Dec 16 2011
Dec 16

I usually use linux, but for various reasons I've needed to use windows lately and so I figured I would setup Xdebug, Acquia Dev Desktop, and Netbeans in Windows.  I didn't see much for guides out there but its really pretty easy.

Step 1 - Install Acquia Dev Desktop:

You can install either the D6 or D7 one, because really they are the same and you can just add D6/7/yourflavor to it using its "import" button.

I installed this to "C:\acquia-drupal" and "C:\sites\acquia-drupal".  That way I don't have to worry about the spaces when configing my php.ini files.  Spaces in file directories always seem to cause me issues.  Like so:

Step 2 - Install Netbeans

I just went for the php version.  Once its installed you can download any plugins you want.

Step 3 - Setup Netbeans

This is pretty easy, I just basically followed: http://drupal.org/node/1019816.  Some of the options shown on that url are missing in my netbeans, so I just ignored them.

Also, install whatever plugins you want (git is a good one) from W.  To do this I had to run netbeans as administrator (in windows 7), everytime after that I didnt, but to get it going the first time I had too.

Step 4 - Add your project and config it for debug

The Drupal.org link above shows you how to add a project.  One tweak I would do after you add the project, right click your project > properties > Run configuration > Advanced > Do not open webbrowser.

Step 5 - Setup PHP for xdebug.

I noticed Acquia Dev Desktop had the xdebug extension already in the "C:\acquia-drupal\php5_2\ext" folder so I didn't even have to download it.

All I did was edit my php.ini file.  I added this to the bottom:

[debug]
zend_extension_ts=C:\acquia-drupal\php5_2\ext\php_xdebug-2.1.2-5.2-vc6.dll;
xdebug.remote_autostart=off
xdebug.remote_enable=1
xdebug.remote_handler=dbgp
xdebug.remote_host=localhost
xdebug.remote_port=9000

You can find a link to your php.ini file opening your Acquia Dev Desktop Control Panel and clicking on Settings, then config tab, then the "edit" button next to the php.ini file.

After you add the above to the php.ini file, stop and start the Acquia Drupal Stack.  Now, go back into setting, config tab, and click the phpinfo link.  This will open a page where you can see if xdebug is setup and working.  If you see anything about xdebug on that page, its probably working.

Step 6 - Install the easy Xdebug plugin for FireFox

This will put 2 little icons in your lower right of firefox, a bug-looking-thing and a green square.

Step 7 - Setup Breakpoints and debug

Boot up Netbeans, Acquia Drupal Stack, and Firefox. 

In firefox, go to the php page you want to debug. 

In netbeans, add breakpoints to where you want to stop.  Then click to the debug button in netbeans:

In firefox, click the green bug (lower right from easy Xdebug) and reload the page.

TADAAA, Netbeans will stop at the breakpoints and show you variables and such.  Very cool.

Conclusion

So there you go.  Pretty quick and easy to get up and running.  If you have any questions just let me know.  I'm not a pro at this stuff but I'll sure try and answer whatever you throw at me.

Oct 11 2011
Oct 11

Zivtech's Senior Developer, Howard Tyson, recently conducted a Node.js webinar with our Drupal partner, Acquia.

The webinar and description are below:

Bring real time interactivity to Drupal with Node.js integration:

Drupal is a powerful, flexible platform for building applications, but not something that handles realtime notifications easily. Node.js is a breath of fresh air in the Open Source web server landscape. It makes writing applications that handle thousands of open connections at the same time easily.

The Nodejs module integrates Drupal with Node.js, allowing for the best of both worlds. Realtime chat, push notifications and help desk functionality can all be easily added to your Drupal site via the Nodejs module, without the usual scalability and performance issues associated with these technologies on the LAMP stack.

This webinar addresses:

  • Why realtime?
  • Why use Node.js?
  • How does the Nodejs module integrates Drupal and Node.js
  • Current features of the Nodejs module
  • Where the Nodejs module is going

Howard Tyson, Senior Developer at Zivtech has been developing Drupal powered websites since 2006. Howard contributes to Drupal and co-maintains the Nodejs module, Version Control API among others.

Contributor(s): 

Howard

Sep 23 2011
Sep 23

Zivtech's Senior Developer, Howard Tyson, recently conducted a Node.js webinar with our partner Acquia.

The webinar and description are below:

Bring real time interactivity to Drupal with Node.js integration:

Drupal is a powerful, flexible platform for building applications, but not something that handles realtime notifications easily. Node.js is a breath of fresh air in the Open Source web server landscape. It makes writing applications that handle thousands of open connections at the same time easily.

The Nodejs module integrates Drupal with Node.js, allowing for the best of both worlds. Realtime chat, push notifications and help desk functionality can all be easily added to your Drupal site via the Nodejs module, without the usual scalability and performance issues associated with these technologies on the LAMP stack.

This webinar addresses:

  • Why realtime?
  • Why use Node.js?
  • How does the Nodejs module integrates Drupal and Node.js
  • Current features of the Nodejs module
  • Where the Nodejs module is going

Howard Tyson, Senior Developer at Zivtech has been developing Drupal powered websites since 2006. Howard contributes to Drupal and co-maintains the Nodejs module, Version Control API among others.

Nov 04 2010
Nov 04

Its first incarnation took place in Brussels on 8-10 October 2010. The main organizer of the event was Kristof Van Tomme (Pronovix) and he got a lot of help from Rudy Van Hoe (Microsoft), Michaela Kraft (Microsoft) and Jakub Suchy (Dynamite Heads). The goal of the event was intensified networking, sharing best practices and building collaborations among Drupal companies to keep the pace in a rapidly evolving, almost turbulent market.

The target audience reacted very quickly: from the available 60 places there were hardly any left 3 days after that the meeting was announced! Finally, 64 Drupal executives and freelancers attended the meeting, representing 55 Drupal companies (generally with 10 to 30 employees) and over 700 Drupalistas mostly from Europe, from about 15 different countries as main office location, but with a much wider market range.

The format of the event (Open Space Technology), introduced to this public and facilitated by Kristof Van Tomme, also required active participation; and the meeting was actually as innovative and collaborative in character as the Drupal community itself.

Several participants published blog posts on the event already, which provide a comprehensive review of the sessions, the meeting conclusions as well as the personal experiences and hopes:

There were numerous action points defined at the event, among which there is still vivid public discussion for example on Drupal marketing resources for enterprises (Enterprise Marketing Resources, Infographics) and Drupal training (research-and-academia, curriculum-and-training). As a concrete outcome of DrupalCXO, there is a survey launched on “Software Used in Drupal Development” to map what software Drupal companies use, how efficient they are and how they could be improved. (Everyone who contributes as a survey participant will also get the summarized version of the aggregate data.)

Almost 400 tweets were also sent on #DrupalCXO during and after the meeting by not only those who were there, but also by those who could not make it. And it could have been hundreds more if it had not been limited by the engagement that the sessions required...

It is also evident from the meeting feedback that the sponsors were very much appreciated both for their contribution and their attitude to the event: each 7th tweet mentioned @Microsoft and said big thanks for helping in the organization and providing its facilities for DrupalCXO, and each 9th thanked @Acquia for sponsoring the Saturday evening program and actively participating at the event.

There are over 60 pictures on the meeting and its venue on Flickr, and there will also be some interviews available soon, which were made at DrupalCXO.

And the future? Well, the informal network that the attendees built at the event (and even before) provide a good basis for future collaboration, and there will surely be places where the discussions can continue (see upcoming events) and take a novel energy even with those who missed this opportunity!

Please don’t forget about the next DrupalCXO either: it will be scheduled for sometime around the Drupal Business Days (26-27 May, 2011), somewhere close to Helsinki… (To be announced later)

Aug 18 2009
Aug 18

Some time ago I wrote an article that looks deeply at the Drupal path system and shows how easy it is for new developers to hook into a running Drupal system. I explore the idea that this openness and extensibility is a key factor in winning large numbers of developers to work on Drupal, and that this is one of the reasons the project is succeeding. The paper is now available at Acquia, beautifully formatted as a technical whitepaper. I’m very happy with this article and am excited to finally have it available. It’s well worth the short survey you’ll be asked to complete before you can download.

About Drupal Sun

Drupal Sun is an Evolving Web project. It allows you to:

  • Do full-text search on all the articles in Drupal Planet (thanks to Apache Solr)
  • Facet based on tags, author, or feed
  • Flip through articles quickly (with j/k or arrow keys) to find what you're interested in
  • View the entire article text inline, or in the context of the site where it was created

See the blog post at Evolving Web

Evolving Web