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Nov 19 2012
Nov 19

Drupal's highly granular permissions system allows site builders to control who can create, edit, and delete each type of content on the site. Third-party modules can add additional permissions to that mix as well, paving the way for extremely focused role-based permission setups. The interface for configuring all of those permissions, however, is more than a bit cumbersome. Thankfully, the Permissions Grid module offers a solution: a consolidated permissions page that only includes node and entity type specific options.

Screenshot of administration screen

Installing the module doesn't alter the operation of Drupal's standard permission forms. Rather, it adds an additional "Permissions Grid" page that exposes just node and entity related permissions. Because Drupal 7's entity system includes Taxonomy terms, Drupal Commerce products, Flag module flag types, and more. Because the permissions are organized by content and entity type rather than by name (the normal Permission screen's default), it's quite a bit simpler to set them up or skim them to review their current state.

Permissions Grid is a simple module, but if you're frustrated by the complexity of node type permissions, it's a quick and painless solution.

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Nov 05 2012
Nov 05

How to Tidy URLs and Relative Links When Moving From Dev to Go-Live (for Drupal 6 and 7)

Few things are as annoying as building something that works perfectly when you create it, but fails when you take it out of the lab. That's how site owners can often feel when content editors create piles and piles of Drupal nodes full of relative URLs in images and links. They look fine on the site, but if the content is syndicated via RSS or Atom, sent out in an email, or otherwise repurposed in another location, the links break. Even worse, hand-made links and images entered while the site is under development can easily point to the outdated "beta" URL. Who can save the day? Pathologic module, that's who.

Pathologic module's configuration options

Pathologic is an input filter -- to install it, you drop the module into your Drupal site and add it to one of your text formats -- Full HTML and Filtered HTML, for example. Whenever content is posted in a format configured to use Pathologic, it will scan the content for URLs and tidy them up. Relative URLs like /node/1 get turned into absolute ones like http://example.com/node/1, URLs pointing to alternative versions of your site like dev.example.com are replaced with your public URL, and so on.

Pathologic can also standardize the protocol of links inside your site's content. If users edit content over a secure connection, for example, it's easy to mix links using the http:// and https:// protocols -- something that can lead to annoying warnings on some users' machines. For developers with exacting URL-correcting needs, it also supports custom URL modification hooks. Using those hooks, your site's custom fixes (replacing MP3 links with a URL on a different server, for example) can piggyback on Pathologic's configuration and logic.

Pathologic is an efficient workhorse of a module that solves an annoying problem efficiently. If you've run into problems with relative links and staging-server URLs breaking links and images on your RSS feeds, you owe it to yourself to check it out!

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About Drupal Sun

Drupal Sun is an Evolving Web project. It allows you to:

  • Do full-text search on all the articles in Drupal Planet (thanks to Apache Solr)
  • Facet based on tags, author, or feed
  • Flip through articles quickly (with j/k or arrow keys) to find what you're interested in
  • View the entire article text inline, or in the context of the site where it was created

See the blog post at Evolving Web

Evolving Web