Jul 31 2013
Jul 31

On Saturday 20th, Jesús and I visited Santander for attending the Drupal Day. The Drupal Day is an itinerant event organized by the Spanish Drupal Association with a local Drupal community.

Around 80 drupalistas were there, and we had very interesting session, mostly centered around the new things that are coming with Drupal 8. Is a great thing that more and more people in the Spanish community is getting involved in core contributions and attending international events, and IMHO this is making Spanish events more interesting every time.

Drupal Day Spain Santander Group Photo

For trying to attract more contributors, we celebrated a short sprint the evening before, and some new people were introduced about core development workflows, but could have been better if we could have spent more than just two or three hours. We should iterate on improving that for next events, but was nice anyway.

Sessions were recorded, so videos of every session should be available soon in the Spanish Association video channel on Vimeo.

Drupal Day Santander Logo

We want to thank to the local community in Santander, they did a gorgeous job organizing the event and innovating with Drujitos (a blue version of mojito) for the party. And of course, thanks Cocomore for sponsoring our assistance there!

Sep 07 2012
Sep 07

Drupal 8 Multilingual Initiative Code Sprint weekend

I took a train from Frankfurt (Germany) down to Munich the Saturday before the DrupalCon. When I joined the Multilingual Sprint on Sunday morning, many of them had already been sprinting for a full day and a number of issues were ready for review, so I dived in, observing the behavior of Drupal 8 before and after applying patches, proof-reading the patches for anything odd (e.g. typos in the documentation), discussing the issues in comments and in IRC with people who were sitting just across the room (other times actually speaking in person). By the end of the day, instead of the dozen or so people that Gábor Hojtsy, the Multilingual Initiative team lead, had expected, there were close to 50 people at the location, some joining us in the work on Multilingual issues, some working on other Drupal 8 tasks, and some who were just arriving in Munich and followed the Tweets to where we were. Luckily, the location rented for the Saturdays and Sundays before and after the DrupalCon week was big enough to accommodate all the extra arrivals.

While on the topic of the venue we used for those weekends, I’d like to personally thank Stephan Luckow and Florian (“Floh”) Klare of the Drupal-Initiative e.V. for all that they did to find a nice place that would still leave us with a budget for food and for their valiant work on stretching the food budget while still serving up excellent fare, in keeping with the fantastic meals we enjoyed the rest of the week. Instead of ordering delivery, they prepared almost everything themselves, including beautiful open-face sandwiches, fruit platters, and lovely grilled specialties at a club we went to where you can barbecue in the Biergarten.

…thanks for the huge help to the local organizers, especially Florian Klare and Stephan Luckow. They helped us manage collecting and spending sponsor money wisely with the Drupal Initiative e.V, prepared great sandwiches and fruit plates for us and even organized a sprinter party night with grill food. It was amazing to work with such helpful and flexible local organizers.
Gábor Hojtsy, September 5, 2012

Luckow and SirFiChi of the Drupal Initiative, organized the location and made us great food!

Since people were “fresh”, I think a lot of work got done on the first weekend and the Monday before the conference (more than 50 people joined us and worked on various core initiatives on Monday in the room we later used for core most conversations at the Sheraton), which also meant that issues were still fresh in our minds while we had days of sessions and conversations, so when we started sprinting again on Friday we had lots of new ideas for the tasks we were still working on. Friday’s sprints were at the Westin Grand, where there was great attendance both upstairs in the main room as well as a large room downstairs from it, where Drupalize.me hosted a core contribution workshop to ease people into the process of contributing to core. I decided to go to that workshop since I’m still pretty new to it all and found a few people sitting nearby who were I was also able to interest in some Multilingual tasks, so while the main group sprinted upstairs, we also worked downstairs. Later on, I came upstairs, and since there were not a lot of simpler tasks for “core newbies”, like myself, I took some time to sprint on a module I contributed some time back, before there was much of anything for Drupal 7 in the area of “multilingual”… and tried to make my module more multilingual-friendly. I got a few good commits and a new release out for Internal Links and also recruited a colleague to look at the code with me, provide some ideas, and become another maintainer. So I personally found Friday quite productive.

*/ First off, a sprint on this scale would not be possible without sponsors and significant on-site help. DrupalCon provided us with space on Monday and Friday, and some great food on Friday. The rest of the days would not have been doable without comm-press, dotProjects.be, Open8.se, OSINet and Acquia. The [ … ] financial sponsorships they provided paid for our weekend venue [ … ].

I continued sprinting with the Multilingual initiative at the Film Coop Saturday and Sunday, leaving mid-afternoon on Sunday to get back to the train station. When I left the other sprinters, Webchick was only finally getting some rest after her trip home and we had about 20 issues that were marked “RTBC”. In all, there were dozens of issues tackled over the weekend. For a complete overview of all the issues we made progress on, see Gábor’s post about the sprints, where you can also check out his excellent DrupalCon core conversation presentation, “Drupal 8’s Multilingual Wonderland”. There is still a lot to do in the time between now and the “feature freeze” deadline, but we made good progress in the DrupalCon sprints, so hopefully we can push on and get the rest of the critical tasks done in the time remaining.

One of the less trivial tasks I took on during the final sprint weekend was documenting the new language_select field type, which involved checking out the Drupal API (documentation) project, updating the Form API table to include a new Element column (language_select) and Property row (#languages), as well as information about these (below the table) and linking them in all the appropriate places. Currently, updating this page is a bit of a pain, but hopefully we will move to a better system for maintaining this information, perhaps even automated generation. While I’d worked on other Drupal documentation pages before, this was the first time I’d actually contributed patches to update the API, so it was a good learning experience.

If you’d like to help out with the Multilingual initiative or other core contribution, you might first want to take a look at the Drupal 8 Initiatives page, where announcements about coming IRC meeting can be seen. This page also has links to the news, roadmaps, filtered issues, and other pertinent information. Drupalladder.org is also a great place to go for lessons to help you work through the steps of being ready to contribute to Drupal core.

I look forward to seeing you all in IRC and in coming code sprints.

Jun 14 2012
Jun 14
Morning stand-up meeting at the Drupal 8 Multilingual Sprint

I was supposed to get into Barcelona at 10:30PM on Tuesday evening, but with delays in my flight, it wasn’t till after midnight that our plane landed; it was after 1 a.m. by the time I reached my hotel. Normally travel, when it runs late and long, makes me feel exhausted, but I was excited to be joining my first Drupal core sprint. I’ve been wanting to do a bit more to help build Drupal and it’s great to not only be somewhat aware of what’s coming in Drupal 8, but to also know that I’ve at least played a small part in making it happen.

I wasn’t sure I would attend the Drupal Dev Days in Barcelona till a couple of weeks ago, but I’m glad I’m here. We have a fairly sizable group of developers here at the Citilab helping work on cutting through the issues for Drupal 8 Multilingual Initiative (D8MI). I’ve been helping with some user interface quirks and since it had been long enough since I’d actually done string translations of the user interface, I started out yesterday as a “tester”… at least trying to look at the problem of translating the interface (e.g. translating “Add content” to German) as if I had never done anything like that before. And we did find some issues and, even better, we were able to address and correct those issues during yesterday’s coding. Others have been working on multilingual issues related to the new configuration management system, and a number of other issues which you, too, can help with, if you’d like to join us remotely (or in person, if you happen to already be in Barcelona — the Sprints continue through Friday, too). There are currently about 40 of us in the IRC channel for i18n and I'd say that at least half of those are working on the Sprint. There are about a dozen (give or take, since people are working on other sprints, too) who are here in Barcelona working on D8MI.

You can help make Drupal 8 better, too!

Jump on IRC (#drupal-i18n) and look at the focus issues for Drupal 8 Multilingual Initiative if you’d like to join use remotely. There is a lot going on right now and it’s not all on Multilingual issues, so if you have some time, I’d like to encourage others to join me in helping ease the burden on the few who do so much and at least do a small bit to make Drupal 8 as awesome as it can be.

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