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Jan 23 2020
Jan 23

In the Drupal support world, working on Drupal 7 sites is a necessity. But switching between Drupal 7 and Drupal 8 development can be jarring, if only for the coding style.

Fortunately, I’ve got a solution that makes working in Drupal 7 more like working in Drupal 8. Use this three-part approach to have fun with Drupal 7 development:

  • Apply Xautoload to keep your PHP skills fresh, modern, and compatible with all frameworks and make your code more reusable and maintainable between projects. 
  • Use the Drupal Libraries API to use third-party libraries. 
  • Use the Composer template to push the boundaries of your programming design patterns. 

Applying Xautoload

Xautoload is simply a module that enables PSR-0/4 autoloading. Using Xautoload is as simple as downloading and enabling it. You can then start using use and namespace statements to write object-oriented programming (OOP) code.

For example:

xautoload.info

name = Xautoload Example
description = Example of using Xautoload to build a page
core = 7.x package = Midcamp Fun

dependencies[] = xautoload:xautoload

xautoload_example.module

<?php use Drupal\xautoload_example\SimpleObject; function xautoload_example_menu() { $items['xautoload_example'] = array( 'page callback' => 'xautoload_example_page_render', 'access callback' => TRUE, ); return $items; } function xautoload_example_page_render() { $obj = new SimpleObject(); return $obj->render(); } use Drupal\xautoload_example\SimpleObject;function xautoload_example_menu() {  $items['xautoload_example'] = array(    'page callback' => 'xautoload_example_page_render',    'access callback' => TRUE,  return $items;function xautoload_example_page_render() {  $obj = new SimpleObject();  return $obj->render();

src/SimpleObject.php

<?php namespace Drupal\xautoload_example; class SimpleObject { public function render() { return array( '#markup' => "<p>Hello World</p>", ); } } namespace Drupal\xautoload_example;class SimpleObject {  public function render() {    return array(      '#markup' => "

Hello World

"
,    );

Enabling and running this code causes the URL /xautoload_example to spit out “Hello World”. 

You’re now ready to add in your own OOP!

Using Third-Party Libraries

Natively, Drupal 7 has a hard time autoloading third-party library files. But there are contributed modules (like Guzzle) out there that wrap third-party libraries. These modules wrap object-oriented libraries to provide a functional interface. Now that you have Xautoload in your repertoire, you can use its functionality to autoload libraries as well.

I’m going to show you how to use the Drupal Libraries API module with Xautoload to load a third-party library. You can find examples of all the different ways you can add a library in xautoload.api.php. I’ll demonstrate an easy example by using the php-loremipsum library:

1. Download your library and store it in sites/all/libraries. I named the folder php-loremipsum. 

2. Add a function implementing hook_libraries_info to your module by pulling in the namespace from Composer. This way, you don’t need to set up all the namespace rules that the library might contain.

function xautoload_example_libraries_info() { return array( 'php-loremipsum' => array( 'name' => 'PHP Lorem Ipsum', 'xautoload' => function ($adapter) { $adapter->composerJson('composer.json'); } ) ); } function xautoload_example_libraries_info() {  return array(    'php-loremipsum' => array(      'name' => 'PHP Lorem Ipsum',      'xautoload' => function ($adapter) {        $adapter->composerJson('composer.json');      }

3. Change the page render function to use the php-loremipsum library to build content.

use joshtronic\LoremIpsum; function xautoload_example_page_render() { $library = libraries_load('php-loremipsum'); if ($library['loaded'] === FALSE) { throw new \Exception("php-loremipsum didn't load!"); } $lipsum = new LoremIpsum(); return array( '#markup' => $lipsum->paragraph('p'), ); } use joshtronic\LoremIpsum;function xautoload_example_page_render() {  $library = libraries_load('php-loremipsum');  if ($library['loaded'] === FALSE) {    throw new \Exception("php-loremipsum didn't load!");  $lipsum = new LoremIpsum();  return array(    '#markup' => $lipsum->paragraph('p'),

Note that I needed  to tell the Libraries API to load the library, but I then have access to all the namespaces within the library. Keep in mind that the dependencies of some libraries are immense. You’ll very likely need to use Composer from within the library and commit it when you first start out. In such cases, you might need to make sure to include the Composer autoload.php file.

Another tip:  Abstract your libraries_load() functionality out in such a way that if the class you want already exists, you don’t call libraries_load() again. Doing so removes libraries as a hard dependency from your module and enables you to use Composer to load the library later on with no more work on your part. For example:

function xautoload_example_load_library() { if (!class_exists('\joshtronic\LoremIpsum', TRUE)) { if (!module_exists('libraries')) { throw new \Exception('Include php-loremipsum via composer or enable libraries.'); } $library = libraries_load('php-loremipsum'); if ($library['loaded'] === FALSE) { throw new \Exception("php-loremipsum didn't load!"); } } } function xautoload_example_load_library() {  if (!class_exists('\joshtronic\LoremIpsum', TRUE)) {    if (!module_exists('libraries')) {      throw new \Exception('Include php-loremipsum via composer or enable libraries.');    $library = libraries_load('php-loremipsum');    if ($library['loaded'] === FALSE) {      throw new \Exception("php-loremipsum didn't load!");

And with that, you’ve conquered the challenge of using third-party libraries!

Setting up a New Site with Composer

Speaking of Composer, you can use it to simplify the setup of a new Drupal 7 site. Just follow the instructions in the Readme for the Composer Template for Drupal Project. From the command line, run the following:

composer create-project drupal-composer/drupal-project:7.x-dev --no-interaction

This code gives you a basic site with a source repository (a repo that doesn’t commit contributed modules and libraries) to push up to your Git provider. (Note that migrating an existing site to Composer involves a few additional considerations and steps, so I won’t get into that now.)

If you’re generating a Pantheon site, check out the Pantheon-specific Drupal 7 Composer project. But wait: The instructions there advise you to use Terminus to create your site, and that approach attempts to do everything for you—including setting up the actual site. Instead, you can simply use composer create-project  to test your site in something like Lando. Make sure to run composer install if you copy down a repo.

From there, you need to enable the Composer Autoload module , which is automatically required in the composer.json you pulled in earlier. Then, add all your modules to the require portion of the file or use composer require drupal/module_name just as you would in Drupal 8.

You now have full access to all the  Packagist libraries and can use them in your modules. To use the previous example, you could remove php-loremipsum from sites/all/libraries, and instead run composer require joshtronic/php-loremipsum. The code would then run the same as before.

Have fun!

From here on out, it’s up to your imagination. Code and implement with ease, using OOP design patterns and reusable code. You just might find that this new world of possibilities for integrating new technologies with your existing Drupal 7 sites increases your productivity as well.

Feb 27 2015
Feb 27

There are thousands of situations in which you do not want to reinvent the wheel. It is a well known principle in Software Engineering, but not always well applied/known into the Drupal world.

Let’s say for example, that you have a url that you want to convert from relative to absolute. It is a typical scenario when you are working with Web (but not just Web) crawlers. Well, you could start building your own library to achieve the functionality you are looking for, packaging all in a Drupal module format. It is an interesting challenge indeed but, unless for training or learning purposes, why wasting your time when someone else has already done it instead of just focussing on the real problem? Especially if your main app purpose is not that secondary problem (the url converter).

What’s more, if you reuse libraries and open source code, you’ll probably find yourself in the situation in which you could need an small improvement in that nice library you are using. Contributing your changes back you are closing the circle of the open source, the reason why the open source is here to stay and conquer the world (diabolical laugh here).

That’s another one of the main reasons why lot’s of projects are moving to the Composer/Symfony binomium, stop working as isolated projects and start working as global projects that can share code and knowledge between many other projects. It’s a pattern followed by Drupal, to name but one, and also by projects like like phpBB, ezPublish, Laravel, Magento,Piwik, …

Composer and friends

Coming back to our crawler and the de-relativizer library that we are going to need, at this point we get to know Composer. Composer is a great tool for using third party libraries and, of course, for contributing back those of your own. In our web crawler example, net_url2 does a the job just beautifully.

Nice, but at this point you must be wondering… What does this have to do with Drupal, if any at all? Well, in fact, as everyone knows, Drupal 8 is being (re)built following this same principle (DRY or don’t repeat yourself) with an strong presence of the great Symfony 2 components in the core. Advantages? Lots of them, as we were pointing out, but that’s the purpose of another discussion

The point here is that you don’t need to wait for Drupal 8, and what’s more, you can start applying some of this principles in your Drupal 7 libraries, making your future transition to Drupal 8 even easier.

Let’s rock and roll

So, using a php library or a Symfony component in Drupal 7 is quite simple. Just:

  1. Install composer manager
  2. Create a composer.json file in your custom module folder
  3. Place the content (which by the way, you’ll find quite familiar if you’ve already worked with Symfony / composer yaml’s):
    "require": {
      "pear/net_url2": "2.0.x-dev"
     }
    
  4. enable the custom module

And that’s it basically. At this point we simply need to tell drupal to generate the main composer.json. That’s basically a composer file generated from the composer.json found in each one of the modules that include a composer themselves.

Lets generate that file:

drush composer-rebuild

At this point we have the main composer file, normally in a vendor folder (if will depend on the composer manager settings).

Now, let’s make some composer magic :

drush composer update

At this point, inside the vendors folder we should now have a classmap, containing amongst others our newly included library.

Hopefully all has gone well, and just like magic, the class net_url2 is there to be used in our modules. Something like :

$base = new Net_URL2($absoluteURL);

Just remember to add the library to your class. Something like:

use Net_URL2;

In the next post we’ll be doing some more exciting stuff. We will create some code that will live in a php library, completely decoupled but at the same time fully integrated with Drupal. All using Composer magic to allow the integration.

Why? Again, many reasons like:

  1. Being ready for Drupal 8 (just lift libraries from D7 or D6 to D8),
  2. Decoupling things so we code things that are ready to use not just in Drupal, and
  3. Opening the door to other worlds to colaborate with our Drupal world, …
  4. Why not use Dependency Injection in Drupal (as it already happens in D8)? What about using the Symfony Service container? Or something more light like Pimple?
  5. Choose between many other reasons…

See you in my next article about Drupal, Composer and friends, on the meantime, be good :-).

Updated: Clarified that we are talking about PHP Libraries and / or Symfony components instead of bundles. Thanks to @drrotmos and @Ross for your comments.

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