Apr 05 2018
Apr 05
April 5th, 2018

DrupalCon Nashville has lifted the veil on sessions at this year’s event and we’re thrilled to be a part of it! Our Web Chefs will be giving talks, facilitating the Business Summit, and running BOFs, so keep an eye out for our green jackets. We’re always happy to have a conversation!


Michal Minecki
Director of Technology at Four Kitchens


Patrick Coffey
Senior JavaScript Engineer at Four Kitchens

Recently there have been strides in web-based VR which enable producers to publish VR experiences via the web. Four Kitchens has been keeping an eye on these technologies and we want to share our experiences building real WebVR applications.


Joel Travieso
Senior Drupal Engineer at Four Kitchens

Any amount of automation is worth it, as long as it is effective. From simple things like manipulating pull request labels and ticket statuses, or using your CI engine to build your changelogs, to strategic operations like removing obsolete Pantheon environments or ensuring you always pick the right database for your build, little chunks of automation can substantially improve your workflow.


Adam Erickson
Senior Drupal Engineer


Jeff Tomlinson
Architect

Drupal’s core search can only take you so far. In this session, we will talk about what it takes to ramp up the search functionality of your site by using Search API and Solr. We can achieve this with the addition of a few modules, configuration adjustments, and the set-up of a view. We will take you from with getting a plan in place all the way through to monitoring your site’s search usage and looking for ways to make improvements.


Randy Oest
Senior Designer and Frontend Engineer

With the growing shift towards a decoupled future a company’s presence is going to be represented by an ever-expanding collection of websites, apps, and talking speakers.

Maintaining design and tone consistency across those channels will be challenging but if done right, it can allow you to enter markets more quickly while keeping the style and tone of your company aligned.

Business Summit


Elia Albarran
Director of Operations

Elia will be co-leading the Business Summit, gathering and confirming speakers, giving feedback on the programming and schedule and emceeing the event.


Trasi Judd
Director of Support and Continuous Improvement

Trasi is speaking at the Summit with one of our South American partners, Alejandro Oses from Rootstack, on how to have a good partnership with near-shore vendors.

Four Kitchens

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Events

Blog posts about ephemeral news, events, parties, conferences, talks—anything with a date attached to it.

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May 10 2017
May 10
May 9th, 2017

DrupalCon is many things to many people. For me, this year’s North America DrupalCon in Baltimore was a chance to connect with my remote co-workers in the same place, help share knowledge while learning things myself, and celebrate all the things that Drupal makes possible.

The Drupal 8 with React.js and Waterwheel Training

Our first big event was “API First Drupal 8 with React.js and Waterwheel Training”, where Web Chef Luke Herrington took a canonical JavaScript application—a todo list built with React—and hooked it up to Drupal 8 through a new JavaScript library called Waterwheel.js. Todos were stored in a headless Drupal site via the JSON API module, and we even provided a login page and a `like` button for todos. Although we had a small army of Web Chefs available to help, Luke had created such a great training that our extra support wasn’t needed, and the attendees were really able to dive deep into how everything worked.

Future of the CMS: Decoupled

“I’ve completely rewritten my talk,” said Todd, the Four Kitchens CEO, at the team dinner on Monday night. I’ve seen him give this talk before but this declaration really piqued my curiosity.

There were a lot of talks at DrupalCon about the “how” of decoupling, but Todd’s revised talk is a great summary of the “why”. In it, Todd talks about the differences between CMSes being “content management systems” versus “website management systems” and about how that content can be managed so that it is reuseable on all categories of devices. Because the technology is always changing, it’s a talk he rewrites at least once a year, and I’m glad I got to see this version of the 2017 talk when I did.

Supercharge Your Next Web App with Electron

To show off his work in Electron, Web Chef James Todd brought two drawing robots to DrupalCon that he set up in our booth. Each machine was powered by RoboPaint, a packaged-up web app. I’ve been curious about Electron for a while, and when I learned that James was giving a talk on the subject I immediately reached out to help him build his slide deck so that I could learn more. His presentation was thorough and entertaining, and he encouraged people to “experiment and play with it, it’ll be fun”.

Drinks with a Mission

The Drupal community believes that open source technology has the power to improve the lives of others, so instead of the usual DrupalCon party, this year, Four Kitchens teamed up with Kalamuna and Manatí to host “Drinks with a Mission”.

We started the night by asking, “If you had a magic wand that would fix a problem, what problems would you fix?” Answers were written down on post-it notes, which were then sorted into groupings, and finally assigned to teams. Each team took their topic, such as How to Better Connect with Nature, and had to come up with solutions to the topic problem. Great ideas can begin in unexpected places, and the ensuing solutions were as thoughtful as they were hilarious.

Watch the recorded stream of the event: Part 1, Part 2

Taking the Train Home

In the last few years I’ve started to become enamored with the concept of “taking the train”. So at the end of DrupalCon I got my wish, and instead of flying, I spent an entire day traveling by rail: from Baltimore, through Philadelphia’s gorgeous train station, and then on to home in the middle of Pennsylvania.

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  • A mostly full report on what went down last week in the Big Easy, gonzo journalism -style.
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Randy Oest
Randy Oest

Randy Oest is an avid Star Trek fan, plays too many board games, and bought his mother an iPad so that he wouldn't have to fix her computer anymore.

Apr 24 2017
Apr 24
April 24th, 2017

Making Huge Strides Back to Desktop

So what is this Electron thing everyone keeps talking about? Even if you haven’t heard of it, you may have used it! With over 4 millions daily users on Slack’s business oriented chat system, their cross-platform desktop application helps them reach their users outside of browsers, but these systems are in fact part of the same thing.

Back in May 2014, prolific bastions of open source and $2b valuated company, GitHub, took the custom application wrapper it originally created for its Atom code editor and released into the world—and Electron was born. Rebranded from “Atom Shell” in 2015, Electron began to take off almost immediately, allowing regular web developers the ability to make native-like, high performance desktop applications using the exact same HTML, CSS, and JavaScript technologies they use to make the rest of the web.

Piggybacking on the huge wave of API first work in Drupal 8 utilized via the Waterwheel client wrapper, building with Electron allows you to create nearly native desktop experiences using frameworks like React, Redux, Angular, or anything else that your team can construct to run in a web browser. Beyond even that, Electron gives JavaScript direct access to low level Node.js and operating system APIs, allowing your application direct file access, running custom binaries for data processing, execution of alternative scripting languages, serial port or hardware access, and tons more.

Supercharge Your Next Web App

This year at DrupalCon Baltimore, we present “Supercharge Your Next Web App with Electron”, a session that digs deep and covers everything you need in order to dip into the waters of Electron. We’ll talk about what big companies have already taken the plunge and even provide a checklist for when not to move from the web to a desktop app.

Though an Electron app may not be the right choice for your next application, knowing what tools are available to you—and understanding their incredible possibilities—is going to serve you anytime you’re  considering user-oriented frameworks. Don’t miss out on this interesting view into a future of low-energy/high-return desktop applications in the DrupalCon Horizons track this year.

And, during active exposition hours, make sure to come over to the Four Kitchens booth to see a live demo of an Electron app powered by JavaScript—we build a robot artist!

Four Kitchens: We make content go

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  • In this issue: Launching the new EW.com, MeteorJS; plus Sane Stack, Herp Derpsum, and switching to Sublime Text 3.
  • Fun & Games DrupalCon Baltimore is next week and we’re so excited to get back together in Baltimore! As the official Drupal Games sponsors, we take fun very seriously and…
  • "API First" or, as some may call it, "Decoupled Drupal", remains a topic of much discussion among the Drupal community. Here are just a few sessions being presented at Drupalcon…
James Todd
James Todd

James tinkers with hardware, software, and everything in between.

Events

Blog posts about ephemeral news, events, parties, conferences, talks—anything with a date attached to it.

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Apr 18 2017
Apr 18
April 18th, 2017

Fun & Games

DrupalCon Baltimore is next week and we’re so excited to get back together in Baltimore! As the official Drupal Games sponsors, we take fun very seriously and this year you can be sure to find some exciting things to do at our booth—we won’t spoil the surprise but let’s just say you’ll get to see some of us IRL and IVRL.

And if you visited us last year, you know we are all about that Free Throw game. Our undefeated Web Chef, Brian Lewis, will be there to take on any challenger. We’ve all been practicing and we are READY. Are you?

We’ll also have some of our widely-enjoyed Lightning Talks during lunch intervals right at our booth! Learn something new in just a few minutes, howbowdat? Stop by our booth to check out the schedule.

Web Chef Talks

It’s been an exciting year and the Web Chefs are ready to drop some knowledge, including:

Future of the CMS: Decoupled, Multichannel, and Content-as-a-Service, presented by Four Kitchens Co-Founder and CEO, Todd Ross Nienkerk.

Supercharge Your Next Web App with Electron, presented by Web Chef engineer, James Todd.

Why Klingon Matters for Content: The Secret Power of Language, presented by our content specialist, Douglas Bigham.

Training: API First Drupal 8 with React.js and Waterwheel, a training with JavaScript engineer, Luke Herrington.

Party with a Purpose

Last—but definitely not least—you’re cordially invited to our official DrupalCon gathering, Drinks with a Mission, hosted by Four Kitchens and our friends at Kalamuna and Manatí.

Join us on April 25th at Peter’s Pour House from 6-9pm for lively conversation, free-flowing libations, and a structured forum for hashing out ideas on how to use Drupal to overcome the challenges many of our communities face in today’s national and global political climate.

RSVP here!

See you in BMD!

Oh! The kittens are coming along to Baltimore as well—four of them to be exact—and we can’t wait to reveal this year’s DrupalCon t-shirt design. We’re not kitten around. We wish we could show you right meow.

P.S. Check out the 10-day Baltimore weather forecast.

Recommended Posts

Lucy Weinmeister
Lucy Weinmeister

Lucy Weinmeister is the marketing coordinator at Four Kitchens. She loves to share all the new and exciting things the Web Chefs are cooking up at 4K. She is forever reading a book.

Events

Blog posts about ephemeral news, events, parties, conferences, talks—anything with a date attached to it.

Read more Events
May 14 2015
May 14

My colleague Adam Juran and I just finished with our session, Zero to MVP in 40 minutes: Coder and Themer Get Rich Quick in Silicon Valley, at DrupalCon LA. This one was a real journey to prepare, and through it we learned a lot of dirty truths about Drupal 8, Javascript frameworks, and the use cases where the two make sense together.

The live coding challenge in our session proposal seemed simple: create a web application that ingests content from an external API, performs content management tasks (data modelling, relationships, etc.) through the Drupal 8 interface, and deliver it all to an AngularJS front-end. This is exactly the “headless Drupal” stuff that everyone has been so excited about for the last year, so doing it in a 40 minute head-to-head code battle seemed like an entertaining session.

Ingesting content from an external API

The first hard truth we discovered was the limitations of the still-nascent Drupal 8. Every monthly release of a new Drupal 8 beta includes a series of “change records,” defining all the system-wide changes that will have to be accounted for everywhere else. For example, one change record notes that a variable we often use in Drupal forms is now a different kind of object. This change breaks every single form, everywhere in Drupal.

The frequency of this kind of change record is a problem for anyone who tries to maintain a contributed module. No one can keep up with their code breaking every month, so most don’t. The module works when they publish it as “stable”, but two or three months later, it’s fundamentally broken. changes like this currently happen 10-15 times every month. Any module we were hoping to use as a part of this requirement – Twitter, Oauth, Facebook – were broken when we started testing.

We finally settled on using Drupal’s robust Migrate module to bring in external content. After all, Drupal 7 Migrate can import content from almost any format! Turns out that this isn’t the case with Drupal 8 core’s Migrate module. It’s limited to the basic framework you need for all migrations. Importers for various file types and sources simply haven’t been written yet.

No matter which direction we turned, we were faced with the fact that Drupal 8 needed work to perform the first requirement in our challenge. We chose to create a CSV Source plugin ourselves (with much help from mikeryan and chx) just to be able to meet this requirement. This was not something we could show in the presentation; it was only a prerequisite. Phew!

Displaying it All in Angular

Building an AngularJS based front end for this presentation involved making decisions about architecture, which ended up as the critical focus of our talk. AngularJS is a complete framework, which normally handles the entire application: data ingestion, manipulation, and display. Why would you stick Drupal in there? And what would an Angular application look like architecturally, with Drupal 8 inside?

You always have a choice of what to do and where to do it. Either system can ingest data, and either system can do data manipulation. Your decision should be based on which tool does each job the best, in your particular use case: a catch-all phrase that includes factors like scalability and depth of functionality, but also subtler elements like the expertise of your team. If you have a shop full of AngularJS people and a simple use case, you should probably build the entire app in Angular!

Given that perspective, Drupal really stands out as a data ingestion and processing engine. Even when you have to write a new Migration source plugin, the Entity model, Drupal’s “plug-ability”, and Views make data crunching extremely easy. This is a strong contrast to data work in Angular, where you have to write everything from scratch.

We feel that the best combination of Drupal and Angular is with Drupal ingesting content, manipulating it, and spitting it out in a ready-to-go format for AngularJS to consume. This limits the Angular application to its strengths: layout, with data from a REST back-end, and only simple logic.

The Session

[embedded content]

In the session, we talked a bit about the larger concepts involved, and moved fairly quickly into the technical demonstration. First, Adam demonstrated the flexibility of the decoupled front-end, using bower libraries to build an attractive layout without writing a single line of custom CSS.  Then I demonstrated importing data from CSV sources into Drupal 8, along with the simplicity of configuring Drupal Views to output JSON. Taken together, the videos are 37 minutes long – not bad for a totally custom RESTful endpoint and a nice looking front-end!

Here is Adam’s screencast, showing off the power of the bootstrap-material-design library to build a good looking site without any custom CSS at all:

Here is my screencast, demonstrating how easy it is to create Migrate module importers and REST exports in Drupal 8.

And here is the final screencast, quickly showing the changes we made in AngularJS to have it call the two Drupal Services.

Want to learn of Forum One’s Drupal development secrets? Check out our other Drupalcon blog posts, or visit our booth (#107) and talk with our tech wizards in person!

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DrupalCon LA Day 1!

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Hacking the Feds: Forum One Among the Winners at GSA Hack-a-Thon

Sep 29 2014
Sep 29

Where in the world is DrupalCon

How do you get to DrupalCon? Well, apparently you just follow the signs!

I’d never thought about it, but nothing makes one happier than official street signs guiding me from the hotel to the venue!

But even with such a welcome, I love the first day of DrupalCon, and I don’t mean trainings, community summit, or sprints, although they are important and valuable. More than all of that I love reconnecting with friends, colleagues, and collaborators.

Adam and Webchick

We discuss the state of Drupal 8, and celebrate recent accomplishments, like the acceptance of the pagination dream markup into Drupal 8 core! This particular issue is one I’ve been working on consistently since Drupal Dev Days last March, but it’s not my victory alone, seven of us worked heavily on the ticket and many others contributed in smaller chunks.

We talk about which sessions we’ll attend and promote our own, namely Campbell’s and my Coder vs. Themer Ultimate Grudge Smackdown: Fight to the Death!

[embedded content]

Kalpana

We also discuss new challenges and next steps, and in the sprint area we collaborate and problem solve together. Forum One’s Kalpana Goel is immensely passionate about core contribution and sprinting and received a scholarship from Drupal Association to come to Amsterdam and do just that.

Last but not least, we talk about the after parties and the social activities. But ultimately, it’s not about the hippest new nightclub or sushi at a shi-shi restaurant, it’s about people. I vastly prefer collecting colleagues and friends old and new into a semi-spontaneous dinner group, and so that’s what we did.

So that’s completes my recap of Day one in Amsterdam. Stay tuned for more updates soon!

Read our other updates for DrupalCon:
DrupalCon Amsterdam, Day 2: From Memories to the Future
DrupalCon Amsterdam, Day 3: Drupal 8 Beta Released
DrupalCon Amsterdam, Day 4: Our Kung fu is more powerful than yours!

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Arriving at a Shared Vocabulary and Understanding of Design Composition

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DrupalCon Amsterdam, Day 2: From Memories to the Future

Jul 06 2012
Jul 06

When the Four Kitchens’ team of web chefs develop a new training course, our guiding principle is: Provide a strong return on investment. You invest the time traveling to the training, attending, and afterwards, practicing the skills acquired. You also invest the energy and effort necessary to develop new skills. You place your trust in the trainers to guide you from where you are now to where you need to be. In return, we invest our time, energy, and best effort in creating training experiences that give you a stronger, more relevant, skillset and the confidence you need to apply it.

We also want you and the training to be the right match, building on your current skillset. Before the event, we send a very specific list of required skills, so that you can be certain that the training you purchased is right for you.

To ensure a valuable return on your investment, we develop our trainings with four essentials in mind.

  1. You leave with skills you need. We are interested in many things. The web chefs’ IRC chat room is a steady stream of links and memes. But when it comes to training, we make sure that the skills we teach are the ones you must have as a web professional. We want the skills you develop to increase your value in the marketplace.
  2. Hands-on experience, in class. Seeing is not doing. We know that the only way to develop a skill is to jump in and do it. We provide a safety net. We approach training as an obstacle course designed to build confidence. Instructions are given and then, you tackle the obstacle. We put the smaller obstacles first so that by the end, you are scaling big walls without breaking a sweat.
  3. Subject matter expertise AND training expertise. Many technical training courses fail because the trainers are not subject matter experts or the subject matter experts are not trainers. We develop trainings as a team, combining expertise in the subject with expertise in the art of training. The finished product is an intellectually satisfying, fun, and valuable day with the web chefs.
  4. Enjoyable, cooperative, encouraging. Training is a community experience. We create an environment where trainees can help each other, receive help from us, and participate in every discussion so that the group builds their skills in a cohesive, connected way. We also have a lot of fun.

Our next training is at DrupalCon Munich. Join us for Responsive Websites: Design and Build for All Devices. Also, keep an eye out for more trainings at BadCamp and DrupalCamp Austin.

Do you need personalized training for your team? Contact us for more information about we help teams become Drupal Experts.

Nov 09 2011
Nov 09

It’s about that time again! Although it’s six months away DrupalCon Denver is ramping up, and session submissions are ready to be voted on by the wonderful Drupal community members. There are almost 600 submissions this year covering every aspect of design, development, mobile, and business strategy. Read on for the informational feasts prepared by the Web Chefs for Denver 2012:

Mobile

Zach Meyer (zachattack), Todd Nienkerk, Chris Ruppel (rupl)

ICANN is the organization responsible for coordinating global use of the domain name system (DNS). Due to the massive scale of their operations they serve users of all types, from feature phone users in Africa to iPad users in LA. This session will take you through Four Kitchens’ process of redesigning ICANN.org from static HTML to a responsive Drupal 7 website.

Chris Ruppel (rupl)

You’ve heard about responsive, mobile-first websites, and have probably built a few at this point. Mobile users have a short attention span, and they stay happy when sites load FAST. Heavy files, extra assets, and other inefficiencies can cause page loads to drag. Come to this session and learn how to keep your mobile users active without sacrificing the richness that desktop users expect.

Zach Meyer (zachattack)

Frameworks can help you rapidly prototype websites in mobile but they are also a crutch. To make a website responsive or have a fluid layout, flexible images and videos you don’t need a framework and sometimes it can be faster to produce without if you know what you are aiming for. Trying to understand what all the features are in a framework and which ones you really need to use for your project can be hard. Is the framework really meeting your needs or is it a swiss-army knife when all you need is a toothpick?

Aaron Stanush

In this session, we will explore the how the mobile era is changing the previously straightforward task of wireframing a website. When designers only have one instance of website (desktop) to wireframe, the layout is uniform. The header, content area, sidebar, and footer all remain static. But if you are designing a responsive website — one whose look and feel adapts depending whether you’re using a phone, laptop, or tablet — then these elements and especially the layout begin to diverge.

Coding and Development

Rob Ristroph (rgristroph)

Continuous Integration has become a standard part of the DevOps of many teams, and one component of that is usually automated testing of the code at a “stage” or “testing” point before it is released. Less common is automated performance testing, which is launching a load test at some point in the continuous integration process. While it is more common to monitor performance of the live site, it is rare to test it prior to making changes live.

Diana Dupuis (dianadupuis)

This is a friendly programming introduction for people new to coding. We’ll take a “Physics for Poets” approach to basic PHP concepts like variables, if/else statements, and functions. You’ll write some code, speak some geek, and start down the addictive path of programming logic. There’s also a geek quiz — in case you don’t know your Picards from your Kirks.

Chris Ruppel (rupl)

In an ever-increasing world of web browsers and mobile devices, how can we possibly keep track of all the front-end functionality on a website? It’s not enough to degrade gracefully; we must be future-friendly. Come to this session to learn about feature detection. It’s the only way to cut through this confusion and maintain a sane developer experience while actually improving user experience.

Rob Ristroph (rgristroph)

Drupal 7 takes more memory per server thread than Drupal 6, reducing the number of threads that can be run on a given server, and raising the minimum requirements for a VPS. This impacts not only bottom-scraping hosting, but also “real” infrastructures, where process size is sometimes viewed as a necessary evil solved by buying RAM. Rob will offer comparisons of D6 versus D7 memory usage in various configurations, and a few simple attempts to reduce it, and benchmark results.

Mark Theunissen

Big websites need big uptime. Do you need to keep a site up, even during code rollout and big database schema changes? If you’ve got the infrastructure, we have the method for you. We can show you techniques that maximize uptime with minimum disruption to your site. In addition, we will show how testing your switchover process regularly prepares you for real catastrophic events that may affect your datacenter.

Michal Minecki (mirzu)

Scrum and Agile are buzzwords that you seemingly can’t get away from. As a developer, if you haven’t run into them one way or another, you will. After working on two large scrum projects — SDG&E’s new website and The Economist — Mike has seen the good, the great, the bad, and the ugly. In this panel members of both teams will discuss their experiences and review what they loved, and what they hated. We’ll attempt to separate the fact from the sales pitch, the process from the ritual, and give you a view from the trenches.

Rob Ristroph (rgristroph)

A general but scientific approach to debugging Drupal problems will be presented, followed by an overview of a variety of tools such as the Devel suite, krumo, xdebug, client side debugging such as Firebug and LiveHTTPHeaders.

Elliott Foster (elliotttf)

Want to learn how to take the hassle out of managing a large Drupal deployment and an even bigger development team? Want to know how we do it at Four Kitchens? We’ll cover tools and best practices for setting up an infrastructure to manage large Drupal sites in multi-server environments.

Mark Theunissen

Do you need to move a huge amount of inconsistent, legacy HTML files and associated documents into Drupal? Is the content in 14 different languages? We’ve done it, and we can show you how recent improvements to the fantastic Migrate module can process your old site with ease. This technique is not only useful for Migrations, but also for moving any static content into Drupal at any stage of a site’s lifetime.

Rob Ristroph (rgristroph)

This presentation will cover a simple setup of a Jenkins (it can even run on your laptop), and a set of scripts will be demonstrated that enable a solid workflow. This will done live as much as possible; slides and screenshots will be a fallback. Electronic copy of the scripts and other files will be provided, so that attendees can modify and use them.

Michal Minecki (mirzu)

In this session we’ll show you how you can use some of the same tools we use to deploy to 30 servers to more reliably deploy your next little project. We’ll go over the high level ideas that make Continuous Integration work in big software development projects and see how these practices and tools scale down to small projects.

Nonprofit, Government & Education

Dave Diers (thebruce)

Higher Education web publishing has big challenges: a diversity of technical needs and expertise; decentralized power and decision-making structures that exist in cooperation with (and sometimes in opposition to) governance committees; complicated institutionalized approval chains; regulatory and privacy issues; intellectual property concerns; and, increasingly, funding issues that impact IT staffing and support. In this session we’ll share experiences with Drupal at several large world-class educational institutions and dive into the benefits of multi-site Drupal web publishing for .edu organizations.

Drupal community

Diana Dupuis (dianadupuis)

Are you a developer (themer, designer, site builder, sys admin) who wants to work on bigger, more complicated projects? Do you want to send your resume to top Drupal shops and get hired? Do you want to assess and approve your skills? If so, come to this session and take the Mad Skillz Quiz. You’ll also find out what top Drupal shops and in-house Drupal team leaders say are the “Most Important Skillz” their best developers possess. The answers will surprise you!

Business and strategy

Diana Dupuis (dianadupuis)

A Drupal website is as effective, performant, and reliable as the team who builds it. Whether you need one developer or twenty, finding the right people is essential to a site’s success. What are the traits and skills to look for when hiring a Drupal developer? What can we learn from Drupal shops with years of experience building successful, and sometimes unsuccessful, Drupal development teams?

Todd Nienkerk

In this panel, some of the world’s top Drupal business development professionals will speak to the RFP process and other options. The strengths and weaknesses of RFPs will be identified, and creative alternatives will be discussed. If you are writing an RFP, this is your wake-up call. If you are bidding, come learn about your options.

About Drupal Sun

Drupal Sun is an Evolving Web project. It allows you to:

  • Do full-text search on all the articles in Drupal Planet (thanks to Apache Solr)
  • Facet based on tags, author, or feed
  • Flip through articles quickly (with j/k or arrow keys) to find what you're interested in
  • View the entire article text inline, or in the context of the site where it was created

See the blog post at Evolving Web

Evolving Web