Apr 25 2019
Apr 25

Do you need to set up a custom image carousel? Or maybe one slider with a teaser, displaying content from your website? What are the best Drupal 8 slideshow modules to consider for implementing and maintaining your slideshow?

And out of the box options are... out of question, right? Your requirements are too specific for that.
Maybe you need:
 

  • a certain number of slider items
  • different arrow designs
  • to display the image slideshow on other pages, too, not just on your homepage
     

With such flexibility and customization requirements in mind, we started digging into the “pile” of Drupal 8 image slider modules.

And here are the 4 ones that we've selected, those with the best reviews in the Drupal community:
 

If it's a fully customized slideshow that you want to implement, Views Slideshow's the module you need.

It'll “spoil” you with tons of add-ons to select from and give your unmatched flexibility. From:
 

  • titles
  • to images
  • to teasers of the last X blog posts on your website
     

… you get to include any type of items in your carousel.

Furthermore, it's jQuery-powered and it allows you to configure different settings for each one of the views that you'll create.

Note: oh, yes, you'll need to be pretty comfortable using Views in order to leverage this module at its full capacity.

Some of its key features:
 

  • your slider can include and display the latest products added to your eCommerce website 
  • you can set up a news item slideshow (the latest X news articles published on your Drupal 8 website)
  • from the latest X blog entries to the latest videos, testimonials, forum posts etc., you're free to include any type of content in your slider...
     

Now, here's a very brief step-by-step on how you can set it up and use it to create your slideshow:
 

1.1. Install and enable the module

Once you've downloaded it from Drupal.org, installed and enabled it, make sure to download its corresponding ZIP folder on Github, as well.

Give your folder a new name  — /jquery.cycle/ — then start uploading all its files to the 
/libraries/ folder in the root of your Drupal website.
 

1.2. Set up your view

Time to create your slideshow now. For this, just go to Structure> Views>Add new view 
 

1.3. Publish your slideshow block

For this, go to Structure>Block layout and select the region on your website that you want your slider to get displayed on.
 

1.4. Create a new image style

As you can see, the images included in your slideshow are currently of different sizes. Therefore, they're not perfectly adjusted to fit the block region that you've chosen for your slider.

To solve this inconvenience, just go to Configuration>Image styles>Add Image style. 

There, you can create a new style, that will be shared by all the images included in your slideshow.
 

2. Slick Slider, One of the Most Popular Drupal 8 Slideshow Modules

Another one of Drupal's modules for creating custom image slideshows, that ships with a heavy load of options. Powerful and flexible... what more could you ask for from your slider solution?

Capitalizing on Ken Wheeler's Slick carousel, working perfectly with Views and fields, the Slick Slider module:
 

  • enables you to set up a slider including multiple views, value fields and paragraph types
  • comes with image, audio and video support
  • supports complex layouts, as well
     

Some of its key features:
 

  • you're free to enable/disable the swipe functionality
  • it's responsive (scales along with its container)
  • some of its layouts are CSS-built
  • it's designed to work with Field collection, Media, Views, Image (and also to work perfectly fine with none of these modules)|
  • it allows you to configure your own “slide selecting” dots, the arrow keys and your slider's navigation, as well
  • it provides modular and extensible skins
  • you get to choose how you want your slideshow to be scrolled: swipe, desktop mouse dragging, auto scroll, mouse wheel scroll...
     

Another one of those Drupal 8 slideshow modules that gets the best reviews.

Here's why:
 

  • it leverages the Owl Carousel slider built by OwlFonk.   
  • it, too, empowers you to customize your image slideshow; in this respect, it ships with a myriad of customization settings
  • it's responsive
  • it capitalizes on a small ecosystem of submodules: Administration UI, Views Style, Field Formatter
     

Some of its key features:
 

  • from customizing your events to styling your controls, it allows you to tailor your image slider to suit all your needs
  • it supports multiple sliders
  • touch events
     

A simple module to consider each time you need to display a group of images in a compact way on your website. It even allows you to set the number of items to be included in your carousel...

Speaking of which, you should know that jCarousel, as its name says it, allows you to leverage the jCarousel jQuery plugin.

For this, it ships with a developer API for other modules to access. Furthermore, it integrates with Views, so you can easily turn any list of images (or other type of content) into a slideshow...

Some of its key features:
 

  • jCarousel field formater
  • out-of-the-box Views support
  • API for using jCarousel without Views
  • a collection of modern skins to choose from
  • Carousel pager that enable users to jump between multiple sliders
     

The END!

These are the first Drupal 8 slideshow modules to consider when looking for the best method for setting up your custom image/content slider.

Packed with tons of customization options, feature-rich and powerful, these 4 solutions for creating image carousels in Drupal 8 should be on your short list when you start looking beyond the out-of-the-box options for putting together a slider...

Apr 24 2019
Apr 24

Simple or custom-made? Is it a quick-to-assemble, rather “prototypical” form that you need for your website? Or a more complex, custom-made one? In a Drupal 8 Contact Forms vs Webform “debate”, which Drupal form builder best suits your data collection requirements?

On one hand, you have the convenience of creating your web forms in no time: simple, straightforward, “conventional” web forms. On the other hand, you get to scan through a never-ending list of advanced options and come up with a complex, fully custom-made web form.

That, of course, if you don't mind the time you need to invest in going through all those different form elements and available features and the risk of getting... overwhelmed by tons of field customization options.

Ease of use vs unlimited capabilities...

The convenience of getting your forms up and ready to collect user data in no time vs the chance to tailor some more advanced forms, ideally customized, carrying lots of different field values.

Decisions, decision...

Now, to help you decide here's a more detailed Drupal 8 Contact Forms vs Webform comparison. Weigh each one of the 2 form modules' benefits and drawbacks, set them against your own needs and... make the choice:


1. The Contact Forms Module 

Being part of Drupal core, there's no need to download and install the module.

Just go to Structure>Contact forms. Next, choose either to opt for the default form or to set up a new one: click the “Add contact form” button.

Drupal 8 Contact Forms vs Webform: Add Contact Form


Once in the form creation screen, enter your form's values in the predefined fields that you have there:
 

  • give the form a name in the “Label” field
  • enter the email address where all the form submission will be sent to (most probably your site admin address) in the “Recipients” field
  • enter your “Thank you” text in the “Message” field there; this will be the “thank you” text line your users will see once they hit the “submit/send” button 
  • in the “Redirect path”, enter the URL to the page that you want them to get forwarded to after they've submitted the forms (that if you don't want them to be redirected back to the homepage, by default)
  • click “Save” and there you have it: a simple form, with all the basic, must-have field values, built in no time
     

Of course, that doesn't mean that you can't further explore the given features and maybe add a few more fields and even styling options.

For instance, you could “Edit” your newly created form. Just select it in the “Contact Forms” screen and, scrolling down the options in the drop-down menu opening up, click the “Manage fields” option.

Click “Add field”, then “select a field type” – Text(plain), let's say – enter the “Label” and configure its settings.

Furthermore, if you want to style your form a bit, hit the “Manage form display” tab and... opt for a placeholder, for example. Next, explore the options available in the “Manage display” screen. For instance, you get to decide if you want your field label to be hidden, inline or visually hidden...

In short: in a Drupal 8 Contact Forms vs Webform comparison, the first form builder will always outshine the latter when it comes to ease of use.

It empowers you to set up a simple form quick and easy...
 

2. The Webform Module

Now, if Contact Forms is a rather minimalist form builder, the Webform module is a feature-rich, powerful one.

The customization features that it ships with go from email notifications to fine-grained access, from statistic collection of data to delivering results in a CSV format. From exporting data in various formats to... conditional sorting and filtering.

In other words, with Webform sky is the limit when it comes to the contact form that you can create.

It can go from a basic one to a highly complex, multi-page form. One made of lots of elements, advanced options for the user to select from, settings and features for you to leverage in the back-end...

But, let's keep in mind that it's contributed module so you'll first need to download it from Drupal.org.

Next, go to “Structure” and hit the “Webforms” tab. Then, click the “Add webform” button and, in the next screen popping up, give your new form a name (enter it in the “Title” field).

You'll be automatically forwarded to the “Build” tab, which is where all the “magic happens”. Once you click the “Add element” button, you'll get to “swim through” a sea of lots and lots... and lots of form elements (known as “fields” in Contact forms) to choose from. Ranging from basic to really advanced ones...

Webform: Select an Element Screen


Let's assume that you'll want to add a “Text field” element. Click the “Add Element” button corresponding it, then scan through all the new customization options listed up in the “Add Text field element” screen opening up next...

Feel free to add other elements to your webform: a “text area” maybe, an “email” element, as well... 

Note: do keep in mind that, once you've settled for the final fields/elements to be included in your web form, you can always change the order to get them displayed in. Just drag and drop them till they fit that predefined order in your mind...

Also, you can check/mark them as “Required” and turn them into “must fill in" fields, as opposed to optional form fields.

Note: feel free to edit that “Thank you” page that your webform will automatically forward users to. How? By clicking “Back to form”>"Settings”>"Confirmation” and selecting from the different options that you have there:
 

  • enter your own Confirmation title (e.g. “Thank you!”)
  • customize your Confirmation message
     

3. Drupal 8 Contact Forms vs Webform: Key Differences

Now that we've run our spotlight over each one of these 2 form building tools, let's make an inventory of the differences that we've identified:
 

  • first of all, it's obvious that the Webform module gives you more control over your web forms' design
     
  • also, unlike Contact Forms, it supports conditional emails; you get to send an email to a specific user in your list based on conditions associated with the value of certain elements in your form
     
  • Webform enables you to add basic logic to your web forms
     
  • … it comes packed with tons of advanced options, ranging from JS effects to conditional logic, to submission handling, etc.
     
  • Contact Forms, on the other hand, allows you to set up a simple contact form in the blink of an eye; you skip the tedious process of scanning through lots and lots of options, settings, and complex features
     
  • Webform allows you to create your forms either in a YAML file or in its the admin-friendly UI
     
  • also, Webform comes as a “cluster” of submodules – Webform REST, Honeypot, Webform Views, SMTP, Webform Encrypt, etc. – which are “responsible for” its multiple capabilities
     

4. In Conclusion...

The conclusion of this Drupal 8 Contact Forms vs Webform “debate” is quite simple: 

If you need a basic form on your website and you need it built fast, go with Contact Forms. Being included in Drupal 8 adds convenience...

But if you want to customize your form (and you have the time), to style it to your liking and “turbocharge” with advanced features and options, then go with Webform.
 

It's a much more powerful and feature-rich form builder, perfectly suited for your complex requirements...


Image by Tumisu from Pixabay

Apr 17 2019
Apr 17

What makes Drupal a great choice from a UX standpoint? What features are responsible for the enhanced end-user experience in Drupal 8? Those features that enable you to easily create an intuitive and enjoyable visitor experience on your own Drupal-based website/application.

And to constantly improve it...

Is it all those performance enhancements that it ships with? Or maybe its “responsive out-of-the-box” nature? Or rather its multilingual capabilities?
 

1. But First: 7 Evergreen Ways to Improve Your Website's UX

It goes without saying that, in order to create an enjoyable, rich user experience on your Drupal 8 website, you'll need to:
 

  • put together a solid UX strategy
  • run extensive user research and map the user's journey
  • come up with an effective, well-planned UX design, paying attention to all the latest design trends (and now decoupled Drupal empowers you to tap into a whole range of new possibilities...)
     

And while carrying out all these phases of the UX design process, make sure to apply the following evergreen techniques for enhancing the visitor's experience:
 

1.1. Optimize the page loading time

For speed will always be the factor with the biggest influence on the user's experience on your Drupal site.

In this respect, there are tons of performance enhancements that you can implement, ranging from aggregating your JS and CSS files to properly configuring your cache to opting for a CDN, to...
 

2.2. Use bullets to structure your text

Bulleted lists are the “holy grail” of neatly structured, easy to read content.

For, in vain you invest time and effort in providing content that delivers real value to your website's visitors if you display it as an... “impenetrable” block of text.

In this respect, bullets help you break down the information. The result: users will see the key product or service benefits/will go through all of the presented features a lot quicker.
 

2.3. Use white space strategically

Speaking of easy to read content: there's no better way to enhance readability and to draw attention to specific elements on a page than... by using the white space itself.

It will automatically direct their attention to the text/image emphasized by all the white space surrounding it.
 

2.4. UX design is consistent Design

From color palette to button styles, from the size of the headings in your text to the chosen font, from the used photos to various design elements... keep consistency across all the pages on your Drupal website.

Otherwise, you risk to confuse and eventually... tire its visitors.
 

2.5. Go for visible, attractive CTAs

Always use action words for your calls to action and make sure they're easily recognizable. CTAs play a crucial role in setting up an intuitive, efficient navigation structure on your website...
 

2.6. Use images wisely

As images are always well-deserved “breaks” for the eye, especially when it's a long text that it's challenged to go through.

And yet, if you fail in using the relevant images, those that perfectly team up with your text... the user experience that you'll deliver will be anything but compelling...
 

2.7. Make your headings a high priority 

Remember to write your headings around some of the main keywords.

Also, strategically design them so that they're highly visible and help users to quickly scan through the content.
 

2. 4 Features Responsible for the Superior End-User Experience in Drupal 8

Gluing together all the design best practices that make a great user experience does call for a flexible and dynamic web platform.

Drupal 8 is that platform. It comes packed with some powerful features that make it easy for you to create the best visitor experience on your website.

Here are the ones with a huge influence on your website's UX:
 

2.1. Drupal 8 is responsive right out-of-the-box

And responsiveness, along with top page loading speed, still is one of those factors with a great influence on visitors' experience with your Drupal website.

With:
 

  • all the available base themes now being responsive
  • the convenience of adapting your images to various screen sizes right from their display properties
     

… creating a compelling end-user experience in Drupal 8 is dead-simple.


2.2. Enhanced performance

From a performance standpoint, Dries Buytaert's post on Drupal 8's performance optimizations is still one of the most relevant sources.

If Drupal was already built to “inject” enterprise-level performance into static pages, Drupal 8, with all its caching enhancements, is designed to speed up dynamic web pages, as well...


2.3. Multilingual capabilities

Remember the user experience's main facets, ranging from useful to findable, to valuable, to credible to... accessible?

Well, Drupal 8 provides you with multilingual capabilities right out of the box. You get to translate your website's UI, content, configuration, etc.

Meaning that, with this multilingual system at hand, you can easily create an accessible user experience on your website.


2.4. Content personalization (by segment, login time, device, language...)

In this respect, the Aqua Lift Connector module is your most reliable tool.

What it does is bring together customer data and content, so that you can deliver targeted content experiences across multiple channels and devices.
 

The END!

And these are those robust features that stand behind the superior end-user experience in Drupal 8. The very reasons why this platform, and particularly this version of Drupal, makes your best ally in creating the most compelling UX on your website.

Photo by Lucian Novosel on Unsplash

Nov 02 2018
Nov 02

What's your favorite tool for creating content layouts in Drupal? Paragraphs, Display Suite, Panelizer or maybe Panels? Or CKEditor styles & templates? How about the much talked about and yet still experimental Drupal 8 Layout Builder module?

Have you "played” with it yet?

As Drupal site builders, we all agree that a good page layout builder should be:
 

  1. flexible; it should empower you to easily and fully customize every single node/content item on your website (not just blocks)
  2. intuitive, super easy to use (unlike "Paragraphs", for instance, where building a complex "layout", then attempting to move something within it, turns into a major challenge)
     

And it's precisely these 2 features that stand for the key goals of the Layout Initiative for Drupal

To turn the resulting module into that user-friendly, powerful and empowering page builder that all Drupal site builders had been expecting.

Now, let's see how the module manages to “check” these must-have strengths off the list. And why it revolutionizes the way we put together pages, how we create, customize and further edit layouts.

How we build websites in Drupal...
 

1. The Context: A Good Page Builder Was (Desperately) Needed in Drupal

It had been a shared opinion in the open source community:

A good page builder was needed in Drupal.

For, even if we had a toolbox full of content layout creation tools, none of them was “the One”. That flexible, easy to use, “all-features-in-one” website builder that would enable us to:
 

  • build complex pages, carrying a lot of mixed content, quick and easy (with no coding expertise)
  • fully customize every little content item on our websites and not just entire blocks of content site-wide
  • easily edit each content layout by dragging and dropping images, video content, multiple columns of text and so on, the way we want to
     

Therefore, the Drupal 8 Layout Builder module was launched! And it's been moved to core upon the release of Drupal 8.6.

Although it still wears its “experimental, do no use on production sites!” type of “warning tag”, the module has already leveled up from an “alpha” to a more “beta” phase.

With a more stable architecture now, in Drupal 8.6, significant improvements and a highly intuitive UI (combined with Drupal's well-known content management features) it stands all the chances to turn into a powerful website builder.

That great page builder that the whole Drupal community had been “craving” for.
 

2. The Drupal 8 Layout Builder Module: Quick Overview

First of all, we should get one thing straight:

The Drupal 8.6. Layout Builder module is Panelizer in core!

What does it do?

It enables you, the Drupal site builder, to configure layouts on different sections on your website.

From selecting a predefined layout to adding new blocks, managing the display, swapping the content elements and so on, creating content layouts in Drupal is as (fun and) intuitive as putting Lego pieces together.

Also, the “content hierarchy” is more than logical:
 

  • you have multiple content sections
  • you get to choose a predefined layout or a custom-design one for each section
  • you can place your blocks of choice (field blocks, custom blocks) within that selected layout
     

Note: moving blocks from one section to another is unexpectedly easy when using Layout Builder!
 

3. Configuring the Layout of a Content Type on Your Website

Now, let's imagine the Drupal 8 Layout Module “in action”.

But first, I should point out that there are 2 ways that you could use it:
 

  1. to create and edit a layout for every content type on your Drupal website
  2. to create and edit a layout for specific, individual nodes/ pieces of content
     

It's the first use case of the module that we'll focus on for the moment.

So, first things first: in order to use it, there are some modules that you should enable — Layout Builder and Layout Discovery. Also, remember to install the Layout Library, as well!

Next, let's delve into the steps required for configuring your content type's (“Article”, let's say) display:
 

  • go to Admin > Structure > Content types > Article > Manage Display
  • hit the “Manage layout” button
     

… and you'll instantly access the layout page for the content type in question (in our case, “Article”).

It's there that you can configure your content type's layout, which is made of:
 

  • sections of content (display in 1,2, 3... columns and other content elements)
  • display blocks: tabs, page title...
  • fields: tags, body, title
     

While you're on that screen... get as creative as you want:
 

  • choose a predefined layout for your section —  “Add section” —  from the Settings tab opening up on the right side of the screen
  • add some blocks —  “Add block”; you'll then notice the “Configure” and “Remove” options “neighboring” each block
  • drag and drop the layout elements, arranging them to your liking; then you can click on either “Save Layout” or “Cancel Layout” to save or cancel your layout configuration
     

And since we're highly visual creatures, here, you may want to have a look at this Drupal 8 Layout Builder tutorial made by Lee Rowlands, one of the core contributors.

In short: this page builder tool enables you to customize the layout of your content to your liking. Put together multiple sections — each one with its own different layout —  and build website pages, carrying mixed content and multiple layouts, that fit your design requirements exactly.
 

4. Configuring and Fully Customizing the Layout of a Specific Node...

This second use case of the Drupal 8 Layout Builder module makes it perfect for building landing pages.

Now, here's how you use it for customizing a single content type:
 

  • go to Structure>Content types (choose a specific content type)
  • click “Manage display” on the drop-down menu 
  • then click the “Allow each content item to have its layout customized” checkbox
  • and hit “Save”
     

Next, just:
 

  • click the “Content” tab in your admin panel
  • choose that particular article that you'd like to customize
  • click the “Layout” tab
     

… and you'll then access the very same layout builder UI.

The only difference is that now you're about to customize the display of one particular article only.

Note: basically, each piece of content has its own “Layout” tab that allows you to add sections, to choose layouts. 

Each content item becomes fully customizable when using Drupal 8 Layout Builder.
 

5. The Drupal 8.6. Layout Builder vs Paragraphs

“Why not do everything in Paragraphs?" has been the shared opinion in the Drupal community for a long time.

And yet, since the Layout Builder tool was launched, the Paragraphs “supremacy” has started to lose ground. Here's why:
 

  • the Layout builder enables you to customize every fieldable entity's layout
  • it makes combining multiple sections of content on a page and moving blocks around as easy as... moving around Lego pieces 
     

By comparison, just try to move... anything within a complex layout using Paragraphs:
 

  • you'll either need to keep your fingers crossed so that everything lands in the right place once you've dragged and dropped your blocks
  • or... rebuild the whole page layout from scratch
     

The END!

What do you think:
 

Does Drupal 8 Layout Builder stand the chance to compete with WordPress' popular page builders?


To “dethrone” Paragraphs and become THAT page layout builder that we've all been expected for? Or do you think there's still plenty of work ahead to turn it into that content layout builder we've all been looking forward to?

Mar 22 2017
Mar 22

It's no doubt that these web design myths “controlling”, just like some “tyrants” the online world, have initially emerged as web design innovative notions, turned into widely used techniques and, finally, into highly influencing web design trends. 

It's also true that since their “adopters” have started to take them way too literally or to refuse to adapt them to the ever-evolving digital landscape, to the ever-changing users' digital behaviors, these web design practices have gradually turned into... myths. Into rigid, “dusty” web design mindsets risking to affect both the design's quality itself and the website visitors' experiences.

Be better than that! Be smarter than that! Take smarter design decisions than those still “stuck” with these preconceived assumptions which are no longer relevant in 2017's web design context. 

And here are the 10 web design myths “exposed”:


1. "The 3 Second Rule"

This is probably the best exemplification of a notion turned into a rigid “rule”. Of a concept taken ridiculously literally!

No need to develop a paranoia imagining your generic website visitor holding a timer in one hand and his mouse (if we're talking about a desktop user) in the other and counting precisely those 3 seconds! It's absurd!

The 3 second rule is just a figure of speech (it could easily be a 2 second a 4 or 5 second rule) “invented” only to stress the importance of an optimized page loading time. To “warn” you that you should constantly strive to boost your website's performance. 

If your web pages load in, let's say, 4 seconds, it's really not the end of the world!

Instead, if they load in 3 seconds just to show a bad design and low quality content... then you might be, indeed, facing a major traffic problem!


2. "White Space Is a Wasted Chance of Capitalizing Space on My Site"

This is already a “prehistoric” type of web design preconception!

And we couldn't give you better examples than Google's front page and Apple's clean and airy design where big chunks of white space act as spotlights directing our eyes towards their “star” products!

“Clutter” is your biggest enemy when it comes to web design! While white space and moreover, strategically using it for guiding your users' attention towards key points on your website, well, this is almost an “art”!

Less sure is more, in this case! White space acts as a spotlight focused on the key content(s) on your web pages, but only if you just know just how to focus it!


3. "Mobile Device Users Are Always On the Fly and Easily Distracted" 

It's a false assumption now “cemented” in the collective thinking: mobile device users are always on the go, always in a rush and easily distracted!

It's noting but an exaggerated generalization!

In fact, studies (Google's studies, the one that we're referring to here taken in 2012) have shown that:
 

  1. 68% of mobile device users are, in fact, accessing websites from their smartphones in the comfort of their homes (surprise, surprise!)
     
  2. 67% of desktop users are simultaneously using another device, as well, as compared to 57% of mobile device users. 
     

We're all living in the age of distractions. We get constantly distracted whether we're just watching TV, doing online shopping on our smartphones or reading articles on our PCs! 

You should still design for highly mobile users, but being fully aware that “on the run”, “striving to resist various distractions”, is not the main context that your mobile device users will be visiting your website in!


4. "Good Usability's a Must, While Good Aesthetics an Option"

This thinking's maybe one of the riskiest user experience pitfalls!

With all the web designers and web owners out there playing all their cards on good usability, they tend to undermine good aesthetics' key role or (even worse) to ignore it completely.

You can't effectively reach out to your users and turn them into customers, if you don't emotionally connect with them, first. If you don't strive to make the very best impression (and since we're all highly visual creatures, a “good first impression” is nothing but another word for “great looks”).

Usability's a very technical concept, made of certain (equally) technical, precise tactics to implement for achieving good usability on your website. While aesthetics is far more “human” and it's to humans that you need to reach out to first and only then to... “prospects”. Do keep that in mind!

When combined, these two “powers”, good usability and good aesthetics, or, better said, good usability and credibility (that good aesthetics invests your Drupal website with) you can't get but a superpower to turbocharge your website with!


5. "User Feedback Is Not to Be Questioned or Debated"

Of course that you should constantly ask for your users' feedback, it's vital for every business, be it online or not!

What you should avoid doing is: taking that feedback, all the comments that your visitors will leave on your site, too literally!

People don't always know what they want and they're quite bad at explaining their preferences, why is it that they like/dislike certain features on your website or anticipating their future choices/behaviors.

A “healthy” way of doing web design is to dig in, starting from your users' comments, to the core problems! Base your design decisions on those core problems to be solved, first and foremost! Complying with your users' suggestions/complains, should come second on your list of “motivations”.
 

6. "Simplicity Can Only Mean Minimalism"- One of the Popular Web Design Myths

And this web design myth is still influencing, to a great extent, web designers' work and website owners' design decision-making!

There's this popular belief turned into a whole trend, that you can't possibly achieve a simple design than by cutting out UI elements, by drastically reducing steps and user interactions on your website.

False! Even a complex web design can be made simple if you're a gifted web designer!

Focusing on simplifying users' experiences and reducing the visual surface (minimalism) is not the same thing as reducing all the “friction” that a way to laborious, overly demanding design would imply from the user's point of view (simplicity).

Its not the same thing as striving to reduce some of the energy that he/she would invest in visually “digesting” the content on your website.

Notice the difference?


7. "Good Design is Self-Sufficient"

“Design in the absence of content is not design, it’s decoration.” 

Therefore, looks aren't everything and good design isn't self-sufficient! Visually-arresting graphics, cool fonts and visually-appealing colors won't compensate for the absence of high quality content.

In other words: if there's no happy “marriage” between web designers and content marketers, you'll be left with a great looking website that only you and your team will get to admire. For no user will ever find it!

If you don't enhance your great looking design with meaningful, engaging content that not only that completes it, but adds extra value to it, with content that addresses your visitors' needs, then your design won't go beyond its decorative function.


8. "The Homepage Is The Most Important Page on My Site"

Homepage's “supremacy” has started to fade away! If it used to be the page that users always landed on first, since it served as the main directory and, therefore, since there was no other way for accessing a website, today this is no longer the case.

And it's time that you, too, started to see the homepage's supremacy as a web design myth!

Now users can land directly on a product page, coming from certain links posted on social media or on other sites. Your website's visitors might not even get to visit the front page at all.

Moreover, and this is especially the case with websites selling products or services, you should accept the fact that your users aren't there for delighting themselves with the “wow” content on your homepage! For them your front page is nothing but a “gateway” to the product pages that they're really interested in. Or, depending on the site's specificity, to the information they can find on other pages of your Drupal site..

Think of Facebook! How often do you visit its homepage as a logged in user?

Put together, all the web pages on your site are much more frequented than your homepage. Just think about that!


9. "The Three Click/Two Tap Rule"


This is another baseless assumption! That all the elements on your website should be at a three-click's distance or a a two-tap's distance (on mobile devices).

Irrelevant! Whether your users decide to prolong their visits on your site or to leave it  after just a few seconds, has nothing to do with this rule. User's main interest is to carry out his task (purchasing something, getting a key info etc.)

You could abide by the three click rule and still witness visitors leaving your website in a rush if the content that they'll you'll deliver them, after precisely these three clicks/two taps, doesn't engage them or meet their needs.

As a general rule: it's precisely when web design rules are taken too literally that they risk to turn into web design myths!


10. "Cutting Out The Navigational Choices"- One of the Influential Web Design Myths

Somehow this theory initially related strictly to short term memory and to multiple product choices, has started to impact web design, particularly navigation, as well!

It's one thing to cut out items from an excessive product/services collection (leading to the paradox of choice) and a completely different thing to start removing pages from your navigational bar/menus. 

It's those pages that grant your user easy access to the content on your site that he's interested in. It's them that will enhance his/her exploration of your website!

So, instead of blocking his/her access to different web pages on your Drupal site and of negatively impacting his overall experience with your website, you'd better figure out how to efficiently group these pages.
 

And it seems that we've reached the end of our list of 10 web design myths you should be aware of and... stay away from! Have you “busted” others, as well?

Dec 12 2016
Dec 12

Don't you just feel the sweet taste of new possibilities right now?

And still, any new Drupal 8 project comes with its own set of challenges, as well, and choosing a theme, from the very start, is probably one of the greatest ones.

What should it be then?

Should you go for a classic base theme (AdaptiveTheme or Zen, maybe), for a contributed theme instead or maybe you prefer implementing the framework yourself or build your very own theme, from scratch, relying on Drupal core?

Before you make the decision that will have a huge impact on your whole project's structure, take some time to go through this quick “quizz” here and try to give yourself some clear answers:
 

  • are you dealing with a multi-site project (meaning that your theme, once chosen and implemented, will be used across all the other websites, too)?
     
  • is the person maintaining the theme a HTML guru or a CSS expert?
     
  • will this theme be used just on the website itself or for internal apps as well?
     
  • what level of front-end performance optimization does it imply?

Classy vs Stable: Which Base Theme Works Best for You?

This might just be the most important choice to take during your Drupal project's life-cycle!

It's your theme that dictates/overrides your CSS, JS and Drupal's markup, you know. Where do you add that your chosen theme can feature a parent-child relationship, where the sub-theme inherits the base theme's templates, JS and CSS.

In short: think through your theme choice for the sake of your project's success and your whole workflow!

“And still, which one to choose: Classy or Stable?”, you might ask yourself.

Here's how you can tell which one suits you (as a Drupal developer, with certain goals in mind and with a certain theming experience) and your particular web project (which comes with its own set of particularities):

  • are you planning to add classes only where the context demands them? Then Stable's The base theme for you!
  • do you want lean markup, with very little classes (e.g toolbar and contextual links), giving you the freedom to customize your own markup patterns in your theme, to create only those classes that are required by your project? Stable again, is the “lucky” word, in this case!
  •  do you want to have a set of classes at your disposal, to tweak and use as styling hooks, right from the starting point? Then it "write" Classy all over your Drupal project!

This being said, let's see which are the 5 factors that you should consider before you choose your Drupal 8 base theme:
 

1. How Much CSS and Markup Updating Does it Require?

How much CSS out-of-the-box does your chosen theme come “equipped” with?

It makes a great difference, you know. Take these two examples for instance:

  1. You decide to build your website on Classy theme, which in Drupal 8 comes with very little core CSS, so you will have to write your own classes and occasionally even to override the templates, depending on what you want your classes to style. 
     
  2. You're building your theme on Zurb Foundation or Boostrap, which come with their own of out-of-the-box classes that all you need to do is apply to your markup. What's important for you to keep in mind, if you incline for this particular work scenario, is that once you have your Drupal site built, there's going to be a lot of template customization to do for adding all those out-of-the-box classes to your site's new components!

2. Has Your Client Expressed Any Preference?

Your client may or may not come with his/ her own preferences when it comes to the theme that you and your team should to build his website on. 

Be sure to have one aspect settled with your client, during your before-the-project meetings: are you supposed to maintain the theme that you two will decide upon on the starting point or is there a chance that this should be replaced with a new one, as the project unfolds? It's essential that you discuss this aspect with your client, for it's important for both of you to consider the learning curve (and implicitly the extra time) of each new theme.

In case your client has no specific preferences regarding the theme to be used for his site, your own theming experience and your development process preferences will be the only factors that will influence your theme choice!
 

3. Consider the Design 

It's no news for any developer, no matter his/her level of experience, that Drupal is tremendously flexible! When it comes to theming, it allows you to build practically anything you want: ranging from a large web app, to great customer-facing websites in the latest design and functionality trends!

Depending on what exactly you need to design in Drupal, you get to choose among several platforms:

  1. Ember or Adminimal make some great administrative themes, that will do their job superbly helping you build your back-end app
     
  2. Zurb Foundation or Bootstrap make great choices if your web project includes components such as tables and forms 

4. Will You Be Using a Pattern Library?

A base theme always makes the perfect choice if you're planning to create your own patterns.

In other words: keep it simple, at the theme level, especially if you'll be applying your own classes, which will then get themed by your own pattern library styles!
 

5. Consider Performance

Less is always better! You keep that in mind and let this common-sense motto guide you through your theme selection!

The more functions, JS libraries and settings your website needs to load, the heavier its “burden” will be (and the longer its load time will be, as well).

Go for a light theme based on Drupal core, which won't come equipped with its own heavy load of out-of-the-box JS libraries and CSS and remember that if less is always more, so does “testing makes it perfect”!

Remember to test all the theme settings on your website, thus keeping its front-end performance closely monitored!

These is our list of factors that any Drupal developer should take into account and think through before choosing the base theme for his/her project. Do you have any other aspects that you usually consider and which determine you to go for a specific base theme or another once you start your Drupal web projects?

May 31 2016
May 31

If you are a developer or a web development agency and you’ve just built a web development prototype, you might often find yourself in a bit of a pickle – your users might find it ugly or your web development demo might look very bad. Here are a few "golden" design tips for web development, guidelines on how to make your web development demos look as good as they deserve.

Keep your cool, By Far One of The Most Valuable Design Tips for Web Development

One way of putting it is like this: “Good design, when it’s done well, becomes invisible. It’s only when it’s done poorly that we notice it.”. Jared Spool’s quote is spot on for all design work but it’s especially true when it comes to web development and demos. If you are building a web development demo users shouldn’t really pay attention to the design aspects of it, but its functionality and purpose.

If you’re trying to make your demo more stylistic, you’re actually moving away from your ultimate goal – keep it simple and focus on its functionality. If it doesn’t look as good as you’d want it to be, try removing some web development design elements such as effects, borders or shadows.

Try to avoid complex color palettes

Poor color choices can make or break a design – your color picks should be made during the UI design process, even if it can be tempting to make bold color choices early in the project.

When making the UI wireframe, you’ll begin using monochrome rudimentary lines and shapes. Once you finished that part, you can start adding more details until you reach the color aspects of your project. Here are a few tips when picking your colors:

It’s a good idea to keep your demos monochrome with plenty of greys until you’re ready to color it up properly.

Another tip is to avoid fully saturated colors, especially when your demo will be viewed on an illuminated screen as this can lead to discomfort for your users.

In the same time, you should avoid black and white due to the same reasons as previously stated – sticking to shades of color will make your users less tired and improve UX.

Add color to your monochrome design but do it just one at a time – each color can be a distraction to your users. Pro tip: you can use a range of saturations of just one color – this will offer plenty of variety and you basically can’t go wrong.

Simple typography works best

If you’re building a web development prototype or a demo there’s no need to for fancy fonts but here are a few pointers on typography:

If you don’t know what to pick, sans-serif works best in all situations. Serif fonts usually have details where strokes terminate. These fonts can help you bring a little bit of personality to your design and at the same time make your text easier to read. While serif fonts have some advantages, they’re not usually used for UI design since at smaller sizes they display varied stroke weights.

Other fonts you should take a look at are humanist droid sans, used by Google in their Android interface, noto, and roboto. If you’re an Apple fan you can go for San Francisco or Neue Helvetica. Firefox OS uses Fira Sans. All these are sans-serif fonts which you can use for your project.

Sometimes characters can be difficult to distinguish – combinations such as 9g, 6b, 2Z, 5S, I11 or 8B can be very confusing for users, depending on the font chosen. It’s best to first test them out in order to see readability and if that’s fine keep using it, if not, do some changes.

White space works wonders

Functional space or white space helps web development designers in many different ways – this space reduces your visitor eye strain, can help draw attention to particular areas of your page and creates a general sense of balance. Cramped UI will make users tired and uncomfortable but keep in mind that “less is more” works perfectly at this stage.

More breathing space will offer your users a breather as well – boosting line heights, margins and plenty of padding works great. And this is one of those priceless design tips for web development to put on top of your "must-do" list.Spread everything out on your design and it will look much better.

Spacing needs to be consistent throughout your design – consistency is the key to harmony and rhythm.

Improve your web development workflow

Foundation and Bootstrap can be a great help to developers even though they receive criticism for making websites look too generic – these tools are perfect for prototypes. Foundation and Bootstrap actually make the right choices on your behalf, leaving you with ample time to focus on other aspects of your project.

Spare yourself the extra work and just grab templates from Foundation or Bootstrap which you can customize to fit your style. Most of these templates are very comprehensive, so you’ll definitely have all the pieces you need to get going.

Conclusions

By following these design tips for web development you’ll smooth any problems you may encounter when building a prototype or demo.

May 11 2016
May 11

Bootstrap is a giant framework with almost everything you could need for building a site or web app interface. Bootstrap is changing, version four is in alpha release. Naturally, we’re just as curious to know what’s different, so I dived into the documentation to find out. Keep in mind, though, that this is an alpha release. It cannot be considered feature-complete. It could radically change.

From Less to Sass

This is obviously the biggest and most important change. Heck, you’ve probably already heard of it. People have gone so far as to procliam the “death of Less” due to this switchover. Well, I don’t know if anything’s gone and died because the Bootstrap team decided to do things differently. It is, however, a monumental undertaking, and it will drastically change how people use and customize the framework. Sass is just generally more developer-friendly, with wider support, a bigger community, and yes, more features. It can do some things that, right now, Less just can’t. I say this with sadness. I’ve never made any secret of my love for Less; but it seems that the community at large has spoken, and declared that Sass is just, well, better.

New features

Figures

Figures are for showcasing single media objects (usually images), with an optional caption. Support for Bootstrap’s various helper classes is factored in, so you can align and style the image (and its caption) however you like. Images placed in a figure element, given the right classes, become responsive automatically.

Flexbox

Now, due to lack of support, Flexbox has not replaced the regular grid system. However, it is available to anyone who wants it. Change a variable, recompile the Sass, and boom! You now have a new, modern layout system.

Cards

Okay, we’ve been seeing the proliferation of card-based design for some time now. Bootstrap now has a specific component for them, with myriad layout options. You can group them up, keep them separate, add headers, footers, buttons, images, and overlay text on those images. Wells, thumbnails, and panels all get replaced by the new card component, so in that way, Bootstrap is a bit more streamlined.

Reboot: new customization variables

Bootstrap has historically been a bit of a pain to customize, aesthetically speaking: There were a lot of styles to over-write, and individual variables to customize if you wanted to make your Bootstrap-based site look like anything other than a Bootstrap-based site. Heck, remember all of those customization apps made just for changing Boostrap’s look? Well the developers have heard your prayers and Github issues. Change all of the transition animations at once, disable rounded corners, change all the colors, or anything else you like with one big bunch of Sass variables. It’s all there in the Reboot module, and it’s about time. We can expect some more original-looking designs now, with any luck.

Rem and em units

That’s right, we’re moving away from pixels, to these relational units of measurement. This ties into the whole customization thing, too. Want a tighter design with thinner margins? Change the main text size, maybe a couple of variables, and boom. Everything looks “thinner”.

Stuff that’s basically the same

As you might expect, everything got re-written and upgraded (because of the Sass move). But still, the basic usage for most of these components will be the same. Do double-check the documentation, though. Certain things will have changed. Take the grid, for example: they added an “extra-large” tier to the grid system, presumably for those ridiculously huge retina screens that we’re seeing these days. · Alerts · Breadcrumb · Button dropdown · Button group · Buttons · Card · Carousel · Code · Collapse · Dropdowns · Forms · Images · Input group · Jumbotron · Label · List group · Modal · Navbar · Navs · Pagination · Popovers · Progress · Reboot · Scrollspy · Tables · The Grid · Tooltips · Typography

Other updates

No more IE8 support

It’s about time. There’s not a whole lot more to say about that. Not much will change for most of us. Anybody who really, really needs to support legacy browsers will have to use an older version of Bootstrap.

All JavaScript plugins have been re-written

The proliferation of ES6 means that a lot of people are re-writing their JavaScript. This means performance improvements for all, the exodus of older browsers, and programmers having fun with new toys. It’s a win-win.

Overall impressions

Where Foundation is going “smaller” and more streamlined with specialized frameworks, Bootstrap seems to want it all. They have done a lot of work to improve performance, and streamline what they could, but Bootstrap still aims to do just about everything you can think of. Mind you, anyone can configure their version of the framework however they like by dropping unnecessary modules, or adding new ones. It’s not a big deal. Still, there’s definitely a one-size-fits-all mindset in play. And that can be a good thing. There are large, wide-scope projects out there that need the room to expand. In any case, Bootstrap will continue to satisfy its users’ needs. It’s going to be mostly the same, but better.
Source: http://www.developerdrive.com

Apr 07 2016
Apr 07

I’m not a fan of color theory. But the theory has always eluded me, and, truthfully, I’ve never found it useful when trying to use color in my projects. Somewhat ironically, I’ve been finding that the better I get at choosing and using color, the better I become in the theory behind it. Of course, that doesn’t really help when you’re just starting out, does it? That’s why, in this article, you won’t see a single color wheel. Instead I’m going to show you a simple color workflow that you can use in your next web project. You will, of course, subconsciously be learning the theory along the way. So, I recommend coming back in a few months time and giving the theory another go.

Choosing A Base Color

We can see something like 10 million colors at any given time, that’s a huge amount of colors. And out of those, we need to choose one — just one color — to be the base of our website, for our brand. Everything will stem from this one color, so it’s kind of important.

How to choose a starting color

Now, picking a color out of the blue (pun intentional) would be quite easy, but we’re not going to do that. For any project in which you’re having contact with clients, you should try to justify as many of your choices as you can. If you don’t, it’ll be a case of your favorite color versus their favorite color. They’re the client. They’re paying you. They will win. Don’t think too much about it. Just make sure you have some kind of reasoning behind your color choice (and every choice, for that matter). It’ll make you look good.

Tips on choosing a starting color

• Use what you have. If the client has a logo with an established color, that will usually be your starting color. • Eliminate your competitors’ colors. If one of your main competitors has a strong brand color, don’t copy it if you can help it. Find your competitors’ colors to eliminate them from your own color schemes. • Think about your target audience. The colors of a website for a pizza shop would sure be very different from the colors for a kids club. Think about who will be using the website and how you want them to feel (excited, serious, taken care of, etc.). • But don’t default to stereotypes. If you’re designing a website for young girls, you don’t have to use pink. Avoid clichés to gain credibility. • Play a word game. If you’re struggling, write down any words that you associate with the client’s business. This list should give you some ideas for colors. If you’re really struggling, hop on any website about color meanings and see which fits best. You should now have a base color in mind for the design. It should be something simple like red, green, blue, yellow or pink. We’ll get to the exact shade next. Let’s say you choose blue.

Choosing A (Nice) Base Color

Instead of messing about with Photoshop’s color-picker to find a nice shade of blue, we’re going to steal like an artist and use other people’s design choices to help us out. First, go to Dribbble.com and Designspiration.com and click on the “Colors” link in both. You can use this as the next step to find the right shade of blue. For a fresh and energetic brand, go for one of the lighter, brighter blues (one of the top five options). For something a bit more corporate and serious, the bottom five should be a better fit. Choose a shade from each website to see actual designs that use that color. You can then use any of CSS-Tricks’ color-picking techniques to grab the exact colors right in the browser. Not only will you see different versions of your base color, but you will easily see colors that match.

Creating A Strong Color Palette

All right, you should now have a HEX value for your color. Now we’re going to make a palette out of that color. And it’s easier than you think. The problem with this kind of color palette is that applying it to a real design isn’t very practical. Most palettes have way more colors than you’d ever need, especially considering that we need to add an average of three neutral colors to every scheme: • white, • dark gray, • light gray (optional). If you tried to add five or six colors to the neutrals, it would be a mess. All you really need are two colors: • a base color, • an accent color (we’ll get to this in a jiffy). If you can create a website using only these five colors, you’ll get a much better result than if you were to go overboard with complementaries, split-complementaries, triads and the rest.

Finding your accent

Your accent color will be used in very small amounts on your website, usually as a call to action. So, it needs to stand out. Your next step is to go to Paletton.com and type your HEX code into the color box. From here, you can find your accent in two ways. First, you could click the “Add Complementary”! That yellow there? That’s your accent. Alternatively, if you don’t like the color it has generated, you can click around the icons at the top to find something more suitable. Personally, I quite like the red that comes up under the triad icon, so I’m going to use that for our scheme. There is, of course, science and stuff behind what Paletton is doing; but, for now, let’s put a pin on it. You’ll learn the theory a bit later, and all will become clear. So, below is our color scheme as it is now. We’ve got a nice base color and a shot of an accent. Let’s add white to the mix, because white is always good. All that’s missing now are some grays.

Adding the gray

For most of my web projects, I find having two shades of gray to be infinitely useful — one dark, one light. You’ll use them a lot. The dark is usually used for text, and the light for when you need subtle differentiation against all that white (usually for backgrounds). You can choose your grays in one of two ways: • You could use Dribbble.com and Designspiration.com again to find a nice gray from your previous results that matches your base color. But usually it’s easier to type blue website in the search bar, which will show more grays in the results. • If you have Photoshop or the like, you could use Erica Schoonmaker’s technique to harmonize your grays with the base color.

Creating harmonious grays

To get our shiny new harmonious grays using Erica’s method, we’ll start by picking two default grays out of a hat. Then, follow these steps: 1. Create two shapes and fill them with #4b4b4b and #f5f5f5. 2. Insert a color fill layer above your two shapes. 3. Change that fill to your base color. 4. Set the blending mode to overlay, and bring the opacity right down to between 5 and 40% (in the example below, it’s set at 40%). 5. Use the color picker and copy your new values. I should point out that this method works exceptionally well when your overlay color is blue. For any other color, you will want to either bring the opacity right down to 5 to 10% or stick with your original grays. Our color scheme is complete.

Applying Your Color Scheme

Now that we’ve got our color scheme, it’s time to apply it. This is a whole other article unto itself. Tip: If you struggle with color, a good trick is to create your website layout in grayscale first. Figure out the hierarchy, and then experiment with the color later. Our accent, red, stands out beautifully against the base color. This is used in very small areas, for buttons and in the icons. The less you use this color, the more it will stand out. The dark gray is used for the text, logo and icon outlines. (Don’t skip putting the colors in your icons. It’s a small detail but makes a big difference.) The white and light gray form the background. The light gray doesn’t have to be here at all, but I find it is another small detail that really makes a website look polished.

Conclusion

As you can see, we really don’t need much more than the palette we’ve created today. But that doesn’t mean you are limited to these colors! As you’re designing, you might decide it’s appropriate to introduce some more colors to your palette. That’s totally fine! As long as you’re attentive, you can use the steps above to find more colors that work with your scheme. The beauty of this is that the more you do it, the better you’ll become at choosing colors. You’ll get to know what works together and what doesn’t. Sometimes, the method above will yield results that are less than desirable, so feel free to tweak things. Play around and have fun learning color theory, without the theory!
Source: https://www.smashingmagazine.com

Jun 02 2015
Jun 02

In April 2015, NASA unveiled a brand new look and user experience for NASA.gov. This release revealed a site modernized to 1) work across all devices and screen sizes (responsive web design), 2) eliminate visual clutter, and 3) highlight the continuous flow of news updates, images, and videos.

With its latest site version, NASA—already an established leader in the digital space—has reached even higher heights by being one of the first federal sites to use a “headless” Drupal approach. Though this model was used when the site was initially migrated to Drupal in 2013, this most recent deployment rounded out the endeavor by using the Services module to provide a REST interface, and ember.js for the client-side, front-end framework.

Implementing a “headless” Drupal approach prepares NASA for the future of content management systems (CMS) by:

  1. Leveraging the strength and flexibility of Drupal’s back-end to easily architect content models and ingest content from other sources. As examples:

  • Our team created the concept of an “ubernode”, a content type which homogenizes fields across historically varied content types (e.g., features, images, press releases, etc.). Implementing an “ubernode” enables easy integration of content in web services feeds, allowing developers to seamlessly pull multiple content types into a single, “latest news” feed. This approach also provides a foundation for the agency to truly embrace the “Create Once, Publish Everywhere” philosophy of content development and syndication to multiple channels, including mobile applications, GovDelivery, iTunes, and other third party applications.

  • Additionally, the team harnessed Drupal’s power to integrate with other content stores and applications, successfully ingesting content from blogs.nasa.gov, svs.gsfc.nasa.gov, earthobservatory.nasa.gov, www.spc.noaa.gov, etc., and aggregating the sourced content for publication.

  1. Optimizing the front-end by building with a client-side, front-end framework, as opposed to a theme. For this task, our team chose ember.js, distinguished by both its maturity as a framework and its emphasis of convention over configuration. Ember embraces model-view-controller (MVC), and also excels at the performance by batching updates to the document object model (DOM) and bindings.

In another stride toward maximizing “Headless” Drupal’s massive potential, we configured the site so that JSON feed records are published to an Amazon S3 bucket as an origin for a content delivery network (CDN), ultimately allowing for a high-security, high-performance, and highly available site.

Below is an example of how the technology stack which we implemented works:

Using ember.js, the NASA.gov home page requests a list of nodes of the latest content to display. Drupal provides this list as a JSON feed of nodes:

Ember then retrieves specific content for each node. Again, Drupal provides this content as a JSON response stored on Amazon S3:

Finally, Ember distributes these results into the individual items for the home page:

The result?

A NASA.gov architected for the future. It is worth noting that upgrading to Drupal 8 can be done without reconfiguring the ember front-end. Further, migrating to another front-end framework (such as Angular or Backbone) does not require modification of the Drupal CMS.

Oct 19 2009
Oct 19

Yeah? Maybe?

[update: maybe not. see comments.]

#D7UX [Tweeted] is about Drupal 7 user experience work.

#D7CX [Tweeted] is about upgrading Drupal contrib modules to stable Drupal 7 releases when Drupal 7 itself is released. Over 100 contributed projects now bear this commitment, which is just awesome!

To me, that leaves #D7DX – a focused effort to get some rockin' Drupal 7 design themes going.

Yes, we have #D4D. And beautiful Drupal 7 themes are part of #D4D. But #D4D is also about Design 4 Drupal events, broader #d4d efforts on Drupal.org, and other design efforts that are happening. But why not a more focused tag, not on making Drupal pretty in general, not on improving the designer's experience in Drupal, but focused just on creating beautiful, semantic, exciting, eye candilicious themes for Drupal 7? For core themes, yes, but also for contrib. All ready and stable by Drupal 7 official release. Now is the time!

I'm writing to myself, here, since for someone who's been working with and designing for Drupal since 2004, I'm very late to the contributed theme party. That has to change.

At any rate, it's an occasion to finally get this blog here out of the Minelli realm. That's a long overdue effort. All I need is a little free time.

Yes.

About Drupal Sun

Drupal Sun is an Evolving Web project. It allows you to:

  • Do full-text search on all the articles in Drupal Planet (thanks to Apache Solr)
  • Facet based on tags, author, or feed
  • Flip through articles quickly (with j/k or arrow keys) to find what you're interested in
  • View the entire article text inline, or in the context of the site where it was created

See the blog post at Evolving Web

Evolving Web