspects of the community including (but not limited to) event organizers, sprint organizers, project maintainers, as well as past and current Aaron Winborn Award nominees. At the workshop, there were a total of 50 attendees (there were a total of 60 seats available), with approximately 64% from underrepresented cohorts. 

Attendees were seated at round tables of approximately 10 people per table. The first half of the workshop was focused on large group exercises that focused on helping attendees think about what it meant to be a leader and a team member. We talked about keeping perspective as team members and not jumping to conclusions about each other's behaviors based on an often (extremely) limited set of data. The second half of the workshop focused on smaller group exercises in which individuals responded to various prompts and then discussed them as a small (table-sized) group. 

A few days after the workshop, we asked the attendees to complete an 11-question follow-up survey. Of the 50 attendees, we had 17 responses for a 33% response rate. We asked what their expectations were for the workshop; representative responses included:

I thought it would be a workshop on leadership, but I was surprised by the approach to the Drupal community.

Didn't know what to expect. So...none

The fact that we had multiple responses indicating that the expectations were not clear tells us that we need to do a better job in communicating exactly what the goals and activities of the workshop will be in the future. 

On a scale of 1-5, 73% of respondents indicated that the workshop met their expectations (via a rating of 4 or 5). 

We also asked respondents to share an insight from the workshop. Responses included:

Transition planning for responsibilities you take on and having a plan in place before even taking on the responsibility.

The need to know why each person on the team is present (their motivation) and the importance of unified movement toward a goal.

I hadn't written out what leadership looked like to me before, so I found that part of the exercise to be quite helpful.

The survey also found that the attendees found more value in the smaller group exercises than the large group exercises (81.3% vs. 60%), with 81.3% indicated they'd be interested in attending future similar workshops.

Many of the open ended responses indicated that some attendees were hoping for more practical, hands-on advice for specific situations. In addition, several of the responses felt that parts of the exercises felt rushed, and wished there was more time. Finally, several attendees commented on the appropriateness of some of the imagery used in one of the workshop exercises, for which the CWG made a public apology following the event. We have gone through all of the comments relating to aspects of the event that were considered negative or unhelpful and will take this into consideration on how we can improve the workshop for the future.

Overall, we feel the workshop was a success, and something that has been long overdue for the Drupal community. We've been discussing how we can make similar content available to everyone in the community, not just DrupalCon attendees. We're open to ideas for future workshops on these topics (and format), let us know if you have any ideas.
 

Jan 11 2018
Jan 11

The Drupal Community Working Group is pleased to announce that nominations for the 2018 Aaron Winborn Award are now open. This annual award recognizes an individual who demonstrates personal integrity, kindness, and above-and-beyond commitment to the Drupal community. It will include a scholarship and stipend to attend DrupalCon and recognition in a plenary session at the event.

Nominations are open to not only well-known Drupal contributors, but also people who have made a big impact in their local or regional community. If you know of someone who has made a big difference to any number of people in our community, we want to hear about it.

This award was created in honor of long-time Drupal contributor Aaron Winborn, whose battle with Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) (also referred to as Lou Gehrig's Disease) came to an end on March 24, 2015. Based on a suggestion by Hans Riemenschneider, the Community Working Group, with the support of the Drupal Association, launched the Aaron Winborn Award.

Nominations are open until March 1, 2018. A committee consisting of the Community Working Group members and past award winners will select a winner from the submissions. Members of this committee and previous winners are exempt from winning the award.

Previous winners of the award are:

  • 2015: Cathy Theys
  • 2016: Gábor Hojtsy
  • 2017: Nikki Stevens

If you know someone amazing who should benefit from this award you can make your nomination.
 

Jan 17 2017
Jan 17

The Drupal Community Working Group is pleased to announce that nominations for the 2017 Aaron Winborn Award are now open. This annual award recognizes an individual who demonstrates personal integrity, kindness, and above-and-beyond commitment to the Drupal community. It will include a scholarship and stipend to attend DrupalCon and recognition in a plenary session at the event.

Nominations are open to not only well-known Drupal contributors, but also people who have made a big impact in their local or regional community. If you know of someone who has made a big difference to any number of people in our community, we want to hear about it.

This award was created in honor of long-time Drupal contributor Aaron Winborn, whose battle with Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) (also referred to as Lou Gehrig's Disease) came to an end on March 24, 2015. Based on a suggestion by Hans Riemenschneider, the Community Working Group, with the support of the Drupal Association, launched the Aaron Winborn Award.

Nominations are open until March 1, 2017. A committee consisting of the Community Working Group members and past award winners will select a winner from the submissions. Members of this committee and previous winners are exempt from winning the award.

Previous winners of the award are:

*  2015: Cathy Theys  
*  2016: Gábor Hojtsy  

If you know someone amazing who should benefit from this award please nominate them at https://www.drupal.org/aaron-winborn-award

Oct 11 2012
Oct 11

Getting things off the ground in any open source community is a challenge.  Beyond motivation, you need some resources to help get things moving with outreach and educational programs. To help you overcome some of the barriers, the Drupal Association has been piloting the Community Cultivation Grant program, drawing on the same awesome attitude that has earned the Drupal Community its community-oriented reputation within the open source universe. 

Now moving beyond the pilot stage, the grant program continues to consider proposals and award grants on an ongoing basis. So far, more than $27,000 has been awarded to 23 organizations in 18 different countries. The funds are meant to assist organizers and leaders to transform, support, and educate their local Drupal communities. They fund creative projects and events like lecture series, sprints for newbies and Drupal Camps to spur growth by educating both inside and outside of the existing community.

A few of the recent grants supporting several unique themes include:

  • Room for Families: Village of Oak Park Drupal User Group’s monthly Ladder/Core Contributor Sprints seeks to broaden the number and type of participants by making accommodations for families with small children (safe, fun places for them to play) and older kids (providing assistance for them to participate and contribute.)
  • College Outreach: DrupalCamp Vietnam, is focusing on introducing Drupal to 500-700 computer science students, programmers and institutions interested in OS CMS. The camp takes place in November, and is expected to attract about 500 people early on as powerful web development tool for young IT students & graduates.
  • Group Learning: Drupal Rally Belarus will serve about 100 people in a Drupal-forum-like event that focuses on cooperation, practical tasks in an informal setting. 

It is not hard to apply, if you have a idea that you think is worth funding.  You can get started at http://association.drupal.org/grants. The rolling application process means that there are no deadlines or grant cycles, so proposals can be submitted anytime and will be reviewed as they come in to ensure the association is responsive to groups and their event schedules. 

Applications are judged on the level of positive impact to the community and how effective the project will be in building and supporting that community.  Other criteria include the amount of the request, level of marketing efforts for the project, ability to measure the success of the project, and number of people who will benefit. 

If you or someone you know has a community-building idea or need that could use a little fuel, check out: https://association.drupal.org/grants/apply.

May 14 2012
May 14

Program Seeks to bolster community education and growth with new process

Building on a successful 2011 pilot program, the Drupal Association is opening a new application process for Drupal Community Cultivation Grants. The grants will assist organizers and leaders within the community that seek to transform, support, and educate Drupal communities around the world. The 2011 program awarded more than $20,000 to 17 projects all over the world in support of camps, training, sprints and a publication.

New to the 2012 program is a rolling application process, eliminating grant cycles and deadlines so that support can be more responsive to the ongoing needs of groups and their event schedules. Another key program enhancement is a greater focus on emerging Drupal markets where there are few other options to fund programs. Proposed projects with no other available resources to implement will receive priority in funding decisions.

Funding Ideas

Drupal Community Cultivation Grants help fund creative projects and events that help the community grow by educating both inside and outside of the existing community. Examples of projects that demonstrate the mission of the grants include Drupal lecture series, sprints for newbies, and DrupalCamps.  

Application Process

Applications will be scored on how effective the project will be in building and supporting, and the level of impact to, the community.  Other criteria include the amount of the request, level of marketing efforts for the project, ability to measure the success of the project, and number of people who will benefit. Information and applications are available at: https://association.drupal.org/grants.

Jul 19 2011
Jul 19

With the release of Drupal 7 earlier this year, it's a great time to take a look at some lesser-known modules that you might find yourself using in the future. None of these 7 modules are considered top-tier modules...yet. In fact, none of them are even in the top 150 most downloaded modules. Modules were selected based on their usefulness and their proven ability to do something extremely well without getting in the way of other tasks. In fact, the majority of these modules are quite small demonstrating that you don't have to write 10,000 lines of code to make a big contribution in the Drupal community. All module statistics are accurate as of publication deadlines.

Module Filter

Project URL: http://www.drupal.org/project/module_filter
Usage: Installed on more than 4,000 sites, ranked 299
Maintainers: James Jeffrey greenSkin) and Brian Gilbert (realityloop)

The Module Filter is one of those modules that as soon as you install it on one site you'll know right away you'll be installing it on all your sites. It organizes your site's administrative Modules List page (admin/build/modules) the way it's supposed to be. By making use of vertical tabs, it greatly reduces the vertical scrolling on the page. The genius behind the module is its "Filter list" quick search box. As soon as the page is loaded, the cursor is automatically placed in this field and all the user has to do it start typing the first few letters of the module they're looking for and the list magically displays matches. For those of us who aren't addicted to Drush yet, this module greatly speeds up the navigation on the Modules List page.

Environment Indicator

Project URL: http://drupal.org/project/environment_indicator
Usage: Installed on more than 600 sites, ranked 1,123
Maintainer: Tom Kirkpatrick (mrFelton)

Environment Indicator is a simple module used to do one thing - help developers identify one development environment from another. When installed and enabled, it gives the site a vertical bar down the left-hand side of the page in which the name of the development environment can be displayed. For example, a site might have three environments, "development", "staging", and "production". Environment Indicator allows you to label each environment via settings.php, so you don't accidentally test a content import on your production server. In addition to being able to select the text, you can also select the color of the vertical bar. If you've ever mistakenly modified the wrong environment, this module might be for you.

Override Node Options

Project URL: http://drupal.org/project/override_node_options
Usage: Installed on more than 5,000 sites, ranked 243
Maintainers: Tim Millwood (timmillwood), Dave Reid, and Joachim Noreiko (joachim)

Despite the fact that Drupal is sometimes criticized for having too many administrative options, every now and then you might find yourself in need of a few more. This might be the case, for example, when you want to give a role the ability to add or edit a node, but not the ability to publish it. While there are several ways to accomplish this, the Override Node Options module is one of the simplest at less than 200 lines of code including comments. It adds specific permissions to access the "published" checkbox as well as other node options (promote to front page, sticky, etc...) This is one of those modules that you often don't realize you need until the client asks for it!

Menu Attributes

Project URL: http://drupal.org/project/menu_attributes
Usage: Installed on more than 8,000 sites, ranked 161
Maintainers: Dave Reid, and Nick Schoonens (Schoonzie)

Not all Drupal designers and themers yearn to be module developers. Not all module developers yearn to be designers or themers. Luckily in the Drupal community, there are people who are able to cross over and, when they do, they create modules like Menu Attributes. This module makes themers' jobs easier by allowing administrators the ability to add unique HTML IDs, class names, and other attributes to individual menu items from the administrative interface. Without this module, this is usually something done via theme function overrides. Want to place a special icon next to one particular menu item using CSS? This module makes it simple.

Fieldgroup

Project URL: http://drupal.org/project/field_group
Usage: Installed on more than 500 sites, ranked 1,258
Maintainers: Jochen Stals (Stalski), Nils Destoop (zupperman), and Kristof De Jaeger (swentel)

This selection is almost cheating, but in the spirit of getting the word out, it made the cut. The "field group" has been a mainstay of CCK for quite some time as it allows you to group any number of fields when designing a content type. Unfortunately, it didn't make the cut into Drupal 7, but a bunch of Belgians took it upon themselves to make it available as a contributed module - and they even managed to make it better with additional display options and some nice administrative user interface improvements. Now, instead of just grouping fields in a fieldset, you have the choice of seven display options including accordions and vertical or horizontal tabs.

Conditional Stylesheets

Project URL: http://drupal.org/project/conditional_styles
Usage: Installed on more than 3,000 sites, ranked 335
Maintainer: John Albin (JohnAlbin)

Themers who have to deal with the inconsistencies of (mostly) earlier versions of Internet Explorer have often resorted to hard-coding IE-specific stylesheets into their theme's page template files. Not only is this a less-than-elegant solution, it also removes these IE-specific CSS files from Drupal's CSS aggregation. While it is possible to add these conditional stylesheets via preprocess functions in a theme's template.php, doing so was a bit of a hassle. The tiny Conditional Stylesheets module (about 75 lines of code including comments) makes it a breeze by allowing themers to define conditional stylesheets in a theme's .info file. The syntax is exactly what it is expected to be, and it makes using IE-specific stylesheets that much less of a hassle.

Omega Theme

The title of this article is a lie: it's actually six modules and one base theme, but I'm sure that after you hear about Omega, you won't mind too much. Drupal themers have a great variety of base themes to choose from when building a custom theme from scratch. Zen, Blueprint, Fusion, NineSixty, and Genesis are just a few of the more well-known options. Omega might just be ready to join the list of "top-tier" base themes. Its creator, Jake Strawn, has put an incredible amount of work into making this rising star a flexible and powerful base theme, and it’s already in use as the basis for Acquia’s training site, maximumpc.com, maclife.com, and many more.

Omega is built on the 960 grid framework and allows for 12, 16, 24, or 32 column layouts. One thing that makes Omega unique is that when it is paired with the Delta module, Omega subthemes can define alternate layouts based on site contexts (from the Context module). A companion module, Omega Tools, provides additional functionality including the ability to create a blank subtheme using Drush. Jake also promises that HTML5 support and a visual region/zone manager are on their way.

With more than 7,000 modules to choose from, finding useful and reliable modules on Drupal.org can be a bit of a challenge. While this article is focused on only 7 lesser-known gems, there are plenty more diamonds in the rough just waiting to be found. Anyone who limits themselves to the top 100 modules (http://drupal.org/project/usage) will rarely find anything new. By doing some research or getting involved in the community you can often find modules that usually end up more useful than you think!

About Drupal Sun

Drupal Sun is an Evolving Web project. It allows you to:

  • Do full-text search on all the articles in Drupal Planet (thanks to Apache Solr)
  • Facet based on tags, author, or feed
  • Flip through articles quickly (with j/k or arrow keys) to find what you're interested in
  • View the entire article text inline, or in the context of the site where it was created

See the blog post at Evolving Web

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