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May 29 2018
May 29

Did you know that Drupal has a Point of Sale (POS) module that pairs with the widely used Commerce module? That's right, Drupal Commerce is now the full end-to-end platform for a complete omnichannel ecommerce experience. Whether you're running an online store, a physical store, or both, you can do it all with Drupal Commerce!

One of the great things about a web-based POS is that all you need is a web browser for it to work. This opens the door to new POS hardware options. You can use an iPad, a laptop, or anything that has a browser. You don't need any expensive or specialized hardware from Moneris, nor do you need a branded solution such as Square. Instead, you now even have the option to build your own POS hardware for very little cost. Today we're featuring a Raspberry Pi based prototype that WE built! The whole setup cost about $250 CAD.

Watch the video below, or keep reading to learn more.

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As mentioned above, we bought a simple touchscreen and mounted a Raspberry Pi on the back. Once up and running, all you have to do is plug it in, connect it to the Internet, and it will automatically boot up into the POS login screen. If your staff has a problem, all they have to do is unplug it and plug it back in. There's no messing with settings or anything. Just reboot. Easy!

Once you get the hardware working, the display can be used in 3 different ways depending on how you need it:Check Out Our High Five Drupal Web Series

  1. The administrative view, which is what the cashier would use.
  2. A customer display view, which shows what the cashier has added so the customer can see the products and prices entered in real-time. Remember: all you need is a browser and something that can display a browser. The customer display is especially easy because it doesn't have to be a touchscreen; you could just use any monitor, a TV, etc, and run it off of the cashier hardware.
  3. A kiosk view, which is basically just running the front end of the site like your customers would do on their home computers. You could set that out in your store and let customers browse products and make purchases.

So, for a shoestring budget, we created a working point of sale that could be used in a store (see the video above). Aside from looking a little silly, our example is perfectly fine and works great. Plus, there are endless options for inexpensive enclosures to make it look better. You could even build or 3D print your own.

The do-it-yourself (DIY) route is a lot cheaper and gives you the freedom to do whatever you want. We will post further details soon on how to do all this yourself, including specific links to the components we used. And remember: it's Drupal, so it's open source, and all the software is free.

Integrated Drupal Ecommerce Solutions

May 01 2018
May 01

A lot of universities use Drupal in some capacity. Universities don't typically have just one site; they're made up of a ton of different pieces put together for course registrations and calendars and events and alumni and so on. So a couple of those pieces might use Drupal. Or one or two departments might use Drupal even if others do not.

Many educational institutions like Drupal because it's open source. Universities are often publicly funded and favor open stuff more than proprietary products. Plus, they need to manage a ton of content by a ton of different people, so they need a really big robust CMS.

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Introducing OpenEDU 3.0

The new OpenEDU 3.0 is a Drupal distribution setup for educational institutions. The older version was mostly a set of custom configurations, whereas 3.0 actually has unique functionality. It has analytics and monitoring built right into it, for instance. There's a new analytics dashboard that allows a central admin to see what's going on in all the different sections without having to check a while bunch of different accounts, which is pretty cool. There's also new functionality related to content management, workflows and editing flows that universities need to handle.

OpenEDU is also being integrated into the Commerce (keep an eye out at commercekickstart.com), so you can have both of them together.

The Commerce Disconnect

Strangely, a ton of universities are using Drupal, but they are not using Commerce. Even those they use Drupal and perform ecommerce are typically using pretty terrible antiquated systems, if they have a system at all.

Check Out Our High Five Drupal Web SeriesLack of awareness is a big factor in this. A lot of universities are so focused on the publishing end that they don't even think about commerce. Another stumbling block is security—they don't want to deal with the compliance issues around online payments, so they just keep doing what they're doing (i.e. accepting cash or taking credit card details over the phone, which is even less secure).

The reality is that businesses or organizations within a university could really benefit from using Commerce, particularly if they already use Drupal. They could just tack on a bit of Commerce and easily sell club memberships and accept donations (remember: Commerce has a built-in point of sale). There could be one central system that IT could maintain and keep secure, and everyone could still spin up their own customized version of it.

TL:DR - Educational institutions already use Drupal and so should really adopt Drupal Commerce to replace their old, antiquated payment systems.

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Our team understands that one-size does not fit all, especially in the education space, so we listen and work together to bring your students and staff the most secure and integrated open source solution available in the Commerce arena. Contact us today to discuss how Drupal Commerce can fit it with your existing systems.

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