Jan 15 2016
Jan 15

This is the first time that I am working with automated tests. I have written tests before and and of course I believe that tests improve projects dramatically, but I have never had (/made) the time in a project to actually do it. So I was quite excited to get started with travis.

First things first, what do you test!?

I was terribly excited to start working with tests, but yesterday we didn't actually have any code to test against yet, so instead we decided, we actually want to run the drupal core tests. We want our module to be enabled, and to test know if any of our code causes a Drupal core regression, so I started with that.

Trial and Error (a lot)...

Travis build history logs showing eventually passing tests ​Travis build history logs showing eventually passing tests.

The documentation is pretty good and there are LOADS of example .travis.yml files floating around, so I started to just get an active environment build working and focused on getting php unit tests working first. I only wanted a couple of tests to run and the main thing I cared about was that drupal installed properly and that the environment was up and running. Eventually I got a passing build with the following .travis.yml

While I was really quite happy with this, I wanted more. Simpletests to say the least, and maybe even behat tests. I found a lot of inspiration when looking at BartFeenstra's (Xano on d.o) Currency module: https://github.com/bartfeenstra/drupal-currency/blob/8.x-3.x/.travis.yml
Most importantly, I found Drupal TI - https://github.com/LionsAd/drupal_ti

Drupal TI

This project makes it almost trivial to integrate Drupal Projects with Travis. It handles a lot of the setup in terms of MYSQL, Drupal download and how to start running tests. It managed to reduce my .travis.yml to the following:

This is quite a bit of code, but it is really clean and well commented so we can clearly see what is going on.

When to test?

So now there are tests... Great! But when do we run them? Running all of Drupal's tests can take quite some time, but we do want to have a check on development to catch things. So in short we need testing on pull requests between individual development repos (eg https://github.com/yanniboi/decoupled_auth) and the main project repo (https://github.com/FreelyGive/decoupled_auth) but when we are doing our development we only really care about project specific tests.

Seeing tests on GitHub

When I create a pull request now, I automatically have the tests run and the results on the pull request:

GitHub pull request GitHub pull request with Travis test results

Travis summary GitHub pull request test results in Travis CI

Eventually what we really want to do, is have a way of checking inside our .travis.yml, if the test has been started by a pull request, or by a code push/merge and run different parameters depending on that. But more about that next time. There will be a blog post on that soon...

In the meantime, use Travis and write tests :)

References:

Jan 13 2016
Jan 13

Developer experience is our primary concern with this Drupal 8 version of doing CRM.

We thought we could improve the experience of helping developers contribute to the project. We noticed that for Drupal 8 all the cool kids were moving to hosting their development to github, such as with Drupal Commerce, but even core bits of Drupal.

So we did some investigating and decided to join them. We thought it would be helpful to share a couple of our thoughts and reasons, we are by no means authorities on this!

Getting Started

Being able to work with Github is really nice. Someone can come along to github and easily fork the main repository which is possible on Drupal.org but much easier on github.

No Special Users

We have a principle where “no individuals is special”. On drupal.org the module maintainers get access to more tools then everyone else. On github everyone is basically the same. In theory someone’s fork may become a bigger deal than the original. This means everyone has the same tools and so the things we do to make lives for our developers easier, everyone else gets to share.

We found that when some developers were maintainers and had access to drupal.org’s git they had a much nicer experience than the people who had to just download the source code or set up their own git experiences.

Pull Requests

Pull Requests are really nice. We think pull requests are pretty much a nicer way of doing patches as you can just click a few buttons and copy and paste it into the issue queue. With Dreditor it is not a big deal but github keeps track of minor changes to a patch much more effectively especially if multiple people are working on it.

  • Although it does require giving others access to my fork of a project and so we have found that sometimes patches are easier
  • Although if multiple people are working on a pull request, they can do it by forking the pull request owner’s repository and do a pull request with that first!

Drupal.org

We definitely still use Drupal.org as the issue queue and turn off all of github’s issue tracking features. We then reference issue numbers in as many commits as possible and certainly all pull requests (We post pull requests in their issue).

One of the committers can, every so often push the “main repository” or any repository to the git repo on drupal.org

TravisCI

We also use travis-ci to handle tests and will follow up with a more detailed post about how we handle testing.

About Drupal Sun

Drupal Sun is an Evolving Web project. It allows you to:

  • Do full-text search on all the articles in Drupal Planet (thanks to Apache Solr)
  • Facet based on tags, author, or feed
  • Flip through articles quickly (with j/k or arrow keys) to find what you're interested in
  • View the entire article text inline, or in the context of the site where it was created

See the blog post at Evolving Web

Evolving Web