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Jul 18 2017
Jul 18
xpersonas

One of my pet peeves is searching for a local event and finding details for that event… 3+ years ago.

Many Drupal sites feature some sort of event type node. It’s really anything with a start date, and likely, an end date. The problem is, most developers don’t take into account whether or not that content should live on once the end date has come and gone.

Perhaps, in some instances, keeping that content on your site makes sense. In most cases though, it does not.

For instance, my 3 year old was really into dinosaurs. I knew there was a dinosaur exhibit coming to town, but I didn’t quite remember the name. Searching online provided quite a few local results. And many of those results were for events in the past.

Discover the Dinosaurs (06/21/2014)
http://www.evansvilleevents.com/home/events/discover-the-dinosaurs
(event has since been unpublished!)

DISCOVER THE DINOSAURS ROARS INTO EVANSVILLE! (12/14/2012)
http://www.evansvilleevents.com/home/2012/12/discover-dinosaurs-roars-evansville
(event has since been unpublished!)

Dino Dig! (06/02/2015)
http://www.cmoekids.org/events/community-events/dino-dig

Event from 2 Years Ago

Discover the Dinosaurs Unleashed (02/18/????)
http://www.evansvilleliving.com/event/discover-the-dinosaurs-unleashed

Sometimes sites will even have past events ranking higher in search results than upcoming events.

There’s a whole other blog post I could write about how useful it is to have the year accompanying the day and month on web content — particularly tech blog posts. Was this written in February of this year or 2006? How can I know?!?

For Drupal sites, there’s a relatively easy fix. It requires a small custom module and the contributed Scheduler module.

The Scheduler module is simple and great. Simply enable it for your content type, and enable, at the very least, the unpublish setting. Once that is set up, create a custom module and invoke the hook_entity_presave() function.

This code is pretty self explanatory. All I’m doing is checking to be sure it’s an event node type that’s being saved, and if so, find the start and end date values to be used when setting the “unpublish_on” field.

You’ll of course have to make sure your node type and field names match up.

Once that’s set up, any time an event is saved, your node is scheduled to unpublish one day after the end date.

If you have a Drupal 7 site, this same idea can be applied. The code in the hook_entity_presave() will be a bit different.

I wish I could start a massive movement to help clean up web content that should have been unpublished or removed long ago. Until then, hopefully this article finds a few devs so that they can ensure their site isn’t one of those sending out poor results.

About Drupal Sun

Drupal Sun is an Evolving Web project. It allows you to:

  • Do full-text search on all the articles in Drupal Planet (thanks to Apache Solr)
  • Facet based on tags, author, or feed
  • Flip through articles quickly (with j/k or arrow keys) to find what you're interested in
  • View the entire article text inline, or in the context of the site where it was created

See the blog post at Evolving Web

Evolving Web