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Jun 15 2021
Jun 15
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When someone tweets a link from your website, Twitter can use Twitter Cards to attach rich photos, videos and media to Tweets.

By doing some minimal configuration changes on your Drupal site using the Metatag Module and the Twitter Cards submodule, users can see a “Card” added below the tweet that contains neatly formatted information coming from your website, as shown in Image 1 below.

Image 1 shows an example of a “Card”.

The cards are generated using HTML markup in the HEAD region of your Drupal site; that’s why the Metatag module is used.

Twitter will scrape your site and generate the card using the HTML meta tags.

Table of Contents

Twitter Cards

There are four variations of Twitter cards. They are:

  1. Summary Card – Displays Title, description, and thumbnail
  2. Summary Card with Large Image – As the name suggests, similar to Summary Card but with a larger image
  3. App Card – A Card with a direct download to a mobile app. Use this Card to drive app downloads
  4. Player Card – Displays video/audio/media.

Image 1 above shows a “Card” of type Summary with Large Image.

In this tutorial, we will look at the steps involved in setting up the “Summary Card with Large Image” Twitter Card.

Getting Started

The Metatag module has a dependency on the Token module. However, if you download and enable the Drupal module using Composer and Drush, the dependency is automatically taken care of as we will show you now.

Use composer to download the module:

composer require drupal/metatag

Once the Metatag module is downloaded using composer, the Token module, which is a dependency, will be downloaded automatically.

Then enable the “Metatag: Twitter Card” submodule:

drush en metatag_twitter_cards -y

The above Drush command will automatically enable the Metatag: Twitter Card submodule, Metatag module and Token module.

Finally, it is always a good idea to clear the cache after enabling Drupal modules:

drush cr

Configure Twitter Cards

By default, Twitter Cards can be added to any content type. We will now configure the Twitter Cards for the Article Content type.

1. Go to Configuration > Metatag (admin/config/search/metatag) and click on “Add default meta tags”.

2. On the next page, select “Article” (or whatever content type you want to configure) from the Type dropdown.

3. Then click on Save. This is required for the correct tokens to appear in the “Browse available tokens” window.

4. Edit the “Content: Article” configuration from the Metatag page.

5. Click on “Twitter cards” to expand the field set and then select “Summary Card with large image” from the Twitter card type dropdown.

6. Now, we have to add tokens into the correct fields. Click “Browse available tokens.” then click on Nodes.

NOTE: If you can’t see “Nodes”, this means you need to save the “default meta tag” option first then edit it again.

Fill in the following fields:

  • Description: [node:summary]
  • Site’s Twitter account: Add your twitter account, i.e., @webwashnet
  • Title: [node:title]
  • Page URL: [node:url]
  • Image URL: [node:field_image] (adjust the field name accordingly)
  • Image alternative text: [node:field_image:alt] (adjust the field name accordingly)

Find Image Field Token

For this type of Twitter card, an image field must exist in your content type. We will show you how to use Token to grab that image data. Click on “Browse available tokens”.

Then drill down by going to Nodes -> Image. This assumes you’re using the Image (field_image) field on the Article content type.

The token should be [node:field_image].

Once you have found the image entity URL, make sure your mouse focus is in the empty Image URL Twitter Card meta tag field, and then click on the image entity URL token value. This will copy/paste the token value into the Image URL field.

Find Image Field Token on Media Asset

If you’re using a media field instead of an image field for handling assets, then use the following token, [node:field_media:entity:thumbnail] (change the field_media name accordingly).

7. Configure any extra fields as needed, then scroll down and click on Save.

8. Once you have filled out the other Twitter Card fields with their respective token values, you should validate the end result markup using the Twitter Card Validator tool. We will now show you how to validate your Twitter card.

As you can see, Twitter successfully recognised our “Summary with large image” card and displayed the information correctly.

NOTE: You’ll need to make sure your website is publicly accessible for the validator tool to work.

View HTML Source

If you want to see the generated markup, view the HTML source on your Drupal site and look for the “twitter:*” meta tags.

Summary

Twitter can display a neatly formatted version of your website’s content whenever someone’s tweets a link to your content. There are various types of Twitter cards depending on your needs.

We have shown how you can use the Metatag module and Twitter Cards submodule to configure Drupal 8 to correctly send your website’s content to Twitter and how to validate your markup to ensure Twitter correctly parses your website content.

FAQ

Q: I changed the default meta tag configuration, but the tags are not changing?

Try clearing the site cache. Go to Configuration > Performance and click on “Clear all caches”.

Editorial Team

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May 12 2021
May 12
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When someone shares a Facebook post with a link to your website, Facebook lets you control how your website content appears to others by parsing your Open Graph (OG) markup.

By doing some minimal configuration changes on your Drupal site using the Metatag Module and the Metatag: Open Graph sub module, you can define what specific content can be shown on Facebook regardless of whether it’s shared from the desktop or mobile web or a mobile app.

It is easier to explain by showing the end result of what we are trying to accomplish. For example, the homepage of www.webwash.net has the following OG markup inside of the :

If someone posted www.webwash.net to Facebook, then Facebook would parse the OG markup like this:

And the end result would look like this:

You can clearly see the corresponding OG tags for the content.

If you want to learn more about the OG tags. Click here for a detailed list and explanations of the Facebook OG tags.

In this tutorial, we are going to show you how to configure a content type to dynamically populate the Facebook OG tags using the Metagtag module and Metatag Open Graph sub module.

Table of Contents

Getting Started

The Metatag module has a dependency on the Token module. However, if you download and enable the Drupal module using composer and drush, the dependency is automatically taken care of as we will show you now.

Use Composer to download the module:

composer require drupal/metatag

Once the Metatag module is downloaded using composer, the Token module, which is a dependency, will be downloaded automatically.

Then enable the “Metatag: Open Graph” sub module:

drush en metatag_open_graph -y

The above drush command will automatically enable the Metatag: Open Graph sub module, Metatag module and Token module.

Finally, it is always a good idea to clear the cache after enabling Drupal modules:

drush cr

By default, Open Graph can be added to any content type. We will now configure Open Graph for the Article Content type.

1. Go to Configuration > Search and meta data > Metatag and click on “Add default meta tags”.

2. On the next page, select “Article” (or whatever content type you want to configure)  from the Type dropdown.

3. Then click on Save. This is required for the correct tokens to appear in the “Browse available tokens” window.

4. Edit the “Content: Article” configuration from the Metatag page.

5. Then in the Open Graph fieldset on the same page, click to expand it. You will now notice quite an exhaustive list of OG tags that you can populate. Firstly, we are going to demonstrate how to populate the Image OG tag.

For this to be successful, your Article content must have at least an image field. We will show you how to use Token to grab that image data.

Click on “Browse available tokens”.

From the Token window click on Nodes to drill down and find the content type fields.

NOTE: If you can’t see “Nodes”, this means you need to save the “default meta tag” option first then edit it again.

Fill in the following fields:

  • Content type: article
  • Page URL: [node:url]
  • Title: [node:title]
  • Description: [node:summary]
  • Image URL: [node:field_image] (adjust the field name accordingly)

Find Image Field Token

To use an image stored in an image field, click on “Browse available tokens”.

Then drill down by going to Nodes -> Image. This assumes you’re using the Image (field_image) field on the Article content type.

The token should be [node:field_image].

Find Image Field Token on Media Asset

If you’re using a media field instead of an image field for handling assets, then use the following token, [node:field_media:entity:thumbnail] (change the field_media name accordingly).

6.After you fill out all of your OG tags fields, click on Save and clear the Drupal cache. If you do not clear your cache, the OG fields may not populate for existing content.

7. Once you have filled out the other OG fields with their respective token values, you should validate the resulting OG markup using the Facebook Sharing Debugger tool. We will now show you how to validate your OG markup.

NOTE: Your website has to be publicly accessible for the debug tool to work.

8. First we need to create a test Article node (make sure to upload an image to our image field). Our test article looks like this:

9. Paste the url for this node into the Facebook Sharing Debugger tool. The output should look like:

As you can see, Facebook successfully parsed our OG markup and displayed the information correctly.

Summary

Facebook lets you control your website’s content whenever someone’s shares a link to your content regardless of whether it’s shared from the desktop or mobile web or a mobile app. Facebook does this by parsing the Open Graph (OG) markup provided by your website. We have shown how you can use the Metatag module and Metatag Open Graph sub module to configure Drupal 8 to correctly generate the OG markup needed by Facebook and we have also shown how to validate your OG markup to ensure Facebook correctly parses your website content.

FAQ

Q: I changed the default meta tag configuration, but the tags are not changing?
Try clearing the site cache. Go to Configuration > Performance and click on “Clear all caches”.

Editorial Team

About Editorial Team

Web development experts producing the best tutorials on the web. Want to join our team? Get paid to write tutorials.

Mar 03 2021
Mar 03

This post is an updated part of our Marketer's Guide to Drupal series. This guide will walk you through considerations for choosing an open source CMS, plus case studies and CMO advice to bring your site to the next level.

Supercharge SEO with Drupal

“Over the last 20 years, Drupal has grown into one of the largest enterprise content management systems in the world.” - Drupal Founder Dries Buytaert

Along with the growth of Drupal, the marketing landscape is vastly different now than it was 20 years ago. The same techniques once used to make the top of the search engine no longer work, so marketers need to understand the powerful role a CMS like Drupal can play in building a successful SEO strategy. 

The release of Drupal 8 marked a significant stride in giving content authors more control. That focus continues to evolve with Drupal 9. Notable editor-focused features include a templating engine called Twig for component variety, an API-first foundation to “write once, publish everywhere”, and an editor-friendly content block authoring experience. Layout Builder additionally provides a "drag and drop" module that lets editors add components to pages and add pages to the site with no code. Now, Drupal 9 has even more upgrades for marketers, tech-savvy or not.

This shift places the marketing team in the driver’s seat more often and allows them to get involved in the CMS decision. In this post, we’ll outline some ways you can up your SEO game with Drupal.

Traditional SEO is Dead

No longer will well-placed keywords alone get you to the top of the SERP ranks. Content is still King in the world of marketing, and it’s what helps you improve your SEO.

Every algorithm change Google has made has one thing in common: it aims to provide the best content based on what it "thinks" the user is trying to find. In other words, the user’s intent. If you want your rankings to stick, don't try to cheat the system. Attract your prospects with informative, entertaining pieces that they can use to take action. And avoid no-value posts that are keyword-stuffed with your industry and the word "best" 100 times. Google can see through it and so can all of your users.

That said, there are a few other factors that are critical to keeping your rankings high that can’t be ignored, including quick load times and mobile-friendliness. Drupal 9 is built with several of these factors in mind to help us make needed improvements quickly and effectively.

Mobile-First Mentality

Drupal 9 is created with responsive design capabilities built-in, so you can begin to address many problems immediately. That’s not to say all of your responsive problems will be solved. Content editors still need to think through their content and imagery, and themers will still need to do configuration to establish things like breakpoints. But Drupal 9 will set you on the right path, giving you and your team many of the tools you need.

You’ll also have the option to choose different images and content for desktop and mobile versions right from the WYSIWYG editor, making it easier to see the differences for every piece of content when you add it and before you publish. This means a solid visual of both versions in real-time for faster publishing and peace of mind knowing exactly what your users experience on any device. 

The Need for Speed

Another big factor that could affect your rankings is speed on both desktop and mobile. Google places such high importance that they provide a PageSpeed Insights test to show where and how your website is slowing visitors down. Drupal 9 is “smart” in that it caches all entities and doesn’t load JavaScript unless it has to. This means the same content won’t be reloaded over and over and instead can be loaded quickly from the cache. It also uses a feature called velocity, which makes creating and publishing new dynamic content experiences is significantly faster than in Drupal 7 and older Drupal versions.

Responsive design is a must-have in today’s digital landscape and speeding up your website on both desktop and mobile is a surprisingly effective way to contribute to your SEO efforts. In short, if your marketing team is focused (as you should be) on top rankings, Drupal 9 provides many of the tools to make that happen. 

Accessibility = Key for Search

Drupal 8 spurred an overall commitment to accessibility from the community, and with the release of Drupal 9 came another big push toward improving web accessibility, including: 

This is important because, as we know, the relationship between web accessibility and SEO is closely intertwined. Although accessibility is not actually a Google ranking factor (yet), improving accessibility on your website has a high chance of improving your SEO rank.

SEO Friendly Modules for Drupal 9

There are thousands of modules available for Drupal 9, many of which are perfect for marketers. Whether you’re looking to try out something new or to find something that fits what you already know, you have your pick. Here are our favorite SEO modules to use when optimizing your site:

  1. Metatag - allows you to automatically provide metadata, aka "meta tags", that help search engines understand your content. This must-have module offers over 300 different meta tags for different purposes, so take a look and find the right ones for your site.
  2. Two Metatag submodules that we highly recommend are Twitter Cards and Open Graph. Connect your site to Facebook, LinkedIn, Slack, Twitter, and other social platforms and control how links will look when shared on them.
  3. Schema.org Metatag - provides a way of adding some of the hundreds of standardized metadata structures from the international schema.org project on a site, making it easier to clearly define metadata that Google et al can use to more accurately understand your site’s unique information.
  4. Pathauto - helps save you time from manually having to create URL path/aliases as new content is created.
  5. Sitemap - provides a site map that gives visitors an overview of your site. It can also display the RSS feeds for all blogs and categories.
  6. Redirect - Almost every new site needs to incorporate 301 redirects for old page URLs. This gives site admins an easy interface for creating those redirects in Drupal.
  7. Google Analytics - this simple module allows site admins the ability to easily configure Google Analytics in Drupal.
  8. Easy Breadcrumbs - uses the current URL (path alias) and the current page's title to automatically extract the breadcrumb's segments and its respective links.

Thankfully, because Drupal is open source, you’re not out of luck in the instance that you can’t find a module that works for you. There are many options available for making a new one that works, from building it yourself to enlisting help from a Drupal team like Mediacurrent.

Visualize SEO Success with Siteimprove

In addition to Drupal's SEO-friendly modules, an SEO optimization tool like Siteimprove can…

  • Give content editors information about their technical SEO to make more informed decisions
  • Gain an understanding of how SEO and content intersect for your overall strategy
  • Flag potential issues before your content is published
  • Provide insights about the SEO impact on unpublishing a page

The Siteimprove module works directly in Drupal, giving editors access to these insights while they’re adding content. This means no more waiting to fix it post-publish. It is important to correctly set up Siteimprove in order to get the most out of it and effectively transform your strategy into a workable roadmap for your site.

SEO and Beyond

Drupal’s content management system is perfectly structured for search optimization and its core features support many of the critical SEO elements. But features only take you so far on their own. To manage and continuously improve your SEO, consider a dashboard like Siteimprove that you can customize to show you just how the data is processed and how it impacts your business's goals.

Setting those custom data points and interpreting the data that comes in can be time-consuming and difficult, so if you need any help, our team of Siteimprove certified experts can apply our knowledge to configuring your dashboards and making sense of the data. Get started with a Siteimprove tune up.

Feb 11 2021
Feb 11

In our recent webinar, we set out to help higher ed marketing teams rethink their digital focus for the year ahead. 

We tapped a group of experts with years of experience helping some of the best-known colleges and universities deliver engaging digital experiences to discuss key web strategy takeaways. Members of the expert panel included:

  • Muzel Chen - Senior Digital Strategist, Mediacurrent 
  • Diane Kulseth - Senior SEO Consultant, Siteimprove 
  • Steve Persch - Technical Product Marketing Manager, Pantheon

If you missed our webinar or want to watch it again, check out the full recording: 

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The live audience came ready with their most pressing questions on topics from personalization and SEO best practices to harnessing analytics and breaking down the communication barriers between Marketing and Admission departments. Below is a summary of what was discussed on the webinar. 

Personalization 

Is personalization dead?

Diane Kulseth: I've seen some higher education institutions using personalization effectively by auto-populating forms. That can be really helpful to keep things seamless for the experience for the student. At the same time, we're talking to a generation that's getting more and more skeptical of the internet. 

There's a misconception that adopting new technology will automatically save you time. Technology, like personalization, can save you a lot of time but it will also take time to implement correctly.

Steve Persch: Technology buying decisions are often made on the assumption that by buying a tool, you will get to spend less time doing a certain task. I think a similar motivation leads a lot of people to buy personalization. They think getting a more powerful measuring tool will fix their problem, but it actually gives you more to measure and requires more of your time.

Muzel Chen: There’s also the issue of how do we use personalization effectively? Students want to get information right away and personalization can reduce these obstacles in navigation and process.

Personalization can mean many things, but in the context of higher ed, we can personalize content for an audience based on their common demographics and behaviors. But it also depends on your medium: are you trying to personalize in social media? Website? Email? Text message? Audiences have different expectations from each marketing channel, which is predicated by the amount of PII (Personally Identifiable Information) they have disclosed to those channels. 

Depending on the context and level of personalization, they can range from convenient to creepy, and striking that right balance can be tricky. But when it works, visitors experience a higher level of engagement because of the convenience and they feel the institution cares about them.

SEO Best Practices for Subsites and Domains 

When thinking about a redesign, I know websites should have ONE main goal, but how do you handle a few different audiences without creating microsites? For example, prospective vs. current students?

Muzel Chen: Some of these issues are mitigated by dedicating an area in your architecture for those specific audiences. But there are situations where it feels the content is servicing all audiences or only one exclusively. These situations typically result in microsites which can be difficult to manage. 

An easy way to address those needs is to start with an audience-neutral page, have the audience self-identify, and place those audience-specific pages at a deeper level. For example, common pages where this occurs are: campus living, parking permits, and health services. These top-level pages will have content that speaks to all audiences and grows in detail as the visitor goes deeper into your site. The details can then begin to diverge by audience type. 

Do you see any trend of separate sites vs. subsites for academic departments (or other smaller units) within a university or college?

Muzel Chen: Over the last decade, it's been very common for higher ed to have subdomains (separate sites) for each individual department or school. But, these sites grow out of hand and become difficult to manage especially when there's not any established governance for tracking content updates across all of the subdomains. 

More institutions are starting to transition to the subfolder (or subsite) practice. It’s easier to see the big picture of all your sites and manage them all within their content management system. 

How can one build a culture of importance for SEO across a decentralized organization (i.e., schools, departments, and offices, like Admissions, all run their own websites)?

Diane Kulseth: I think the biggest part is tying it back to what it all means. Whether it's donor relations, increased revenue for the university, or admissions, tie it back to their goals. That's first and foremost and all of that helps the website and it helps your students. It helps your donors. It helps your prospective parents of students to be able to better navigate the website. 

SEO is great for SEO's sake and building great traffic, but it's also really helpful for all your other marketing initiatives to make sure that people are able to get where they want to go on a seamless web experience that loads properly and is easy to navigate with strong information architecture. 

Marketing Strategy and Analytics 

What are some of the challenges you've seen higher ed leaders face when implementing marketing technology?

Muzel Chen: Reporting. I often see data collection tools being misconfigured. Or collecting lots of data without really defining its purpose. Everybody wants to get access to analytics data, and once that's provided, they use it once and never touch it again. Suddenly, you have 100 users and nobody is providing insights. Without data, all planning comes down to guesswork.

Steve Persch: You almost need Google Analytics for your Google Analytics to track who's using it.

Which analytics data seems to be the most valuable to higher ed? I realize this is likely very organization or campaign dependent, but anything generally useful that may not be obvious?

Diane Kulseth: First and foremost, you want to have your reports on RFIs or requests for information and your applications, and then connect that to enrolled students within your CRM or admissions platform. 

Beyond that, once you start digging deeper, it's really important to start looking at insights like when people are coming to this page from an advertising campaign, are they actually engaging with the page for a substantial amount of time? Are they going elsewhere? How are they responding to your marketing messages? Can you get even more granular and start looking at the demographics behind them? Are these men, women, what are their age ranges? What other insights can you glean from your different tools? I think all of that can be really helpful, but again, start with your basics: RFIs, enrollments, and applications.

Overcoming Department Silos 

Do you have any tips for how Admissions and Marketing can work together?

Steve Persch: Shifting to an iterative or agile mindset for your website is especially difficult when so much of a university operates on a semester or year-long calendar. There's an expectation that you need the web plan for the next year or 10. Saying we're going to do small experiments and get feedback week by week is challenging to accomplish in the higher ed ecosystem. However, I think that you need to find a way to do it with strong cross-departmental relationships across those silos. 

Muzel Chen: We talked about analytics access as one of the technology challenges, but as far as a people challenge, what I see most often is communication. A lot of departments are still siloed — especially marketing and admissions.

A good starting point here is setting up a meeting cadence where you can share common challenges to solve and opportunities to pursue. For example, an ideal project is to link marketing and admissions data, which tracks the visitor as they leave the main site and enters the application process. Marketing could validate their campaigns by reviewing the application data, whereas admissions could personalize the student experience by using marketing’s data. 

Optimize Your Higher Ed Site 

Explore how RainU CMS can help your school launch on Drupal in 30 days or less with a Pantheon-powered hosting solution. Together with Siteimprove, Mediacurrent’s digital strategists can help you optimize your website for SEO, accessibility, and overall performance. 

Jan 18 2017
Jan 18

Magnifying glass over Google search bar Magnifying glass over Google search bar

A few tweaks and modules later, Drupal has easy to build SEO friendly websites. To achieve it, there are two sides involved:

  • Developers and designers will apply technical enhancements (making a good use of the core and contributing modules, write semantic and valid HTML prototypes).
  • Clients create good content.

Below are a few things you can do to improve SEO on your website just by working with content (texts, images, files).

Text content

Title

When you create a page on a website, the page title you decide on is used in several different places so it’s important to get it right and make sure it’s clear and useful.

Page title will appear:

  • On the page (usually as h1 heading)
  • In the main menu
  • In the url page
  • On listings linking to the page (from your site and also from social media sources)

All of above are picked up by search engines, so it’s important to include relevant keywords in your titles.

Page titles should be clear and descriptive. If titles are too long to fit into a menu, or if you want to have a different menu link then the page title you could use the ‘menu link title’ field to display.

Drupal has a feature that allows you to specify a ‘menu link title’, you can find this at the bottom of the edit page form in the “menu settings” tab > “Menu link title”.

Please note, spaces in titles will be converted into dashes in the url, so do not use  dashes in titles. Maybe you could replace dashes with a colon to avoid “double dashed” urls.

Meta description tag

The meta description is the excerpt that displays under the page title and site name on the search engine’s results page. If it’s not filled in, the body copy will be used instead. This may lead to a cut off excerpt, but you could manually fill the ‘meta description’, or use the ‘summary’ field to avoid it.

In Drupal, the body text field on a page is accompanied by a summary field. It is important to fill this in. Sometimes, it’s used on the site as a teaser to promote users to click the page and read the full copy.  Remember, it will be picked up as the meta description for the page if no meta description was manually added.

Headings

When adding or editing content to the Body, in the WYSIWYG toolbar at the top of the text field, you’ll see a dropdown with a few headings options. Commonly, you will have a choice of heading 2, heading 3, heading 4, and normal/paragraph.

When starting a new section on a page, use one of the headings defined in the dropdown. Headings are picked up by search engines and will contribute to your search rank.

Besides helping out with SEO, headings are designed to draw the reader’s eye so that they are able to find what they were looking for much easier. They are also useful for good content structure if the copy is long.

For SEO purposes you should only have the h1 tag used once on a page. H1 is commonly the page title.

Anchor Texts

This is the text that links to something else. For example, if I would like to point you to the about us page, then the anchor text is the (commonly) blue text you see.

Search engines compare the text written in the anchor to the link “behind” it. So if they anchor text includes keywords or phrases that will add value over time.

Anchor text is read by screen readers so it plays an important role in complain with accessibility requirements.

Please make sure that your anchor text is also descriptive.

Length

As a general rule the copy should be as long as it needs to be. Online content is not read in the same way as printed content, so keep things concise, clear and straightforward bearing in mind the user experience, not only the SEO.

As a reference, some SEO advisers recommend around 200 words as a minimum for page copy.

Files (Images, documents)

Filenames

Filenames should follow the following convention to eliminate technical problems and to improve SEO.

  • Use full words
  • Replace spaces with dashes
  • Do not use special characters, just letters, numbers and dashes.

Filenames should be also descriptive.

Some good examples are: mobomo-logo-red.jpg, partnership-agreement-2017.pdf

Reference: https://support.google.com/webmasters/answer/114016?hl=en

Alt Text

This is a descriptive text that appears if an image cannot be loaded and is also used by screen readers. So here SEO is directly implicated with Accessibility. It’s especially important if the image also acts as a link.

This text should clearly describe the image.

Filesize

Main thing you should know about files in web: Large file sizes slow down page load.

Users tends to abandon pages if the load time is greater than 3 seconds. So search engines “don’t like” to direct users to slow sites.

So, you can help to keep the page speed to a minimum by making sure the files you add are light.

A general rule is to try to keep images filesize below 70k, this sometimes is hard especially with large images (banners for example), so let’s say images should not ever be larger than 600k.  

Format

All images should be saved in jpeg format.

Documents should be saved as pdf or doc (for editable documents).

Other

404 and 403 pages

We are going to set up these pages for you, but it’s important that you fill them with accurate content given your audience. For example, you could add a link to your Homepage here or to an Archive / Search page to help your audience finding what they were looking for.

Please note these points listed above are changes you can apply without any tech support, they are just Content edits you can apply by yourself when adding / updating content for your website.

Here’s a few SEO related Drupal modules that makes developers lives easier.

Jul 15 2015
Jul 15

Regardless of industry, staff size, and budget, many of today’s organizations have one thing in common: they’re demanding the best content management systems (CMS) to build their websites on. With requirement lists that can range from 10 to 100 features, an already short list of “best CMS options” shrinks even further once “user-friendly”, “rapidly-deployable”, and “cost-effective” are added to the list.

There is one CMS, though, that not only meets the core criteria of ease-of-use, reasonable pricing, and flexibility, but a long list of other valuable features, too: Drupal.

With Drupal, both developers and non-developer admins can deploy a long list of robust functionalities right out-of-the-box. This powerful, open source CMS allows for easy content creation and editing, as well as seamless integration with numerous 3rd party platforms (including social media and e-commerce). Drupal is highly scalable, cloud-friendly, and highly intuitive. Did we mention it’s effectively-priced, too?

In our “Why Drupal?” 3-part series, we’ll highlight some features (many which you know you need, and others which you may not have even considered) that make Drupal a clear front-runner in the CMS market.

For a personalized synopsis of how your organization’s site can be built on or migrated to Drupal with amazing results, grab a free ticket to Drupal GovCon 2015 where you can speak with one of our site migration experts for free, or contact us through our website.

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SEO + Social Networking:

Unlike other content software, Drupal does not get in the way of SEO or social networking. By using a properly built theme–as well as add-on modules–a highly optimized site can be created. There are even modules that will provide an SEO checklist and monitor the site’s SEO performance. The Metatags module ensures continued support for the latest metatags used by various social networking sites when content is shared from Drupal.

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E-Commerce:

Drupal Commerce is an excellent e-commerce platform that uses Drupal’s native information architecture features. One can easily add desired fields to products and orders without having to write any code. There are numerous add-on modules for reports, order workflows, shipping calculators, payment processors, and other commerce-based tools.

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Search:

Drupal’s native search functionality is strong. There is also a Search API module that allows site managers to build custom search widgets with layered search capabilities. Additionally, there are modules that enable integration of third-party search engines, such as Google Search Appliance and Apache Solr.

Third-Party Integration:

Drupal not only allows for the integration of search engines, but a long list of other tools, too. The Feeds module allows Drupal to consume structured data (for example, .xml and .json) from various sources. The consumed content can be manipulated and presented just like content that is created natively in Drupal. Content can also be exposed through a RESTful API using the Services module. The format and structure of the exposed content is also highly configurable, and requires no programming.

Taxonomy + Tagging:

Taxonomy and tagging are core Drupal features. The ability to create categories (dubbed “vocabularies” by Drupal) and then create unlimited terms within that vocabulary is connected to the platform’s robust information architecture. To make taxonomy even easier, Drupal even provides a drag-n-drop interface to organize the terms into a hierarchy, if needed. Content managers are able to use vocabularies for various functions, eliminating the need to replicate efforts. For example, a vocabulary could be used for both content tagging and making complex drop-down lists and user groups, or even building a menu structure.

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Workflows:

There are a few contributor modules that provide workflow functionality in Drupal. They all provide common functionality along with unique features for various use cases. The most popular options are Maestro and Workbench.

Security:

Drupal has a dedicated security team that is very quick to react to vulnerabilities that are found in Drupal core as well as contributed modules. If a security issue is found within a contrib module, the security team will notify the module maintainer and give them a deadline to fix it. If the module does not get fixed by the deadline, the security team will issue an advisory recommending that the module be disabled, and will also classify the module as unsupported.

Cloud, Scalability, and Performance:

Drupal’s architecture makes it incredibly “cloud friendly”. It is easy to create a Drupal site that can be setup to auto-scale (i.e., add more servers during peak traffic times and shut them down when not needed). Some modules integrate with cloud storage such as S3. Further, Drupal is built for caching. By default, Drupal caches content in the database for quick delivery; support for other caching mechanisms (such as Memcache) can be added to make the caching lightning fast.

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Multi-Site Deployments:

Drupal is architected to allow for multiple sites to share a single codebase. This feature is built-in and, unlike WordPress, it does not require any cumbersome add-ons. This can be a tremendous benefit for customers who want to have multiple sites that share similar functionality. There are few–if any–limitations to a multi-site configuration. Each site can have its own modules and themes that are completely separate from the customer’s other sites.

Want to know other amazing functionalities that Drupal has to offer? Stay tuned for the final installment of our 3-part “Why Drupal?” series!

About Drupal Sun

Drupal Sun is an Evolving Web project. It allows you to:

  • Do full-text search on all the articles in Drupal Planet (thanks to Apache Solr)
  • Facet based on tags, author, or feed
  • Flip through articles quickly (with j/k or arrow keys) to find what you're interested in
  • View the entire article text inline, or in the context of the site where it was created

See the blog post at Evolving Web

Evolving Web