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Apr 22 2021
Apr 22

As DrupalCon comes to a close for the crew at Mediacurrent, we’ve all had a chance to reflect on the experience. Here are the top 10 things we loved and learned at this year’s event.

1. Opening New Doors to ‘Discover Drupal’

Drupal talent is in high demand and The Drupal Association is focused on cultivating that talent with an emphasis on diversity, equity, and inclusion. That’s important to our team at Mediacurrent, too. We love helping young professionals get started in a Drupal career (like our two student interns who experienced their first-ever DrupalCon last week!) and we jumped at the chance to become a training partner for the just-launched Discover Drupal program. We will be mentoring students and providing an opportunity to intern with us after they have finished their scholarship.

Discover Drupal offers a 12-month scholarship and training program for underrepresented individuals in the open source community. Learn more and support the program

Speaking of training, our booth offer this year was a drawing for a free 4-hour training workshop in one of our most popular topics: Front-End Development, Decoupled Drupal with Gatsby, or Drupal Component-Based Theming. We are very excited to be drawing the names of 3 winners this week, who will learn about current technology demands and best practices using active discussion and a hands-on workshop. Watch our Twitter channel to see who wins!

2. Bright Horizons Ahead for Drupal 10 

Dries reinforced that the sun is quickly setting on Drupal 8, with community support ending this fall. Drupal 7’s days are numbered as well. If you haven’t already, it’s time to think about your Drupal 9 action plan.

Key dates for Drupal 7 and 8

The community’s innovation efforts will focus on Drupal 9 while also looking ahead to June 2022 — the target release date for Drupal 10.

Drupal 9 and 10 timeline

3. Going Back to Our Site Builder Roots

Drupal’s roots are about empowering site builders to build ambitious websites with low code. 

-Dries Buytaert, State of Drupal Keynote - DrupalCon North America 2021

What made YOU fall in love with Drupal? 

In his State of Drupal keynote, Dries reflected on Drupal’s core strength to find focus for the year ahead. He reasoned that to help our community grow and become even more successful, we need to give every user a clear reason to adopt Drupal. 

Many Drupal love stories share a common spark; the feeling of being quickly empowered by Drupal’s low code approach. To give site builders that “love at first site” feeling, Dries announced the Project Browser Initiative. That goal is to make site builder basics like installing a module as easy as installing an iPhone app and rise to the competition of Wix, Squarespace, and WordPress. 

Drupal program browser initiative

4. Building a Better Foundation for Future Features

Everyone wants to know what comes next for our favorite digital experience platform. As always, DrupalCon sessions and the Driesnote shed some light on the innovation that lies ahead, highlighting both core and contrib initiatives that the community is working to advance.

Visitors to the Mediacurrent booth saw how Rain CMS speeds up development and gives content creators the authoring experience they crave. (If you missed it, Rain CMS now ships with Layout Builder to make page building a breeze) 

Dries shared a progress update on the core strategic initiatives that are blazing trails for future functionality and improvements in Drupal core. These initiatives shaped the program content, with a different one assigned to each day of the conference. 

  • Easy Out of the Box - This initiative is improving Drupal's ease-of-use remains a top priority.
  • Decoupled Menus - This initiative is positioning Drupal as the go-to for decoupled. Now, non-module Javascript projects have a home on Drupal.org.
  • Automatic Updates - By getting automated security updates into Drupal 9 core, we can help site owners sleep soundly.
  • Drupal 10 Readiness - Drupal 9 is just under a year old but the community is already looking ahead. Dries called for community support to hit the target release date for Drupal 10.

5. Celebrating and Encouraging Community Contributions 

Drupal continues to shine as of the most scalable, robust, and mature development communities in open source. We heard from Heather Rocker, Global Executive Director of the Drupal Association, about some of the initiatives that are making it easier for first-time and non-coding contributors to get involved.

Both individual and company-level contributors were celebrated on the DrupalCon stage. Congratulations are in order for AmyJune Hineline, the recipient of this year’s Aaron Winborn Award. The award honors individuals for their outstanding commitment to the Drupal project and community. (Check out our interview with AmyJune from season one of the Open Waters podcast.) 

Giving back to Drupal remains a core priority for the Mediacurrent team. This year, we’re proud to show our support for the Drupal Association as a Diamond Drupal Certified Partner and excited to maintain our rank as one of the top five organizational contributors. 

top companies sponsoring Drupal

6. The More Sites, The Merrier

How do you manage and maintain dozens or even hundreds of sites effectively?

That’s the question Jay Callicott, VP of Operations at Mediacurrent, set out to answer in his DevOps track session on scaling Drupal with the power of multisite. Drupal’s multisite capabilities are a standout feature, setting it apart from other CMS platforms. Yet there’s a lot to consider - configuration, deployments, site provisioning, and more. 

This session recording is now available to registered attendees with public access coming in a few weeks. Stay tuned!

Drupal multisite presentation slide shows a decision tree

7. Making Sense of Open Source Security 

Mediacurrent’s Drupal security pros took the stage to tackle a timely topic: open source security for marketing and business leaders.

As open source software like Drupal continues to become widely adopted, sticking to security standards is a challenge. The global losses from cybercrime totaled nearly $1 trillion last year (csis.org), raising the stakes on security even higher. 

Be on the lookout for the session recording for a playbook on how to optimize your Drupal security. They covered how to become a security-first organization, embrace process automation, harden Drupal security, and create clear security policies.

these Drupal modules protect from OSWAP

8. Higher Education: The Stage for Ambitious Digital Experiences

DrupalCon’s industry summits are always a great accompaniment to the regular program, and this year was no exception. At the Higher Education Summit, Director of Development Dan Polant was joined by one of Mediacurrent’s ivy league partners  to co-present a case study session. We saw how the university relies on Drupal to model complex data and got a behind-the-scenes look at the decoupled architecture with Gatsby. 

A decoupled approach lets us choose a dedicated solution for a given job

9. Drupal is Powering Hope 

At this year’s DCon, we saw how Drupal is powering some of the most impactful organizations in the world. All but one of the major COVID-19 vaccine-producing companies use Drupal. 

Major nonprofits like Habitat for Humanity also rely on Drupal. Through its website, the organization has helped more than 5.9 million people build or improve the place they call home. Mediacurrent has been honored to support Habitat’s mission and partner with them to build a maintainable platform that thrives on support from the Drupal community. The Drupal Showcase session recording for Habitat for Humanity: Building a foundation for digital success will be publicly available soon. We’re grateful for the opportunity to reflect on the success we achieved through our partnership, and we hope others can learn from it. 

Covid vaccine sites Pfizer, Modern, J&J run on Drupal

10. The Momentum Continues With Drupalfest 

DrupalCon has ended but the celebration continues with Drupalfest. 

Interested in learning more about contributing to Drupal? Let Mediacurrent’s Community Lead Damien McKenna be your guide. Join Damien for Contrib Open Hours through the end of April. 

Watch the State of Drupal Keynote 

Check out the recording of the State of Drupal keynote below.

[embedded content]

Cheers to 20 years, Drupal! We look forward to gathering again next year.

Apr 08 2021
hw
Apr 08

I missed joining the DrupalNYC meetup today. Well, I almost missed it but I was able to catch the last 10 minutes or so. That got me thinking about events and that’s the topic for today–Drupal events and their impact on my life. I travelled extensively for 4-5 years before the pandemic restrictions were put in place and since then, I have attended events around the world while sitting in my chair. These travels and events are responsible for my learnings and my professional (and personal) growth. And these are the perspectives that have given me the privilege that I enjoy.

Before I go further, I should thank two organizations that have made this possible for me. The first is my employer, Axelerant, which cares deeply about the community and us being a part of that. They are the reason I was able to contribute to Drupal the way I did and could travel to a lot of these events. The second organization I want to thank is the Drupal Association who organize DrupalCons and made it possible for me to attend some of them.

Why have and attend events?

Software is not written in a vacuum. Any software engineer who has grown with years of experience realizes that the code is a means to an end. It is only a means to an end. You may have written beautiful code; code that has the power to move the souls of a thousand programmers and make poets weep, but if that code is not solving a person’s need, it has no reason to exist.

Therefore, we can say that Drupal has no reason to exist were it not for the people it impacts. Drupal events bring these people together. They enable people to collaborate and solve challenges. They enable diverse perspectives which is the lifeblood of innovation. And they enable broad learning opportunities you would never have sitting in front of a screen staring at a block of code. In other words, these events give a reason for you to keep building Drupal. These events and these people give you a reason to grow.

Why travel?

Not lately, but DrupalCons usually mean travel and everything that comes along with it (airports!) I strongly believe travel is a strong influencer of success. Travelling, by definition, puts you in touch with other people. People whom you have never met and with whom you don’t identify at all. It is these people that give you the perspective you probably need to solve a problem. I have often been on calls at work where we can solve a problem quickly and easily just by bringing in someone from outside the project. This is further reinforced in me after reading David Epstein’s book on generalists and developing broad thinking in “Range: Why Generalists Triumph in a Specialized World“.

In other words, the same reason why events help you grow, travel does too. It just appears to work differently. I have travelled to Australia, United States, Spain, United Kingdom, Switzerland, New Zealand and transited through many other countries. I travelled to these places to attend DrupalCons or other Drupal events and I learned just as much, if not more, from my travels as I learnt at the events.

Online events

True, we cannot travel with restrictions now and that has meant some events getting cancelled and many happening online. Does it give the same benefits as an in-person event. The short answer is “No”. No, it does not give the same benefits but it gives different benefits. Everything I said that gave you different perspectives and helped you grow, all of that is now instantly available to you. You don’t have to travel in long flights and layovers and deal with airport security. A click can take you to any event in the world. You don’t even have to dress up; although people will appreciate it if you do when you turn on the camera.

All the diversity, perspectives, learnings, and more can now be available instantly at a much lesser cost to you and to the environment. Online events may not be a replacement for in-person events, but they have their place and the world now realizes how powerful and effective they can be. I have heard of people who finally attended their first DrupalCon because it was online. Programmers, of all people, should realize how technology can bring people together.

The fatigue of online events

No one pretends that events, online or in-person, are going to be smooth and free of frustration. Online events may be subject to Zoom fatigue in the same way that in-person events are subject to jetlag. These are real problems and like we have learned how to deal with jetlag, we should learn how to deal with online fatigue. It’s our first year and we will only get better.

How do we learn at events?

The answer is simple. No, really. It is very simple and you may think why did I even write a section heading to say this. You learn at events by talking to people. That’s the trick. That’s the magic. Talk to everyone you can. I can identify with the classical introverted programmer who is happy with a screen in front of their face. Talking is a lot of work. More importantly, talking is risky. It makes you vulnerable.

But that exactly is what makes you learn and grow. You can’t expect to gain perspectives without talking to people who could provide that.

Okay, so how do I talk to people?

If talking seems like a lot of work, start by listening. If going to someone and talking to them one-on-one is intimidating, join a group conversation and listen in. Contribute what you can when you can. The Drupal community is awesome and welcoming and I know that they are not likely to make you feel unwelcome if you are just joining a group to listen in.

Online events make it easier to hide and keep our heads down. Resist that temptation and hit the Unmute button to ask a question or just even thank a speaker. Most online conferencing solutions have a networking feature. Use that to pair up with someone random. It’s not as good as running into someone in the hallway but it is good enough.

But, what do I talk about?

That’s a fair question and I think a lot about that. I feel safe in saying that I start by listening. A couple of sentences in, I realize that I do have something to offer. At the time, I don’t worry about how valuable it would be but I share that anyway and I have usually found that the other person finds some value in it.

It is no secret that a lot of us suffer from imposter syndrome. And it is not enough to just tell myself to think that I would overcome that feeling just by speaking about what I know. That is why I listen and offer what I can. If I don’t feel like offering anything, that’s fine. Sometimes, it is enough to just say hello and move on. In fact, this has happened several times to me. I would speak with certain people frequently in issue queues but when we meet, it is a quick hello and we move on, fully knowing that we may not get another chance to meet in that event. And that’s okay.

The awesome Drupal community

Everything I said above is from my own experience dealing with my inhibitions and insecurities in interacting with these celebrated folks. I have many stories of how some of the most popular contributors made me feel not just welcome but special when I met them for the first time. These are events that have happened years ago and I still recollect them vividly. I have shared these stories often both while speaking and in writing. And I am not talking about one or two such people. Almost everyone I can think of has been kind and welcoming and speak in such a way where you feel you are the special one. I can say that because I did feel special talking with them. In those cases, all I had to do was walk in the hallway where they happened to be and just say “Hello”.

Almost all Drupal events are online now and that is a great opportunity for you to get started. The most notable one right now is the DrupalCon North America happening next week. Consider attending that. If you’re attending, consider speaking up and saying hello. And if you are a veteran, consider welcoming new people into the group and make them feel special. If you can’t make it to DrupalCon, there are dozens of other events in various regions throughout the world. Find the one that interests you and go there. You don’t even have to fasten your seatbelt to get there.

Mar 19 2021
Mar 19

rocket blasts off against a starry sky

DrupalCon North America 2021 is right around the corner! Check out the ever-growing schedule of sessions, industry summits, and special events on the official event site, and mark your calendar for these Mediacurrent sessions. 

Our Sessions 

The Mediacurrent team is proud to support this community event as a platinum sponsor. We’ll be presenting several sessions at this year’s online conference.

Whether you’re a site builder scaling up with multisite, a marketing leader in search of current guidance on open source security, or a Drupal community member of any kind looking for inspiring real-world case studies, we’ve got you covered. 

Here’s what we have in store for sessions and case studies in Drupal innovation:

Unlock The Power of Multisite 

DrupalCon program speaker card with Jay's headshot

Join Jay Callicott, Mediacurrent’s VP of Technical Operations, for a comprehensive approach to manage your Drupal sites at scale.

Interested in evaluating multisite options for your organization? Jay will cover several ways to scale your Drupal platform from one site to many dozens or even hundreds.

Register here to join the session and learn best practices for governing multiple sites from one codebase, how to configure a multisite installation, and considerations for your hosting solution. 

Open Source Security for CMOs

DrupalCon program speaker card with Mark and Krista's headshots

As open source software continues to become widely adopted, adhering to security standards is becoming more challenging. So what's a CMO to do?

Inspired by our ebook, The CMO’s Guide to Open Source Security, this session will help you navigate the terminology, expectations, and tools to ensure security is a priority for your web properties.

You can register here to join the session led by Mediacurrent’s resident Drupal security experts Mark Shropshire and Krista Trovato.

Case Study: Habitat for Humanity 

Imagine a world where everyone has a decent place to live. That’s the vision fueling Habitat for Humanity to create ambitious digital experiences with Drupal. 

This session will present a case study covering how Drupal is being used to bring mission-driven innovation to reality for this international nonprofit. Both Drupal site builders and non-technical roles are encouraged to attend. 

You can register here to join the session led by Mediacurrent Project Manager Vicky Walker and two members of Habitat for Humanity's web team.  

Drupal for Higher Education 

The year 2020 called for higher ed leaders to accelerate digital marketing strategies. For many, Drupal was a key part of the equation. This rang true among a spectrum of Mediacurrent’s higher education partners, including an Ivy League university that chose a decoupled architecture for its breakthrough knowledge platform.

Dan Polant, Director of Development at Mediacurrent, will share that story in a co-presented session at the Higher Education Summit. The session will explore the University’s driving mission to build toward a brighter financial future on a Drupal and React-based platform.

Join the session on April 20 at the Higher Education Summit.

Connect with Us

There's more to come! Check back for Rain CMS demos, Drupal 9 info sessions, giveaways, and more coming soon to our DrupalCon 2021 event page.

Jul 06 2020
Jul 06
Kaleem Clarkson

It feels like a lifetime ago that the event organizers’ request to become an official working group was approved by the Drupal Association at DrupalCon Amsterdam. Since then, 2020 has been a year that no-one will forget-from a global virus to social justice demonstrations-the world as we know it has been forever changed.

So far in 2020, we have learned some valuable lessons that we think will help us be a better working group moving forward.

Organizing Events is Hard. Organizing volunteer-led events is difficult already, let alone during complete uncertainty. Many event organizers have had to make very difficult but swift decisions by either canceling or trying to pivot to a virtual conference format.

Finding the Right Time is Hard. Organizing a global group of volunteer event organizers is also hard. As someone who has had little time on international teams, I admittedly thought of finding a meeting time a breeze. I was completely wrong.

Global Representation is Hard. One of our top priorities was to have global representation to help foster growth and collaboration around the world but unfortunately due to either the meeting times or not enough focused marketing on international event organizers the participation was just not where the board felt it should be.

After a few emails and some friendly debates, the board looked for opportunities for change that can help solve some of the lessons we have learned.

Alternating Meeting Times in UTC Format. To help foster more international participation, all scheduled meetings will alternate times all marketed and posted in the Coordinated Universal Time (UTC) format. Public meetings will now be at 12:00 pm UTC and 12:00 am UTC.

Increase Board Membership to 9. The group decided to expand the board members to 9. We are highly encouraging organizers from around the world to submit their names for interest to increase our global representation.

Maintain and Recruit Advisory Board Members. Succession planning is critical for any operation, and our advisory board provides more flexible commitment in participation which we hope will be our number one resource for new members down the road.

Board Members Nominations. In addition to expanding the number of board seats, Suzanne Dergacheva from DrupalNorth (Canada) and Matthew Saunders (DrupalCamp Colorado) have accepted their nominations from advisors to board members.

  • Camilo Bravo (cambraca) — DrupalCamp Quito — Ecuador / Hungary
  • Baddý Sonja Breidert (baddysonja) — DrupalCamp Iceland, Germany, Europe, Splash Awards — Europe
  • Kaleem Clarkson (kclarkson) -DrupalCamp Atlanta — Atlanta, GA, USA
  • Suzanne Dergacheva (pixelite) — DrupalNorth — Montreal, QC CANADA
  • Leslie Glynn (leslieg) Design 4 Drupal Boston, NEDCamp — Boston MA
  • Matthew Saunders (MatthewS) — Drupalcamp Colorado — Denver, CO, USA
  • Avi Schwab (froboy) — MidCamp, Midwest Open Source Alliance — Chicago, IL, USA

There are so many things that all of us organizers would like to get working, but one of our goals has been to identify our top priorities.

Event Organizer Support. We are here to help. When volunteer organizers need guidance navigating event challenges, there are various channels to get help.

Drupal Community Events Database. In collaboration with the Drupal Association, the EOWG has been working on putting together a new and improved event website database that will help market and collect valuable data for organizers around the world.
Submit your event today: https://www.drupal.org/community/events

Drupal Event Website Starter kit. To help organizers get events up and running quickly, an event website starter kit was identified as a valuable resource. Using the awesome work contributed by the Drupal Europe team, JD Leonard from DrupalNYC has taken the lead in updating the codebase. It is our hope more event organizers will help guide a collaborative effort and continue building an event starter kit that organizers can use.

Join the Event Organizer Slack here and Join #event-website-starterkit

The Drupal Event Organizers Working Group is seeking nominations for Board Members and Advisory Committee Members. Anyone involved in organizing an existing or future community event is welcome to nominate.

EOWG Board Members. We are currently looking for nominations to fill two (2) board seats. For these seats, we are looking for diverse candidates that are event organizers from outside of North America. Interested organizers are encouraged to nominate themselves.

EOWG Advisory Committee. We are looking for advisory committee members. The advisory committee is designed to allow individuals to participate who may not have a consistent availability to meet or who are interested in joining the board in the future.

Nomination Selection Process: All remaining seats/positions will be selected by a majority vote of the EOWG board of directors.

Submit Your Nomination: To submit your nomination please visit the Issue below and submit your name, event name, country, territory/state, and a short reason why you would like to participate.

Issue: https://www.drupal.org/project/event_organizers/issues/3152319

Nomination Deadline: Monday, July 6th, 11:59 pm UTC

Jul 31 2019
Jul 31

Approaching 20 years old, the Drupal Community must prioritize recruiting the next generation of Drupal Professionals

Kaleem ClarksonFerris Wheel in Centennial Olympic Park in Atlanta, Georgia

Time flies when you are having fun. One of those phrases I remember my parents saying that turned out to be quite true. My first Drupal experience was nearly 10 years ago and within a blink of an eye, we have seen enormous organizations adopt and commit to Drupal such as Turner, the Weather Channel, The Grammys, and Georgia.gov.

Throughout the years, I have been very fortunate to meet a lot of Drupal community members in person but one thing I have noticed lately is that nearly everyone’s usernames can be anywhere between 10–15 years old. What does that mean? As my dad would say, it means we are getting O — L — D, old.

For any thriving community, family business, organization, or your even favorite band for that matter, all of these entities must think about succession planning. What is succession planning?

Succession planning is a process for identifying and developing new leaders who can replace old leaders when they leave, retire or die. -Wikipedia

That’s right, we need to start planning a process for identifying who can take over in leadership roles that continue to push Drupal forward. If we intend to promote Drupal as the solution for large and small enterprises, then we should market ourselves as a viable career option to lure talent to our community.

There are many different way’s to promote our community and develop new leaders, one of which is mentorship. Mentorship helps ease the barrier for entry into our community by providing guidance around how our community operates. The Drupal community does have some great efforts taking place in the form of mentoring such as Drupal Diversity & Inclusion (DDI) initiative, the core mentoring initiative and of course the code and mentoring sprints at DrupalCon and DrupalCamps. These efforts are awesome and should be recognized as part of a larger strategic initiative to recruit the next generation of Drupal professionals.

Companies spend billions of dollars a year in recruiting but as an open-source community, we don’t have billions so

… what else can we do to attract new Drupal career professionals?

This year’s Atlanta Drupal Users’s Group (ADUG) decided to develop the Drupal Career Summit, all in an effort to recruit more professionals into the Drupal community. Participants will explore career opportunities, career development, and how open source solutions are changing the way we buy, build, and use technology.

  • Learn about job opportunities and training.
  • Hear how local leaders progressed through their careers and the change open source creates their clients and business.
  • Connect one-on-one with professionals in the career you want and learn about their progression, opportunities, challenges, and wins.

On Saturday, September 14 from 1pm -4:30pm. Hilton Garden Inn Atlanta-Buckhead 3342 Peachtree Rd., NE | Atlanta, GA 30326 | LEARN MORE

Student and job seekers can attend for FREE! The Summit will allow you to meet with potential employers and industry leaders. We’ll begin the summit with a panel of marketers, developers, designers, and managers that have extensive experience in the tech industry, and more specifically, the Drupal community. You’ll get a chance to learn about career opportunities and connect with peers with similar interests.

We’re looking for companies that want to hire and educate. You can get involved with the summit by becoming a sponsor for DrupalCamp Atlanta. Sponsors of the event will have the opportunity to engage with potential candidates through sponsored discussion tables and branded booths. With your sponsorship, you’ll get a booth, a discussion table, and 2 passes! At your booth, you’ll get plenty of foot traffic and a fantastic chance to network with attendees.

If you can’t physically attend our first Career Summit, you can still donate to our fundraising goals. And if you are not in the position to donate invite your employer, friends, and colleagues to participate. Drupal Career Summit.

Sep 02 2018
Sep 02
Drupal Europe

In only 8 days Drupal Europe will be happening from September 10 to 14 in Darmstadt, Germany. Are you coming?

Throughout the last 12 months a lot of volunteers worked really hard to make this event happen. Starting with our decision and commitment at DrupalCon Vienna to organize Drupal Europe, followed by an extensive search for locations, numerous volunteers have been busy for a year. Reaching out to sponsors, structuring the program, organizing the Open Web Lounge, planning the venue spaces, answering all your emails, writing visa invitation letters, launching trainings, reviewing sessions and putting together the big schedule.

How it started in the community keynote photo by Amazee Labs

Drupal Europe hosts 162 hours of sessions, 9 in-depth workshops, 3 training courses, contribution every day but the biggest value of all is meeting everyone. This conference brings together CEOs, project managers, marketing professionals, and developers alike. It is both a technology conference and a family reunion for the Drupal community and that is why we organized it.

Drupal Europe is a unique possibility to meet your (international) colleagues and talk about what drives, connects and challenges our community. There is only one open source community where “you come for the code and stay for the community” is so deeply rooted. And Drupal Europe is also a great place to connect with other open source technologies. WordPress, Rocket.Chat, Typo3, Mautic, you name it! You may be surprised that there are more that connect us than what separates us.

Have a look at the diverse and interesting program.

Besides the sessions and BoFs we also plan our other traditional activities.

On Thursday evening we organise the exciting Trivia Night where you can win eternal fame with your team.

Contribution opportunities are open all week. On Monday and especially Friday, mentors will be around to help you get started contributing. Contribution is for everyone, all skill and energy levels are invited.

New this year at Drupal Europe is the first international Splash Awards! All golden and silver winners from local Splash Awards will compete for the European awards.

All together we think there are plenty of reasons why you should come to Darmstadt and participate at Drupal Europe.

To make our offer even better, if you buy a ticket before end of the late ticket deadline (today or tomorrow), you enter a raffle for a free hotel room for Sept 10–13 at Intercity Hotel Darmstadt! Use FLS-LPNLGS5DS84E4 to also get 100 EUR off the ticket price.

The hotel room raffle closes and online ticket sales will stop at end of Monday. You will only have a chance to buy a ticket onsite at Drupal Europe afterwards.

Grab this last chance to join us at Drupal Europe, book your travels and have a safe trip getting here.

See you in Darmstadt!

Image Darmstadium venue in Darmstadt, Germany
Apr 06 2018
Apr 06

A straightforward mission doesn’t always mean there’s a simple path. When we kicked off the Mass.gov redesign, we knew what we wanted to create: A site where users could find what they needed without having to know which agency or bureaucratic process to navigate. At DrupalCon Baltimore in 2017, we shared our experience with the first nine months of the project building a pilot website with Drupal 8, getting our feet wet with human-centered (AKA “constituent-centric”) design, and beginning to transform the Mass.gov into a data-driven product.

https://medium.com/media/488562ad39a45ea9675f3d96f13b21ce/href

Interested in a career in civic tech? Find job openings at Digital Services.
Follow us on Twitter | Collaborate with us on GitHub | Visit our site

DrupalCon 2017 Presentation: Making Mass.gov data driven and constituent centric was originally published in Massachusetts Digital Service on Medium, where people are continuing the conversation by highlighting and responding to this story.

Oct 22 2014
Oct 22

Along with Malcolm and other colleagues from the Capgemini Drupal team, I attended the recent Drupalcon in Amsterdam. And as well as admiring the Dutch attitude to cycling and its integration in the city (btw London, blue paint on the road != a cycle superhighway), we also caught up on the state of Drupal and its future. So here a few reflections from Drupalcon Amsterdam.

Drupal In The Enterprise - A Key Component In The Wider Web

I’ve been to a few Drupalcons now, and compared to previous years, use of Drupal in the enterprise (or more generally at scale) seems much more commonplace. Dries Buytaert’s (Drupal founder) keynotes have made reference to Drupal’s ability to integrate with other systems as a key strength, and in these types of projects, Drupal is not used as the all-in-one solution that maybe was more commonplace a few years ago.

Partly this is also due to the way the web has moved far beyond the idea of ‘a thing you use on your desktop computer’, and Drupal has shown itself to be adaptable to this. For example, the idea of Headless Drupal was a well covered topic this year. Of course, previous ‘cons have had talks on uses of Drupal with other technologies (e.g. node.js talk from London 2011) but whereas it seemed more an interesting edge case then, now there are many successful real-world projects adopting these ideas.

The Sessions

Based on my not-entirely-comprehensive memory of the subset of sessions I attended from past Drupalcons, this year there seemed to be many more talks which could have easily been at a frontend or PHP specific conference. Drupal 8’s use of Symfony 2 components and shift to making use of components Proudly Found Elsewhere is part of this.

A few talks that those of us who attended would recommend (not an exhaustive list). I won’t go into too much detail (that’s all in the slides and the video) but these are worth checking out.

Automated Frontend Testing

The types of frontend testing which can be automated, covering performance (Phantomas), CSS (Wraith) and end-to-end (CasperJS) and integrating this into your build workflow. Slides Video

Models & Service Layers; Hemoglobin & Hobgoblins

I think the PHP track is a welcome addition to Drupalcon. When developing custom functionality on projects here at Capgemini, we often write the business models and logic as separate classes to Drupal which are then ‘glued’ via hooks which implement those classes. That kind of separation has advantages with portability, testability and some amount of simplification in that Drupal isn’t a dependency. Video

Cory Doctorow’s Keynote

Very interesting talk on how open-source is (in some ways) critical to our individual freedom in the modern world. In an age where “a modern house is a computer that you co-inhabit”, if a system went down - or arguably worse, were controlled by overzealous authorities - it can become uninhabitable. What do we do in this case? Is the Apple iTunes/U2 debacle merely the thin end of the wedge? Interesting viewing for anyone who contributes or uses open source. Video

Drupal 8 And The Future

As Drupal 8 entered beta during the conference, it was an opportunity to check out the changes. The plugin system for extending functionality looks interesting. In Drupal projects at Capgemini we have adopted approaches such as abstracting business logic and objects into standalone libraries and classes, called from hooks and callbacks where we need integration with Drupal. This approach allows us easier unit-testing and portability of classes. D8’s plugin system looks like a good way of achieving those advantages while implementing a Drupal API.

Having spent a lot of time on projects wrestling with the various methods of deploying and updating configuration, the CMI (Configuration Management Initiative), which imports and exports YAML files to update and dump site configuration is a very welcome addition.

In the frontend, I’m looking forward to using the Twig templating. The idea of having cleaner PHP-free templates yet still with the flexibility to have filters and basic logic is going to help improve separation between the theme and module layer. It’ll be new to me (as will other things) but as with other components, they have been successfully used in other PHP projects so there is documentation and examples already out there. There are some smaller changes too - removing drupal.js’s dependency on jQuery (thereby gently encouraging use of native JS), updating the versions of included libraries (and committing to keeping them up-to-date during D8’s lifetime) and including no JavaScript by default are good steps to optimising the frontend.

Where things may be more challenging is the APIs which have both new object-oriented components and retain the hook and callback system in some combination (for example, declaring widgets via hook_element_info). To take an example from a core module, the file module’s managed_file widget functionality is spread across a number of callbacks as well as its own FileWidget class. It’s not the most straightforward development flow to follow. Where this has some advantages is that existing modules will not need a complete OO rewrite just to be compatible with D8 - a module author could do a simple port at first before rewriting to take advantage of the new APIs. But some care is need to ensure that the advantages of encapsulation, increased unit-testability and extendability that the OO patterns introduce are not compromised by dependencies on a particular hook or callback.

Taking The Leap

Finally, as Drupal 8 progressed from alpha to beta during Amsterdam Drupalcon, it does seem now that it can be realistically considered for projects coming up on the horizon. Obviously there will a lot more work going into the project to fix bugs and improve performance and so forth. But now the major API decisions and changes have been made. But with this iteration of Drupal incorporating many more features from the contrib world (Views, WYSIWYG, etc) and PHP (Symfony2 components), it looks to be a healthy position for use when that 8.0.0 finally lands.

Aug 31 2010
Aug 31

With Drupalcon Copenhagen now behind us and Drupalcon Chicago approaching, I've found myself thinking about what Drupalcon is and how it's changing.

My first Drupalcon was in Barcelona, I was lucky enough to get to tag along with the guys from Bryght. I had an absolutely amazing time and met dozens of people, many of whom are now quite close friends. To top it off I also met my now fiancee and a future boss (no longer my boss, but still a good friend).

Since then, the twice yearly Drupalcons have consistently been highlights in my year. It's often the only time I get to see many of my friends in person.

Drupalcon is not a conference. At least not in the traditional sense. It's a time where some of the smartest people in the community get together, work on code, figure out problems, and teach each other what they know. It differs from a traditional conference in that there are no paid speakers and it doesn't come with a $2000+ price tag. In addition almost everyone attending is also a participant, whether they're there to hack code, present, contribute to BoF's, etc., everyone at Drupalcon makes it what it is.

Or I should say Drupalcon was that.

Since the first Drupalcon in Antwerp (correct me if I'm wrong), the number of people in attendance has almost consistently doubled every time. With 3000+ people at DCSF and a planned 4000+ attending Drupalcon Chicago, maintaining the personal feel that Drupalcons have traditionally had is simply no longer sustainable and I don't believe possible.

A few of the signs that lead me to believe this are:
* One of the stated goals of DC Chicago in the opening keynote at Copenhagen was to make it the "biggest" Drupalcon ever. I recall in Barcelona the goal was "Best Drupalcon Ever!". Biggest is still a great goal, but it doesn't say anything of the quality of the con, nor if people will enjoy it or not.

* At the end of each conference, traditionally the final keynote includes a slideshow of flickr photos from the conference. This to me is a reminder that the conference was about the attendees. It's an important reminder that the conference isn't so much about the sessions and learning, as it is about the experience of having everyone there in one place at one time. This was absent from this years closing keynote. In fact, this years closing keynote seemed more like the season finale of a reality TV show, than the closing keynote of a Drupalcon.

* DC Chicago will select a set of more "well known" speakers prior to opening up the session proposals and voting to the public. While this is actually quite beneficial to people who need to convince their companies to let them attend it is a big change (possibly the biggest in my eyes) to the way Drupalcons are traditionally a bit more open for anyone in the community to present their ideas. I see this ultimately heading down the road of having the conference organizers select all the speakers, and possibly even moving to the paid speaker and expensive conference price tag model. When the vast majority of the attendees shifts from Drupal contributors to people trying to learn what Drupal is and how it can fit into their company, this is really only natural.

* Lastly, Drupalcons are now being planned multiple years in advance. This is quite different from the planning that normally occurs one Drupalcon in advance.

None of these changes are necessarily bad things, they're just a sign that times are changing.

For me personally, I think Drupalcon will soon no longer be something I look forward to and anticipate, but instead something I go to out of obligation for the work I do.

This doesn't mean I'm not still super excited about the community and new things that are happening in Drupal, but instead that it's time to redirect my energy elsewhere. I think the stuff I'm really gonna be excited about in the future will be the local Drupal camps, and things like the upcoming PNW Drupal Summit (which unfortunately I'll be missing :( ). Also, I think there will be some very cool community stuff happening in new areas with Drupalcon like conferences happening in Asia, South America, and Africa.

The most important aspect of Drupal is the community. It's sad to think that Drupalcons are leaving that behind a bit, but I also don't think there's any other way it can go.

With that said, I had an amazing time in Copenhagen. There were a few issues (as there always are) but overall the conference organizers did a great job putting it together and I thought the sessions had a very good balance from intro to advanced. And I'm definitely looking forward to seeing everyone in Chicago :).

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