Jun 18 2018
Jun 18
June 18th, 2018

Last month, Ithaca College introduced the first version of what will represent the biggest change to the college’s website technology, design, content, and structure in more than a decade—a redesigned and rebuilt site that’s more visually appealing and easier to use.

Over the past year, the college and its partners Four Kitchens and design firm Beyond have been hard at work within a Team Augmentation capacity to support the front-to-back overhaul of Ithaca.edu to better serve the educational and community goals of Ithaca’s students, faculty, and staff. The results of the team’s efforts can be viewed at https://www.ithaca.edu.  

Founded in 1892, Ithaca College is a residential college dedicated to building knowledge and confidence through a continuous cycle of theory, practice, and performance. Home to some 6,500 students, the college offers more than 100 degree programs in its schools of Business, Communications, Humanities and Sciences, Health Sciences and Human Performance, and Music.

Students, faculty, and staff at Ithaca College create an active, inclusive community anchored in a keen desire to make a difference in the local community and the broader world. The college is consistently ranked as one of the nation’s top producers of Fulbright scholars, one of the most LGBTQ+ friendly schools in the country, and one of the top 10 colleges in the Northeast.

We emphasized applying automation and continuous integration to focus the team on the efficient development of creative and easy to test solutions.

On the backend, the team—including members of Ithaca’s dev org working alongside Four Kitchens—built a Drupal 8 site. The transition to Drupal 8 keeps the focus on moving the college to current technology for sustainable success. Four Kitchens emphasized applying automation and continuous integration to focus the team on the efficient development of creative and easy to test solutions. To achieve that, the team set up automation in Circle CI 2.0 as middleware between the GitHub repository and hosting in PantheonGitHub was used throughout the project to implement, automate, and optimize visual regression, advanced communication between systems and a solid workflow using throughout the project to ensure fast and effective release cycles. Learn from the experiences obtained from implementing the automation pipeline in the following posts:

The frontend focused heavily on the Atomic Design approach. The frontend team utilized Emulsify and Pattern Lab to facilitate pattern component-based design and architecture. This again fostered long-term ease of use and success for Ithaca College.

The team worked magic with content migration. Using the brainchild of Web Chef, David Diers, the team devised a plan to migrate of portions of the site one by one. Subsites corresponding to schools or departments were moved from the legacy CMS to special Pantheon multidevs that were built off the live environment. Content managers then performed a moderated adaptation and curation process to ensure legacy content adhered to the new content model. A separate migration process then imported the content from the holding environment into the live site. This process allowed Ithaca College’s many content managers to thoroughly vet the content that would live on the new site and gave them a clear path to completion. Learn more about migrating using Paragraphs here: Migrating Paragraphs in Drupal 8

Steady scrum rhythm, staying agile, and consistently improving along the way.

In addition to the stellar dev work, a large contributor to the project’s success was establishing a steady scrum rhythm, staying agile, and consistently improving along the way. Each individual and unit solidified into a team through daily 15-minute standups, weekly backlog grooming meetings, weekly ‘Developer Showcase Friday’ meetings, regular sprint planning meetings, and biweekly retrospective meetings. This has been such a shining success the internal Ithaca team plans to carry forward this rhythm even after the Web Chefs’ engagement is complete.     

Engineering and Development Specifics

  • Drupal 8 site hosted on Pantheon Elite, with the canonical source of code being GitHub and CircleCI 2.0 as Continuous Integration and Delivery platform
  • Hierarchical and decoupled architecture based mainly on the use of group entities (Group module) and entity references that allowed the creation of subsite-like internal spaces.
  • Selective use of configuration files through the utilization of custom and contrib solutions like Config Split and Config Ignore modules, to create different database projections of a shared codebase.
  • Migration process based on 2 migration groups with an intermediate holding environment for content moderation.
  • Additional migration groups support the indexing of not-yet-migrated, raw legacy content for Solr search, and the events thread, brought through our Localist integration.
  • Living style guide for site editors by integrating twig components with Drupal templates
  • Automated Visual Regression
Aerial view of the Ithaca College campus from the Ithaca College homepage. From the Ithaca College Homepage.

A well-deserved round of kudos goes to the team. As a Team Augmentation project, the success of this project was made possible by the dedicated work and commitment to excellence from the Ithaca College project team. The leadership provided by Dave Cameron as Ithaca Product Manager, Eric Woods as Ithaca Technical Lead and Architect, and John White as Ithaca Dev for all things legacy system related was crucial in the project’s success. Ithaca College’s Katherine Malcuria, Senior Digital User Interface Designer,  led the creation of design elements for the website. 

Katherine Malcuria, Senior Digital User Interface Designer, works on design elements of the Ithaca.edu website

Ithaca Dev Michael Sprague, Web Chef David Diers, Architect,  as well as former Web Chef Chris Ruppel, Frontend Engineer, also stepped in for various periods of time on the project.  At the tail end of the project Web Chef, Brian Lewis, introduced a new baby Web Chef to the world, therefore the amazing Randy Oest, Senior Designer and Frontend Engineer, stepped in to assist in pushing this to the finish line from a front-end dev perspective. James Todd, Engineer, pitched in as ‘jack of all trades’ connoisseur helping out where needed.

The Four Kitchens Team Augmentation team for the Ithaca College project was led by Brandy Jackson, Technical Project Manager, playing the roles of project manager, scrum master, and product owner interchangeably as needed. Joel Travieso, Senior Drupal Engineer, was the technical lead, backend developer, and technical architect. Brian Lewis, Frontend Engineer, meticulously worked magic in implementing intricate design elements that were provided by the Ithaca College design team, as well a 3rd party design firm, Beyond, at different parts of the project.

A final round of kudos goes out to the larger Ithaca project team, from content, to devOps, to quality assurance, there are too many to name. A successful project would not have been possible without their collective efforts as well.

The success of the Ithaca College Website is a great example of excellent team unity and collaboration across multiple avenues. These coordinated efforts are a true example of the phrase “teamwork makes the dream work.” Congratulations to all for a job well done!

Special thanks to Brandy Jackson for her contribution to this launch announcement. 

Four Kitchens

The place to read all about Four Kitchens news, announcements, sports, and weather.

May 08 2018
May 08
May 8th, 2018

Over the past few months, Four Kitchens has worked together with the Public Radio International (PRI) team to build a robust API in PRI’s Drupal 7 site, and a modern, fresh frontend that consumes that API. This project’s goal was to launch a new homepage in the new frontend. PRI intends to re-build their entire frontend in this new structure and Four Kitchens has laid the groundwork for this endeavor. The site went live successfully, with a noticeable improvement in load time and performance. Overall load time performance increased by 40% with first-byte time down to less than 0.5 seconds. The results of the PRI team’s efforts can be viewed at PRI.org.

PRI is a global non-profit media company focused on the intersection of journalism and engagement to effect positive change in people’s lives. PRI’s mission is to serve audiences as a distinctive content source for information, insights and cultural experiences essential to living in our diverse, interconnected world.

Overall load time performance increased by 40% with first-byte time down to less than 0.5 seconds.

Four Kitchens and PRI approached this project with two technical goals. The first was to design and build a full-featured REST API in PRI’s existing Drupal 7 application. We used RESTFul, a Drupal module for building APIs, to create a JSON-API compliant API.

Our second technical goal was to create a robust frontend backed by the new API. To achieve that goal, we used React to create component-based user interfaces and styled them with using the CSS Modules pattern. This work was done in a library of components in which we used Storybook to demonstrate and test the components. We then pulled these components into a Next-based application, which communicates with the API, parses incoming data, and uses that data to populate component properties and generate full pages. Both the component library and the Next-based application used Jest and Enzyme heavily to create thorough, robust tests.

A round of well-deserved kudos to the PRI team: Technical Project Manager, Suzie Nieman managed this project from start to finish, facilitating estimations that led the team to success. Senior JavaScript Engineer, Patrick Coffey, provided keen technical leadership as well as deep architectural knowledge to all facets of the project, keeping the team unblocked and motivated. Engineer, James Todd brought his Drupal and JavaScript expertise to the table, architecting and building major portions of PRI’s new API. Senior Frontend Engineer, Evan Willhite, brought his wealth of frontend knowledge to build a robust collection of elegant components in React and JavaScript. Architect, David Diers created mechanisms that will be responsible for managing PRI’s API documentation that can be used in future projects.

Special thanks to Patrick Coffey and Suzie Nieman for their contributions to this launch announcement. 

Four Kitchens

The place to read all about Four Kitchens news, announcements, sports, and weather.

Oct 02 2017
Oct 02

Working in the charity sector you learn to be pretty resourceful when you need to be, and that doesn’t stop at blagging free stuff (obviously we never do that ;)).

One of the most significant things we learnt from amalgamating our campaign sites onto a single platform was the efficiency that emerged from reusing code and functionality.

So when our Schools and Youth team approached us with an objective that was new to all of us we did what anyone else would do, look at what we’d done already and could copy!

The objective

Noses! 

Red Noses to be precise. We’ve just launched our first ever ‘Design a Red Nose’ competition for schools where students between 4 and 18 can draw their own Nose design with a chance of getting their masterpiece as one of the final nine Noses made for the next Red Nose Day in 2019. Yes, it’s pretty exciting stuff and we’ve had more than a few disgruntled members of staff annoyed at the fact that they’re no longer schoolchildren.

To build the entry functionality, we needed a simple and efficient solution for teachers and school staff to be able to upload their students’ entries.

I thought about various online forms we’d created in the past and whether we could repurpose those to add an image upload mechanism.

Then my somewhat genius colleague Caroline – whom you might know from blogs such as Optimistic about our future of optimisation and How ‘going live’ became my mental blogger –  completely flipped it on its head and suggested a piece of functionality we’d used for past Sport Relief and Red Nose Day campaigns – our fundraiser gallery. This was used for our fundraisers to upload photos of themselves doing the weird and wonderful things people do for Comic Relief.

It seemed like the perfect solution and – spoiler alert – eventually it was, but obviously there were a few creases to iron out first. I won’t bore you with the details, no one likes ironing, but in short we had to:

  • Add an online form to the current functionality
  • Adapt the existing validations to fit other file sizes and formats like pdf
  • Ensure the designs being uploaded had somewhere to go and that we could get to them!
  • Ensure the data in the online form was sent to a secure and integrated database we could access
  • Integrate a schools address look-up used for schools-related forms

So we managed to get the form up and running (despite a few niggles that came up in QA, a few grumbles that came up with the changing the validations and error messages and a couple of gripes when we tried to link the form to our CRM database) – hurrah!

Lessons learned

There were lots of elements to this upcycling process: numerous parties that needed to be consulted, from data and legal, to tech and design; finding and implementing a solution in six weeks (while working on other products with clashing launch dates) and; testing and ensuring a simple user journey.

So, what nuggets of wisdom can I pass on to anyone else about to attack the same kind of problem?

  1. Communicate! Regular stand-ups made sure all teams were on the same page at all times, and allowed us to work quickly.
  2. Upcycle! Look at what you’ve used before and how you can adapt and iterate to get to your end goal more quickly. Also, think about how you might use it again – we’ve already planned our next iteration!
  3. Trust and collaboration! We reached a solution smoothly and efficiently because our stakeholders came to us with the problem. By being descriptive to our dev team of what was needed rather than prescriptive about what they should build, our team ended up building the best thing!
  4. Focus! It’s easier said than done but where you can get teams to focus on one thing at a time, it’s efficient, productive and keeps people a lot happier!

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Jun 30 2016
Jun 30

We’ve found that the best Drupal agency is the one with a highly functioning, happy team. To be fair, remote or distributed agencies are happier and more productive anyways and that’s based on remote work surveys. But we’re going a step further with the goal of becoming the best Drupal agency, specifically by ensuring our team is a happy one.

Our Goal: Be Best Drupal Agency

There are a few important factors, features of wellness, which help make the best Drupal agency. For us, these are our fantastic Life Coach (working full-time for our team members), peer-determined semi-annual raises, results-based productivity that’s not measured in hours, and much more. How we approach work-life balance, organizational culture, time, and money have changed the way we do everything. Most importantly, it works.

We take employee satisfaction to an extreme

We hired a Life Coach full-time for our team members. This unique move has helped forward our holistic approach to instill job satisfaction, side step burnout, and enable healthy professional growth. Team members can contact our life coach to work on career path objectives, stress management, personal goal setting, life changes, social challenges, and much more.

This internal resource may seem bizarre to some, but it’s an option with benefits that go beyond productive workdays. A life coach fosters satisfaction and helps banish workplace indifference.

We’ve got an excellent kudos system. Our HR system integrates with Slack, which lets us give publically and receive pats on the back throughout the day. We encourage many notes of appreciation, recognizing monthly those who give and receive the most. This enablement creates a healthy and congratulatory environment within our organization.

In a professional environment like this, concealed positive feedback doesn’t always do the job. We’re building a positive culture for our team, with an emphasis on goals, personal development, and satisfaction.

Often when logging into our Slack system, we find personalized messages from the CEO and COO encouraging us to reach out to our leaders and peers if there’s something on our minds. It’s a great way to promote openness and remind everyone, daily, what we value here.

Need to Grow Your Team? Learn How

We make it a point to survey team engagement and belonging. Quarterly surveys give our team members opportunities to bring forward their sentiments. While our open door policy is always in effect, these questionnaires allow us to ensure organizationally Axelerant is feeling good.

Monthly 1-on-1’s are about career growth. Making improvements and milestones are imperative, but you could say that career growth is paramount. Team members discuss with leaders their future so they can visualize the stepping stones.

Being a best Drupal agency is one which enables career growth and skill refinement, and having these every month—for everyone—applies a strategy.

In these meetings, we discuss training opportunities, the possibilities of educational reimbursement and career path changes. If a team member is interested in another vertical or department, we can nurture a transition or part-time involvement.

Our progressive policies are benefits. Team members are encouraged to take advantage of leave, travel, and tech policies whenever applicable. Inside Axelerant, you’ll find travel and technology budgets (Wi-fi reimbursement and device replacement); group health insurance; and a generous 35-days leave plus maternity, sabbatical, and paternity leave options.

Days off are shareable with other team members. And these are paid, of course.

We do work differently

There’s been quite a bit of talk recently about burnout in the Drupal community. Work-life balance has been at the heart of this conversation, and at the crux of work-life balance you’ll find company policy. Let’s face it. Overworking, a culture of perpetual overtime, and burnout have a lot—if not everything—to do with an agency’s approach to productivity. The best Drupal agency or firm will put this into perspective and do the right thing.

Download Drupal Staff Augmentation Case Study

We don’t clock in or out. We deliver quality work on time and budget, without timesheets. Productivity is about results via Key Performance Indicators, not punch cards. When you work hard, efficiently, and you’re connected with the team, you achieve these quality results.

Of course, our approach is detailed; we’ve adopted and refined agile frameworks which support our self-organized, self-managed teams.

Agile powers how we get things done. Our performance tracking and collaborative efforts align with this approach. There are much more reasons for our Drupal success in delivery, including our competence with automation.

We set our work schedules. This scheduling is expressive of deep trust and responsibility, and it’s a serious testament. If top Drupal agencies want to keep top performing team members happy, allowing time for daily activities (whether these involve family, social, or spiritual norms) is a great start.

Axelerant’s work-life balance is in the hands of each team member.

This doesn’t mean that our employees aren’t up early in the morning or late at night. What this means is while some may choose to be up before the sun (or long after it’s gone), it’s up to them. We encourage them to do what’s best for themselves.

These agile and scheduling characteristics help foster our team’s wellness, as both are focused on the needs of the individual. We’ve found that this doesn’t hinder project success, in fact, it helps to ensure it.

Rigidity doesn’t work, and our teams have proven that they can be trusted with accountability and independence.

We handle finances differently

We’re transparent. In Axelerant, employees can view salaries, raises, and other details about company spending. These aren’t coveted secrets; figures are talked about openly. In this way, every employee is kept in the loop and encouraged to ask questions about our internal affairs. We keep ourselves honest, and we don’t mind talking about money.

We’re passionate about our work and our livelihood. Some firms and agencies don’t like to speak about money. We’re not like this. Let’s be frank, financial conversations centered on our employee’s needs aren’t signs of a lack of passion or selfishness. At Axelerant, we encourage openness.

Download: Continuous Discovery White Paper (PDF)

Semi-annual raises are peer-determined. Each team receives a raised budget based on profits. Next, the allocation of this amount is by honest team-level discussions. We’ve found that this system in conjunction with 1-on-1s, metrics, and engagement survey enables team recognition and promotes project feats. While this isn’t wholly competitive, it does encourage personal growth.

We’re paid on-time, in monthly lump sums. This consistency works perfectly for our employees when it comes to putting away savings and meeting monthly budgeting needs. Whereas some agency employees need to wait for several weeks or a couple of months for addressing their school loans, rent, food, and other financial concerns, Axelerant employees are already done during the first week of every month.

Being remote sure helps

Remote teams have the opportunity to put their best face forward. This doesn’t mean telecommuters are fake or disingenuous. Digital practitioners, despite contrary opinions, have the ability to interact in ways face-to-face team members can’t. They can compose themselves and avoid reactive, knee-jerk responses.

We’re talking about the unproductive kinds of office culture, the kinds that can weigh heavy in the workplace. These things can produce, over time, an unhappy (and by extension an unproductive) team. Remote work avoids this and other unpleasantness that can come with the brick and mortar.

But what’s more important is our people are free to be around their friends and family without hesitation. Working from a home office or a cafe liberates the team—gives them freedom

Being global changes everything

Axelerant is a globally distributed team (France, Taiwan, India, Israel, Japan, Australia, United States, and more to come). Some of us are from the major cities; others live in small towns—why does this matter? Because we’ve built a close-knit international team and have attained a diversity some can only dream of.

We’re a melting pot. Our cultural differences create a unique environment that enriches us all. The unique perspectives and insights every team member brings to Axelerant make our team dynamic. Diversity is the workplace gives organizations of all kinds a real advantage.

The importance of having this universal, a global mindset in today’s market can’t be undervalued. We’re world travelers, with a deep appreciation for the new. This connectedness is positive energy that charges Axelerant’s brand: we’re multicultural movers and boundary pushers.

There are global events and retreats happening back-to-back. Our annual retreat officially brings us all together for epicness, but we often see one another at international cons, camps, and other local meetups. This sponsored travel takes many of us to places we wouldn’t be visiting otherwise, broadening our horizons, and exposing us to the world even more.

We’re an international, 24-hour powerhouse. We use time zones to our advantage. This provides a tremendous advantage to our clients and enables us to get ahead of other agencies. At any time, somebody from Axelerant, somewhere in the world, is working hard at getting the right thing done.

It’s simple, happy people work hard

Happy employees are more productive. and happy, skilled production is what makes up the best Drupal agency.  We’ve found that satisfied employees with proper work-life balance are the best, bottom line. If you don’t have happy people, you’ve got a revolving door, an impassionate workforce, and indifference.

Unhappy people are indifferent. Unhappiness can breed indifference, and indifference is what will sink any agency. The day your people become unhappy is another day closer to them becoming unconcerned and eventually inactive.

If you want the best Drupal agency, find wellness

Beyond an extensive portfolio, and efficient Drupal services, a top Drupal agency will display healthy indications of a flourishing culture. The culture comes from people. If you’re looking for the best talent, which is what every organization in need of a Drupal vendor is looking for, then look for happy talent. Empowered teams produce powerful work. When more decision makers start to get this, we’ll all be in a better place.

These are just a few oddities that make us great. If you’re looking to hire or work for the best Drupal agency, these are some of the details you should be considering.

This article was originally published in November, 2015. It has since been updated.

Jul 17 2014
Jul 17

The world can often seem to rush by and if you don’t stop to smell the roses you can miss it.

In the coming months we at SystemSeed will be “going back to our roots” so to speak and attending DrupalCon Amsterdam from September 29th to Oct 3rd.

We hope to meet like-minded techies (and possibly the next SystemSeed employee), the next incredible minds on stage giving presentations and the busy bees working away in the Birds of a Feather groups.

If you would like to meet us with - either the managers, systems architects or our amazing dev team - please contact us and we’ll grab a coffee or some office space to chat.

Apr 05 2013
Apr 05

Listen online: 

Git is often touted as among other things being extremely flexible. It's a big selling point for the software. You're not throwing all your eggs in one basket and assuming that there is one singular workflow to rule them all. This flexibility can also be a challenge though. In this podcast we'll talk about the various ways that we at Lullabot use Git when working with teams of people. Both small and large. And the organizational tricks we've learned along the way to help make sure our projects continue moving forward and don't get to messy.

Some of the things discussed include designating someone as a branch manager, working in feature/task branches to keep your code organized and easy to review, and using pull requests. Spoiler alert! We end up boiling it all down to this. There is no one perfect way, but whatever way you decided to organize your team make sure you document it and that everyone on the team knows what you decided.

Podcast notes

Ask away!

If you want to suggest your own ideas for podcasts, or have questions for us to answer on a podcast, let us know:
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Release Date: April 5, 2013 - 10:00am

Album:

Length: 42:35 minutes (24.85 MB)

Format: mono 44kHz 81Kbps (vbr)

Feb 01 2012
Feb 01

One of our most hotly requested features is support for multiple developers working on a single Drupal site as a team. We’re happy to announce that our first iteration of team management has now gone live.

You will now find the “Team” pane under the “Site Configuration” tab on your site dashboard:

Initially, the account that creates the site will be considered the owner and unremovable. Once a site begins payment, the ownership will change to the billed user. You can add new team members by clicking “Add Member” and entering in their e-mail address.

Currently, you can only add registered Pantheon accounts. Once added, a team member has full access to the site dashboard.

In future iterations, you will be able to invite unregistered users and limit access to site operations. Documentation can be found on the wiki under Account Access.

Dec 01 2011
Dec 01

December 1st, 2011

My name is Maeghan, I am a Calgary born and raised girl on a mission since graduating from University called ProjectONE12. I am interning in ten companies in one hundred & twelve days across North America in search of my dream job. I had the opportunity to work at Fotolia in Calgary, Adobe MAX in LA, BBDO in Toronto, Dealmaker Media in San Francisco, Trico Charitable Foundation in Calgary and now at ImageX Media here in Vancouver! Since starting I have been featured in, Women 2.0, CTV Live TV, Toronto Star, Calgary Herald, and The Reflector.

My time at ImageX went by VERY quickly… I think that is because there was a lot of laughing, learning and foosball :) The job for the week was to help with some research and marketing efforts for the company, but a major portion of time was on answering the question “why is ImageX a great place to work”.

So I got to shoot a video!!!

ImageX Media has created some of the top websites in North America and specialize in Drupal development, which was something that I really enjoyed learning about. However what I really loved was the atmosphere they created in the office. Its a tech company, so its super casual and relaxed even in the way they interact as a team. They each work on their own project, but collaborate and discuss aloud what they are working on with the rest of the team. It was neat to hear them talk about things like… the vision they have for the site, how they want viewers to be able to interact and use the site… as well as what they wanted the overall experience to be like. The whole team worked together and would bring in different knowledge and expertise to each project and it was so refreshing to hear the developers take such pride in the work they produced. Another cool thing is all the employees are heavily involved in the community through volunteering, educating and speaking at different events. I love that! I think the idea of giving back is so important today, and it is refreshing to see that to the team of ImageX.. its not something they go out of their way to do, giving back is just a part of their every day life, which is something that I also try to do.

I think the thing that I enjoyed most about the team was the opportunity to be surrounded by people who love what they do. Everyone was so much fun to work with – so considerate and welcoming to share with me what they know, which was a big deal… because by no means am I a developer… sometimes I wish I could be.. I only know like two lines of code… but the team took the time to sit me down and tell me what they were working on, and asked for my help on non-technical aspects of their work.

The end of the week came fast… I think that is because i was laughing, learning and working hard the whole time I was there. But my boss Glenn treats the office to lunch on Fridays and the team let me pick the type of food I wanted for my goodbye lunch. We had a little pow-wow in the boardroom and I shared with them the adventures of this project so far as well as a blooper video I made for them.

My time with ImageX was really special, I think I felt the closest with these coworkers because I interviewed them and learn about what they do, what they love, and shared a lot of laughs :) I really felt like I made good friends there, and for that… I am super grateful.

Maeghan Smulders was having too much fun on the job at ImageX Media

Maeghan Smulders earns an iPad for her work at ImageX Media

Dec 01 2005
Dec 01

You might have already noticed, but I'll re-iterate nevertheless: the Drupal project has released Drupal 4.6.4 and 4.5.6 which fix three security vulnerabilities. Everyone running a Drupal site is advised to upgrade, as always.

Multiple people were mighty busy yesterday preparing, finalizing and testing the patches and advisories. I was one of them, although I was more like lurking around trying to look busy ;-) Anyways, I have sent the respective advisories (DRUPAL-SA-2005-007, DRUPAL-SA-2005-008, DRUPAL-SA-2005-009) to the "usual suspects" today: Bugtraq, Full Disclosure, and the php-sec mailing list. The advisories have already been picked up by Secunia and a bunch of other security sites...

Btw: I finally received news that my domain was transferred to my new web hoster today, which led to a short downtime. Everything should be fine now. If you notice any problems, please drop me a note.

About Drupal Sun

Drupal Sun is an Evolving Web project. It allows you to:

  • Do full-text search on all the articles in Drupal Planet (thanks to Apache Solr)
  • Facet based on tags, author, or feed
  • Flip through articles quickly (with j/k or arrow keys) to find what you're interested in
  • View the entire article text inline, or in the context of the site where it was created

See the blog post at Evolving Web

Evolving Web