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Dec 17 2020
Dec 17

argument-open-source

Recently, Drupal has been on an update rampage. The introduction of the oh-so-beautiful Drupal 9 core has spurred a chain reaction of upgrades across the Drupal platform. Just this week, we’re getting a new default theme (which is hyper-minimalist and easy-on-the-eyes), a 20% reduction in install times, and automated lazy load for images. But let’s talk about the juiciest UI/UX update that came with Drupal 9 — the standardization of Drupal’s Layout Builder.

If you’ve built a pre-Drupal-9 website over the past few years, you probably dabbled with Panels/Panelizer, WYSIWYG templates, or even custom coding to set up your UX/UI. And that works. We did it for years. But you can throw that worn-out Panelizer module in the trash. The times, they are a-changing. Drupal’s new Layout Builder module combines the core functionality of Panelizer with an out-of-the-box WYSIWYG engine.

First hinted at in 2017, Drupal Layout Builder officially left the onerous Drupal testing pipeline last year as part of Drupal’s 8.7 updates. Despite circulating for a year now, the chaos of 2020 has overshadowed this potent and flexible tool. So, let’s talk about it. Here’s what you need to know about Drupal’s Layout Builder.

What is Layout Builder?

Layout Builder is a WYSIWYG page editing engine that lets you manipulate back-end features via an easy-to-use drag-and-drop interface. It’s difficult to overstate just how valuable Layout Builder is when it comes to time-savings. You can create templates in minutes, immediately preview and create content changes, and tweak page-by-page UI/UX features to create more cohesive and on-the-fly websites and landing pages.

At its core, Layout Builder is a block-based layout builder. You can create layouts for either a single page or all content of a specific type. In addition, you can jump in and create rapid-fire landing pages based on your existing design theme. There are three “layers” that Layout Builder operates on to help you build out holistic websites.

  1. Layout templates: You can create a layout template for all content of a specific type. For example, you can make a layout template for your blog posts or a layout template for every product page. This template will be shared across all pages, so you don’t have to go in and rebuild for each content type.
  2. Customized layout templates: You can also go in and make granular changes to a specific layout template. So, if you want a certain product page to be different than the layout template, you can make granular changes to just that page.
  3. Landing pages: Finally, you can create one-off pages that aren’t tied to structured content — like landing pages.

Important: Founder of Drupal — Dries Buytaert — dropped a blog post with some use cases for each of these layers.

To be clear, Layout Builder isn’t a WYSIWYG template. It uses your existing template. Instead, it allows non-developers (and lazy-feeling developers) to quickly make per-page changes to the website without diving into code. But these aren’t just simple changes. You can create a layout template for every page type (e.g., creating a specific layout for all the shoes you sell), and you can also dive into each of these layout pages to make custom changes. So, it really lets you get granular with your editing without forcing you to completely retool and redesign pages for each type of content. This gives Layout Builder a massive advantage over WordPress’s Gutenberg — which requires you to go in and re-lay elements for every page individually.

Here’s the kicker: you get a live-preview of all changes without bouncing between the layout and the front-end. Every block and field you place and every change you make to taxonomies or content is visible the second you make the change. The entire process takes place on the front-end, and changes are instantly visible. Remember, Layout Builder is part of Drupal’s Core, so you don’t need to implement new entity types of dig into third-party elements. It’s an out-of-the-box experience.

Advantages of Layout Builder

Last year, we got a gorgeous, picture-perfect demo of how Layout Builder would work. It’s beautiful, fast, and packs a punch that other leading layout builders are indeed missing. So, to help unpack the value of Layout Builder, let’s look at some of the advantages of Layout Builder:

Customization

Beyond Layout Builder’s incredibly powerful and customizable block-based design engine, it offers customization in usage. Let’s say you want to create an amazing landing page. You can start with a blank page that’s untied to structured content, drop in some hero images, a few pieces of text, some content, and a video. Suddenly, you have a custom landing page (complete with modules, blocks, and taxonomy) that exists in a separate ecosystem from your website.

Simultaneously, you can create a template for every blog post, then dive into a specific blog post and make on-time changes to just that page while still being tied to your structured content. Remember, you can make these changes nearly instantly, without touching code. And you’ll see a live preview of every change immediately without switching between interfaces.

Accessibility

Drupal is committed to accessibility. The second principle of Drupal’s Values & Principles page reads, “build software everyone can use,” and this rings true. Layout Builder meets Drupal’s accessibility gate standards (i.e., conforms to WCAG 2.0 and ATAG 2.0, text color has sufficient contrast, JavaScript is keyboard-usable, etc.)

Ease-of-use

Like many WYSIWYG editors, Drupal Layout Builder is all about “blocks.” But these aren’t your run-of-the-mill blocks. There are inline blocks, field blocks, global blocks, and system blocks. Each of these has its own use case, and you can combine these block types to create stellar pages in minutes. For example, global blocks are used to create templates, and inline blocks are used to create page-specific changes that don’t impact the layout. The combination of these block types makes Layout Builder a hassle-free experience.

Additionally, there are plenty of ease-of-use features built into the core. Layout Builder works with the keyboard, has plenty of usability features that tie to Drupal’s value statements, and allows nit-picky setups for customized workflows.

Creating a Drupal Website is Easier Than Ever

With Layout Builder, users can generate valuable content and pages without needing to patch together various WYSIWYG tools or Panel/Panelizer. At Mobomo, we’re incredibly excited for our clients to dive into Drupal Layout Builder and make actionable and memorable changes to their templates based on their in-the-moment needs and experiences.

But Layout Builder isn’t a replacement for a well-designed and well-developed website. We can help you build your next world-class website. Once we’re done, Layout Builder gives you the freedom to make substantial changes without the headaches, back-and-forth, or unnecessary touchpoints. Are you ready to create a customer-centric, experience-driven digital space? Contact us.

Nov 18 2020
Nov 18

From the consumer perspective, there’s never been a better time to build a website. User-friendly website platforms like Squarespace allow amateur developers to bypass complex code and apply well-designed user interfaces to their digital projects. Modern site-building tools aren’t just easy to use—they’re actually fun.

For anyone who has managed a Drupal website, you know the same can’t be said for your platform of choice. While rich with possibilities, the default editorial interface for Drupal feels technical, confusing, and even restrictive to users without a developer background. Consequently, designers and developers too often build a beautiful website while overlooking its backend CMS.

Drupal’s open-ended capabilities constitute a competitive advantage when it comes to developing an elegant, customer-facing website. But a lack of attention to the needs of those who maintain your website content contributes to a perception that Drupal is a developer-focused platform. By building a backend interface just as focused on your site editors as the frontend, you create a more empowering environment for internal teams. In the process, your website performs that much better as a whole.

UX principles matter for backend design as much as the frontend

Given Drupal’s inherent flexibilities, there are as many variations of CMS interfaces as there are websites on the platform. That uniqueness is part of what makes Drupal such a powerful tool, but it also constitutes a weakness.

The editorial workflow for every website is different, which opens an inevitable training gap in translating your site’s capabilities to your editorial team. Plus, despite Drupal’s open-source strengths, you’ll likely need to reinvent the wheel when designing CMS improvements specific to your organization.

For IT managers, this is a daunting situation because the broad possibilities of Drupal are often overwhelming. If you try to make changes to your interface, you can be frustrated when a seemingly easy fix requires 50 hours of development work. Too often, Drupal users will wind up working with an inefficient and confusing CMS because they’re afraid of the complexity that comes with building out a new interface.

Fortunately, redesigning your CMS doesn’t have to be a demanding undertaking. With the right expertise, you can develop custom user interfaces with little to no coding required. Personalized content dashboards and defined roles and permissions for each user go a long way toward creating a more intuitive experience.

Improving your backend design is often seen as an additional effort, but think of it as a baseline requirement. And, by sharing our user stories within the Drupal community, we also build a path toward improving the platform for the future.

Use Drupal’s Views module to customize user dashboards

One of the biggest issues with Drupal’s out-of-the-box editorial tools is that they don’t reflect the way any organization actually uses the CMS. Just as UX designers look to provide a positive experience for first-time visitors to your site, your team should aim for delivering a similarly strong first impression for those managing its content.

By default, Drupal takes users to their profile pages upon login, which is useful to . . . almost no one. Plus, the platform’s existing terminology uses cryptic terms such as “node,” “taxonomy,” and “paragraphs” to describe various content items. From the beginning, you should remove these abstract references from your CMS. Your editorial users shouldn’t have to understand how the site is built to own its content.

Powering Our Communities homepage

In the backend, every Drupal site has a content overview page, which shows the building blocks of your site. Offering a full list that includes cryptic timestamps and author details, this page constitutes a floodgate of information. Designing an effective CMS is as much an exercise in subtraction as addition. Whether your user’s role involves reviewing site metrics or new content, their first interaction with your CMS should display what they use most often.

Manage News interface

If one population of users is most interested in the last item they modified, you can transform their login screen to a custom dashboard to display those items. If another group of users works exclusively with SEO, you can create an interface that displays reports and other common tasks. Using Drupal’s Views module, dashboards like these are possible with a few clicks and minimal coding.

By tailoring your CMS to specific user habits, you allow your website teams to find what they need and get to work faster. The most dangerous approach to backend design is to try and build one interface to rule them all.

Listen to your users and ease frustrations with a CMS that works

Through Drupal Views, you can modify lists of content and various actions to control how they display in your CMS. While Views provides many options to create custom interfaces, your users themselves are your organization’s most vital resource. By watching how people work on your site, you can recognize areas where your CMS is falling short.

Drupal content dashboard

Even if you’ve developed tools that aimed to satisfy specific use cases, you might be surprised the way your tools are used. Through user experience testing, you’ll often find the workarounds your site editors have developed to manage the site.

In one recent example, site editors needed to link to a site page within the CMS. Without that functionality, they would either find the URL by viewing the source code in another tab and copying its node ID number. Anyone watching these users would find their process cumbersome, time-consuming, and frustrating. Fortunately, there’s a Drupal module called Linkit that was implemented to easily eliminate this needless effort.

There are many useful modules in the Drupal ecosystem that can enhance the out-of-the-box editorial experience. Entity Clone expedites the content creation process. Views Bulk Operations and Bulk Edit simplify routine content update tasks. Computed Field and Automatic Entity Label take the guesswork out of derived or dependent content values. Using custom form modes and Field Groups can help bring order and streamline the content creation forms.

Most of the time, your developers don’t know what solutions teams have developed to overcome an ineffective editorial interface. And, for fear of the complexity required to create a solution, these supposed shortcuts too often go unresolved. Your backend users may not even be aware their efforts could be automated or otherwise streamlined. As a result, even the most beautiful, user-friendly website is bogged down by a poorly designed CMS.

Once these solutions are implemented, however, you and your users enjoy a shared win. And, through sharing your efforts with the Drupal community, you and your team build a more user-friendly future for the platform as well.

Dec 28 2018
Dec 28

Themes improperly check renderable arrays when determining visibility

Kaleem ClarksonPhoto by Hello I'm Nik on Unsplash

One of the many great advantages of being a part of an open source project is that there are so many smart people out there are willing to contribute their time for the betterment of the project. This ability to crowdsource bugs and feature requests that rarely stumps the community is what makes Drupal such a powerful application.

While rare, sometimes the community finds a bug that is very difficult to solve. Let me introduce you to [#953034] Themes improperly check renderable arrays when determining visibility.

I was first introduced to this bug while trying to add a view block in the left sidebar. When the view was empty I expected the block and the sidebar to not be displayed. As you can see below, while the block was empty the sidebar was still being rendered.

The sidebar is Still being displayed.

I then googled and stumbled upon another issued, Empty view causes region to be displayed and it was exactly what I was looking for, but I noticed it was marked as a duplicate issue and linked to [#953034] Themes improperly check renderable arrays when determining visibility. This bug was reported to Drupal 7 core on October 26, 2010. The issue has over 310 comments and 230 followers.

You can really tell the severity and complexity of an issue when you see some of the brightest Drupal contributors have been making suggestions and striking out. They include but are not limited to:
bleen, chx, Cottser, Crell, DamienMcKenna, EclipseGc, Fabianx, Jeff Burnz, jenlampton, joachim, joelpittet, JohnAlbin, lauriii, markcarver, mdrummond, moshe weitzman, mpotter, samuel.mortenson, tim.plunkett, webchick, Wim Leers, xjm.

While I am not a backend developer, I felt like I could still help by highlighting a major issue that maybe someone either inside or outside the community could help find a solution.

Please remember to read the complete issue before commenting as so many people have suggested solutions to fix but have ran into a roadblock.

Oct 21 2018
Oct 21

Wouldn’t it be nice if you could add any block you want to your paragraphs?

Kaleem Clarkson

In years past, layout for Drupal has been in the hands of front-end developers, but over time various modules were developed that provided site-builders the ability to adjust the layout. An improvement yes, but there still wasn’t a clear cut option that empowered content editors to alter the layout during the editorial process.

Look out! Here comes the Paragraphs Module. This module has been taking the Drupal community over by storm because it allows content editors to add pre-designed components which gives each page the option to have different layouts. One of the limitations of the Paragraphs module, is that each paragraph can only be used once, and only for the current node you are editing. This means that you can’t re-use a common paragraph such as a call to action block, email signup or contact us form, so you end up finding yourself duplicating a lot of work if you want the same block on numerous pages. While the Drupal community has been working to help solve this problem by allowing the re-use of paragraphs, there are still going to be plenty of situations where you want to insert custom blocks, views, or system blocks such as the site logo or login block.

How do you allow your site editors to add re-used blocks into their content during the editorial process?

There are plenty of awesome articles out there that explains how to use paragraphs so I won’t get into that. To follow along with my steps be sure to have downloaded and enabled both the Paragraphs and the Block Field modules.

Steps to Add Blocks to Paragraphs

  1. Download and Enable the Paragraphs and Block Field modules.
  2. Create a paragraph type called Block Reference (or whatever name you want)
  3. Add a new field, by selecting the Block (plugin) field type from the dropdown and save it.
  4. Go to manage display and make the label hidden.
    I always forget this step and then I scratch my head when I see the Block Ref field label above my views title.
  5. Now go to back to your content type that has the paragraph reference field and ensure the Block Reference paragraph type is correctly enabled.
    The content type with the paragraph reference field was not covered in this tutorial.
  6. When adding or editing your content with a paragraph reference field. Add the Block Reference paragraph type. Select the name of the block that you would like to reference from the dropdown hit save on the content and watch the magic happen.

In conclusion, it does feel a little scary giving content editors this much freedom so it will be imperative that all views and custom blocks have descriptive names so that editors can clearly identify what blocks to reference. Overall I feel like this is a good solution for referencing existing blocks that can save a lot of time and really unleashes the power of the paragraphs module. The Drupal community continues to amaze me!

Jun 25 2018
Jun 25
Drupal Europe

Drupal Europe is both a technology conference and a family reunion for the Drupal community. Bringing together 1600+ attendees, it is the largest community driven Drupal event taking place on the European continent this year. For anyone connected with Drupal this is a unique opportunity to share your experience, learn, discuss, connect and contribute back to the community.

Being a community driven conference, we wanted to focus on real life case studies and not the usual technology driven structure. So we’ve introduced industry tracks which focus on specific industry sectors.

Photo with CCO licence via Pexels.com from StartupStockPhotos

The Higher Education track is for anyone using Drupal or thinking of migrating to Drupal at a college or university who is looking to connect with other Higher-Ed Drupal users.

If you have experience of delivering Drupal solutions in the higher education sector or are looking for inspiration on how you continue to develop your CMS further, this is the right track for you.

Drupal is a popular choice in higher education, and many of us are using it in creative and inventive ways. With Drupal 8, the opportunities for exploration and experimentation expand even further — from headless Drupal to top-tier configuration management. Let’s showcase our successes and best-practices with Drupal 8!

We know many universities are still on Drupal 7 and are keen to migrate to Drupal 8, so come to share what works for you and see wins from your peers.

Photo with CCO licence via Pexels.com from StatusStockphoto

Have you launched a Drupal 8 project recently that you are proud of? Started a campus Drupal users group and have tips for others looking to create their own? Developed a great user support model for your content editors? Conquered decoupled Drupal with your frontend stack? Share your awesome projects and lessons learned with your peers.

  • Education sector
Photo with CCO licence via Pexels.com from Pixbay
  • Drupal in a Day (how Global Training Days got to be a localized event)
  • From CMS to LMS
  • Web accessibility in higher education
  • GDPR and childrens information
  • Javascript for higher education
  • Migration from Drupal 7 to 8
  • How Drupal 8 API-first helps to
    integrate with existing IT-Infrastructure
  • Build your own Drupal Community

Session submission is open and we ask you to submit interesting session proposals to create an awesome conference. Session proposals are not limited to Drupal and all topics in relationship with Higher Education are welcome.

Please also help us to spread the word about this awesome conference. Our hashtag is #drupaleurope.

If you want to participate in the organisation or want to recommend speakers or topics please get in touch at [email protected].

Drupal is one of the leading open source technologies empowering digital solutions around the world.

Drupal Europe 2018 brings over 2,000 creators, innovators, and users of digital technologies from all over Europe and the rest of the world together for three days of intense and inspiring interaction.

Drupal Europe will be held in Darmstadtium in Darmstadt, Germany — with a direct connection to Frankfurt International Airport. Drupal Europe will take place 10–14 September 2018 with Drupal contribution opportunities every day. Keynotes, sessions, workshops and BoFs will be from Tuesday to Thursday.

Jul 07 2010
Jul 07

Alfresco wants to be a best-in-class repository for you to build your content-centric applications on top of. Interest in NOSQL repositories seems to be growing, with many large well-known sites choosing non-relational back-ends. Are Alfresco (and, more generally, nearly all ECM and WCM vendors) on a collision course with NOSQL?

First, let’s look at what Alfresco’s been up to lately. Over the last year or so, Alfresco has been shifting to a “we’re for developers” strategy in several ways:

  • Repositioning their Web Content Management offering not as a non-technical end-user tool, but as a tool for web application developers
  • Backing off of their mission to squash Microsoft SharePoint, positioning Alfresco Share instead as “good enough” collaboration. (Remember John Newton’s slide showing Microsoft as the Death Star and Alfresco as the Millenium Falcon? I think Han Solo has decided to take the fight elsewhere.)
  • Making Web Scripts, Surf, and Web Studio part of the Spring Framework.
  • Investing heavily in the Content Management Interoperability Services (CMIS) standard. The investment is far-reaching–Alfresco is an active participant in the OASIS specification itself, has historically been first-to-market with their CMIS implementation, and has multiple participants in CMIS-related open source projects such as Apache Chemistry.

They’ve also been making changes to the core product to make it more scalable (“Internet-scalable” is the stated goal). At a high level, they are disaggregating major Alfresco sub-systems so they can be scaled independently and in some cases removing bottlenecks present in the core infrastructure. Here are a few examples. Some of these are in progress and others are still on the roadmap:

  • Migrating away from Hibernate, which Alfresco Engineers say is currently a limiting factor
  • Switching from “Lucene for everything” to “Lucene for full-text and SQL for metadata search”
  • Making Lucene a separate search server process (presumably clusterable)
  • Making OpenOffice, which is used for document transformations, clusterable
  • Hiring Tom Baeyens (JBoss jBPM founder) and starting the Activiti BPMN project (one of their goals is “cloud scalability from the ground, up”)

So for Alfresco it is all about being an internet-scalable repository that is standards-compliant and has a rich toolset that makes it easy for you to use Alfresco as the back-end of your content-centric applications. Hold that thought for a few minutes while we turn our attention to NOSQL for a moment. Then, like a great rug, I’ll tie the whole room together.

NOSQL Stores

A NOSQL (“Not Only SQL”) store is a repository that does not use a relational database for persistence. There are many different flavors (document-oriented, key-value, tabular), and a number of different implementations. I’ll refer mostly to MongoDB and CouchDB in this post, which are two examples of document-oriented stores. In general, NOSQL stores are:

  • Schema-less. Need to add an “author” field to your “article”? Just add it–it’s as easy as setting a property value. The repository doesn’t care that the other articles in your repository don’t have an author field. The repository doesn’t know what an “article” is, for that matter.
  • Eventually consistent instead of guaranteed consistent. At some point, all replicas in a given cluster will be fully up-to-date. If a replica can’t get up-to-date, it will remove itself from the cluster.
  • Easily replicate-able. It’s very easy to instantiate new server nodes and replicate data between them and, in some cases, to horizontally partition the same database across multiple physical nodes (“sharding”).
  • Extremely scalable. These repositories are built for horizontal scaling so you can add as many nodes as you need. See the previous two points.

NOSQL repositories are used in some extremely large implementations (Digg, Facebook, Twitter, Reddit, Shutterfly, Etsy, Foursquare, etc.) for a variety of purposes. But it’s important to note that you don’t have to be a Facebook or a Twitter to realize benefits from this type of back-end. And, although the examples I’ve listed are all consumer-facing, huge-volume web sites, traditional companies are already using these technologies in-house. I should also note that for some of these projects, scaling down is just as important as scaling up–the CouchDB founders talk about running Couch repositories in browsers, cell phones, or other devices.

If you don’t believe this has application inside the firewall, go back in time to the explosive growth of Lotus Notes and Lotus Domino. The Lotus Notes NSF store has similar characteristics to document-centric NOSQL repositories. In fact, Damien Katz, the founder of CouchDB, used to work for Iris Associates, the creators of Lotus Notes. One of the reasons Notes took off was that business users could create form-based applications without involving IT or DBAs. Notes servers could also replicate with each other which made data highly-available, even on networks with high latency and/or low bandwidth between server nodes.

Alfresco & NOSQL

Unlike a full ECM platform like Alfresco, NOSQL repositories are just that–repositories. Like a relational database, there are client tools, API’s, and drivers to manage the data in a NOSQL repository and perform administrative tasks, but it’s up to you to build the business application around it. Setting up a standalone NOSQL repository for a business user and telling them to start managing their content would be like sticking them in front of MySQL and doing the same. But business apps with NOSQL back-ends are being built. For ECM, projects are already underway that integrate existing platforms with these repositories (See the DrupalCon presentation, “MongoDB – Humongous Drupal“, for one example) and entirely new CMS apps have been built specifically to take advantage of NOSQL repositories.

What about Alfresco? People are using Alfresco and NOSQL repositories together already. Peter Monks, together with others, has created a couple of open source projects that extend Alfresco WCM’s deployment mechanism to use CouchDB and MongoDB as endpoints (here and here).

I recently finished up a project for a Metaversant client in which we used Alfresco DM to create, tag, secure, and route content for approval. Once approved, some custom Java actions deploy metadata to MongoDB and files to buckets on Amazon S3. The front-end presentation tier then queries MongoDB for content chunks and metadata and serves up files directly from Amazon S3 or Amazon’s CloudFront CDN as necessary.

In these examples, Alfresco is essentially being used as a front-end to the NOSQL repository. This gives you the scalability and replication features on the Content Delivery tier with workflow, check-in/check-out, an explicit content model, tagging, versioning, and other typical content management features on the Content Management tier.

But why shouldn’t the Content Management tier benefit from the scalability and replication capabilities of a NOSQL repository? And why can’t a NOSQL repository have an end-user focused user interface with integrated workflow, a form service, and other traditional DM/CMS/WCM functionality? It should, it can and they will. NOSQL-native CMS apps will be developed (some already exist). And existing CMS’s will evolve to take advantage of NOSQL back-ends in some form or fashion, similar to the Drupal-on-Mongo example cited earlier.

What does this mean for Alfresco and ECM architecture in general?

Where does that leave Alfresco? It seems their positioning as a developer-focused, “Internet-scale” repository ultimately leads to them competing directly against NOSQL repositories for certain types of applications. The challenge for Alfresco and other ECM players is whether or not they can achieve the kind of scale and replication capabilities NOSQL repositories offer today before NOSQL can catch up with a new breed of Content Management solutions built expressly for a world in which content is everywhere, user and data volumes are huge and unpredictable, and servers come and go automatically as needed to keep up with demand.

If Alfresco and the overwhelming majority of the rest of today’s CMS vendors are able to meet that challenge with their current relational-backed stores, NOSQL simply becomes an implementation choice for CMS vendors. If, however, it turns out that being backed by a NOSQL repository is a requirement for a modern, Internet-scale CMS, we may see a whole new line-up of players in the CMS space before long.

What do you think? Does the fundamental architecture prevalent in today’s CMS offerings have what it takes to manage the web content in an increasingly cloud-based world? Will we see an explosion of NOSQL-native CMS applications and, if so, will those displace today’s relational vendors or will the two live side-by-side, potentially with buyers not even knowing or caring what choice the vendor has made with regard to how the underlying data is persisted?

About Drupal Sun

Drupal Sun is an Evolving Web project. It allows you to:

  • Do full-text search on all the articles in Drupal Planet (thanks to Apache Solr)
  • Facet based on tags, author, or feed
  • Flip through articles quickly (with j/k or arrow keys) to find what you're interested in
  • View the entire article text inline, or in the context of the site where it was created

See the blog post at Evolving Web

Evolving Web