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Mar 02 2020
Mar 02

As of Drupal 8.7, the Media and Media Library modules can be enabled and used out-of-box. Below, you'll find a quick tutorial on enabling and using these features.

out-of-box before media and media library

In the past there were two different ways to add an image to a page.

  1. An image could be added via a field, with the developer given control over its size and placement:
     

    Image field before media library
  2. An image could be added via the WYSIWYG editor, with the editor given some control over its size and placement:
     

    Image field upload choices screen

A very straightforward process, but these images could not be reused, as they were not part of a reusable media library.

reusing uploaded media Before Drupal 8.7

Overcoming image placement limitations in prior versions of Drupal required the use of several modules, a lot of configuration, and time. Sites could be set up to reference a media library that allowed editors to select and reuse images that had previously been uploaded, which we explained here.

This was a great time to be alive.

What is available with Media Library

Enabling the Media and Media Library modules extends a site's image functionality. First, ensure that the Media and Media Library core modules are enabled. 

Enable media library in drupal

A media entity reference field must be used with the Media Library. It will not work with a regular image field out-of-box.

Image field on manage display page

On the Manage form display page, select "Media library" widget. 

Media library widget on manage display page

On the "Node Add" and "Node Edit" forms, you’ll see the below difference between a regular image field and a field connected to the media library.

Media library field on node edit

Click on “Add media” and you’ll see a popup with the ability to add a new image to the library or to select an image that is already in the library.

Media field grid

With a simple configuration of the field, if multiple media types are allowed in the field, you’ll see vertical tabs for each media type.

Media grid with multiple media types

WYSIWYG configuration

The WYSIWYG editor requires a few steps when configuring the media library for a specific text format. First, a new icon will appear with a musical note overlapping the image icon. This should be added to the active toolbar and the regular image icon should be moved to the available buttons.

wysiwyg toolbar configuration

Under “Enabled filters,” enable “Embed media."  Under the filter settings, vertical tab settings can be chosen for media types and view modes. Once that configuration is saved, you’ll see on a WYSIWYG editor that you have the same popup dialog for adding a new image to the media library, or selecting an already-uploaded image.

wysiwyg media configuration

Once you are on a "Node Add or "Node Edit" page with a WYSIWYG element, you’ll see the media button (image icon plus musical note).

Media button on wysiwyg editor

Clicking on the media button brings up the same, familiar popup that we saw earlier from the image field:

media library grid

This article is an update to a previous explainer from last year. 

Dec 09 2019
Dec 09

With Drupal 9 set to be released later next year, upgrading to Drupal 8 may seem like a lost cause. However, beyond the fact that Drupal 8 is superior to its predecessors, it will also make the inevitable upgrade to Drupal 9, and future releases, much easier. 

Acquia puts it best in this eBook, where they cover common hangups that may prevent migration to Drupal 8 and the numerous reasons to push past them.

The Benefits of Drupal 8

To put it plainly, Drupal 8 is better. Upon its release, the upgrade shifted the way Drupal operates and has only improved through subsequent patches and iterations, most recently with the release of Drupal 8.8.0

Some new features of Drupal 8 that surpass those of Drupal 7 include improved page building tools and content authoring, multilingual support, and the inclusion of JSON:API as part of Drupal core. We discussed some of these additions in a previous blog post

Remaining on Drupal 7 means hanging on to a less capable CMS. Drupal 8 is simply more secure with better features.

What Does Any of This Have to Do With Drupal 9?

With an anticipated release date of June 3, 2020, Drupal 9 will see the CMS pivot to an iterative release model, moving away from the incremental releases that have made upgrading necessary in the past. That means that migrating to Drupal 8 is the last major migration Drupal sites will have to undertake. As Acquia points out, one might think “Why can’t I just wait to upgrade to Drupal 9?” 

While migration from Drupal 7 or Drupal 8 to Drupal 9 would be essentially the same process, Drupal 7 goes out of support in November 2021. As that deadline approaches, upgrading will only become an increasingly pressing necessity. By migrating to Drupal 8 now, you avoid the complications that come with a hurried migration and can take on the process incrementally. 

So why wait? 

To get started with Drupal migration, be sure to check out our Drupal Development Services, and come back to our blog for more updates and other business insights. 
 

Mar 13 2019
Mar 13

Note: This post refers to Drupal 8, but is very applicable to Drupal 7 sites as well

Most Drupal developers are experienced building sitewide search with Search API and Views. But it’s easy to learn and harder to master. These are the most common mistakes I see made when doing this task:

Not reviewing Analytics

Before you start, make sure you have access to analytics if relevant. You want to get an idea of how much sitewide search is being used and what the top searches are. On many sites, sitewide search usage is extremely low and you may need to explain this statistic to stakeholders asking for any time-consuming search features (and yourself before you start going down rabbit holes of refinements).

Take a look for yourself at how the sitewide search is currently performing for the top keywords users are giving it. Do the relevant pages come up first? You’ll take this into account when configuring boosts.

Using Solr for small sites

Drupal 8 Search API comes with database search included. Search API DB has come a long way over the years and is likely to have the features you need for smaller sites. Using a Solr backend is going to add complexity that may not be worth it for the amount of value your sitewide search is giving. Remember, if you use a Solr backend you have to have Solr running on all environments used in the project and you’ll have to reindex when you sync databases.

Not configuring all environments for working Solr

Which takes us to this one. If you do use Solr (or another server-side index) you need to also make sure your team has Solr running on their local environments and has an index for the site. 

Your settings.php needs to be configured to connect to the right index on each environment. We use Probo for review sandboxes so we need to configure our Probo builds to use the right search index and to index it on build.

Missing fields in index or wrong type

Always included the ‘Rendered HTML’ field in your search index rather than trying to capture every text field on all your content types and then having to come back to add more every time you add a field. Include the title field as well, but don’t forget to use ‘Fulltext’ as its field type. Only ‘Fulltext’ text fields are searchable by word.

Not configuring boosts

In your Processor settings, use Type-specific boosting and Tag-boosting via HTML filter. Tag boosting is straightforward: boost headers. For type-specific boosting you’re not necessarily just boosting the most important content types, but also thinking about what’s in the index and what people are likely looking for. Go back to your analytics for this. 

For example, when someone searches for a person’s name, are they likely wanting the top result to be the bio and contact info, a news posting mentioning that person, or a white paper authored by the person? So, even if staff bios are not the most important content on the site, perhaps they will need to be boosted high in search, where they are very relevant.

Not ordering by relevance

Whoops. This is a very common and devastating mistake. All your boost work be damned if you forget this. The View you make for search results needs to order results by Relevance: Descending.

Using AJAX

Don’t use the setting to ‘Use AJAX’ on your search results View. Doing so would mean that search results don’t have unique URLs, which is bad for user experience and analytics. It’s all about the URLs not about the whizzbang.

Not customizing the query string

Any time you configure a View with an exposed filter, take the extra second to customize the query string it is going to use. ‘search’ is a better query string than ‘search_api_fulltext’ for the search filter. URLs are part of your user interface.

No empty text

Similarly, when you add an exposed filter to a search you should also almost always be adding empty text. “No results match your search” is usually appropriate.

Facets that don’t speak to the audience

Facets can be useful for large search indexes and certain types of sites. But too many or too complex facets just create confusion. ‘Content-type’ is a very common facet, but if you use it, make sure you only include in its options the names of content types that are likely to make sense to visitors. For example, I don’t expect my visitors to understand the technical distinction between a ‘page’ and a ‘landing page’ so I don’t include facet links for these.

A screen shot of facets in DrupalYou can exclude confusing facet options 

Making search results page a node

I tell my team to make just about every page a visitor sees a node. This simplifies things for both editors and developers. It also ensures every page is in the search index: If you make key landing pages like ‘Events Calendar’ as Views pages or as custom routes these key pages will not be found in your search results. 

One important exception is the Search Results page itself. You don’t want your search results page in the search index: this can actually make an infinite loop when you search. Let this one be a Views page, not a Views block you embed into a node.

Important page content not in the ‘content’

Speaking of blocks and nodes, the way you architect your site will determine how well your search works. If you build your pages by placing blocks via core Block Layout, these blocks are not part of the page ‘content’ that gets indexed in the ‘Rendered HTML.’ Anything you want to be searchable needs to be part of the content. 

You can embed blocks in node templates with Twig Tweak, or you can reference blocks as part of the content (I use Paragraphs and Block Field.)

Not focusing on accessibility

The most accessible way to handle facets is to use ‘List of Links’ widget. You can also add some visually hidden help text just above your facet links. A common mistake is to hide the ‘Search’ label on the form. Instead of display: none, use the ‘visually-hidden’ class.

Nov 09 2018
Nov 09

Last week, the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) Vaccine Makers Project (VMP) won a PR News Digital Award in the category “Redesign/Relaunch of Site.” The awards gala honors the year’s best and brightest campaigns across a variety of media. 

PR News Award on a table.

Our CEO, Alex, and our Director of Client Engagement, Aaron, along with members of the Vaccine Makers team attended the event at the Yale Club in New York City.

Screenshot of a Tweet posted by the PR News. Source

The Vaccine Makers Project (VMP) is a subset of CHOP’s Vaccine Education Center (VEC). It’s a public education portal for students and teachers that features resources such as lesson plans, downloadable worksheets, and videos. 

The Vaccine Makers team first approached us in need of a site that aligned with the branding of CHOP’s existing site. They also wanted a better strategy for site organization and resource classification. Our team collaborated with theirs to build a new site that’s easy to navigate for all users. You can learn more about the project here.

Screenshot of a Tweet from Vaccine Makers team. Source

We’d like to thank CHOP and the Vaccine Makers team for giving us the opportunity to work on this project. We’d also like to thank PR News for recognizing our work and hosting such a wonderful event. 

Finally, we’d like to congratulate our incredible team for their endless effort and dedication to this project. 
 

Oct 29 2018
Oct 29

At this year's BADCamp, our Senior Web Architect Nick Lewis led a session on Gatsby and the JAMstack. The JAMStack is a web development architecture based on client-side JavaScript, reusable APIs, and prebuilt Markup. Gatsby is one of the leading JAMstack based static page generators, and this session primarily covers how to integrate it with Drupal. 

Our team has been developing a "Gatsby Drupal Kit" over the past few months to help jump start Gatsby-Drupal integrations. This kit is designed to work with a minimal Drupal install as a jumping off point, and give a structure that can be extended to much larger, more complicated sites.

This session will leave you with: 

1. A base Drupal 8 site that is connected with Gatsby.  

2. Best practices for making Gatsby work for real sites in production.

3. Sane patterns for translating Drupal's structure into Gatsby components, templates, and pages.

This is not an advanced session for those already familiar with React and Gatsby. Recommended prerequisites are a basic knowledge of npm package management, git, CSS, Drupal, web services, and Javascript. Watch the full session below. 

About Drupal Sun

Drupal Sun is an Evolving Web project. It allows you to:

  • Do full-text search on all the articles in Drupal Planet (thanks to Apache Solr)
  • Facet based on tags, author, or feed
  • Flip through articles quickly (with j/k or arrow keys) to find what you're interested in
  • View the entire article text inline, or in the context of the site where it was created

See the blog post at Evolving Web

Evolving Web