Apr 03 2018
Apr 03

While everyone has a busy week attending Drupalcon sessions and events (be sure to check out Mediacurrent’s afterparty) , if you find some extra time, Nashville has an eclectic mix of activities and places to go. Whether you're looking for great music in none-other than "Music City" or you're looking for a nice place to relax and grab a bite to eat, take advice from a Nashville native and check out my list of Nashville's must-see spots. When you're ready to take a break from drupalin', check out these suggestions and engulf yourself in the Nashville culture. 

Music

Downtown Nashville

Image source: Wikipedia 

Whether you enjoy country music or prefer other genres, Nashville offers something for every taste.  Some nights you might need to venture outside downtown for more rock and roll. If music is at the top of your Nashville bucket list, here are nine spots you won’t want to miss:  

Food 

Nashville Chicken

Source: Monell’s

There has been a huge number of new restaurants opening but here are a couple of classics and a newish one:

  • Rotier’s Restaurant, the original Cheeseburger in Paradise? A Nashville classic and award winner, just be sure to get the burger on French bread.
  • Family style southern food at Monell's.  Dinner and breakfast are served to the table and passed around like a family holiday.
  • Hip Pinewood Social attracts visitors any time of day, breakfast and Crema coffee, co-working spot during the day, and bowling on antique lanes in the evening.
  • Need Barbecue? Martin’s, Peg Leg Porker,  Edleys, or G’z BBQ are all good choices.
  • Restaurants of award winning chefs include Sean Brock's Husk from Charleston, Tandy Wilson's City House, and the Catbird Seat. This year's James Beard semifinalists include Henrietta Red, Bastion, Josephine, and longtime East Nashville restaurant Margot Café & Bar.
  • Nashville Hot Chicken is very popular with heat level choices for anyone. But pay heed if they warn you when ordering.

Don't forget about the famous Nashville Hot Chicken. A few favorites among many great spots:

  • Princes Hot Chicken Shack. The original.
  • The Tenders Royale from Pepperfire is a nice introduction along with a couple of local drafts on tap, and blues music in the background.
  • Tenn Sixteen Great East Nashville Five Points restaurant.  The hot chicken comes in one heat level, kind of a "Nashville medium".  That is, it's usually pretty hot, unlike other restaurants that don’t specialize in hot chicken.
  • Fannie Mae's, which conveniently just opened up a new restaurant location near the convention center.
  • Another list hot chicken can be found here


Museums

George Jones Museum

Source: George Jones Museum (Also known as the home of the Mediacurrent Afterparty!)

Nashville is rich with history and musical history is at no shortage. Most of these museums are an easy walk or bus ride downtown:

  • The Frist Center -  This art deco building was originally the post office. The current exhibition is the exclusive North American venue of Rome: City and Empire from the British Museum.
  • Country Music Hall of Fame and Museum - Across the street from the convention center, you can also check out Hatch Show Prints or tacos from Bajo Sexto.
  • Musicians Hall of Fame and Museum - This museum “honors the talented musicians who actually played on the greatest recordings of all time.” Additionally The Rolling Stones first ever major exhibition, Exhibitionism, is making its last U.S stop, taking on Music City at the Musicians Hall Of Fame and Museum.
  • Lane Motor Museum - An amazing variety of the largest European collection of cars in the U.S. located a few miles from the convention center.

Exercise

Warner Park

Source: Expedia

Jogging/Walking

  • The downtown Cumberland River Greenway connects to Bicentennial mall - This route can be varied for any distance. 
  • Another popular area for walking and jogging is to cross the Shelby Street Pedestrian Bridge to Cumberland Park and Nissan stadium. 

Hiking/Trail Running 

  • Warner Parks - Large wooded parks on the western boundary of Nashville has hills with a view of the city.
  • B Cycle has bikes for rent by the hour with many locations to pick up or leave a bicycle.   


Family and Kids Activities


Miscellaneous

  • There is a free bus downtown to the Gulch or Farmer's Market and Germantown that has stops around the convention center.  Look for the Green Circuit.  This would be a good way to get to the AAA Nashville Sounds Baseball game in the evening.  
  • A couple of hints on street pronunciations beyond just a southern accent might help too:

       Demonbreun Street - Pronounced da-mun’-bree-un.
       Lafayette Street - Pronounced luh-fay’-ett. ( I know, I know) 


Hopefully everyone has a great experience in Nashville and comes back for a more leisurely visit. 

Sep 22 2016
Sep 22

Giving back to our communities isn’t a new thing for us. And come Monday, five of our team members will be at DrupalCon Dublin. There will be plenty of Axelerant to go around. We’ve got three sessions, each in a different track, and the official event photography team will be led by Michael, our COO.

But before we get into what we’re bringing to Dublin, we should mention that we started to schedule our meet and greets. And we want you to be one of them. Let’s get together at a local brew pub and talk about Open Source problems and solutions in the community:

Let's connect at DrupalCon Dublin

Now, let’s get into what we’re up to. We’re presenting in Front-End, Project Management, and Business tracks at DrupalCon Dublin, so be sure to add them to your list.

Choosing The “Right Agile Methodology” For Your Drupal Projects

Date: 09/27/2016

Time: 14:15 to 15:15

Room: Liffey Meeting 4 | New Relic

Add this session to my schedule!

Shani and Prabhat will explore and compare different agile methodologies and share tips on how to choose the right one so you can accelerate your Drupal project. In this session, they’ll cover effective uses of CYNEFIN, a popular decision-making framework, to differentiate between Drupal projects and choosing right agile methodologies for the same.

Shani and Prabhat will cover:

  • Scrum
  • Extreme programming
  • Feature-driven development
  • Scrumban
  • Kanban
  • Lean development

Expected Takeaways:

A clearer idea of which methodology is right for each project, considering: project size, team size, iteration length, roles and responsibilities, and distributed team support. They’ll also discuss risk mitigation levels and customer interaction.

Growing Via Strategic Account Management Frameworks

Date: 09/27/2016

Time: 17:00 to 18:00

Room: Wicklow Hall 2A | Druid

Add this session to my schedule!

Piyush will take you through our Account Management practice and share some real-life case studies demonstrating how we hit target sales quota by 2-3x and achieved maximum strategic account objectives within the desired timeline.

Have you connected with Piyush yet?

Piyush will cover:

  • Customer onboarding process
  • Kickoff meetings
  • Routine engagement health check-ins
  • Invoicing and collections management
  • Satisfaction surveys and testimonials management
  • Complaint and grievances management
  • Contract renewals and extensions.
  • Opportunity exploration: researching the client, industry, references, social media, etc.
  • Evangelizing clients via social media, digital marketing, and event participations

Expected Takeaways:

  • What is Account Management?
  • What skills and talents are required to excel in Account Management specific to Drupal
  • What activities must be performed to maximize Account Management ROI?
  • What are some of the accountabilities and performance metrics used?

React Front-End For Your Drupal 8 Back-End

Date: 09/29/2016

Time: 12:00 to 13:00

Room: Wicklow Hall 2B | Platform.sh

Add this session to my schedule!

Aliya and Bassam will give a hands-on session. By the end of it, you’ll have learned how to build a decoupled website using React ecosystem on the front-end, using Drupal 8 as the content management system (and a data source).

Aliya and Bassam will cover:

  • How to configure Drupal to expose RESTful resources using Drupal 8
  • Enable CORS support for the domains/port running our React application
  • Authenticate requests using JWT
  • Consume data on front-end using Redux store
  • Pass data from Redux store React components

Expected Takeaways:

  • Be able to build a RESTful API using Drupal 8
  • Use any backend with react front-end

Covering DrupalCon Dublin

Michael has a knack for capturing Open Source events around the world as a way of giving back. He’s been leading the photography for two DrupalCons now: DrupalCon Asia and DrupalCon New Orleans.

He’s coming fully equipped to help the Drupal Association immortalize DrupalCon Dublin for all of us, and you can help. If you’d like to contribute to this process, there’s still time to join the “Official Photography Team.”

And while he’ll be running around the event like a paparazzo, Michael would still like to connect with you one-on-one to answer any questions you have about Axelerant. Be sure to take him up on the offer if there’s something you feel we can help you accomplish.

Want to chat about something? Parth Gohil

Parth Gohil

Parth is Axelerant's Community Manager hailing from Surat. He loves supporting open source communities, piloting single-engine aircraft, and being a Cha-Cha Productions actor.

Feb 25 2016
hw
Feb 25

DrupalCon Asia Day 2 dawned bright and promising. I was excited to know who would win the visualization challenge and hoping it was me. I wanted that Royal Enfield Classic 350. Read about my day 0 and day 1 here.

@Dries checking out the @drupal bike. @DrupalConAsia #drupalconasia #devcontest pic.twitter.com/1EgUETJxGn

— azri (@azrisolutions) February 18, 2016

About an hour or two later, I said this

Awesome! Thanks @azrisolutions, @Dries, @azrisolutions. #DrupalCon pic.twitter.com/bjiuMAqYs3

— hussainweb (@hussainweb) February 20, 2016

I can finally say this. That's @Dries on MY bike. ???? https://t.co/mdrPU91q2d

— hussainweb (@hussainweb) February 20, 2016

Yes, that’s right! I won this beautiful bike

@dries handing the keys to the winner of azri devcontest @hussainweb @DrupalConAsia #devcontest pic.twitter.com/hsyqCQTdjC

— azri (@azrisolutions) February 20, 2016

Congratulations @hussainweb on winning @azrisolutions drupalcon dev contest, truly deserving @BangaloreDrupal #proud pic.twitter.com/wglMjmb1sU

— Chakri (@chakri_iiith) February 20, 2016

Okay, I went in the wrong order. The day actually started with Holly Ross telling us about Drupal in India.

"Now I'm in future cause I'm in India." – @drupalhross #DrupalCon pic.twitter.com/y6vGgBQZso

— hussainweb (@hussainweb) February 20, 2016

The need is increasing for Drupal talent. – @drupalhross #DrupalCon pic.twitter.com/pvH6Kqwolq

— hussainweb (@hussainweb) February 20, 2016

Thanks @drupalhross for encouraging @DrupalCAP Miles to go :) @DrupalConAsia pic.twitter.com/gcUhgpHByO

— Rakhi Mandhania (@MandhaniaRakhi) February 20, 2016

Come to the sprints tomorrow. #DrupalCon pic.twitter.com/eoePSY3x5D

— hussainweb (@hussainweb) February 20, 2016

After the winner for the developer contest was announced (me), we heard Danese Cooper share her amazing insights into open source and tell us about open source in India

"Make the world better, monetize some of it." #DrupalCon

— Larry Garfield (@Crell) February 20, 2016

"open source is a level playing field." #DrupalCon

— hussainweb (@hussainweb) February 20, 2016

"You're not cogs in a wheel anymore." #DrupalCon pic.twitter.com/fPbaCBuHQY

— hussainweb (@hussainweb) February 20, 2016

"Reputation is a big thing, I'm this country and in open source." #DrupalCon pic.twitter.com/gHllZQu41L

— hussainweb (@hussainweb) February 20, 2016

Diversity in Drupal #DrupalCon pic.twitter.com/c0JeowI2Le

— hussainweb (@hussainweb) February 20, 2016

That's Drupal and it's a beautiful thing. #DrupalCon pic.twitter.com/NSWf6Dbs6b

— hussainweb (@hussainweb) February 20, 2016

Be transparent. If it's not the best code you've ever written, say that and still share it. @divadanese keynote at #drupalconasia

— xjm (@xjmdrupal) February 20, 2016

.@DivaDanese on #Drupal community: #diversity #niceness #global #balance @DrupalConAsia "best open source community on the planet!"

— Ani Gupta (@anigupta) February 20, 2016

OH: "There's inherent niceness here." Via @divadanese #DrupalCon

— Larry Garfield (@Crell) February 20, 2016

Don't make people feel small when you help them. Make them feel big. Lift them up & they'll lift you. @divadanese keynote at #drupalconasia

— xjm (@xjmdrupal) February 20, 2016

Thanks for the nice words @DivaDanese. You had me shed a tear (and that doesn't happen easily). #dccooper #drupalcon

— Dries Buytaert (@Dries) February 20, 2016

It’s up to us, as practitioners, to hold government to their promise to use open source. @DivaDanese #DCAsia #dccooper #DrupalCon

— Donna Benjamin (@kattekrab) February 20, 2016

"It's not a video game." I can totally identify with this. @DivaDanese #DrupalCon

— hussainweb (@hussainweb) February 20, 2016

@DivaDanese working for govt is a great idea #dccooper @DrupalConAsia pic.twitter.com/VVLXtDKRaR

— Vaibhav Jain (@vaibhavjain_in) February 20, 2016

Q&A with @DivaDanese by @parth_gohil #DrupalCon pic.twitter.com/Va9Jnacm9G

— hussainweb (@hussainweb) February 20, 2016

Oh, and if something can increase the joy of winning the bike, it was this

You know what is awesome? @hussainweb winning a #Drupal motor cycle at @Drupalcon /cc @azrisolutions

— Dries Buytaert (@Dries) February 20, 2016

You know what makes it even more awesome? You tweeting about this. Thank you! https://t.co/mcL6z2Q5c2

— hussainweb (@hussainweb) February 20, 2016

We also heard from Jacob Singh about contributions from Acquia and Acquia India

Contributions by @acquia India by @JacobSingh #DrupalCon pic.twitter.com/Yg5BpvvBDf

— hussainweb (@hussainweb) February 20, 2016

Oh, and there is a dance again

Of course the #DrupalConAsia dance number spills out into the audience. #DrupalCon pic.twitter.com/8hctX02UJC

— Larry Garfield (@Crell) February 20, 2016

[embedded content]

Then there is a day filled with sessions, BOF’s, and meeting people

Nice meeting you @hussainweb congrats again pic.twitter.com/ewF6cqetfI

— shyam_raj (@shyam_raj) February 20, 2016

Azri team handing over the azri Drupal bike to @hussainweb @DrupalConAsia cc/ @skwashd @drupalhross @joshua_io pic.twitter.com/8V4p9uqal0

— azri (@azrisolutions) February 20, 2016

Team @axelerant taking a class ;) #drupalcon #dcasia pic.twitter.com/VMlG8DYIP4

— Murtaza Alvi (@AlviMurtaza) February 20, 2016

Axelerant Raspberry winner - DrupalCon Asia 2016

I was also a part of the panel discussing contributions and community in India

Contribution vs. Consumption - DrupalCon Asia 2016

Contribute without code? Know who: 1-#UX with webchick,lewisnyman,bojhan 2-help gabor with #Multilingual & translate! #DrupalCon #DCAsia

— Adelle Frank (@adellefrank) February 20, 2016

Asia/India has similar #Contribution issue with being afraid to DO until learn how #DrupalCon #DCAsia

— Adelle Frank (@adellefrank) February 20, 2016

It was time to take the bike out

Here we go. Winner of contest taking this one for a spin #DrupalCon #dcasia @hussainweb pic.twitter.com/GGqoomsmVc

— Isabell Schulz (@murgeys) February 20, 2016

@skwashd and @hussainweb on the azri Drupal bike @DrupalConAsia #sholay #sholaymoment #DrupalCon pic.twitter.com/nBnHV8LHr4

— azri (@azrisolutions) February 20, 2016

don't they look cute ? @DrupalConAsia pic.twitter.com/qNRZsq3Ofg

— mortendk (@mortendk) February 20, 2016

And then sprint next day and meeting more people

Hey @drupalconasia – these folks are ready to learn to sprint. He'd on down to the lecture hall complex and join in! pic.twitter.com/Ahk7QKAzT3

— Holly Ross (@drupalhross) February 21, 2016

#DrupalCon mentored sprints. New contributors #FTW! pic.twitter.com/VqOO5o2Egj

— Larry Garfield (@Crell) February 21, 2016

woo we did it,350+ ppls joined us, amazing exp, thnx to all @DrupalConAsia mentors. spl thnx 2 @xjmdrupal @webchick pic.twitter.com/LkPRce7Mkl

— Ravindra Singh (@ravindrasingh01) February 21, 2016

Codesprint @DrupalConAsia @nikunjhk @mohit_rocks @Crell #DrupalCon @axelerant pic.twitter.com/ywQmlgA8Vf

— Mitesh Patel (@miteshmap) February 21, 2016

1025 people came to @DrupalConAsia :)

— mortendk (@mortendk) February 21, 2016

1025 attendees, of which 82% just experienced their first DrupalCon at @DrupalConAsia!

— The Lyf of Barthe (@BartFeenstra) February 21, 2016

Great closing session @amandagonser @RachFrieee https://t.co/BHaYumWXy1

— Megan Sanicki (@megansanicki) February 21, 2016

To everyone involved in making @DrupalConAsia happen – THANK YOU. Best time of my life. You are the most generous community!

— Holly Ross (@drupalhross) February 21, 2016

1025 people attended #drupalconasia! That's almost triple #DrupalCon Sydney. Awesome effort team. pic.twitter.com/yAwBMUHXgu

— Dave Hall (@skwashd) February 21, 2016

First-time contributors #DrupalCon India – Sprints https://t.co/V7xQAPK7lN pic.twitter.com/IavkV6Oszn

— Josef Dabernig (@dasjo) February 21, 2016

Where we come for the code and stay for the community. #drupalconasia #DividedByBoundariesUnitedByDrupal pic.twitter.com/7tm5NSx63B

— Manogna (@ManognaRao) February 21, 2016

I gotta say, 6 DrupalCons down, the gratitude/love from the community in India is truly touching. Thx for everything! It's been incredible.

— Rachel Friesen (@RachFrieee) February 22, 2016

Goodbye @DrupalConAsia. What an incredible time we had. Thank you for your amazing generosity #drupalcon

— Megan Sanicki (@megansanicki) February 22, 2016

.@DrupalConAsia is over, Auntie? But we will have another, na? #HappyDrupalista #DCAsia #DrupalCon pic.twitter.com/4xbkq0Ux4D

— Adelle Frank (@adellefrank) February 22, 2016

Thank you sprint mentors at @DrupalConAsia ! pic.twitter.com/yvHTbeItpZ

— xjm (@xjmdrupal) February 21, 2016

Say hi to the Indian #Drupal community #DrupalCon https://t.co/RRLhzjFYNd pic.twitter.com/jJCtMwmrnF

— Josef Dabernig (@dasjo) February 19, 2016

Divided by boundaries but united by #drupal friends from PK @drupakpakistan @m_tanweer @DrupalConAsia @DrupalMumbai pic.twitter.com/1zYenYpBbB

— Rachit Gupta (@tweet_rachit) February 21, 2016

I'm checking out of #DrupalCon and feeling overwhelmed. What a con! What a community! I'm privileged to be a part. pic.twitter.com/x49eGI8EgG

— hussainweb (@hussainweb) February 21, 2016

Oh, and one more selfie

Here is my #DrupalCon #selfie w/ @parth_gohil, @piyushpoddar, @Crell in background, and photobomb by @drupalhross. pic.twitter.com/AR38NON1KD

— hussainweb (@hussainweb) February 21, 2016

This DrupalCon was very special to me, not least because it was in India. But this tweet captures it.

This tweet captures everything that Drupal is. It is about community, about people, about love. #DrupalCon https://t.co/2PvLB5h3uJ

— hussainweb (@hussainweb) February 23, 2016

Feb 20 2016
hw
Feb 20

DrupalConASIA is here!!! I am back in the busy city of Mumbai and in the premises of IIT Bombay, which also saw DrupalCamp Mumbai last year. This time, it is a much bigger conference; in all ways. More people, more sessions, more community, more fun.

Lol I was just about to post the same thing. Good morning @hussainweb and #DrupalConAsia! pic.twitter.com/0vpWPc80hp

— Novella C. (@italiatina) February 18, 2016

As DrupalCon tradition goes, we start on Thursday, 18-Feb-2016, with summits (for business, government, education, and community) and a whole lot of trainings. I was fortunate enough to speak at the community summit about some of the issues surrounding contribution.

@hussainweb speaks about DO contrib tracking at community summit @drupalcon #drupalconasia pic.twitter.com/293Xp0IL7w

— DEVIKA DAS (@das_devika) February 18, 2016

@hussainweb talking about DO contrib tracking at Community Summit @DrupalConAsia #DrupalCon pic.twitter.com/gZMyBLQm2V

— Sushil (@thesushyl) February 18, 2016

I was still tired with everything around the con, including the Developer Contest by Azri Solutions in which I was participating, and went back early. The only other thing I did that day was attend Axelerant’s team dinner / party. I also met my old colleagues at Blisstering Solution there.

Finally did it! I submitted my visualizations for the @azrisolutions #devcontest at @DrupalConAsia. #fingerscrossed pic.twitter.com/HDAKWXHagp

— hussainweb (@hussainweb) February 18, 2016

Next day dawned early but I was still not well and was late to prenote!

Late for #DrupalCon prenote. ???? pic.twitter.com/2eSWmdqpEL

— hussainweb (@hussainweb) February 19, 2016

The prenote was great, and ended with a dance where almost all of the audience went up on the stage to dance.

"Why is #DrupalCon special?" Hear it from the community. pic.twitter.com/HVguNkl8Lm

— hussainweb (@hussainweb) February 19, 2016

There are more people on the stage than you can see in audience. This is @DrupalConAsia. #DrupalCon pic.twitter.com/JkZSzbW7Fv

— hussainweb (@hussainweb) February 19, 2016

[embedded content]

This was followed by an introduction by Holly Ross, a guide to pronouncing D8 by Sunit Gala, and then the DriesNote.

269 contributors to #Drupal8 from Asia. #DrupalCon pic.twitter.com/UtMEuwreEe

— hussainweb (@hussainweb) February 19, 2016

How you can get away contributing to #Drupal8 on a Friday night. #DrupalCon pic.twitter.com/DgwCwBW9Xf

— hussainweb (@hussainweb) February 19, 2016

#DriesNote begins pic.twitter.com/YCwp5SG81k

— hussainweb (@hussainweb) February 19, 2016

"If #Drupal does not do well in India, it will be very sad." – @Dries #DriesNote #paraphrased pic.twitter.com/Vdfx1MnNdt

— hussainweb (@hussainweb) February 19, 2016

What hair product does @dries use? #DriesNote

— Dave Hall (@skwashd) February 19, 2016

Ah, we've reached the Davos section of the #DriesNote. #DrupalCon pic.twitter.com/pmbhn8VE9U

— Larry Garfield (@Crell) February 19, 2016

Of course, Dries had to wear a turban.

@Dries befoe #DriesNote at #DrupalConAsia, putting on turban! pic.twitter.com/M2iO4eCS7a

— Sushil (@thesushyl) February 19, 2016

And who’s up for an yearly DrupalCon in India?

"Totally makes sense for India to have an annual conference" – @Dries #DriesNote Q&A

— hussainweb (@hussainweb) February 19, 2016

"I can totally see this being the third largest conference." – @Dries, on #DrupalCon in India. #DriesNote Q&A

— hussainweb (@hussainweb) February 19, 2016

And then the group photo.

Thank you to everyone in the community who is here to support DrupalCon Asia! #DrupalCon pic.twitter.com/AEMbcqAl8v

— DrupalCon Asia (@DrupalConAsia) February 19, 2016

We then went to sessions, collecting swag at booths, meeting people, and so on.

@Zaizi @ZaiziAsia #drupalteam with @hussainweb pic.twitter.com/CpF4u2vkMo

— Niraj Meegama (@nmeegama) February 18, 2016

We are talking about migrating a top 50 website in Room 23 at @DrupalConAsia. #DrupalCon @axelerant pic.twitter.com/UCBH5Ov7AI

— hussainweb (@hussainweb) February 19, 2016

@hussainweb discussing RESTful Panels for legacy #drupalcon #dcasia pic.twitter.com/nUaPPQA8Tu

— Murtaza Alvi (@AlviMurtaza) February 19, 2016

@_agupta_ @lakshminp @hussainweb @skippednote from at #DrupalCon on Migrating https://t.co/LHs5vx3i7N @axelerant pic.twitter.com/ap7UpSx7Pn

— Sushil (@thesushyl) February 19, 2016

.@chakri_iiith and @gokulnk from @BangaloreDrupal discuss community at #DrupalCon pic.twitter.com/tEahoDgtMT

— hussainweb (@hussainweb) February 19, 2016

.@emma_maria88 and the joy of #Contribution !! #DrupalCon #DCAsia pic.twitter.com/GErwYdnJa8

— Adelle Frank (@adellefrank) February 19, 2016

@prestonso giving session in Hindi! pic.twitter.com/TMjaMvTpE6

— Gulab Bisht (@gulabbisht) February 19, 2016

.@mohit_rocks and Ankit discuss design patterns. #DrupalCon @axelerant pic.twitter.com/jSMOuoRsPr

— hussainweb (@hussainweb) February 19, 2016

New contributors can work on… #DrupalCon pic.twitter.com/KV1JKhlBTs

— hussainweb (@hussainweb) February 19, 2016

It was all possible because of the Drupal Association team and sponsors:

.@DrupalConAsia is possible because of a great partnership with IIT Bombay. Thanks to @psunthar pic.twitter.com/iJNwcxPjNh

— Megan Sanicki (@megansanicki) February 19, 2016

A great day making new friends @DrupalConAsia @axelerant pic.twitter.com/sMhp9E6toW

— Megan Sanicki (@megansanicki) February 18, 2016

Still smiling after organizing all the @DrupalConAsia programming for MONTHS. Great job @amandagonser #DrupalCon pic.twitter.com/UgDpFmyXPz

— Megan Sanicki (@megansanicki) February 19, 2016

Be sure to thank @RachFrieee for bringing @DrupalConAsia to India. 1 year of hard work. @DrupalConAsia #drupalcon pic.twitter.com/bTN3X2XYuW

— Megan Sanicki (@megansanicki) February 19, 2016

Oh yummy local snacks. Thanks @axelerant pic.twitter.com/RD9PApREFu

— Megan Sanicki (@megansanicki) February 19, 2016

Such cool #drupal tattoos. Thanks @Blisstering @DrupalConAsia #drupalcon pic.twitter.com/wt41cv7hDA

— Megan Sanicki (@megansanicki) February 19, 2016

I am most thankful for our @DrupalConAsia volunteers. pic.twitter.com/kg6T2uDw0q

— Megan Sanicki (@megansanicki) February 18, 2016

Be sure to thank #drupal volunteers @DrupalConAsia. This team donated a full day to help at registration pic.twitter.com/7CINFU953i

— Megan Sanicki (@megansanicki) February 18, 2016

It was a great day and I’m looking forward to Day 2!

Group photo by Michael Cannon under Share-alike license.

Sep 23 2015
Sep 23
[embedded content]

At DrupalCon Barcelona this year I presented with Dick Olsson outlining a plan for CRAP (Create Read Archive Purge) and revisions (on all content entities) in core.

Phase 0

For Drupal 8.0.0
Enable revisions by default (https://www.drupal.org/node/2490136) on content types in the standard install profile and when creating new content types.

Phase 1

For Drupal 8.1.0

  • Improve the Revisions API performance, some of this will come from moving elements from the multiversion module into the entity API.
  • Enable revisions by default for all content entity types. So not just nodes anymore but blocks, comments, taxonomy terms etc.
  • Introduce a revision hash, parents and tree. Each revision needs to have a parent so you know where it’s come from, each parent can have multiple child revisions.
  • Data migration - Moving all 8.0.0 sites to 8.1.0 will mean moving their data to the new revision system.

Phase 2

For Drupal 8.2.0

  • Remove the ability to not have revisions. To simplify the API and the data stored it makes sense to remove the ability to disable revisions. This will allow us to remove all the conditional code around if an entity has a revision or not.
  • Delete is a new flagged revision. When deleting an entity a new revision will be created and this revision will be flagged as deleted. This is the archive element of the CRAP workflow.
  • Introduce purge functionality. There may be times when an entity needs to be completely deleted.
  • Commit trash module to core. Trash is just a UI for the delete flag. It displays all entities marked as deleted. It then allows these to be restored by creating a new revision not flagged deleted, or purged by removing the entity.

Simple right?

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May 29 2015
May 29

Recently, I had the opportunity to present my core conversation, Pain Points of Learning and Contributing in the Drupal Community, at DrupalCon Los Angeles.

drupal 8 logo isolated CMYK 72My co-presenter Frédéric G. Marand and I talked about the disconnect between Drupal and api.drupal.org on core and some of the pain points to contributing and learning in the Drupal community. We also spoke little bit on the benefits of continuous contribution and sporadic contribution.

The open mic discussion brought up some interesting issues, and so I have compiled some links to answer questions.

Audience Suggestions and Responses

  • Stable release of Drupal 8 will help people start on client work and support contribution. The Drupal community needs to recognize contribution not just in the form of patch, but mentors mentoring on IRC during core office hours, credit to code reviewers on the issue queue, recognize event organizers and have people edit their profile on Drupal.org and list their mentors at the end of a sprint.
  • We now have an issue on Drupal.org to allow crediting for code reviewers (and other non-coders) as first-class contributors.
  • Make profiles better on Drupal.org. Here is an issue for that – [Meta] new design for User Profiles.
  • Event organizers could get an icon on their profile page. You can read more on that – Make icons for the items in the list of user contributions to be included on user profiles.
  • Another issue to read – Reduce Novice Contribution differences and consolidate landing pages, content, blocks.
  • Explanations of what needs to be done could be a big time-saver. For Drupal 8 there are pretty clear outlines of what could be done for core.
  • There was a suggestion to provide video and audio documentation instead of just text, walking people through issues. There are four or five companies that make videos and we have core office hours for walking people through the issue.
  • A few people expressed that its hard to keep up with IRC and are looking for easier ways to communicate. I have created an issue for that and you can read more here – Evaluate whether to replace Drupal IRC channels with another communication medium.
  • Another audience member suggested that we need to make sure that communications that happen in IRC are summarized and documented on issues, so more people can get familiar with the discussion.
  • There were some suggestions for core mentoring that have been proposed but haven’t panned out such as Twitter or hangouts (privacy concerns, less office-friendly).
  • Someone suggested that those who don’t like to get on IRC, can get core updates via email (This week in Drupal Core) which is a weekly-to-monthly update on all the cool happenings in Drupal 8.
  • Users can also subscribe to issue notifications in email on the issues/components they want to follow on Drupal.org.

Overall it was an enlightening core conversation and it was amazing to hear from the community about their pain points and suggestions they made.

To see more of our discussion watch the presentation and view the slides.

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Behind the Curtain: The Making of the DrupalCon Prenote

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4 Content Questions to Ask Yourself Before Your Next Website Redesign

May 21 2015
May 21

The Drupalcon song - with actions!

I am never missing the #DrupalCon #prenote again. So brilliant.

— Kelley Curry (@BrightBold) May 12, 2015


DrupalCon always leaves me full of energy, and Amsterdam 2014 was no exception. The three of us – Adam Juran, me, and my wife Bryn – sat together on the short train ride back home to Cologne. Some chit chat and reminiscing quickly led to anticipation of the next DrupalCon, in LA. We were excited about the possibilities of this world-class host city. The home of Hollywood, Venice Beach, and Disneyland sounded like a great destination, but after three years of co-writing the DrupalCon “opening ceremony” with Jam and Robert, we were more excited about the possibilities for the Prenote. We knew we had to up the ante, make something new and different from previous years, and LA seemed like a gold mine of possibilities.

Every DrupalCon, before the keynote from Dries, this small group has staged a “pre-note.” The goal of the prenote is to break the ice, to remind everyone present that Drupal is a friendly, fun, and above all, inclusive community. It’s often themed after the host city: in Munich, Jam and Robert taught everyone how to pour a good Bavarian beer, and brought in a yodeling instructor for a singalong (yodel-along?) at the end. In Portland we held a “weirdest talent” competition, featuring prominent community members juggling and beat boxing. Every year it gets more fun, more engaging, and more entertaining for the audience.

Learning how to pour beer at the Drupalcon Munich prenote, 2012

Learning how to pour beer at the Drupalcon Munich prenote, 2012

On that train ride home, we threw around a lot of possibilities. Maybe the prenote could be set on a muscle beach, with Dries as the aspiring “98 pound weakling.” Or the whole thing could be a joke on a hollywood party. We briefly considered a reality-TV style “Real coders of Drupalcon” theme, but nobody wanted to sink that low. That’s when the idea struck: we could do it as a Disney musical!

Part of Your World

The Prenote was Jam and Robert’s baby, though. We knew that we would have to have some absolutely knock-down material to convince them of our concept. With beer in hand, the three of us started work on Part of your world from the Little Mermaid, as the client who is excited for the worst website idea ever.

“I’ve got sliders and icons a-plenty,
I’ve got OG with breadcrumbs galore.
You want five-level dropdowns?
I’ve got twenty!
But who cares? No big deal.
I want more!”

We quickly moved on to the song for the coder who would save the day, You ain’t never had a friend like me from Aladdin. We got halfway through this fun number before we realized that the song titles alone could do a lot of the convincing. Another beer, and we had a list of potential songs. There was so much material just in the song titles, we knew that the music would take center stage.

Some of our favorite titles from this first list were ultimately cut. Maybe someday we’ll flesh them into full songs for a Drupal party, but in the meantime you can let your imagination run wild. Hakuna Matata from The Lion King was to become We’ll Build it in Drupal! The Frozen parody, Do You Wanna Build a Website was a big hit, and so was Aladdin’s A Whole New Theme.

We showed our idea to Jam and Robert the first chance we got. They took one look at our list of songs and said the three words we wanted to hear: “run with it.”

You Ain’t Never had a Friend Like Me

Forum One's Adam Juran and Campbell Vertesi as

Forum One’s Adam Juran and Campbell Vertesi as “Themer” and “Coder” at the Drupalcon Austin prenote, 2014

We divided up responsibility for  the remainder of the songs and started to experiment with the script. What kind of story could we wrap around these crazy songs? How much time did we really have, and could we do all this music? We were all absorbed in our normal work, but every chance we got, the group of us would get together to throw ideas around. I don’t think I’ve ever laughed as much as while we wrote some of these songs.

Writing parody lyrics is entertaining on your own, but as a duo it’s a laugh riot.  More than once we checked the Drupal song lyrics project for inspiration. We riffed on ideas and tried different rhyme schemes until things seemed to just “fit.”

Heigh Ho, Heigh Ho

In the last few weeks leading up to DrupalCon, Adam and I met two and three times a week for long sessions, brainstorming new lyrics. We powered through writing the script around the whole thing, and started to address the logistical problems of backtracks, props, and costumes as well.

via Mendel at Drupalcon LA. Ronai Brumett as the perfect hipster Ariel

via Mendel at Drupalcon LA. Ronai Brumett as the perfect hipster Ariel

Finally we set about casting the different songs. Adam and I had always wanted to sing the Agony duet from Into the Woods, so that one was easy. We had a tentative list of who we wanted in the other songs, but we had no idea who would be willing. All of a sudden the whole endeavor looked tenuous again. Why did we think Dries would be OK to make a joke about Drupal 8 crashing all the time? Would Jeremy Thorson (maintainer of the test infrastructure on Drupal.org) even be interested to get up on stage and sing about testing? We realized that we’d never heard these people sing karaoke, much less in front of thousands of people!

One by one we reached out to the performers and got their approval. Some of them were more enthusiastic than others. Dries replied with “OK, I trust you guys,” while Larry Garfield and Jeremy Thorson insisted on rewriting some of their lyrics and even adding verses! The day before the show, Larry was disappointed that we couldn’t find giant foam lobster claws for his version of Under the Sea from the Little Mermaid. Aaron Porter bought a genie costume and offered to douse himself in blue facepaint for his role, and Ronai Brumett spent a weekend building the perfect “hipster Ariel” costume.

When You Wish Upon a Star

On DrupalCon – Monday the day before the show – the cast assembled for the first time for their only rehearsal together. I arrived a few minutes late, direct from a costume shop on Hollywood Boulevard. Jam had built karaoke tracks on his laptop, and Robert had put together a prompter for the script, so the group huddled around the two laptops and tried to work through the whole show.

Via <a href=

Via Mendel at Drupalcon LA. The prenote cast rehearses. From left to right, Larry Garfield, Aaron Porter, Adam Juran, Jeffrey McGuire, Campbell Vertesi.

The rehearsal showed us what a hit we had created. The performers had embraced the motto: “if you can’t sing it, perform it” and they started to feed off each other’s energy. We all laughed at Ronai’s dramatic rendition of Part of My Site, and the Agony Duet raised the energy even further. It turned out that Dries had never heard When You Wish Upon a Star from Pinocchio before, but he was willing to learn as long as he could have someone to sing along with him!

via Mendel at Drupalcon LA. Aaron Porter codes with his butt - on Dries Buytaert's laptop!

via Mendel at Drupalcon LA. Aaron Porter codes with his butt – on Dries Buytaert’s laptop!

The rehearsal really started to hit it’s stride when Aaron delivered You Ain’t Never had a Dev Like Me. Aaron had never sung in public before, and we could tell he was nervous. Then the backtrack started playing with its blaring horns, and he came alive. It’s a difficult piece, with lots of fast moving text and a rhythm that can be hard to catch. Aaron launched into it with gusto. He had us in stitches when he shouted “can your friends do this!” and grabbed Dries’ laptop to start typing with his butt. When he nailed the high note at the end with a huge grin on his face, it was a deciding moment for the group.

From that moment on we were on a ride, and we knew it. Simpletest (to the tune of Be Our Guest from Beauty and the Beast) turned out to be a laugh riot, and Jeremy led us naturally into a kick line for the grand finale. We cheered Larry’s choreography skills during the dance break of RTBC, and Ben Finklea was a natural (as ever) at leading us all in Commit, to the tune of Heigh Ho from Snow White.

Forum One UX lead Kristina Bjoran, had protested the most of everyone about having to sing, but the moment she started with our version of Let it Go from Frozen, we were caught up in the feeling of it. I don’t think anyone expected the goosebumps that happened when we sang that chorus together, but we all appreciated what it meant.

Let it Go

The morning of the show saw the whole cast up bright and early. Though we joked about doing a round of shots before going on stage, no one seemed nervous. In fact we spent most of the setup time laughing at one another. Larry discovered that he has great legs for red tights. Aaron got blue face paint everywhere. We cheered at Jam and Robert’s Mickey and Minnie costumes, and laughed at Ronai’s perfect Hipster Ariel.

Some of us had last minute changes to make: Jeremy spent his time crafting oversized cuffs for his costume. I had forgotten the belt to my ninja outfit, so we made one out of duct tape. Kristina discovered that her Elsa costume limited her movement too much for the choreography she had planned. Dries was the only one who seemed nervous to me – this guy who has spoken in public countless times was afraid of a little Disney! We sang through the song together one last time, and it was time to go on.

via Mendel at Drupalcon LA. Jeremy Thorson leads the

via Mendel at Drupalcon LA. Jeremy Thorson leads the “Simpletest” song. Behind him, from left: Campbell Vertesi, Ronai Brumett, Adam Juran, Aaron Porter, Dries Buytaert

Everyone knows the rest – or at least, you can see it on youtube. What you probably don’t know is how hard we all laughed as we watched the show backstage. Even knowing every word, the energy from the audience was infectious. In the end, there’s nothing quite like standing in front of three thousand people and shouting together: “we come for code, but we stay for community!”

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Evolving the Nation’s Report Card – A Study of Designing New Reports

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Participating in the Drupal Community

May 15 2015
May 15

A number of us from Forum One are sticking around for Friday’s sprints, but that’s a wrap on the third day of DrupalCon and the conference proper!

Wednesday and Thursday were chock-full of great sessions, BoFs, and all the small spontaneous meetings and conversations that make DrupalCons so fruitful, exhausting and energizing.

Wednesday

Forum One gave three sessions on Wednesday. John Brandenburg presented Maximizing Site Speed with Mercy Corps, a case study of our work on www.mercycorps.org focusing on performance optimization. Kalpana Goel of Forum One and Frédéric G. Marand presented Pain points of learning and contributing in the Drupal community, a session on how to encourage and better facilitate code contributions to Drupal from community members. And finally Forum One’s Andrew Morton presented Content After Launch: Preparing a Monkey for Space, a survey of content considerations for project success before, during, and after the website build process. The other highlight from my perspective on Wednesday was a great talk by Wim Leers and Fabian Franz on improvements to Drupal performance/speed, and how to make your Drupal sites fly.

Thursday

On Thursday, Daniel Ferro and Dan Mouyard rounded out the seven Forum One sessions with their excellent presentation, To the Pattern Lab! Collaboration Using Modular Design Principles. The session describes our usage of Pattern Lab at Forum One to improve project workflow and collaboration — between visual designers, front- and back-end developers, and clients — an approach that has eased a lot of friction on our project teams. I’m particularly excited about how it’s allowed our front-end developers to get hacking much earlier in the project lifecycle. (We were glad to see the presentation get a shout out from Brad Frost, one of the Pattern Lab creators.)

Other highlights for me on Thursday were the beloved Q&A with Dries and friends and sitting down over lunch with other Pacific Northwest Drupalers to make some important decisions about the PNW Drupal Summit coming to Seattle this fall.

Next Stops for DrupalCon

In addition to looking ahead to DrupalCon Barcelona, the closing session revealed the exciting news that DrupalCon will be landing in Mumbai next year!

#DrupalCon is coming to Mumbai! Plus other photos from todays closing session https://t.co/Y3vWCQCSTu? pic.twitter.com/zEt4Y6VLxS

— DrupalCon LosAngeles (@DrupalConNA) May 15, 2015

And the always anticipated announcement of the next DrupalCon North America location… New Orleans!

And the next North American #DrupalCon will be…… pic.twitter.com/AXiFxv3gfW

— DrupalCon LosAngeles (@DrupalConNA) May 14, 2015

That news was ushered in soulfully by these gentlemen, Big Easy style, pouring out from the keynote hall into the convention center lobby.

Great way to announce #DrupalCon New Orleans! #DrupalConLA pic.twitter.com/3cRmV8jI1F

— Andy Hieb (@AndyHieb) May 14, 2015

And to finish off the day properly, many of us hooted and hollered at Drupal trivia night, MC’d by none other than Jeff Eaton.

Another fantastic #DrupalCon trivia night in progress… Woo! pic.twitter.com/AzavA2AFXi

— Jeff Eaton (@eaton) May 15, 2015

A great con was had by all of us here at Forum One… On to the sprints!

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Hacking the Feds: Forum One Among the Winners at GSA Hack-a-Thon

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May 14 2015
May 14

My colleague Adam Juran and I just finished with our session, Zero to MVP in 40 minutes: Coder and Themer Get Rich Quick in Silicon Valley, at DrupalCon LA. This one was a real journey to prepare, and through it we learned a lot of dirty truths about Drupal 8, Javascript frameworks, and the use cases where the two make sense together.

The live coding challenge in our session proposal seemed simple: create a web application that ingests content from an external API, performs content management tasks (data modelling, relationships, etc.) through the Drupal 8 interface, and deliver it all to an AngularJS front-end. This is exactly the “headless Drupal” stuff that everyone has been so excited about for the last year, so doing it in a 40 minute head-to-head code battle seemed like an entertaining session.

Ingesting content from an external API

The first hard truth we discovered was the limitations of the still-nascent Drupal 8. Every monthly release of a new Drupal 8 beta includes a series of “change records,” defining all the system-wide changes that will have to be accounted for everywhere else. For example, one change record notes that a variable we often use in Drupal forms is now a different kind of object. This change breaks every single form, everywhere in Drupal.

The frequency of this kind of change record is a problem for anyone who tries to maintain a contributed module. No one can keep up with their code breaking every month, so most don’t. The module works when they publish it as “stable”, but two or three months later, it’s fundamentally broken. changes like this currently happen 10-15 times every month. Any module we were hoping to use as a part of this requirement – Twitter, Oauth, Facebook – were broken when we started testing.

We finally settled on using Drupal’s robust Migrate module to bring in external content. After all, Drupal 7 Migrate can import content from almost any format! Turns out that this isn’t the case with Drupal 8 core’s Migrate module. It’s limited to the basic framework you need for all migrations. Importers for various file types and sources simply haven’t been written yet.

No matter which direction we turned, we were faced with the fact that Drupal 8 needed work to perform the first requirement in our challenge. We chose to create a CSV Source plugin ourselves (with much help from mikeryan and chx) just to be able to meet this requirement. This was not something we could show in the presentation; it was only a prerequisite. Phew!

Displaying it All in Angular

Building an AngularJS based front end for this presentation involved making decisions about architecture, which ended up as the critical focus of our talk. AngularJS is a complete framework, which normally handles the entire application: data ingestion, manipulation, and display. Why would you stick Drupal in there? And what would an Angular application look like architecturally, with Drupal 8 inside?

You always have a choice of what to do and where to do it. Either system can ingest data, and either system can do data manipulation. Your decision should be based on which tool does each job the best, in your particular use case: a catch-all phrase that includes factors like scalability and depth of functionality, but also subtler elements like the expertise of your team. If you have a shop full of AngularJS people and a simple use case, you should probably build the entire app in Angular!

Given that perspective, Drupal really stands out as a data ingestion and processing engine. Even when you have to write a new Migration source plugin, the Entity model, Drupal’s “plug-ability”, and Views make data crunching extremely easy. This is a strong contrast to data work in Angular, where you have to write everything from scratch.

We feel that the best combination of Drupal and Angular is with Drupal ingesting content, manipulating it, and spitting it out in a ready-to-go format for AngularJS to consume. This limits the Angular application to its strengths: layout, with data from a REST back-end, and only simple logic.

The Session

[embedded content]

In the session, we talked a bit about the larger concepts involved, and moved fairly quickly into the technical demonstration. First, Adam demonstrated the flexibility of the decoupled front-end, using bower libraries to build an attractive layout without writing a single line of custom CSS.  Then I demonstrated importing data from CSV sources into Drupal 8, along with the simplicity of configuring Drupal Views to output JSON. Taken together, the videos are 37 minutes long – not bad for a totally custom RESTful endpoint and a nice looking front-end!

Here is Adam’s screencast, showing off the power of the bootstrap-material-design library to build a good looking site without any custom CSS at all:

Here is my screencast, demonstrating how easy it is to create Migrate module importers and REST exports in Drupal 8.

And here is the final screencast, quickly showing the changes we made in AngularJS to have it call the two Drupal Services.

Want to learn of Forum One’s Drupal development secrets? Check out our other Drupalcon blog posts, or visit our booth (#107) and talk with our tech wizards in person!

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DrupalCon LA Day 1!

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Hacking the Feds: Forum One Among the Winners at GSA Hack-a-Thon

May 13 2015
May 13

DrupalCon day one was a great start to this year’s North American Drupal conference! Forum One is well represented this year, giving seven presentations this week.

The Con started off with the traditional “pre-note” show in the early morning. The pre-note is a session designed to get people out of their seats and into the feeling of this big, welcoming community. Jam McGuire, Robert Douglass,

via <a href=

via Mendel: Forum One’s Kristina Bjoran leads the Prenote finale. From left: Jeffrey McGuire, Larry Garfield, Campbell Vertesi, Adam Juran, Dries Buytaert, Ronai Brumett, Aaron Porter

Forum One’s Adam Juran and I have been putting these together for a few years now, and for DrupalCon LA we wrote a Disney musical about Drupal. From Ariel’s song “Part of My Site” to our own version of Into the Woods’ “Agony,” the show got a lot of laughs with its parody lyrics. One high point was Dries, the founder of Drupal, entering the stage with top hat and cane to perform, “When you install Drupal 8? to the tune of “When You Wish Upon a Star” – ending prematurely with a fatal error! This was followed by “Someday D8 Will Come”, and a lot of laughs. The prenote ended with Forum One’s Kristina Bjoran leading the audience in a DrupalCon version of “Let It Go” from Frozen. After all the laughter, it was a nice moment to hear the audience cheer in unison: “we come for code, but we stay for community.”

[embedded content]

Dries’ keynote came next. This year he didn’t talk so much about the great new features of Drupal 8 – we’ve been talking about that for four years now! Instead, he focused on the history of Drupal as a platform, starting in his dorm room in 2001. Once we got to the present day, he switched to the coming challenges in the web sector. The Internet is becoming less and less about browser-based interaction, according to Dries. Increasingly people access data using tailored apps or devices, which means there is a great need for a data back-end like Drupal that can provide for all of these end points. Consumers demand more and more customized and predictive content, and Drupal 8 is a strong platform for that capability.

The day was filled with interesting sessions, but a few stuck out to us. There was Amitai and Josh Koenig’s Decoupled Drupal talk, where they demonstrated an automatic headless Drupal site generator. There were a couple of interesting sessions about long form content: the technical side by Murray Woodman and Jeff Eaton, and the strategic side by Forum One’s Kristina Bjoran and Courtney Clark. Courtney had a double-header day: she also presented about Forum One’s work on content strategy for Drupal.org. I got to present with Adam Juran and Jam McGuire about headless Drupal, building a simple Drupal 8 backed AngularJS demonstration in 40 minutes. We learned a lot about various prototyping tools, and were surprised to find no clear consensus on a standard toolkit for this important problem. Forum One resources were asked a lot of questions about how we use Pattern Lab in this space. Forum One’s Daniel Ferro and Dan Mouyard have a session about Pattern Lab on Thursday.

[embedded content]

[embedded content]

[embedded content]

Be sure to keep checking back for more of our takeaways and recaps of DrupalCon LA.

The cast of the prenote: Dries Buytaert, Aaron Porter, Ben Finklea, Robert Douglass, Adam Juran, Campbell Vertesi, Jeremy Thorson, Kristina Bjoran, Ronai Brumei, Larry Garfield, Jeffrey

via Mendel: The cast of the prenote, from top left: Dries Buytaert, Aaron Porter, Ben Finklea, Robert Douglass, Adam Juran, Campbell Vertesi, Jeremy Thorson, Kristina Bjoran, Ronai Brumett, Larry Garfield, Jeffrey McGuire

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Google to Non-Mobile sites: ‘You’re Dead to Me’

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Zero to MVP in 40 Minutes: What We learned Building Headless Drupal 8 for DrupalCon LA

May 08 2015
May 08

DC2015_Spread_The_Word_Sponsor

So you’re going to Drupalcon? Looking for a new job? Here are some quick tips to up your chances on finding a great new gig!

Do your homework. Take some time to check out what companies will have a booth and what companies will have employees presenting a session or running a BOF. Also, be sure to check out the Drupal.org job board. Looking into this ahead of time will help you get a game plan together. Maybe a company you admire doesn’t have a booth but their CTO is presenting a session – attend the session and look to strike up a conversation after the session about any open positions.

Take this time to dig past the job description. You’re going to have a chance to interact with current employees of the companies you’re interested in at Drupalcon, so take this time to ask about the things that aren’t necessarily in a job description. Did their company pay their way to Drupalcon and what else can they tell you about professional development opportunities? Do they have a good work/life balance? People tend to be more open/friendly at events like this so find out more about what is important to you! You might be able to get some great insight into what their company culture is like. Perhaps your dream company doesn’t have an open position that is a good fit for you – ask what their future growth plans are – maybe there could be a role opening up soon that could work for you!

Come prepared/follow up. Be sure to have more than enough copies of your resume or business cards. Be sure to include your Drupal.org ID on your resume or perhaps on the back of your card  this is especially helpful for developement folks. Also, don’t forget to get the business card of the people you talk to about the companies/roles you’re targeting. You want to be sure you follow up with an email after Drupalcon to strengthen the connections you made and hopefully get referred through that employee for an open role – that is a much stronger application than if you’re a general applicant.

And just in case you’re interested in Forum One check out our open tech positions!

Outside of tech we’re looking for…

We’re also presenting several sessions! Come meet some of our awesome team members.

If you’re looking a for a new gig come by and meet the team at Booth #107.  While you’re at the booth take a minute to vote on your favorite Drupal topic, and be sure to check out the results on Twitter (@ForumOne)!

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Content After Launch: Preparing a Monkey for Space

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Google to Non-Mobile sites: ‘You’re Dead to Me’

May 08 2015
May 08

We’re excited to announce this talk, Content After Launch – Preparing a Monkey for Space on Wednesday, May 15, 2015 from 5pm to 6pm at DrupalCon LA!

So what’s it all about? Well, coupled with a silly metaphor, I’m going to be talking about what happens to content during various stages of a website build, from the initial kickoff, through the production, and well after launch. The talk will touch on:

  • how all team members can get involved in the success of a launched website.
  • setting and managing expectations for what it takes to run a site post-launch.
  • everything you might have missed while focused on designing and building the website.

Come for the metaphor, stay for the juicy takeaways! Spoiler alert – there will be an abundance of monkey photos.

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To the Pattern Lab! Collaboration Using Modular Design Principles

May 07 2015
May 07

Beakers and science equipment. The beakers are filled with patterns instead of plain liquids.

Come check out our presentation at Drupalcon 2015 in Los Angeles about modular design on Thursday, May 14, 2015 at 1:00 – 2:00pm PST.

You’ll learn how to use styleguide/prototyping tools like Pattern Lab to increase collaboration between designers, themers, developers, and clients on Drupal projects. A focus on modular design early on in a Drupal project improves workflow and efficiency for the whole team!

After applying modular design principles into your design workflow you will have, guaranteed *:

  • Shinier, more polished sites: You’ll improve collaboration between themers and designers without relying so much on static photoshop comps, dramatically improving the end product’s quality at a higher detail level.
  • Happier clients: Clients will be able to see functional visual designs earlier in the project and be able to play with the site in an easy to use interface.
  • Happier developers: Developers can concentrate on the hard work of building the site while themers and designers concentrate on the visual design.
  • Project managers overcome with joy: Sites will be more easily themed, front-end bugs will be caught earlier, clients can see progress sooner, designers will be less bogged down in Photoshop iterations, and projects will be more successful.

We hope to see you there. It should be a lot of fun and we are genuinely interested in hearing your thoughts. If you are impatient and want to learn more about Pattern Lab and design patterns in general, take a look at this blog post by Brad Frost on designing pattern flexibility.

* not an actual guarantee. Results may vary. Consult your doctor if your clients remain happy for over four hours

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Telling Simple (and Complex!) Stories with Open Data

May 06 2015
May 06

In a world where your page load speed is critical to success…

I couldn’t resist. With Drupalcon in Tinsel Town, I’m going to start most of my conversations with “in a world…” [Ed. note: Only if you use the Don LaFontaine voice every time.]

My session for Drupalcon LA is a partner session with Forum One client Mercy Corps. We’ll team up to show you how we maximized the performance of mercycorps.org. Maximizing Site Speed with Mercy Corps will take a tour of specific measures we used to make their critical fundraising platform blazing fast. Come see me, John Brandenburg, and Drew Betts, lead User Experience Designer at Mercy Corps, as we tag team on subjects like measuring user engagement, debugging Drupal caches and measuring performance. We will even discuss some quick tips that every Drupal site manager should use to maximize the performance of their own site.

Why come to this session?

Perhaps because Google itself ranks your site on speed. Or perhaps increments in site speed can demonstrably increase conversion rates. Or perhaps you are tired of hearing the groans of your own digital staff about the performance of your public site. After the session, we will have a Q&A where you can learn from the experts and ask questions about improving the performance of your own sites. In the meantime you can also check out my more detailed blog post on Drupal site speed.

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SEO Cheat Sheet: Tips and Tools for Improving Your Standing in Search

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Telling Simple (and Complex!) Stories with Open Data

May 01 2015
May 01

We are pumped to talk about styles of storytelling on Tuesday, May 12, 2015 at 2:15 – 3:15pm.

In our DrupalCon session, we will:

  • dissect what’s become a major buzzword – “long-form content.”
  • take a look at different types of long-form content
  • explore how “story” fits in
  • uncover what types of storytelling best suit your needs
  • help you figure out when long-form is right for you and your organization

Many organizations are embracing storytelling techniques to better connect with their audiences and drive them to action. They’re implementing long-form content as a platform for storytelling making use of its rich imagery, interactive elements, and better sharing capabilities.

People generally learn more and remember more when more of their senses are engaged by a story. Stories that include images get about twice the engagement as text-only stories. Stories told with visual elements are instantly captivating. The more senses that are engaged, the more emotions will be engaged and the more memorable the experience will be.

So come join us! And in the meantime, get yourself excited about storytelling by checking out this TED talk by Pixar writer Andrew Stanton.

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Pain Points of Learning and Contributing in the Drupal Community

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New Design, Site and Workflow for USDA’s National Institute Food and Agriculture

Apr 30 2015
Apr 30

At Drupalcon L.A. I’ll be co-leading a core conversation about the, “Pain Points of Learning and Contributing in the Drupal Community.” A core conversation is not a teaching session, it’s format is a little different and let’s the speaker engage with the audience.

So what is this conversation all about?

I’d like to start with a story. I started contributing to Drupal 8 core just before DrupalCon Portland in 2013. I was listening to  a live hangout with different initiative leads in Drupal 8, and Larry Garfield (crell) was talking about how he needed help with the hook_menu conversion. I asked Larry how can I help and he pointed me to some documentations he wrote on Drupal.org. At this time I took my first steps into core with a normal issue, and I’ve been contributing ever since. This year I’ve been slowly climbing up the contributor list on drupalcores.com.

As someone who puts a lot of energy into contribution, I hope it means something when I say: it’s too hard to contribute to major/critical issues in the Drupal 8 issue queue.

I ran into a great example recently, when I picked up issue 2368769. I figured that after 5 years as a Drupalist, I must be able to make some meaningful contribution to this critical bug. Boy was I wrong! What did they mean by “lazy-loading route enhancers”? I searched the codebase and Drupal documentation, and couldn’t find any example to work from. I found generic Symfony documentation on the subject, but it still wasn’t enough.

What’s going on in the issue queue?

This story reveals a bottleneck in the Drupal 8 development process: the top contributors. There is a group of 50 – or perhaps fewer – who understand and are current on the ongoing major/critical issues with Drupal 8. We all appreciate their incredible hard work, especially since most of them are contributing in their personal time. But in my case, even as an experienced Drupalist and core contributor, I was stuck! Asking top contributors for help in IRC is always an option, but it distracts them from their own work/concentration/thought process  – we don’t want to see top contributors spending 90% of their time answering questions!

So how can we make it possible for non-top-50 contributors to help out on major/critical issues? How can knowledgeable Drupalists who want to contribute to major/critical issues make life easier for top contributors, instead of harder? What are some ways to get knowledge transfer outside of that group?

With just a little more guidance, people outside that “top 50” group could do so much more than the “novice” and “normal” issues we presently tackle. We talk about “continuous contribution” in Drupal 8, where a contributor doesn’t hesitate to work on the issues, and if you’re eager to learn every day, nothing should stop you from contributing.

How will the Drupal world look with our new ideas adopted? What could be possible?

In the Drupal community, we always say “if you don’t like something, make it better.” This session is that first step to make this better.

I’m excited to hear suggestions from the community. How do we break the “top 50” limit, and let the next 100 contributors contribute to major/critical issues? This conversation is where we can work on this problem together, to encourage more contributors to stop limiting themselves and get involved on a deeper level. Maybe we’ll even see the benefits as soon as big sprint day on Friday, May 15, 2015. I hope to see more contributors working on critical major bugs/issues. Let’s break the barrier together!

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Why You Should Help the Nepalis, and How to Start

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Styles of Storytelling: Cultivating Compelling Long-form Content

Mar 19 2015
Mar 19

After a very successful drush code-sprint at BADCamp 2014, drush make now supports YAML format!

Instead of the old INI format

api = 2 ; Set contrib directory. defaults[projects][subdir] = "contrib" core = "7.x" projects[drupal][type] = "core" projects[drupal][version] = "7.32" ; Remove scary ajax error when autocomplete terminates: https://www.drupal.org/node/1232416#comment-8748879 projects[drupal][patch][] = "https://www.drupal.org/files/issues/D7-fix_autocomplete_terminated_error..." ; Ensure plain text fields evaluate line breaks. projects[drupal][patch][] = "http://drupal.org/files/text-plain-1152216-24.patch" projects[addressfield][version] = "1.0-beta5" projects[addressfield_tokens][version] = "1.4" projects[admin_views][version] = "1.3" projects[field_collection][version] = "1.0-beta7" ; Field collections are ownerless https://drupal.org/node/1954124 projects[field_collection][patch][] = "https://drupal.org/files/issues/field_collection-ownerless_fields-195412..." ; Fixes fatal error in migrate code: https://www.drupal.org/node/2315921#comment-9028779 projects[field_collection][patch][] = "https://www.drupal.org/files/issues/migrate-fatal-error-2315921-01.patch"

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api = 2

; Set contrib directory.

defaults[projects][subdir] = "contrib"

core = "7.x"

projects[drupal][type] = "core"

projects[drupal][version] = "7.32"

; Remove scary ajax error when autocomplete terminates: https://www.drupal.org/node/1232416#comment-8748879

projects[drupal][patch][] = "https://www.drupal.org/files/issues/D7-fix_autocomplete_terminated_error..."

; Ensure plain text fields evaluate line breaks.

projects[drupal][patch][] = "http://drupal.org/files/text-plain-1152216-24.patch"

projects[addressfield][version] = "1.0-beta5"

projects[addressfield_tokens][version] = "1.4"

projects[admin_views][version] = "1.3"

projects[field_collection][version] = "1.0-beta7"

; Field collections are ownerless https://drupal.org/node/1954124

projects[field_collection][patch][] = "https://drupal.org/files/issues/field_collection-ownerless_fields-195412..."

; Fixes fatal error in migrate code: https://www.drupal.org/node/2315921#comment-9028779

projects[field_collection][patch][] = "https://www.drupal.org/files/issues/migrate-fatal-error-2315921-01.patch"

YAML can be used with the latest version of Drush 7:

api: 2 # Set contrib directory. defaults: projects: subdir: "contrib" core: "7.x" projects: drupal: type: "core" version: "7.33" patch: # Remove scary ajax error when autocomplete terminates: https://www.drupal.org/node/1232416#comment-8748879 - "https://www.drupal.org/files/issues/D7-fix_autocomplete_terminated_error..." # Ensure plain text fields evaluate line breaks. - "http://drupal.org/files/text-plain-1152216-24.patch" addressfield: "1.0-beta5" addressfield_tokens: "1.4" admin_views: "1.3" field_collection: version: "1.0-beta7" patch: # Field collections are ownerless https://drupal.org/node/1954124 - "https://drupal.org/files/issues/field_collection-ownerless_fields-195412..." # Fixes fatal error in migrate code: https://www.drupal.org/node/2315921#comment-9028779 - "https://www.drupal.org/files/issues/migrate-fatal-error-2315921-01.patch"

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api: 2

# Set contrib directory.

defaults:

  projects:

    subdir: "contrib"

core: "7.x"

projects:

  drupal:

    type: "core"

    version: "7.33"

    patch:

        # Remove scary ajax error when autocomplete terminates: https://www.drupal.org/node/1232416#comment-8748879

      - "https://www.drupal.org/files/issues/D7-fix_autocomplete_terminated_error..."

        # Ensure plain text fields evaluate line breaks.

      - "http://drupal.org/files/text-plain-1152216-24.patch"

  addressfield: "1.0-beta5"

  addressfield_tokens: "1.4"

  admin_views: "1.3"

  field_collection:

    version: "1.0-beta7"

    patch:

        # Field collections are ownerless https://drupal.org/node/1954124

      - "https://drupal.org/files/issues/field_collection-ownerless_fields-195412..."

        # Fixes fatal error in migrate code: https://www.drupal.org/node/2315921#comment-9028779

      - "https://www.drupal.org/files/issues/migrate-fatal-error-2315921-01.patch"

Included .make files whether local, or discovered recursively within downloaded projects, can be in either YAML of INI format.

In order to use the newly-supported YAML format, simply name files with a .yml extension, such as my_project.make.yml.

The best part? This can be used now! Even though YAML files are mostly a new concept for Drupal 8, drush make will parse YAML make files for Drupal 7, and even Drupal 6.

Oct 17 2014
Oct 17

image01DrupalCon Amsterdam 2014…what a week! Drupal 8 Beta released, core contributions made, and successful sessions presented!

Drupal 8 Beta — has a nice ring to it, don’t you think?! But what exactly does that mean? According to the drupal.org release announcement, “Betas are good testing targets for developers and site builders who are comfortable reporting (and where possible, fixing) their own bugs, and who are prepared to rebuild their test sites from scratch if necessary. Beta releases are not recommended for non-technical users, nor for production websites.” Or more simply put, we’re over the hump, but we’re not there yet. But you can help!

Contrib to Core

One of the biggest focal points of this DrupalCon was contributing to Drupal 8 core in the largest code sprints of the year. Specially trained mentors helped new contributors set up their development environments, find tasks, and work on issues. This model is actually repeated at Drupal events all over the world, all year long. So even if you missed the Con, code sprints are happening all the time and the community truly welcomes all coders, novice or expert.

Forum One is proud that our own Kalpana Goel was featured as a mentor at DrupalCon Amsterdam.Forum One is proud that our own Kalpana Goel was featured as a mentor at DrupalCon Amsterdam. She is very passionate about helping new people contribute.

It was my third time mentoring at DrupalCon and like every time, it not only gave me an opportunity to share my knowledge, but also learn from others. Tobias Stockler took time to explain to me the Drupal 8 plugin system and walk me through an example. And fgm explained Traits to me and worked on a related issue.

-Kalpana Goel

Campbell Vertesi, Technical Architect

Forum One Steps Up

While the sprints raged on, other Forum One team members led training sessions for people currently developing with Drupal. I, Campbell, presented Panels, Display Suite, and Context – oh my! to a capacity crowd (200+), and together, we presented Coder vs. Themer: Ultimate Grudge Smackdown Fight to the Death to over three hundred coders and themers. Now that Drupal 8 Beta is released we’re already looking forward to creating a Drupal 8 version of Coder vs. Themer for both Los Angeles and Barcelona!

This year’s European DrupalCon was a huge success, and a lot of fun! As a group, our Forum One team got to take a leading role in teaching, mentoring, and sharing with the rest of the Drupal community. It’s easy to pay lip service to open source values, but we really love the opportunity to show how important this community is to us. We recently estimated that we contribute almost a hundred patches to Drupal contrib projects in a good month. We’re pretty proud of that participation, but it’s only at the conventions that we get to engage with other Drupalists face to face. DrupalCon isn’t just for the code, or the sessions. It’s for seeing and having fun with our friends and colleagues, too.

At Amsterdam, we got to participate in code sprints, lead sessions and BOFs (birds of a feather sessions), and join the community in lots of fun extracurricular activities. We’re already making plans for DrupalCon LA in the spring. We’ll see you there!

DrupalCon LA DrupalCon Barcelona

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Where’s the Message in Panels Node Edit Forms?

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Knowledge Café Recap: “Communicating Data for Impact”

Oct 02 2014
Oct 02

Drupal Kung Fu

Campbell and I presented our session, Coder vs. Themer, Thursday morning and it was a huge success! The gist of the session was this: Campbell and I are both martial artists in addition to Drupalists, and we drew comparisons between our respective martial arts (Ninjitsu and Kung fu) and our respective Drupal roles (coder and themer). Then we both attempted, in real time, to build a Drupal site from a markup. I (the themer) was only allowed to use the theme layer, while Campbell (the coder) could only use the code/module layer. The 302 attendees for our session were more than just spectators – they were active participants, cheering us on when we found clever solutions and booing when we took hacky shortcuts!

So who won?! Watch the video (slides with audio) and decide for yourself!

[embedded content]

Birds of a featherLater that afternoon we also led a BOF (Birds of a Feather) expanding on our earlier session. We dubbed this follow-up Coder vs. Themer: Fight Club. In it the attendees are divided into small development teams, each containing at least one coder and one themer. We then challenged them to collaborate and build out mockups. We had the luxury of having Augustin Delaporte and Robert Douglass of Commerce Guys there to provide development servers on their platform.sh hosting platform. All the teams did well and, more importantly, everyone had a lot of fun.

2015 DrupalCon EuropeDrupalcon Amsterdam’s closing session always has the big reveal of next year’s European Drupalcon venue, and we were all very excited when it was announced that the 2015 Drupalcon Europe would take place in beautiful Barcelona, Spain on September 21-25. Campbell and I cannot wait and are already planning several new, fun, energetic, and engaging sessions!

Read our other updates for DrupalCon:
DrupalCon Amsterdam, Day 1: Signs, Signs Everywhere Signs
DrupalCon Amsterdam, Day 2: From Memories to the Future
DrupalCon Amsterdam, Day 3: Drupal 8 Beta Released

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DrupalCon Amsterdam, Day 3: Drupal 8 Beta Released

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Where’s the Message in Panels Node Edit Forms?

Oct 01 2014
Oct 01

Cory DoctorowToday was day three of DrupalCon Amsterdam, and it started with a bang with Cory Doctorow as the keynote speaker. Cory is a noted Open Source activist, journalist, and blogger, and he has a long history of involvement with the Drupal community.

He spoke passionately about the importance of transparency in software in an age when computers pervade every aspect of our lives. “We should be concerned about making free software because people want to be free, and people cannot be free in an information age without freedom of access to information,” he declared. The speech was inspiring for the crowd here, and I recommend that you give it a watch.

Drupal 8 Logo

The buzz around the keynote was quickly replaced by much bigger news: Drupal 8 Beta has finally been released! The official announcement is available on drupal.org.

We are proud and honored that so many Forum One developers have been among the 2,300 people who contributed to Drupal 8.

Campbell and I devoted a large chunk of today prepping for our session, Coder vs. Themer, and the associated BOF (Birds of a Feather) workshop. In the session we explore the division in most development teams between the two kinds of developers. We take the style of a kung fu battle as we race each other to “live code” a working site in front of the audience. In the workshop, we divide participants into teams to take the same challenge and try different collaboration styles throughout the session. For those who haven’t seen it yet, check out our promo video.

Coder vs Themer

image02We capped off the evening by taking part in the musical portion of Cultural Night. Jam (HornCologne) led off with a trio of pieces for Alphorn. Yes, Alphorn. Like in the Ricola commercials! Then Campbell and I sang a rendition of the famous duet from Mozart’s Don Giovanni, La ci darem la mano. However, we did replace the Italian words with Drupal lyrics, “Panels handles layouts…”.

We were accompanied by organizer Peter Grond’s excellent string quartet, which played beautifully, but also with a great sense of fun. They even followed our operatic duet with the theme from the Mario Bros video game! They also played a few fusion jazz/classical pieces, which I later found out were composed by members of the quartet. The evening was so inspirational that we plan to make Drupal Musical Night a regular part of the DrupalCon experience!

And now to sleep, Campbell and I present Coder vs. Themer at 10:45am tomorrow morning in the main auditorium!

Read our other updates for DrupalCon:
DrupalCon Amsterdam, Day 4: Our Kung fu is more powerful than yours!
DrupalCon Amsterdam, Day 1: Signs, Signs Everywhere Signs
DrupalCon Amsterdam, Day 2: From Memories to the Future

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DrupalCon Amsterdam, Day 2: From Memories to the Future

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DrupalCon Amsterdam, Day 4: Our Kung fu is more powerful than yours!

Sep 30 2014
Sep 30

image05

Today started out bright and early for our Forum One team, setting up for our part in the famous DrupalCon Prenote. This is one of the best-known “secrets” of DrupalCon. As Drupal founder Dries Buytaert puts it, “If you only get up early once during DrupalCon, this is the morning to do it.” In past years we’ve taught the audience how to pour beer (DrupalCon Munich), conducted the crowd in the “Drupal Opera” (DrupalCon Prague), and explored the funny and strange talents of the Drupal community (DrupalCon Portland). Of course, no one could forget our famous Coder/Themer Wonder Twins appearance at the Drupal Superheroes Prenote from DrupalCon Austin!

This year, the Prenote theme was Drupal memories. We heard from many of the famous Drupal core contributors about how they became involved in the community and how it ultimately changed their lives. A beautiful highlight was Nancy Beers sharing the romantic video her husband sent her from Drupal Camp in Seville, shortly after they met at DrupalCon in London. After showing the video, Nancy got down on one knee on stage and proposed!

Adam and I got to re-enact the founding of Acquia, one of Drupal’s biggest service providers. We re-enacted that first partnership between Dries Buytaert and Jay Batson in a great Star Wars-themed parody. “Join me, and together we can rule the Internets as CEO and CTO,” intoned Jay in a Darth Vader mask. The audience loved it, and, of course, Adam and I thoroughly enjoyed our parts as well.

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Campbell and Bryn Vertesi sing Drupal MemoriesAt the end of the reminiscing, we directed the audience to stand up and take “selfies” of themselves with the stage in the background, while the core contributors up front took their own “selfies” to match. Then I took the microphone with my opera singing, Drupalist wife, Bryn Vertesi, to sing a Drupal-lyrics version of “Memories”, from the musical CATS. “Once we’re Beta, you’ll understand what happiness is,” became the catchphrase for the day!

DrupalCon Selfies

The Dries keynote was exciting as well, mostly because of the announcement that Drupal 8 is going to Beta at the end of the convention! This is great news for developers and clients alike, as the Drupal 8 API brings enormous improvements in flexibility, scalability, and usability. Forum One’s own Kalpana Goel has been hard at work, not just helping to write Drupal 8, but mentoring others as well. She spent her day in the sprint room, where the core contributors mixed celebrating the milestone with planning sessions for the next development phase.

image03

Today I also got to try out a new session, introducing the fundamental layout concepts in Drupal 7 and 8, and teaching people how to combine them for the best effect. Panels, Display Suite, and Context – oh my! ran overtime with a full room, and finally I decided we had to move the discussion to a “Birds of a Feather” workshop, tomorrow. I’m looking forward to it!

This was a long and eventful day for us here at DrupalCon Amsterdam. We’ll finish it off with a well-deserved beer at one of Holland’s famous breweries, hopefully somewhere along one of the many beautiful canals that dot this city. We’ll report back with more tomorrow!

DrupalCon Amsterdam

Read our other updates for DrupalCon:
DrupalCon Amsterdam, Day 3: Drupal 8 Beta Released
DrupalCon Amsterdam, Day 4: Our Kung fu is more powerful than yours!
DrupalCon Amsterdam, Day 1: Signs, Signs Everywhere Signs

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DrupalCon Amsterdam, Day 1: Signs, Signs Everywhere Signs

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DrupalCon Amsterdam, Day 3: Drupal 8 Beta Released

Sep 29 2014
Sep 29

Where in the world is DrupalCon

How do you get to DrupalCon? Well, apparently you just follow the signs!

I’d never thought about it, but nothing makes one happier than official street signs guiding me from the hotel to the venue!

But even with such a welcome, I love the first day of DrupalCon, and I don’t mean trainings, community summit, or sprints, although they are important and valuable. More than all of that I love reconnecting with friends, colleagues, and collaborators.

Adam and Webchick

We discuss the state of Drupal 8, and celebrate recent accomplishments, like the acceptance of the pagination dream markup into Drupal 8 core! This particular issue is one I’ve been working on consistently since Drupal Dev Days last March, but it’s not my victory alone, seven of us worked heavily on the ticket and many others contributed in smaller chunks.

We talk about which sessions we’ll attend and promote our own, namely Campbell’s and my Coder vs. Themer Ultimate Grudge Smackdown: Fight to the Death!

[embedded content]

Kalpana

We also discuss new challenges and next steps, and in the sprint area we collaborate and problem solve together. Forum One’s Kalpana Goel is immensely passionate about core contribution and sprinting and received a scholarship from Drupal Association to come to Amsterdam and do just that.

Last but not least, we talk about the after parties and the social activities. But ultimately, it’s not about the hippest new nightclub or sushi at a shi-shi restaurant, it’s about people. I vastly prefer collecting colleagues and friends old and new into a semi-spontaneous dinner group, and so that’s what we did.

So that’s completes my recap of Day one in Amsterdam. Stay tuned for more updates soon!

Read our other updates for DrupalCon:
DrupalCon Amsterdam, Day 2: From Memories to the Future
DrupalCon Amsterdam, Day 3: Drupal 8 Beta Released
DrupalCon Amsterdam, Day 4: Our Kung fu is more powerful than yours!

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Arriving at a Shared Vocabulary and Understanding of Design Composition

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DrupalCon Amsterdam, Day 2: From Memories to the Future

Aug 02 2012
Aug 02

I've got my ticket punched for Munich, and I'm excited. In addition to checking in with all my European Drupal friends, I'm going to be interviewing Project Leader Dries for the opening keynote!

We did something like this at BADCamp last fall, and it was a great success. The conversational format lets us dig into topics more in-depth — hurray for follow-up questions! — plus the range of material we cover can be wider. Not only can we get a chance to see Dries in a more personal setting, but it's an opportunity to ask probing questions about how he sees Drupal's future as a project, a technology, and a business ecosystem.

Clearly I'm thrilled and honored to be invited to participate in the Keynote event like this. I've spent a lot of time working in/on/with this project, and within this great community, because I believe in it. My colleagues and I founded Pantheon because we believe Drupal is key to a better internet. It's really exciting to be able to engage with Dries, to talk about that vision and what we see coming up.

Can't wait to catch you all in Munich!

Apr 12 2012
Apr 12

One of the greatest aspects of Drupal is the outstanding community of Drupal users and supporters that constantly work to not only make the software function better, but to make your overall experience using it better. With Drupal, that experience has many opportunities to extend beyond the electronic world and into the real world by way of DrupalCon and regional Drupal meetups. Prior to moving to Portland, Oregon, I had the privilege of coordinating the Denver Drupal meetups and have been able to visit other meetups. While all regional meetups have their own local flavor, they are all share a welcoming atmosphere... and the Portland meetup is no exception.

April's Portland Drupal meetup kicked off with Voodoo Doughnuts (courtesy of the Drupal Association), followed by reports from DrupalCon Denver. Some of the highlights that Portlanders mentioned include:

  • Drupal 8 is being built upon Symfony! Symfony is an open source PHP framework that will replace some of Drupal's low level code with stable, optimized code and allow for better and faster Drupal development. One analogy presented at DrupalCon was: Symfony is to PHP as jQuery is to JavaScript.
  • Drush 5 was released during DrupalCon. Did you know that you can now install, configure and run Drupal (including the web server) with just one command?
  • The Education Unconference was a huge success, not only as a one day pre-conference event, but continuing discussions and BoFs throughout the entire week. The overwhelming positive feedback has prompted discussions about more education inclusion for next year's DrupalCon Portland.
  • DrupalCon is coming to Portland! Just in case anyone hadn't already heard, we had to mention it again.

Following the highlights, Jacob, Neil and Stephanie talked about what DrupalCon Portland means to the local community, how Portlanders can get involved and a bit about the process of hosting DrupalCon. It's a lot of work (even with the incredible support provided by the Drupal Association), but the Portland community is excited to jump in and make DrupalCon Portland the best one yet. If you'd like to get involved, fill out the volunteer form.

With the air still buzzing with DrupalCon talk, we headed over to The Lucky Lab Beer Hall for food, drinks and continued discussions. For information about future Portland area meetups, visit the Portland Drupal Groups page.

Apr 05 2012
Apr 05

Update: Here's the follow up post on drupal.org with the implementation plan: http://drupal.org/node/1540656.

DrupalCon is over (since two weeks already). It was an awesome time. Some say it was the best so far. Thankfully it doesn't mean that the community will sleep until Munich. No, now it's time for action! The code freeze is coming closer and things need to happen quickly.

One of the things that I've decided to help with for Drupal 8, is improved support for content staging in core. At DrupalCon there were quite a bit of discussions around this matter. And I'm going to try to summarize this in this blog post.

Content staging is a lot of different things to different people. It involves workflows, APIs to manage content, universally unique and identifiable content, APIs for pushing and merging content between environments, and so on. Many people also use content staging-like functionalities to share content across networks of sites. So, when people talk about content staging they often talk about it in different contexts or focusing on different technical problems. Here are some of the semi-related discussions that took place.

Core conversation on content staging

On Tuesday I started off with my core conversation on this topic. You'll find slides and videos here: http://denver2012.drupal.org/content/content-staging-core

Discussions about Workflows

@stevector and robeano held a core conversation about the editorial workflow experience in Drupal and highlighted some problems with revision management in core. This is something we need to improve to efficiently be able to stage revisions of content. But more about that in the next blog post. Listen to the core conversation here: http://denver2012.drupal.org/content/i-just-want-edit-node

Discussions about Entity API

On Tuesday (if I recall correctly) we held an Entity API BoFs. One of the things we talked about was introducing a Property API, similar to what the Entity API contrib module for Drupal 7 provides. This would unify how we interact with fields and properties on the code level and help solve one of the toughest problems for efficient content staging, namely consistently tracking what properties and fields that adds dependencies (like author or taxonomy terms). This would then be defined in the property API, similar how “data types” are used in the Entity API contrib module and Rules.

Another important discussion that happened around the Entity API in core was @DamZ's and @lsmith's core conversation about implementing standards for document storage in content management systems in general, but Drupal in particular. One of the very interesting topics was the plan for introducing PHPCR to Drupal. PHPCR defined a standardized API for how content should be stored and managed. That in turn, would make it a lot easier to implement a standardized outward-facing API and a canonical format for our content (like CMIS). This would define a more robust transportation protocol for moving content between environments. Go ahead and listen to the whole core conversation here: http://denver2012.drupal.org/content/open-standards-and-document-oriented-storage.

Notes from the content staging BoFs

For the Drupal 7 BoF that was held, we mostly talked about how people are tackling content staging (and similar functionality) right now. We simply concluded that people and organizations do it very differently. Some people are using Deploy, some people don't, some people build more advanced content staging/preview functionalities on a single site together with modules like Workbench Moderation or State Machine. One thing that came out of the Drupal 7 BoF was that we should look deeper into how we can integrate Deploy and State Machine better with each other. More on this in another post.

For the Drupal 8 BoF we identified some of the things I already mentioned in this blog post:

  • better revisioning support for single-site content staging
  • ability to define variants of your configuration (more on this below)
  • ability to synchronize deployments of configuration and content together
  • we need a canonical entity format

Being able to work on different variants of configuration for your site was something we talked a lot about. One exemplifying scenario would be an editor on an e-commerce site that, through the UI, prepares new sets of content together with a new variant of configuration (menus, views, landing pages etc) for the launch of a new spring clothes collection. Currently in CMI there's no API support for this, not even support for different variations between staging and production. It's for now recommended that you solve this on a VCS level with different branches of your code. I talked to Greg Dunlap, the initiative lead, about this and he said it has been discussed. But providing API support for this and eventually a UI where you blindly can switch between variants of your configuration is complicated with the risk of mangling your database (switching between different Field API configurations for instance). So we would need to think some more about this and eventually re-visit this discussion.

Summary

All in all, there were a lot of good discussions and ideas flying around. The next step will be to formalize a more concrete plan and start work on things we need to improve for better content staging in Drupal 8. Work is already being done in a lot of areas that help improve the situation, but there's more work to do. More about this in the next blog post ;)

Mar 28 2012
Mar 28

This past week at DrupalCon Denver, I attended a wonderful BoF on project management. The session started as a conversation about the complexities of Drupal project management. As we collected a bulleted list, one item in particular from our list stuck with me:

In Drupal development, fixed budget projects exist in an instantaneous sense, but in reality evolve constantly.

One can never account for every unknown on any given project, even when given an infinite amount of time. This idea captures the typical project process exceptionally well as Drupal (and its community) rapidly changes and improves, but we often stumble on the "two steps forward, one step back" phenomenon as a part of this. How can we account for these external risks and explain this phenomenon to our collaborators in the project process? Without firm understanding of this concept, the frustration is likely to mount for all parties.The illusion of moving forward by several paces only to jump back detracts (sometimes entirely) from the fact that progress has been made. This often leaves development teams discouraged and clients, stakeholders and collaborators neglected. As project managers, we're posed with bridging the gap. But how?

Because sometimes modules become abandoned, patches never get merged, and other dominant features crop up, it's best not to guarantee the use of any one particular module, installation profile, distribution or any other kind of feature, but rather an encompassing functionality. For example, instead of specifying the use of the ShareThis module, specify the functionality for users to share pages with members of their social networks. Not only does this get at the meat of the problem we're trying to solve, it explains it in language that our stakeholders will understand, and it won't lock the development team into a dead-end in terms of solutions architecture.

At this point, I can hear site builders and business developers alike saying to themselves, "You expect us to account for building this feature from scratch when there's already something out there that does what I want? That will multiply the size our estimate!" The answer is: not necessarily. Obviously, the Views module is not going to be abandoned any time soon (and if it somehow is, there better well be an jaw-droppingly awesome successor). It really depends on the strength and the state of the feature the developers wish to incorporate, and how cutting edge the stakeholder wants to be. The most cutting edge stakeholder will likely be understanding of the two-steps-one-step phenomenon, so it's a moot point. Those who aren't looking for the shiniest tool in the toolshed should be happy to settle with something that is tried and true. As for those who fall in between, consulting on a feature-by-feature basis will likely get you what you need to accomplish the project: "We could go wtih module X which is currently the standard, or we can try module Y which seems to be up and coming for such and such reasons, but may have risks involved as it's still in its early stages."

A graph of Everett Rogers Technology Adoption Lifecycle model. Drawn in OmniGraffle and then trimmed in Apple Preview. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:DiffusionOfInnovation.pngAnother great resource to determine where a particular feature is, and where it is going is by consulting the good old technology product cycle diagram (More about the product life cycle on Wikipedia). The development team should be able to place where the feature falls in the product cycle. If they can't, then it's probably not a safe bet. Anywhere at the tail end of a growth phase or in the maturity phase is ideal. This diagram will speak to many clients, stakeholders and collaborators in a way that they will understand. If they see that the module they're interested in is in a decline or an early growth phase, they should be able to understand the consequences with little explanation.

A cry I hear coming from the coding side of my psyche is: "Modules and other functionality can't be swapped out so simply-- they aren't interchangeable. What if the module we intended to use is one I'm familiar with, but the one we end up going with is completely foreign to me?" This begins to get into internal risk mitigation and recognizing the skill set of your team. Skipping over the complexities of that (enormous) topic, before selecting a module and getting gung-ho about it, give your developers time during the design phase to familiarize themselves with the options, and gain confidence in their ability to manipulate them to suit the needs of the project. If they're not confident in this before the design is solidified, they may as well be building the feature themselves. How this affects budget, especially with regard to an increase, will need to be discussed with the client, and the budget balanced accordingly.

In the end, by avoiding specifics and focusing on goals (while still emphasizing the feasibility of the target) in the sales process gives the design and development team the freedom to accomplish the goals in the best way possible in the moment. If uncertainties arise out of product life cycle changes, the path forward should be determined by the stakeholders, so long as they understand the consequences and the available options fit within budget (which could encompass an entire blog post on its own).

All in all, my mind is still churning the ideas exchanged during the brief 15 minutes in this one hour BoF in the three day conference and I can't wait to contribute again to the DrupalCon experience (next time, at home base!) in Portland in 2013. Looking forward to seeing you all next May!

Image: A graph of Everett Rogers Technology Adoption Lifecycle model. Drawn in OmniGraffle and then trimmed in Apple Preview. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:DiffusionOfInnovation.png

Mar 12 2012
Mar 12

Posted Mar 12, 2012 // 0 comments

We've got our sites set on some pretty exciting sessions at the 2012 DrupalCon in Denver. I made sure to poll the team on their top picks technical, government, business and design sessions, and I have them for you here…

Design Talks We're Excited to See

Business & Strategy Talks We'll Hear

Government Talks We'll Definitely Catch

Technical Talks We Wouldn't Miss

I'm definitely looking forward to seeing some old friends in Denver week. In the meantime, if you have any recommendations for sessions we should see, leave your suggestions below.

As our Director of Marketing, Betsy Ensley is cheerfully promoting our work to prospects, clients, staff members, and the greater Drupal and semantic web communities at-large. Whether she’s tweeting about a recent blog post, attending ...

Mar 10 2012
Mar 10

The lack of a robust content staging solution in Drupal has been long standing. In this post I won’t go into details of why this is such a difficult problem to solve. Instead, I’ll suggest a plan, to make a plan, to solve it! So, those of you that are interested in tackling a strategically important functionality for Drupal 8, please continue to read.

What’s being done right now?

Throughout the last 8-9 months I’ve been working on a rewritten version of UUID and Deploy for Drupal 7. It’s been moving slow for different reasons, one being because we’re very few people coding on it. But (dare I say it?) we are close to a release of Deploy!

Acquia started an initiative called Large Scale Drupal (LSD), focusing on identifying, planning and consolidating work on problems for large scale Drupal implementations. Content staging is one focus area, with wireframes and workflow discussions.

In parallel with all this, the Configuration Management Initiative landed the first UUID patch and the initial version of the file based configuration API. Both patches are important for improving the content staging situation in Drupal 8, but it’s not enough.

A plan, to make a plan

For those of you that are interested to work on this topic, here are some events you should participate in during DrupalCon Denver, and some points we need to discuss in order to get out of Denver with a solid plan on how to make content staging work better in Drupal 8!

Core conversation: Content Staging in Core, Tue 11:15am – 11:45am

Some points I will raise and we hopefully will discuss during my core conversation:

  • Why a file based configuration API isn’t the whole answer
  • What I think is needed in core to tackle content staging better (this will also be a separate post soon)
  • Next steps for the UUID implementation in core
  • Do we need some sort of documentation, group or sub-initiative to track this?

BoF: Content Staging in Drupal 7, Wed 11:45am – 1:00pm

  • Work being done in different projects for Drupal 7, like Deploy, State Machine, LSD etc.
  • How to consolidate work across those projects
  • Next steps moving towards a working solution in Drupal 7

BoF: Content Staging in Drupal 8, Wed 1:00pm – 2:00pm

  • Follow up on our discussion from the core conversation
  • Create issues, documentation or plans we find needed in order to move forward

Thought?

This blog post is a cross post of this g.d.o post, please discuss there.

Feb 27 2012
Feb 27

There are only a few weeks left until DrupalCon Denver, and we’re getting pumped up at Evolving Web for the year’s largest Drupal hangout. With an estimated 4,000 participants in mile high Denver, March 19-23th promises to be a week teeming with exciting sessions, networking and skiing! Four of us will be heading down to Denver, and we hope to see you there. We have lots planned for the conference from contests to sessions to code sprints

Update: We've revised our contest, see evolvingweb.ca/drupalirl for the updated version!

DrupalCon Ticket Giveaway

We have one extra ticket for DrupalCon Denver to give away. If you're a Montreal Drupaler who's planning on attending the Drupal 8 Multilingual code sprint in Denver, give us a tweet @evolvingweb and let us know you're interested!

Photo Contest

Following on the heels of our Drupal Crossword in London, comes our Drupal Celebrity Photo Contest! Hunt down your favourite Drupaler for a photo-op, then tweet the picture with hashtag #drupalceleb for a chance to win a camera! More information and contest rules at evolvingweb.ca/drupalceleb. UPDATE: To address concerns raised about privacy, we've modified our photo contest, now called Drupal In Real Life photo challenge. For more info, see the follow-up blog post Drupalcon Contest, Take Two.

Session: Multilingual Site Building with Drupal 7

Curious about what it takes to integrate multilingual support into your website? I'm co-presenting a session on multilingual Drupal with Florian Loretan from Wunderkraut. We'll introduce you to Drupal’s multilingual architecture and help you get off the right foot when planning your next big project. Our session, Don't Get Lost in Translation: Multilingual Site Building with Drupal 7, will take place on Tuesday, March 20th at 3:45pm in Room 203.

Drupal 8 Multilingual Code Sprint

Gabor Hojsty will be leading a Drupal 8 Multilingual Initiative codesprint on the last day of DrupalCon, as well the two days following DrupalCon. There has been a strong push towards greater multilingual support in Drupal 8, and we want to help as much as possible. We'll be at the sprint, so come by and help make this initiative a success. See Gabor’s post on groups.drupal.org for more information.

Silver Sponsors

We’re excited to sponsor DrupalCon Denver at the Silver level this year! Ever since DrupalCon DC, we’ve been showing our support for the conferences by pledging sponsorship at different levels. Join us in Denver at booth 103, where we’ll be hanging out for the week. Come by, say hello and grab some of our awesome swag.

While we’re busy getting ready for DrupalCon, we hope you’ve had a chance to review the schedule and fit in your favourite sessions. Tickets are still available, so get yours now. See you in Denver!

Feb 04 2012
Feb 04

Posted by Graeme Blackwood on Saturday, 4 February 2012 at 6pm

One of the most important and complex aspects of a DrupalCon is the schedule. An enormous amount of work goes into getting it right – from the huge number of session submissions, which have to be reviewed and selected by the track chairs and their teams, to the people whose job it is to carefully consider and decide time slots for all of them.

Once all of this work has taken place, the schedule then needs to be presented, in print, on meter boards, posters and in the delegate guide, as well as on the website and mobile app.

With around 70-80 sessions over three days and eight tracks, with three possible skill levels and multiple presenters, all split up into different time slots, and sometimes sub-time slots, presenting this lot is not a simple task. I had some great people working with me on the London schedule and I think we did a pretty good job.

For Denver, the plan was to take the schedule a bit further, making it responsive so that the layout adjusts to the size of the screen you are viewing it on. This is particularly useful for mobile phones and tablets, on which the user experience would be very poor if the design wasn't responsive. Initially the Denver team were looking at a table format for the schedule, similar to the Chicago approach: http://chicago2011.drupal.org/schedule. This layout is really good, but tables don't do well with responsive design. Tables have no way of rearranging themselves – if the width of the table shrinks, the cells just squash horizontally until they are stopped by the longest word in each. This looks pretty horrible and usually breaks a website's layout on smaller screens.

DrupalCamp Austin did use a semi-table layout, and importantly, it doesn't actually use table markup, meaning it can collapse. This worked well because the number of sessions in a given time slot was limited. Denver's maximum is seven sessions in a single time slot, which even in a 960 set up, would be really squashing them in on a single row and force them to collapse almost immediately on the slightest resize.

Drupalcamp Austin's horizontal schedule layout

So a different method was needed. Initially taking the approach of a mobile web app, I put together an example schedule using Denver's branding to help demonstrate how it could collapse on smaller screens. The main difference in this layout is that instead of side by side, the sessions are stacked, divided by the time slots. The track icons were produced for Drupalcon Chicago and it felt really right to pick them up again for Denver.

The Denver team then adapted the prototype to fit the website and extended the icon set to cover the new tracks. While implementing, they made some subtle improvements to my prototype, like the track title on hover: http://denver2012.drupal.org/program/schedule

Drupalcon Denver web app prototype

There are definitely more improvements to be made. The hit area isn't very large on the sessions (only the title), so it's not always easy to press with your finger; wrapping everything in an a tag would resolve this. The rooms aren't displayed yet, which would be pretty useful to help you find your way around and some of the sessions don't fall into specific time slots, so we are working on adding these soon. Also the filters are yet to be implemented on the Denver site, but it is worth looking at the prototype on a mobile device to see how I envisaged them working.

This is of course, just one example of a schedule for one event format, but if you are reading this from inside or outside the 'Drupalsphere', I hope you found some of the ideas useful.

Categories: drupal, DrupalCon, Mobile, Responsive, UX

Jan 18 2012
Jan 18

In preparation for our DrupalCon Denver training, we're rounding up some of the free Drupal videos tutorials on Build a Module.com so potential attendees can get a feel for the style of training. We will be leveraging the Mentored Training model I posted about several months ago, and piloted successfully at BADCamp. In this model, the traditional 'lecture' is pre-recorded in order to free up the instructors to help students with specific issues and provide that critical face-to-face time for the entire duration of the training. It's really quite awesome.

If you're considering doing any training at DrupalCon but haven't quite hopped on the boat yet - due to cost or time commitment - let me point out a couple of the less obvious benefits. While the information you learn will be useful, what you'll find even more valuable is the time you get to spend directly with skilled Drupal instructors who can help you over your specific hurdles. A second subtle benefit is the connections you'll make both with the instructors and your fellow students, connections that I guarantee will pay back dividends throughout DrupalCon and way beyond.

If you're curious about our particular training (we have 9+ amazing trainers lined up), check out this writeup which includes a short video outlining how the training works and some of the benefits. If you'd just like to peruse some of our free videos on using Git and getting every essential Drupal 7 configuration component or piece of content into code, check out the videos below:

Free videos on Git and getting everything into code

How to use a scalable Git branching model called Gitflow - 6:41

In this free (but information packed) video, we take our develop-master branch workflow and expand it to include several branch tracks in a system commonly called "Gitflow". This system, while it looks kind of crazy as a chart, takes the guesswork out of branch organization and lays down a set of sustainable rules for a project of any complexity.

How to create, deploy and clean up a release branch - 8:37

With a release branch, you capture a (hopefully) stable state of your code base and push it to a production site. In this video we walk you through each step of the way, from creating and working within the release, pushing it to production, and cleaning up after the push.

Overview of database components you can add to version control - 5:50

Getting our code into version control is a great start, but that's just half the battle with Drupal, since so much information is captured in the database. In this video, we begin the process of exploring the best way to get database components into our Git repository.

How to download and install the Features module - 1:50

The new videos this week walk you through the first steps of using the Features module, but before you do that, you'll need to actually install it. It's pretty straightforward, but we wanted to walk you through the process to make sure we get all the steps covered.

How to organize features and implications of getting everything into code - 4:09

Once you wrap your mind around the power of a feature module and the basics of updating and manipulating it, the next question you're likely to have is 'where do I put which component?' In this video, we talk you through how to organize components in a sustainable, reasonable way.

How to create and modify a Selenium macro that builds a node - 7:08

To demonstrate using Selenium IDE, we begin by recording a macro that generates a new node. You can record virtually any change with Selenium, but this would be one common use of the tool. We'll follow it up with one more test to demonstrate some additional techniques.

The challenges of overriding shared feature modules and some solutions - 4:53

One of the biggest hurdles to adopting Features as a configuration management solution is that overriding configuration options captured in a feature module isn't always straightforward. In this video we begin the review of best practices when overriding these features.

Dec 23 2011
Dec 23

After DrupalCon London, I was sitting on the banks of the Thames river sipping champagne when I remembered the time I told my friend I was joining the co-op program at Concordia. He launched into a story about his own co-op experience. One day, he had to do "pen testing".

"Ooh, you got to do penetration testing?" I asked. I find computer security interesting, so I was kind of excited. But then I remembered that my friend was a business major and that there is no way he would have been doing penetration testing.

"No, I mean... I was testing pens. My supervisor gave me a ziploc bag full of pens and told me to test each one to make sure it had ink." At that, I got a mouthful of coffee up my nose.

In May, I joined Evolving Web for a co-op work term that was to last eight months, and I am happy to say that my duties have not included testing pens, cold-calling charities to sell them snake-oil SEO packages, or doing Excel data entry.

During my time at Evolving Web, I've helped build real Drupal projects. One of them will be used by friends in the future. I had a real impact on these systems, and I've grown as an engineer by getting thrown head-first into them. Sometimes I made mistakes, but I had great mentorship from the entire team. I'm proud of the work I got done.

I was fortunate enough to travel with the company to New York, Boston, London (UK), and Toronto to Drupal Camps and Cons. At these events, I was introduced to an enthusiastic and friendly community of developers, designers, project managers, and entrepreneurs. For someone who has always had trouble "getting into open source", the warm welcome by the Drupal community meant I could gain the confidence to do real open source work. I also had the privilege to give my talk on custom fields and poutine. The chance to share my knowledge with the community was fun and rewarding.



Me on the road back from Boston with Evolving Webbers Logan and Simone



The Evolving Web team at DrupalCon London

At the code sprints in London and Montreal, I contributed a modest handful of patches to Drupal core and contrib — and I got to do it on company time. Evolving Web takes the community seriously, and I've been constantly encouraged to give back as much as I can. I'm no longer afraid to jump into issue queues and submit patches. For a novice developer, I'd recommend contributing to Drupal as a great way to get used to open source — the people are just too friendly.

As my co-op term draws to an end, and I return to the cold, unforgiving halls of academia, I'll look back on my time at Evolving Web fondly. I hope that other co-op students get a chance to experience what I've experienced, because if you've got to have a co-op job, this is the one to have. I'm happy to say I'll be coming back in the summer.

Nov 11 2011
Nov 11

With each week that DrupalCon Denver is coming nearer, the excitement in the community grows. At Trellon, we're not immune to that excitement, and we're proud to be a Platinum sponsor of Drupalcon Denver. We're looking forward to seeing members of the Drupal community there, both old friends and new. We're excited about the opportunity that Drupalcons give us not only to learn more about the direction of Drupal, but to help shape it. We're eager to learn what new and exciting things people around the world have been doing with Drupal. We want to hear about the great things you've built with Drupal, and we'd be happy to talk about what we've been up to lately, too.

We're also excited about sharing things that we've learned with you. As a result, we've put together proposals for a wide range of sessions.

Until midnight on Monday, November 14, you can head over to the Drupalcon site and vote for any of these that you'd like to attend.

We are already now looking forward to DrupalCon Denver to meet all of you great guys in person. Until Denver!

Jun 28 2011
Jun 28

Cadre Web Hosting is sending someone to Drupalcon London 2011. Will it be you?

That's right, Cadre is sending one lucky winner to London to attend Drupalcon all on our dime. Since we are Silver Sponsors this year we decided that we'd give away a conference registration along with airfare and lodging for the week of Drupalcon. All you have to do is be from the US, Canada or Europe and gain the most points during the contest, simple right?

Here's how it works:

Step two: Activate your contest page by following the activation link we'll send you after submitting the entry form

Step three: Run your contest! Send your contest page around to everyone you know. For each tweet or facebook post someone does through your page you get one point. Folks can do this once per day, so be sure to get your crew to come back so you can stay in the lead. We'll be sending out additional updates with other ways to win points as the contest continues, so stay tuned for those announcements!

Step four: The contestant with the most points wins!

In addition to the grand prize, we will also be giving runner-up prizes including a year's worth of web hosting and fancy Cadre t-shirts, how about that? Are you so excited you just can't stand it? We are too, so get over there, sign up and start rallying your supporters!

We'll see one of you in London, good luck!

The Cadre Web Hosting Team

Mar 05 2011
Mar 05

March 5th, 2011

Hi there! For all you Drupal lovers who’ll be at DrupalCon 2011 in Chicago: Achtung, baby! We’re having a little contest, and the lucky winner will get an unlocked iPhone 4!!

Participation is easy:

How it works

To be eligible:

  • The winner must be a DrupalCon attendee.
  • Tweets must be sent to @imagex_media with a #DrupalCon hashtag.
  • Only your first 3 tweets will be considered (we’re not wanting a spamfest… QUALITY is what counts)
  • Contest ends on Thursday, March 10 at 3:30 PM (CST).

A panel of Drupal experts will decide on the most entertaining, engaging and/or educational tweet throughout the conference. The winner will get a brand new unlocked 16 GB iPhone 4.

If you need a creative spark, here are some recent examples from Twitter:

After we announce the winning tweet, we’ll be following up to share some of the coolest sites we discovered.

Why a contest?

Nine of us ImageX-ers are coming to DrupalCon, and we’re pretty amped about it. We’re looking forward to connecting with some of our favorite clients and friends from shops all around the world. So we thought, “Hey, what better way to share our excitement than offer a cool, fun giveaway?”

If you’re at DrupalCon, be sure to come by Booth 37 and say hi!

Sessions ImageX will be presenting at Drupalcon

ImageX Drupalcon Updates

If you’d like to stay abreast of what we’re up to throughout the week, follow us on Twitter or on Facebook.

Posted In:

Nov 04 2010
Nov 04

Its first incarnation took place in Brussels on 8-10 October 2010. The main organizer of the event was Kristof Van Tomme (Pronovix) and he got a lot of help from Rudy Van Hoe (Microsoft), Michaela Kraft (Microsoft) and Jakub Suchy (Dynamite Heads). The goal of the event was intensified networking, sharing best practices and building collaborations among Drupal companies to keep the pace in a rapidly evolving, almost turbulent market.

The target audience reacted very quickly: from the available 60 places there were hardly any left 3 days after that the meeting was announced! Finally, 64 Drupal executives and freelancers attended the meeting, representing 55 Drupal companies (generally with 10 to 30 employees) and over 700 Drupalistas mostly from Europe, from about 15 different countries as main office location, but with a much wider market range.

The format of the event (Open Space Technology), introduced to this public and facilitated by Kristof Van Tomme, also required active participation; and the meeting was actually as innovative and collaborative in character as the Drupal community itself.

Several participants published blog posts on the event already, which provide a comprehensive review of the sessions, the meeting conclusions as well as the personal experiences and hopes:

There were numerous action points defined at the event, among which there is still vivid public discussion for example on Drupal marketing resources for enterprises (Enterprise Marketing Resources, Infographics) and Drupal training (research-and-academia, curriculum-and-training). As a concrete outcome of DrupalCXO, there is a survey launched on “Software Used in Drupal Development” to map what software Drupal companies use, how efficient they are and how they could be improved. (Everyone who contributes as a survey participant will also get the summarized version of the aggregate data.)

Almost 400 tweets were also sent on #DrupalCXO during and after the meeting by not only those who were there, but also by those who could not make it. And it could have been hundreds more if it had not been limited by the engagement that the sessions required...

It is also evident from the meeting feedback that the sponsors were very much appreciated both for their contribution and their attitude to the event: each 7th tweet mentioned @Microsoft and said big thanks for helping in the organization and providing its facilities for DrupalCXO, and each 9th thanked @Acquia for sponsoring the Saturday evening program and actively participating at the event.

There are over 60 pictures on the meeting and its venue on Flickr, and there will also be some interviews available soon, which were made at DrupalCXO.

And the future? Well, the informal network that the attendees built at the event (and even before) provide a good basis for future collaboration, and there will surely be places where the discussions can continue (see upcoming events) and take a novel energy even with those who missed this opportunity!

Please don’t forget about the next DrupalCXO either: it will be scheduled for sometime around the Drupal Business Days (26-27 May, 2011), somewhere close to Helsinki… (To be announced later)

Jul 10 2010
Jul 10

Drupal’s multilingual capabilities are essential to it’s success. Most of the people who use Drupal need to do so in a language other than English. While Drupal offers great capabilities for internationalization and localization, it’s a bit of work to set up, and several key concepts come into play. Here are the sessions for DrupalCon Copenhagen that deal with language, i18n, and l10n. It’s appropriate that the European DrupalCon have a strong focus on these topics. Please go vote for them!

Jun 21 2010
Jun 21

The next Drupalcon in Copenhagen is just 2 months away and the session planning is already in progress. I have been selected as a chair of Drupal for Business track (see sessions in this track).

The focus of this track is case studies, showcases, Drupal products and everything related to using Drupal in your business. There is still time to submit a session and if you have an idea of a high-quality session related to business, submit it now! (Do you know somebody who should in your opinion present but didn't submit a session? Let me know at jakub @ dynamiteheads . com and I will contact them).

The sessions will be selected based on a few criteria:

  • User voting
  • General session quality

Make sure you fill in your user profile at Drupalcon site and post some information about any talks you did in past (if you did any and they don't have to be related to Drupal). That will help us select the best sessions for Drupalcon and make the whole event rock even more!

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Feb 26 2010
Feb 26

By Dmitri Gaskin  |  Posted in ,   |  February 26th, 2010

I won't bore you with the gory details of Drupalcon SF, as it seems every other blog on the Drupal planet is doing (yes, we KNOW it's coming up and we know for sure that it will be AWESOME).

Anyway, Boldium (specifically, me, Dmitri Gaskin) has two session proposals: Drush and the Introduction to Theming. Both should be a whole lot of fun and very awesome, so you should go vote on them!

The Drush session will pretty much cover everything you need to know about Drush. Drush, which is short for Drupal Shell, is the most awesome thing since sliced Drupal. It allows you to control your site from the command line and do all kinds of cool stuff. I'll also be showing how to use my module Drush Make, which is receiving a lot of hype.

I've given the Introduction to Theming talk twice before: once at BADCamp '07 and again at BADCamp '09. Both times, there was a a standing-room only audience. In this talk, I cover the basics of theming that anyone will need to know. This will be a hands-on session that requires no knowledge of PHP.

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Pages

About Drupal Sun

Drupal Sun is an Evolving Web project. It allows you to:

  • Do full-text search on all the articles in Drupal Planet (thanks to Apache Solr)
  • Facet based on tags, author, or feed
  • Flip through articles quickly (with j/k or arrow keys) to find what you're interested in
  • View the entire article text inline, or in the context of the site where it was created

See the blog post at Evolving Web

Evolving Web