Jun 06 2018
Jun 06
June 6th, 2018

I recently had the privilege of helping PRI.org launch a new React Frontend for their Drupal 7 project. Although I was fairly new to using React, I was able to lean on Four Kitchens’ senior JavaScript engineering team for guidance. I thought I might take the opportunity to share some things I learned along the way in terms of organization, code structuring and packages.

Organization

As a lead maintainer of Emulsify, I’m no stranger to component-driven development and building a user interface from minimal, modular components. However, building a library of React components provided me with some new insights worth mentioning.

Component Variations

If a component’s purpose starts to diverge, it may be a good time to split the variations in your component into separate components. A perfect example of this can be found in a button component. On any project of scale, you will likely have a multitude of buttons ranging from actual <button> elements to links or inputs. While these will likely share a number of qualities (e.g., styling), they may also vary not only in the markup they use but interactions as well. For instance, here is a simple button component with a couple of variations:

const Button = props => { const { url, onClick } = props; if (url) { return ( <a href={url}> ... </a> ); } return ( <button type="button" onClick={onClick}> ... </button> ); }; constButton=props=>{  const{url,onClick}=props;  if(url){    return(      <ahref={url}>        ...      </a>    );  return(    <buttontype="button"onClick={onClick}>      ...    </button>

Even with the simplicity of this example, why not separate this into two separate components? You could even change this component to handle that fork:

function Button(props) { ... return url ? <LinkBtn {...props}/> : <ButtonBtn {...props} />; } functionButton(props){  returnurl?<LinkBtn{...props}/>:<ButtonBtn{...props}/>;

React makes this separation so easy, it really is worth a few minutes to define components that are distinct in purpose. Also, testing against each one will become a lot easier as well.

Reuse Components

While the above might help with encapsulation, one of the main goals of component-driven development is reusability. When you build/test something well once, not only is it a waste of time and resources to build something nearly identical but you have also opened yourself to new and unnecessary points of failure. A good example from our project is creating a couple different types of toggles.  For accessible, standardized dropdowns, we introduced the well-supported, external library Downshift.:

In a separate part of the UI, we needed to build an accordion menu:

Initially, this struck me as two different UI elements, and so we built it as such. But in reality, this was an opportunity that I missed to reuse the well-built and tested Downshift library (and in fact, we have a ticket in the backlog to do that very thing). This is a simple example, but as the complexity of the component (or a project) increases, you can see where reusage would become critical.

Flexibility

And speaking of dropdowns, React components lend themselves to a great deal of flexibility. We knew the “drawer” part of the dropdown would need to contain anything from an individual item to a list of items to a form element. Because of this, it made sense to make the drawer contents as flexible as possible. By using the open-ended children prop, the dropdown container could simply just concern itself with container level styling and the toggling of the drawer. See below for a simplified version of the container code (using Downshift):

export default class Dropdown extends Component { static propTypes = { children: PropTypes.node }; static defaultProps = { children: [] }; render() { const { children } = this.props; return ( <Downshift> {({ isOpen }) => ( <div className=”dropdown”> <Button className=”btn” aria-label="Open Dropdown" /> {isOpen && <div className=”drawer”>{children}</div>} </div> )} </Downshift> ); } } exportdefaultclassDropdownextendsComponent{  staticpropTypes={    children:PropTypes.node  staticdefaultProps={    children:[]  render(){    const{children}=this.props;    return(      <Downshift>        {({isOpen})=>(          <divclassName=dropdown>            <ButtonclassName=btnaria-label="Open Dropdown"/>            {isOpen&&<divclassName=drawer>{children}</div>}          </div>        )}      </Downshift>    );

This means we can put anything we want inside of the container:

<Dropdown> <ComponentOne> <ComponentTwo> <span>Whatever</span> </Dropdown> <Dropdown>  <ComponentOne>  <ComponentTwo>  <span>Whatever</span></Dropdown>

This kind of maximum flexibility with minimal code is definitely a win in situations like this.

Code

The Right Component for the Job

Even though the React documentation spells it out, it is still easy to forget that sometimes you don’t need the whole React toolbox for a component. In fact, there’s more than simplicity at stake, writing stateless components may in some instances be more performant than stateful ones. Here’s an example of a hero component that doesn’t need state following AirBnB’s React/JSX styleguide:

const Hero = ({title, imgSrc, imgAlt}) => ( <div className=”hero”> <img data-src={imgSrc} alt={imgAlt} /> <h2>{title}</h2> </div> ); export default Hero; constHero=({title,imgSrc,imgAlt})=>(  <divclassName=hero>    <imgdata-src={imgSrc}alt={imgAlt}/>    <h2>{title}</h2>  </div>exportdefaultHero;

When you actually need to use Class, there are some optimizations you can make to at least write cleaner (and less) code. Take this Header component example:

import React from 'react'; class Header extends React.Component { constructor(props) { super(props); this.state = { isMenuOpen: false }; this.toggleOpen = this.toggleOpen.bind(this); } toggleOpen() { this.setState(prevState => ({ isMenuOpen: !prevState.isMenuOpen })); } render() { // JSX } } export default Header; importReactfrom'react';classHeaderextendsReact.Component{  constructor(props){    super(props);    this.state={isMenuOpen:false};    this.toggleOpen=this.toggleOpen.bind(this);  toggleOpen(){    this.setState(prevState=>({      isMenuOpen:!prevState.isMenuOpen    }));  render(){    // JSXexportdefaultHeader;

In this snippet, we can start by simplifying the React.Component extension:

import React, { Component } from 'react'; class Header extends Component { constructor(props) { super(props); this.state = { isMenuOpen: false }; this.toggleOpen = this.toggleOpen.bind(this); } toggleOpen() { this.setState(prevState => ({ isMenuOpen: !prevState.isMenuOpen })); } render() { // JSX } } export default Header; importReact,{Component}from'react';classHeaderextendsComponent{  constructor(props){    super(props);    this.state={isMenuOpen:false};    this.toggleOpen=this.toggleOpen.bind(this);  toggleOpen(){    this.setState(prevState=>({      isMenuOpen:!prevState.isMenuOpen    }));  render(){    // JSXexportdefaultHeader;

Next, we can export the component in the same line so we don’t have to at the end:

import React, { Component } from 'react'; export default class Header extends Component { constructor(props) { super(props); this.state = { isMenuOpen: false }; this.toggleOpen = this.toggleOpen.bind(this); } toggleOpen() { this.setState(prevState => ({ isMenuOpen: !prevState.isMenuOpen })); } render() { // JSX } } importReact,{Component}from'react';exportdefaultclassHeaderextendsComponent{  constructor(props){    super(props);    this.state={isMenuOpen:false};    this.toggleOpen=this.toggleOpen.bind(this);  toggleOpen(){    this.setState(prevState=>({      isMenuOpen:!prevState.isMenuOpen    }));  render(){    // JSX

Finally, if we make the toggleOpen() function into an arrow function, we don’t need the binding in the constructor. And because our constructor was really only necessary for the binding, we can now get rid of it completely!

export default class Header extends Component { state = { isMenuOpen: false }; toggleOpen = () => { this.setState(prevState => ({ isMenuOpen: !prevState.isMenuOpen })); }; render() { // JSX } } exportdefaultclassHeaderextendsComponent{  state={isMenuOpen:false};  toggleOpen=()=>{    this.setState(prevState=>({      isMenuOpen:!prevState.isMenuOpen    }));  render(){    // JSX

Proptypes

React has some quick wins for catching bugs with built-in typechecking abilities using React.propTypes. When using a Class component, you can also move your propTypes inside the component as static propTypes. So, instead of:

export default class DropdownItem extends Component { ... } DropdownItem.propTypes = { .. propTypes }; DropdownItem.defaultProps = { .. default propTypes }; exportdefaultclassDropdownItemextendsComponent{DropdownItem.propTypes={  ..propTypesDropdownItem.defaultProps={  ..defaultpropTypes

You can instead have:

export default class DropdownItem extends Component { static propTypes = { .. propTypes }; static defaultProps = { .. default propTypes }; render() { ... } } exportdefaultclassDropdownItemextendsComponent{  staticpropTypes={    ..propTypes  staticdefaultProps={    ..defaultpropTypes  render(){    ...

Also, if you want to limit the value or objects returned in a prop, you can use PropTypes.oneOf and PropTypes.oneOfType respectively (documentation).

And finally, another place to simplify code is that you can deconstruct the props option in the function parameter definition like so. Here’s a component before this has been done:

const SvgLogo = props => { const { title, inline, height, width, version, viewBox } = props; return ( // JSX ) } constSvgLogo=props=>{  const{title,inline,height,width,version,viewBox}=props;  return(    // JSX

And here’s the same component after:

const SvgLogo = ({ title, inline, height, width, version, viewBox }) => ( // JSX ); constSvgLogo=({title,inline,height,width,version,viewBox})=>(

Packages

Finally, a word on packages. React’s popularity lends itself to a plethora of packages available. One of our senior JavaScript engineers passed on some sage advice to me that is worth mentioning here: every package you add to your project is another dependency to support. This doesn’t mean that you should never use packages, merely that it should be done judiciously, ideally with awareness of the package’s support, weight and dependencies. That said, here are a couple of packages (besides Downshift) that we found useful enough to include on this project:

Classnames

If you find yourself doing a lot of classname manipulation in your components, the classnames utility is a package that helps with readability. Here’s an example before we applied the classnames utility:

<div className={`element ${this.state.revealed === true ? revealed : ''}`} > <divclassName={`element${this.state.revealed===true?revealed:''}`}>

With classnames you can make this much more readable by separating the logic:

import classNames from 'classnames/bind'; const elementClasses = classNames({ element: true, revealed: this.state.revealed === true }); <div classname={elementClasses}> importclassNamesfrom'classnames/bind';constelementClasses=classNames({  element:true,  revealed:this.state.revealed===true<divclassname={elementClasses}>

React Intersection Observer (Lazy Loading)

IntersectionObserver is an API that provides a way for browsers to asynchronously detect changes of an element intersecting with the browser window. Support is gaining traction and a polyfill is available for fallback. This API could serve a number of purposes, not the least of which is the popular technique of lazy loading to defer loading of assets not visible to the user.  While we could have in theory written our own component using this API, we chose to use the React Intersection Observer package because it takes care of the bookkeeping and standardizes a React component that makes it simple to pass in options and detect events.

Conclusions

I hope passing on some of the knowledge I gained along the way is helpful for someone else. If nothing else, I learned that there are some great starting points out there in the community worth studying. The first is the excellent React documentation. Up to date and extensive, this documentation was my lifeline throughout the project. The next is Create React App, which is actually a great starting point for any size application and is also extremely well documented with best practices for a beginner to start writing code.

Web Chef Evan Willhite
Evan Willhite

Evan Willhite is a frontend engineer at Four Kitchens who thrives on creating delightful digital experiences for users, clients, and fellow engineers. He enjoys running, hot chicken, playing music, and being a homebody with his family.

Web Chef Dev Experts
Development

Blog posts about backend engineering, frontend code work, programming tricks and tips, systems architecture, apps, APIs, microservices, and the technical side of Four Kitchens.

Read more Development
May 08 2018
May 08
May 8th, 2018

Over the past few months, Four Kitchens has worked together with the Public Radio International (PRI) team to build a robust API in PRI’s Drupal 7 site, and a modern, fresh frontend that consumes that API. This project’s goal was to launch a new homepage in the new frontend. PRI intends to re-build their entire frontend in this new structure and Four Kitchens has laid the groundwork for this endeavor. The site went live successfully, with a noticeable improvement in load time and performance. Overall load time performance increased by 40% with first-byte time down to less than 0.5 seconds. The results of the PRI team’s efforts can be viewed at PRI.org.

PRI is a global non-profit media company focused on the intersection of journalism and engagement to effect positive change in people’s lives. PRI’s mission is to serve audiences as a distinctive content source for information, insights and cultural experiences essential to living in our diverse, interconnected world.

Overall load time performance increased by 40% with first-byte time down to less than 0.5 seconds.

Four Kitchens and PRI approached this project with two technical goals. The first was to design and build a full-featured REST API in PRI’s existing Drupal 7 application. We used RESTFul, a Drupal module for building APIs, to create a JSON-API compliant API.

Our second technical goal was to create a robust frontend backed by the new API. To achieve that goal, we used React to create component-based user interfaces and styled them with using the CSS Modules pattern. This work was done in a library of components in which we used Storybook to demonstrate and test the components. We then pulled these components into a Next-based application, which communicates with the API, parses incoming data, and uses that data to populate component properties and generate full pages. Both the component library and the Next-based application used Jest and Enzyme heavily to create thorough, robust tests.

A round of well-deserved kudos to the PRI team: Technical Project Manager, Suzie Nieman managed this project from start to finish, facilitating estimations that led the team to success. Senior JavaScript Engineer, Patrick Coffey, provided keen technical leadership as well as deep architectural knowledge to all facets of the project, keeping the team unblocked and motivated. Engineer, James Todd brought his Drupal and JavaScript expertise to the table, architecting and building major portions of PRI’s new API. Senior Frontend Engineer, Evan Willhite, brought his wealth of frontend knowledge to build a robust collection of elegant components in React and JavaScript. Architect, David Diers created mechanisms that will be responsible for managing PRI’s API documentation that can be used in future projects.

Special thanks to Patrick Coffey and Suzie Nieman for their contributions to this launch announcement. 

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Apr 27 2018
Apr 27

Happy Friday everyone. This episode we are joined by Anthony Fournier to talk about his experience in taking the data from Drupal and making it available for component based themes.

Feb 15 2018
Feb 15

Last fall at BADCamp it was exciting to see that a component-driven approach to building Drupal 8 themes is becoming the standard. Many people are doing great things to advance this approach, including reducing duplication and simplifying data structures. In the day-long front end summit, and in many sessions and BOFs during BADCamp, great tips were shared for making the most of helper modules, such as the UI Patterns module, as well as techniques that make the most of Pattern Lab, KSS, and other front end systems.

While Drupalers are rejoicing at these exciting advances allowing newfound front end freedoms, there are still a few hoops to be aware of in order to make the most of Drupal, especially for a newcomer who might be eager to shove aside a lot of what Drupal provides. Some of these things, like contextual links, are nice-to-haves that can make life easier for content administrators. However, other things that are easily dismissed in a component-driven approach, like letting Drupal fully render fields, can cause headaches further on if they’re ignored, and make life difficult when it comes to keeping your front end forward-compatible with Drupal.
 

A Quick Recap of the Component-Driven Approach

At its basic level, the component-driven approach to Drupal theming means:

  1. Breaking your site’s interface down into independent components.
  2. Organizing those components into a system of reusable parts (i.e., the Atomic Design philosophy).
  3. Build out those parts however you see fit in a standalone presentation platform that supports twig (i.e., a KSS, or Pattern Lab style guide), with the pieces of those components that can change set up as variables in the twig files.

These component twig files that you use to build your system of reusable parts essentially serve as replacements for the templates in your Drupal theme (field.html.twig, block.html.twig, node.html.twig, etc.) You’ll still need the Drupal templates -- for now, see the UI Patterns module note at the end -- but they only serve as the “presenter” that helps map values from Drupal to the appropriate variables in your component template. The biggest payoffs with this approach are:

  1. Build things how you like them! You’re in control of the markup, and don’t necessarily have to be a seasoned Drupal developer to dive in.
  2. Back end setup, and front end build out can happen at the same time.
  3. A more organized, and structured presentation layer that’s not strictly tied to Drupal, and could potentially be repurposed for other platforms.

For a deeper dive into the components-driven approach, be sure to check out Mario Hernandez’s blog post series on integrating components into Drupal: Part 1, Part 2, and Part 3.

So if you’re not following a component-driven approach already, I’m sure you can see why it’s becoming popular. However, before diving in, here are a few things to consider to help you keep your approach forward-compatible with Drupal, and hopefully avoid headaches.
 

When It Comes To Fields, Let Drupal Do Its Thing

As we know, the default field markup in Drupal 8 is abstracted to account for field labels, and multiple values. This means that by default in Drupal even a simple, single value text field is going to render with multiple layers of <div>s wrapping the value of the field. However, let’s say you have a callout component in your style guide that includes an optional subtitle field. You’d probably mark that up with just a single, semantic element, like this:
 

{% if subtitle %}
 <h3 class=”callout__subtitle”>{{ subtitle }}</h3>
{% endif %}


And let’s say on the Drupal side of things you’re going use a custom block type for adding callout components to your site. Therefore, in the block--callout.html.twig template that serves as the “presenter” for mapping Drupal values to the component template, you’d have something like this:
 

{% include ‘@custom_theme/callout/callout.twig’ with {
  ...
  ‘subtitle’: content.field_subtitle
  ...
} %}


Since we’re letting Drupal render the subtitle field in our block template, we’d end up with all the default field markup inside our <h3>, which isn’t what we want at all.

While the quickest solution may be to pull out the value of the subtitle field from the render array for the field, and pass that to the component template...
 

‘subtitle’: content.field_subtitle.0['#context].value 


...this can come back to bite you later because of the way Drupal 8 handles caching. One option that’s more cache-friendly is to use the Twig Field Value module. This module gives you custom filters that help you safely pluck the value you need from the render array for the field:
 

‘subtitle’: content.field_subtitle|field_value


This is better, but we’re still shoving aside how Drupal adds attributes to the field markup. We’d only have our custom class on the <h3> for the subtitle, with no way for modules in the Drupal ecosystem to inject their classes or other attributes. As some of the “Outside-In” initiatives in Drupal start to mature this will become increasingly important if you want to take advantage of them. What follows are some options for how you can make your components more “loyally” accommodate Drupal.
 

Follow Drupal’s Lead For Field Markup

First, you could markup your component templates with additional wrappers that include only your classes, which would apply styling to the semantic element included in the variable output of your component template. Understandably, this could lead to a bit more bloated styling and markup, plus require you to include markup in the sample data that your style guide uses. Example:

Component markup:

{% if subtitle %}
  <div class=”callout__subtitle-wrapper”>
    {{ subtitle }}
  </div>
{% endif %}

Component placeholder data in the style guide:

{
  “subtitle”: “<h3 class=\”callout__subtitle\”>Subtitle Text</h3>”
}

In this case, when the component is implemented on the Drupal side of things, you would create a custom field template for the subtitle field, where you would change the markup to use only a single <h3>, plus add the “callout__subtitle” class via the Drupal addClass() function.

Drupal field template for the subtitle field in our “callout” custom block type:
 

<h3{{ attributes.addClass(‘callout__subtitle’) }}>
  {%- for item in items -%}
    {{ item.content }}
  {%- endfor -%}
</h3>

But Wait, I Want Control Of My Markup!

The previous option somewhat defeats the purpose of the markup freedom you get with a component driven approach, so you may want to instead consider leaving the component markup nice and lean, and just use a <span> tag for the subtitle field where the Drupal-specific attributes can be applied.

Component markup:

{% if subtitle %}
  <h3 class=”callout__subtitle”>
    {{ subtitle }}
  </h3>
{% endif %}

Component placeholder data in the style guide:

{
  “subtitle”: “Subtitle Text”
}

Drupal field template for the subtitle field in our “callout” custom block type:

<span{{ attributes }}>
  {%- for item in items -%}
    {{ item.content }}
  {%- endfor -%}
</span>

This works pretty nicely, but you may find that those Drupal attributes really need to be output where they were intended: the main wrapper for the field.
 

Twig Embed To The Rescue

A good middle ground for keeping your markup lean, but still loyally accommodating Drupal attributes, is to use twig embed blocks in your component template. This means you could put whatever you want inside the embed block declaration for the subtitle field in the component template, and on the Drupal side when the callout component is integrated via a twig embed, we simply swap that subtitle block with something else. Example:

Component markup:

{% block callout_subtitle %}
{% if subtitle %}
  <h3 class=”callout__subtitle”>
    {{ subtitle }}
  </h3>
{% endif %}
{% endblock %}

Component placeholder data in the style guide:

{
  “subtitle”: “Subtitle Text”
}

Drupal block template for integrating a callout component:

{% embed ‘@custom_theme/callout/callout.twig’ with {
  ...
  ‘subtitle’: content.field_subtitle
  ...
} %}
  {% block callout_subtitle %}
    {{ subtitle }}
  {% endblock %}
{% endembed %}

Drupal field template for the subtitle field in our “callout” custom block type:

<h3{{ attributes.addClass(‘callout__subtitle’) }}>
  {%- for item in items -%}
    {{ item.content }}
  {%- endfor -%}
</h3>

Accommodate Attributes All The Way Up

Now that we’ve established some options for accommodating Drupal at the field level, let’s take a look at how to accommodate Drupal in the block template for our callout component example.

One key Drupal feature that’s extremely helpful for content administrators is contextual links. To make these work in our callout component example we’ll need to accommodate the Drupal attributes variable on the main wrapper of the component template, plus include the title_prefix/title_suffix variables. These are what Drupal needs to inject the contextual links into a template.

Since the attributes variable can include class, id, and data attributes in one variable, we need to make sure we only combine Drupal’s classes with ours, and let the other attributes render without Drupal classes. This can be accomplished on the main wrapper of our callout component template:

<div class=”callout {{ attributes ? attributes.class }}”{{ attributes ? attributes|without(‘class’) }}>

Note that the ‘without’ twig filter in this example is a Drupal-specific filter, so for your style guide you’ll want to make sure you’re using one that supports Drupal’s custom filters (both KSS node, and Pattern Lab have configuration options that support Drupal twig filters.)

The other thing you’ll want to include to make sure contextual links get injected are the title_prefix/title_suffix variables. You typically will want to include this around the markup for the main title of the component:

{{ title_prefix }}
<h3 class=”callout__title”>
  {{ title }}
</h3>
{{ title_suffix }}

Make Sure Empty Means Empty

You may recall when first discussing the subtitle for our callout component it was mentioned that it would be an optional field, and in our component template we include an ‘if’ statement to check for a populated subtitle before outputting its related markup. One thing to keep in mind when letting Drupal fully render fields is that even though no content may have been entered for the subtitle on the Drupal side, your component may still read the value of the rendered field as not being empty, and proceed with outputting the markup inside the if statement. This is especially problematic when you have twig debug turned on in your theme.

A reliable way to avoid false positives when checking for empty fields is to check the results of a field after applying the render and trim filters. Example:

‘subtitle’ = content.field_subtitle|render|trim is not empty ? content.field_subtitle


Leave No Content Unrendered

Finally, one last step we’ll want to take in our “presenter” template, is to make sure we allow Drupal to go ahead and do its render thing on the main content variable of the block, even though we’re only interested passing specific field values to our component template. This is again is to help avoid headaches with how caching is handled (read more about this here: https://www.drupal.org/docs/8/api/render-api/cacheability-of-render-arrays). We also need to make sure that we exclude the fields we passed over to our component template since we don’t want them to actually be output in the Drupal template. Example:

{{ content|without(‘field_title’, ‘field_subtitle’, ‘body’) }}


What The Future Holds

As mentioned in the beginning there is also UI Patterns module that many are embracing for a component-driven approach to Drupal site building. The benefit of this module is that it eliminates the need for the “presenter” template when integrating your components.

For now, though, if you find yourself in a position where your Drupal templates are having to serve as the presenter for your components, make sure to consider these ways of keeping things as forward-compatible as possible with Drupal, so that you can take advantage of new Drupal initiatives as their rolled out, and save yourself some headaches later on.

Additional Resources
5 Advantages of Component Driven Theming | Video
Building Components: Breaking it Down | Blog
5 Aspects of Component Driven Back End Development with Drupal 7 | VIdeo

Nov 13 2017
Nov 13
November 13th, 2017

Welcome to the fourth episode in our video series for Emulsify 2.x. Emulsify 2.x is a new release that embodies our commitment to component-driven design within Drupal. We’ve added Composer and Drush support, as well as open-source Twig functions and many other changes to increase ease-of-use.

In this video, we’re going to teach you how to best use a DRY Twig approach when working in Emulsify. This blog post accompanies a tutorial video, embedded at the end of this post.

DRYing Out Your Twigs

Although we’ve been using a DRY Twig approach in Emulsify since before the 2.x release, it’s a topic worth addressing because it is unique to Emulsify and provides great benefit to you workflow. After all, what drew you to component-driven development in the first place? Making things DRY of course!

In component-driven development, we build components once and reuse them together in different combination—like playing with Lego. In Emulsify, we use Sass mixins and BEM-style CSS to make our CSS as reusable and isolated as possible. DRY Twig simply extends these same benefits to the HTML itself. Let’s look at an example:

Non-DRY Twig:

<h2 class=”title”> <a class=”title__link” href=”/”>Link Text</a> </h2> <h2class=title><aclass=title__link” href=/>LinkText</a>

DRY Twig:

<h2 class=”title”> {% include "@atoms/01-links/link/link.twig" with { "link_content": “Link Text”, "link_url": “/”, "link_class": “title__link”, } %} </h2> <h2class=title>{%include"@atoms/01-links/link/link.twig"with{"link_content":LinkText,"link_url":/,"link_class":title__link”,

The code with DRY Twig is more verbose, but by switching to this method, we’ve now removed a point of failure in our HTML. We’re not repeating the same HTML everywhere! We write that HTML once and reuse it everywhere it is needed.

The concept is simple, and it is found everywhere in the components directory that ships in Emulsify. HTML gets written mostly as atoms and is simply reused in larger components using the default include, extends or embed functions built into Twig. We challenge you to try this in a project, and see what you think.

[embedded content]

Thanks for following our Emulsify 2.x tutorials. Miss a post? Read the full series here.

Pt 1: Installing Emulsify | Pt 2: Creating your Emulsify 2.0 Starter Kit with Drush | Pt 3: BEM Twig Function | Pt 4: DRY Twig Approach | Pt 5: Building a Full Site Header in Drupal

Just need the videos? Watch them all on our channel.

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Web Chef Evan Willhite
Evan Willhite

Evan Willhite is a frontend engineer at Four Kitchens who thrives on creating delightful digital experiences for users, clients, and fellow engineers. He enjoys running, hot chicken, playing music, and being a homebody with his family.

About Drupal Sun

Drupal Sun is an Evolving Web project. It allows you to:

  • Do full-text search on all the articles in Drupal Planet (thanks to Apache Solr)
  • Facet based on tags, author, or feed
  • Flip through articles quickly (with j/k or arrow keys) to find what you're interested in
  • View the entire article text inline, or in the context of the site where it was created

See the blog post at Evolving Web

Evolving Web