Feb 11 2016
Feb 11

amazon-web-services-drupal-architecture

Mobomo believes in partnering.

Over the years we have partnered with Amazon, IBM, Tracx, and a number of other companies and organizations. We are pleased to announce our recent partnership with the Drupal Association (https://assoc.drupal.org), Drupal has been a major contributor in the community for many years. 

Drupal is an open-source content management system framework used to make many of the websites and applications that you use every day. Drupal has great standard features like easy content authoring, reliable performance, and excellent security. But what sets Drupal apart from other solutions is its flexibility and extensibility; modularity is one of its core principles. Drupal allows you to build the versatile, structured content that is needed for engaging and dynamic web experiences.

We are very pleased to be a part of the Drupal community, since we have developed Drupal solutions for major Federal Government websites in the past this partnership only makes sense. We are excited about our partnerships and look forward to building bigger and better things as a supporting partner of Drupal.org. Be sure to visit our Drupal page.

Mar 20 2015
Mar 20

Today is an exciting day for the Drupal community! Collectively, we’re all moving a few steps closer to a full release of Drupal 8 with the help of a program called Drupal 8 Accelerate. This is a pilot program from the Drupal Association designed to put $250,000 of community funds towards eliminating the last 50 critical issues between us and release.

The Drupal Association has been an incredible leader in the effort to release Drupal 8, pledging to set aside $62,500 to match every dollar donated to the provide Drupal 8 Acceleration Grants.

What’s the latest with Drupal 8 Accelerate?

But we knew we could do even more to turbocharge this project. Today we are announcing that D8 Accelerate is now getting a huge boost from seven anchor sponsors, who have pledged to “match the match,” amplifying every donation made and accelerating the community’s investment in Drupal 8.

Phase2, Acquia, Appnovation, Lullabot, Palantir, PreviousNext, and Wunderkraut have collectively pledged another $62,500 to match the Drupal Association’s matches of community donations. This is an all-out, everyone-in community effort to move D8 from beta to release. Our goal is to bring the total to $250,000 available for grants by September. We are now more than half way there.

drupal-relay_1

Why should we all want Drupal 8 to succeed?

The answer is simple: D8 will empower us to use Drupal the way many of us have wanted to for a long time. D8 improves the API layer, multi-lingual capabilities, theming and the editor experience. It also makes is much more powerful for developers (which matters a lot to us at Phase2).

Historically, it has been a challenge to integrate new libraries or different front-end elements without a lot of leg work. Imagine, for example, how the availability of Twig theming will enhance your projects. Or how flexible implementations can be with dependencies on meaningful external software integrated through Symfony routing. We will even be able to more seamlessly incorporate mobile apps into the digital strategies we develop, correcting one of the main weak points of previous Drupal releases.

Put simply, Drupal 8 is a win for our collective clients, and therefore it is a win for all of us.

Phase2 & Drupal 8

At Phase2, we want Drupal 8 to succeed because our clients have increasingly big needs and major challenges, and we believe that Drupal 8 is moving in the direction to address those. For that reason, we’ve made investing in Drupal 8 a priority, not only by way of the Drupal 8 Accelerate program, but also in the form of contributed code and shared knowledge gleaned from major enterprise Drupal 8 implementations.

Taking on early Drupal 8 implementations enables us to commit our people to the D8 cause, while directly supporting our client’s mission. It also provides us with a group of advanced scouts to report back from the front lines and develop training for the rest of our team.

Principle among these scouts was Software Architect Jonathan Hedstrom, whose contributions to D8 include Drush support, core patch reviewing, testing and re-rolling, writing tests, modules upgrades (Redis), and more. In addition to Jonathan, Senior Developer Brad Wade made important front-end contributions, while Software Architect Mike Potter has been a significant part of Features development.

We’ll be sharing a lot of what we learned from our D8 work so far at DrupalCon Los Angeles, so stay tuned for our session announcements next!

 An all-out, everyone-in effort

It took the whole Drupal community – including individuals, companies, the Drupal Association – to get D8 to the place it is now. We are honored to have contributed alongside everyone involved. It has certainly been a heavy lift for many community members, so to each of these people and organizations, we say thank you. The success of Drupal 8 is the most important priority of our community.

Screen Shot 2014-09-04 at 11.14.45 AM

However, Drupal 8 still needs a strong push to get over the finish line. So we must ask one more time for the support of our fellow Drupalers. We all have a major stake in the success of the project, and everyone can play an instrumental role getting it out the door. Even the smallest donation makes a difference when every dollar you donate is now matched, compounding your impact. You can read more about how the funds actually support the grant program to achieve the work on the Drupal Association D8 Accelerate page.

If you would like to donate, please visit the D8 Accelerate Fundraising site and please consider using my profile as a way to easily make your contribution so we can start enjoying those launch parties!

Mar 20 2015
Mar 20

Today is an exciting day for the Drupal community! Collectively, we’re all moving a few steps closer to a full release of Drupal 8 with the help of a program called Drupal 8 Accelerate. This is a pilot program from the Drupal Association designed to put $250,000 of community funds towards eliminating the last 50 critical issues between us and release.

The Drupal Association has been an incredible leader in the effort to release Drupal 8, pledging to set aside $62,500 to match every dollar donated to the provide Drupal 8 Acceleration Grants.

What’s the latest with Drupal 8 Accelerate?

But we knew we could do even more to turbocharge this project. Today we are announcing that D8 Accelerate is now getting a huge boost from seven anchor sponsors, who have pledged to “match the match,” amplifying every donation made and accelerating the community’s investment in Drupal 8.

Phase2, Acquia, Appnovation, Lullabot, Palantir, PreviousNext, and Wunderkraut have collectively pledged another $62,500 to match the Drupal Association’s matches of community donations. This is an all-out, everyone-in community effort to move D8 from beta to release. Our goal is to bring the total to $250,000 available for grants by September. We are now more than half way there.

Drupal 8

Why should we all want Drupal 8 to succeed?

The answer is simple: D8 will empower us to use Drupal the way many of us have wanted to for a long time. D8 improves the API layer, multi-lingual capabilities, theming and the editor experience. It also makes is much more powerful for developers (which matters a lot to us at Phase2).

Historically, it has been a challenge to integrate new libraries or different front-end elements without a lot of leg work. Imagine, for example, how the availability of Twig theming will enhance your projects. Or how flexible implementations can be with dependencies on meaningful external software integrated through Symfony routing. We will even be able to more seamlessly incorporate mobile apps into the digital strategies we develop, correcting one of the main weak points of previous Drupal releases.

Put simply, Drupal 8 is a win for our collective clients, and therefore it is a win for all of us.

Phase2 & Drupal 8

At Phase2, we want Drupal 8 to succeed because our clients have increasingly big needs and major challenges, and we believe that Drupal 8 is moving in the direction to address those. For that reason, we’ve made investing in Drupal 8 a priority, not only by way of the Drupal 8 Accelerate program, but also in the form of contributed code and shared knowledge gleaned from major enterprise Drupal 8 implementations.

Taking on early Drupal 8 implementations enables us to commit our people to the D8 cause, while directly supporting our client’s mission. It also provides us with a group of advanced scouts to report back from the front lines and develop training for the rest of our team.

Principle among these scouts was Software Architect Jonathan Hedstrom, whose contributions to D8 include Drush support, core patch reviewing, testing and re-rolling, writing tests, modules upgrades (Redis), and more. In addition to Jonathan, Senior Developer Brad Wade made important front-end contributions, while Software Architect Mike Potter has been a significant part of Features development.

We’ll be sharing a lot of what we learned from our D8 work so far at DrupalCon Los Angeles, so stay tuned for our session announcements next!

 An all-out, everyone-in effort

It took the whole Drupal community – including individuals, companies, the Drupal Association – to get D8 to the place it is now. We are honored to have contributed alongside everyone involved. It has certainly been a heavy lift for many community members, so to each of these people and organizations, we say thank you. The success of Drupal 8 is the most important priority of our community.

Drupal 8 blog

However, Drupal 8 still needs a strong push to get over the finish line. So we must ask one more time for the support of our fellow Drupalers. We all have a major stake in the success of the project, and everyone can play an instrumental role getting it out the door. Even the smallest donation makes a difference when every dollar you donate is now matched, compounding your impact. You can read more about how the funds actually support the grant program to achieve the work on the Drupal Association D8 Accelerate page.

If you would like to donate, please visit the D8 Accelerate Fundraising site and please consider using my profile as a way to easily make your contribution so we can start enjoying those launch parties!

Mar 20 2015
Mar 20

Today is an exciting day for the Drupal community! Collectively, we’re all moving a few steps closer to a full release of Drupal 8 with the help of a program called Drupal 8 Accelerate. This is a pilot program from the Drupal Association designed to put $250,000 of community funds towards eliminating the last 50 critical issues between us and release.

The Drupal Association has been an incredible leader in the effort to release Drupal 8, pledging to set aside $62,500 to match every dollar donated to the provide Drupal 8 Acceleration Grants.

What’s the latest with Drupal 8 Accelerate?

But we knew we could do even more to turbocharge this project. Today we are announcing that D8 Accelerate is now getting a huge boost from seven anchor sponsors, who have pledged to “match the match,” amplifying every donation made and accelerating the community’s investment in Drupal 8.

Phase2, Acquia, Appnovation, Lullabot, Palantir, PreviousNext, and Wunderkraut have collectively pledged another $62,500 to match the Drupal Association’s matches of community donations. This is an all-out, everyone-in community effort to move D8 from beta to release. Our goal is to bring the total to $250,000 available for grants by September. We are now more than half way there.

Drupal 8

Why should we all want Drupal 8 to succeed?

The answer is simple: D8 will empower us to use Drupal the way many of us have wanted to for a long time. D8 improves the API layer, multi-lingual capabilities, theming and the editor experience. It also makes is much more powerful for developers (which matters a lot to us at Phase2).

Historically, it has been a challenge to integrate new libraries or different front-end elements without a lot of leg work. Imagine, for example, how the availability of Twig theming will enhance your projects. Or how flexible implementations can be with dependencies on meaningful external software integrated through Symfony routing. We will even be able to more seamlessly incorporate mobile apps into the digital strategies we develop, correcting one of the main weak points of previous Drupal releases.

Put simply, Drupal 8 is a win for our collective clients, and therefore it is a win for all of us.

Phase2 & Drupal 8

At Phase2, we want Drupal 8 to succeed because our clients have increasingly big needs and major challenges, and we believe that Drupal 8 is moving in the direction to address those. For that reason, we’ve made investing in Drupal 8 a priority, not only by way of the Drupal 8 Accelerate program, but also in the form of contributed code and shared knowledge gleaned from major enterprise Drupal 8 implementations.

Taking on early Drupal 8 implementations enables us to commit our people to the D8 cause, while directly supporting our client’s mission. It also provides us with a group of advanced scouts to report back from the front lines and develop training for the rest of our team.

Principle among these scouts was Software Architect Jonathan Hedstrom, whose contributions to D8 include Drush support, core patch reviewing, testing and re-rolling, writing tests, modules upgrades (Redis), and more. In addition to Jonathan, Senior Developer Brad Wade made important front-end contributions, while Software Architect Mike Potter has been a significant part of Features development.

We’ll be sharing a lot of what we learned from our D8 work so far at DrupalCon Los Angeles, so stay tuned for our session announcements next!

 An all-out, everyone-in effort

It took the whole Drupal community – including individuals, companies, the Drupal Association – to get D8 to the place it is now. We are honored to have contributed alongside everyone involved. It has certainly been a heavy lift for many community members, so to each of these people and organizations, we say thank you. The success of Drupal 8 is the most important priority of our community.

Drupal 8 blog

However, Drupal 8 still needs a strong push to get over the finish line. So we must ask one more time for the support of our fellow Drupalers. We all have a major stake in the success of the project, and everyone can play an instrumental role getting it out the door. Even the smallest donation makes a difference when every dollar you donate is now matched, compounding your impact. You can read more about how the funds actually support the grant program to achieve the work on the Drupal Association D8 Accelerate page.

If you would like to donate, please visit the D8 Accelerate Fundraising site and please consider using my profile as a way to easily make your contribution so we can start enjoying those launch parties!

Oct 03 2013
Oct 03

When is Drupal 8 coming out? What's going to change in the new version? How do I keep track of it, and most importantly, how am I going to learn what I need to know? These are the questions we're going to answer in a Drupal Association webinar on October 22. Joe Shindelar is going to give an update on where things are with Drupal 8, covering a raft of new features and changes that you'll want to know about. He's going to look at it from different perspectives — as a site-builder, themer, and module developer. After giving a overview on the neat new stuff you'll see, he'll also list some great resources for how to learn more, and start sharpening your Drupal 8 skills. You'll also get some tips for how to jump on the Drupal 8 train, and keep up with it, so when the final release gets out there, you will be an expert ready to take advantage of it.

This FREE online webinar is hosted by the Drupal Association, and you can join us on October 22, 2013 from 11am - 12pm EDT [UTC -4] (find your local time). You'll need to sign up, so get on it!

Mar 08 2013
Mar 08

Listen online: 

In this episode, Addison Berry is joined by Holly Ross, the Executive Director of the Drupal Association (DA). We talk about who Holly is, where she's come from, and here role in the DA. There is some timely discussion about transparency and communication for the DA and the community, and how Holly looks to address these concerns.

Podcast notes

Release Date: March 8, 2013 - 10:00am

Album:

Length: 41:48 minutes (24.1 MB)

Format: mono 44kHz 80Kbps (vbr)

Feb 04 2013
Feb 04

Today is bittersweet for the Drupal Association, as Jacob Redding has transitioned the Executive Director role to Holly Ross. Jacob did a phenomenal job growing the Drupal Association, Drupal.org and Drupal as a whole. Jacob’s special attention to the community has helped create a culture that many of us are proud to be a part of; his passion and dedication for Drupal has always been evident.

Under Jacob’s leadership we have broadened our activities, streamlined operations and significantly increased revenues. The Drupal community members grew by 1143% to 800,000 and we gained 3286% more committers to 23,000 in just three years. That said, our DrupalCon sizes and attendance expanded, which has helped increase Drupal adoption throughout the world. The Drupal Association staff of 12 has settled into Portland and is well positioned in Oregon's active open source community.

With Holly onboard, our vision remains to become the largest open source, non-profit organization that continually increases its support to the community and project. Jacob, thank you for all your hard work and tenacity! I look forward to continuing to work with you in the community.

Jan 11 2013
Jan 11

Listen online: 

In this episode, our first in 2013, Addison Berry has gathered Lullabots Kyle Hofmeyer, Joe Shindelar, and Juampy Novillo Requena to chat about some big news items in the Drupal world from 2012, and take a look at what may lay ahead in 2013.

Podcast Notes

If you want to suggest ideas for podcasts, or have questions for us to answer on a podcast, let us know:
Twitter
Facebook
Contact us page

Release Date: January 11, 2013 - 10:47am

Album:

Length: 50:48 minutes (29.44 MB)

Format: mono 44kHz 81Kbps (vbr)

Dec 07 2012
Dec 07

CivicActions is incredibly excited about the announcement that Holly Ross will be joining the Drupal Association as Executive Director and what it means for the Drupal community. Her background in growing the Nonprofit Technology Entrepreneurs Network and its annual NTC conference is probably the most perfectly suited for nurturing and growing the Drupal community since Jacob Redding (Three cheers for Jacob! Hiphip!  HipHip!  HipHip! w00t!).  She leaves behind an incredibly vibrant community that has grown, diversified and strengthened over the years of her open and positive leadership.  

As long time advocates of Drupal and Free and Open Source Software in the nonprofit space, we've been active participants and sponsors of community events for both the Drupal and Nonprofit Technology communities. We love them both and are excited to support Holly as she figures out how she can be of the best service to the Drupal Community.

Dec 05 2012
Dec 05

I'm pleased to announce that the Drupal Association's Board of Directors has appointed Holly Ross as its new Executive Director. Holly is a well-known visionary leader in the nonprofit technology community with a proven track record of developing and implementing organizational strategies that provide direct community benefit.

Most recently, Holly was responsible for NTEN, the Nonprofit Technology Network, which works to help nonprofits use technology to create the change that they want to see in the world. During Holly’s ten years at NTEN, she helped grow the community from just a handful of individuals to over 60,000 people. NTEN has also been using Drupal for the last six years, so she is no stranger to our community.

Holly shared her excitement with the Drupal Association Board of Directors about her new role, saying, “I am thrilled to be making this move, which allows me to capitalize on my experience building community and embrace the added challenge of helping this international community collaborate on the Drupal project. I can’t wait to get started and be a part of a group of colleagues who share the values and passion for technology that I do.”

We are fortunate to have someone like Holly step up to lead the Drupal Association. Holly will start on February 1st, 2013. Like the rest of the Board of Directors, I look forward to working with Holly to grow the Drupal Association and to support the Drupal project.

Holly succeeds outgoing Co-Managing Director Jacob Redding and interim Managing Director Megan Sanicki, who both led the Drupal Association during the search process and have prepared it for new leadership over the last few months. The Board and the entire Drupal Association thanks Jacob for his hard work and dedication over the last several years. He has architected a strong foundation for the Drupal Association that allows Holly to take the organization to the next level. We wish Jacob best of luck with his new ventures. We are excited to have Megan continue with the Drupal Association as Chief Operating Officer, focused on Operations and Business Development.

Holly is looking forward to connecting with our community, and you should feel free to reach out to her with your feedback and ideas at [email protected].

Oct 17 2012
Oct 17

In June, Jacob Redding, our Executive Director at the Drupal Association, decided that it was time for him to transition out of the Executive Director role to pursue new challenges. Hence, the Drupal Association Board of Directors started a search for a new Executive Director. We have had some very promising conversations, which we feel will lead to a strong placement that will strengthen and grow the Drupal Association and the community.

The Board understands the importance of the Executive Director search and is conducting it with diligence and thoroughness. Since that means there is a chance that the next Executive Director will not be secured by Jacob's departure, the Board has worked with the Association staff to implement a continuity and transition plan for the organization. For the next four months, Megan Sanicki, former Director of Sales & Business Development at the Drupal Association, and Jacob Redding will both serve as Managing Directors of the Association. Megan has already worked closely with Jacob over the last two years to build the Drupal Association and set direction. In the event that there is a gap of time between Executive Directors, Megan will be well prepared to bridge that gap and ensure operations continue without missing a beat. And, in this new role, she will focus on optimizing Drupal Association operations, so we will be positioned for the new Executive Director to start strong on his or her first day.

Please welcome Megan to her new position at the Drupal Association.

Sep 23 2012
Sep 23

Its time for the electing the 2 members that can help the Drupal Association as they asked: … the community is asked to step in with strategic direction and new and fresh ideas through the nomination and election of at-large community representatives. In the last 6 years of hard community work ive gathered ideas & concepts that I truly belive will help the Associaition forward. Dont worry I am not gonna talk politics, Im keeping this to what the Association asked for & what the Community needs: Ideas & strategy that brings us to the next level: In a nutshell the DA need to be relevant to its members, fix the transparency issues & become an international organization.

Let me get to work & put me on the Board for the Drupal Association! the DA needs a strong voice from the community and somebody that can get shit done!
You can read the presentation of my candidature + see all kinds of questions to my concepts & ideas on the a.d.o
This is the braindump of some of the concepts, please discuss & comment - this is to importent to limit to a simple Voting for a board.

Be relevant for the community

Why would anyone become a member of the DA unless theres a good reason for it? the DA isnt “really” relevant for the Drupalistas, even that they do run servers, plans huge events(“huh does the DA runs drupal.org”) and whatever else thats not visible in the Drupalsphere - We can choose to be frustraded by that or look at how we can strengthen the connection to the community that we are so proud of. Lets get some love in between the Association & the members.

International org, easy baby!

Build an international structure, that can come in used no matter if you wanna do a local camp, find like minded, build more business, or plan a 5000 attendess Drupalcon, its all relationships and thats whats makes Drupal work: the community.

In rought sketches the organtational structure would be alittle like this:
Local -> Regional -> Continent -> World :
Local (user groups fx Copenhagen, manchester)
Country (countrys & states: Denmark, New York)
Region (scandinavia, Europe, North west pacific…)
World (Drupal Association)

local group & switchboard

When a new member signs up lets make sure they know whats goin on: a Welcome mail to the new member containing relevant info: user group’s , local contact persons date, list of upcoming events in the region etc, that will make new members feel welcome & have a place to go and geek out with other Drupalistas.

Regions

The regions is where we look at the bigger picture, what are the needs & what can be done, to strenghten that area. fx “Theme specific events”: “Drupal Developer Days”, Design Camp, Business meetup Nort england etc.
By having the DA to facilitate the events (the COD, that are running the DrupalCons today) Working with the community it layes the groundwork for Future bigger events, The regional community works together & learns eachothers strenghts & weaknesses.

Now we have an international structure, with simple communication structures, that would make even the boyscouts proud.

Drupalcon’s

Drupalcons are great events, I have said it before and will repeat it as many times it can: “Its the heartbeat of the Community” We have gone from a pure local planned events to a professional structure, lets remember what made the old events great & add that on top of the professional conferences we have now.

Drupalgangers needs some love again, we know the boyfriends, girlfriends, kids & parents are there, why did we forget them? Building on top of the Regional groups, it gets easy to figure out whos coming & communicate it out.

Afterhours hangout
DrupalCons are more than sessions + wifi + chairs!
I have learned that its not just a place we drink a beer afterwards - Its where we build the relationships, but lets not forget those of our comunity members that are not so loud, and dont have a need to party all night -make sure they are not forgotten! This isnt a thing that cost money, but it needs some planning from the local group and willingness from the Drupal Associaiton. By adding the social part back on the agenda, Its like 8 hours of more DrupalLove each day, at the cost of zero!

Drupalcamp box

The biggest issue for a DrupalCamp (besides of getting a Venue & finding a date + speakers) are those small things, that we always forgets: Name badges, Programs, posters, lanyard, Drupal Stickers, DA membership flyers. The DA should provide this to the members, call in and order the “DrupalCampBoxOfEpicAwesomeness”: 2 weeks later you have the 200 nametags, lanyards, tshirts stickers etc, there now the Camp looks supercool without having to hunt for designers & Drupal Looks good to the outside.

DrupalCamp Design & site building.

The 2md biggest issue for the camps, besides of all the points above ;) is the hosting & the Design of the campsite, there is an initiative that are working on making drupal pretty, but thats just a part of it. the DA have allready put in all the resources for the DrupalCons that are running on COD - It could be of great benefit to the local groups if that solution got shared with our local groups, shave off time for planning & make events even better.

We dont always have to invent the wheel, when initiatives in the community takes form into something great, we should not close our eyes to it, instead embrase the intiatives and make it better for us all. A HardRocking Event mapshould be easy accessible from d.o. Its simple low hanging fruit, but look at how much value it could give us!

Transparency issues

Angie @webchick asked me at the candidate page what my ideas was for making the DA transparent, its a lot of text & ideas and im sure your already tired in you head, heres a quick sum:

  • Make it easy to understand what the DA does
  • Make the Drupal association Board members visible
  • Make the staff visible
  • Set the agenda and take discussions about the hard issues in the open
  • Do tell why things are as they are (ticket pries etc)

Meet the people! the DA needs better communication & listen to the community, not more Board members thats sitting in the big castle in Portland (I hope there is a castle) Its all about communication & building trust.

In a year Dude ?

This will “probably” take more than a year to complete, but that problem we can talk about in a year! or at the next camp im gonna be presenting “how & why the Drupal Association is Rocking hard” Happy Voting and lets share the ideas & movoe forward, we have all deserved a more open dialog of where we wanna see Drupal in the future, and that is from the beautiful code to the decisions that defines our culture

Sep 20 2012
Sep 20

Earlier this year, I posted about our first Drupal Association community elections. We introduced the community elections with the goal to make sure that the Drupal community is always well-represented on the Drupal Association's Board of Directors.

Well, the time has come to run our elections again. Nominations opened on 1 September and were open for two weeks. 18 people from the Drupal community put themselves forward as candidates. Please have a look at the election candidates. Voting will be open from September 24 to October 7 but now is the time to engage with the candidates.

Who can vote?

You are eligible to vote if you have an account on drupal.org, logged in during the past 12 months, and created your account before August 31 this year when the election was announced. Once voting opens, you can login at http://association.drupal.org and rank the candidates in order of preference.

How does voting work?

Sep 19 2012
Sep 19

Tonight at 22:00 CET im gonna be at “meet the candites” call, where you can ask me and my fellow 5 candidates all the things you wanna know. Fx. why each of us will be perfect candidates as the Communitys Voice on the Drupal Associations board, or who makes the best coffe or whatever.

No seriously you should drop by the call and listen in.
Yup its a telephone call (huh) yeah a tlf call, not on skype or google-hangout etc. But its a combination of an IRC chat and us candidates answering.
This will also give you a chance to hear my soothing, smooth and raw voice with that sexy copenhagen manly accent that I roll (hey I have to make it a little bit interesting n fun)

How does it work

Login to IRC: #drupal-association
or use the web interface
This is where you post the Questions. There will be a moderater that will make sure that we answer them.

Pick up you phone and find you local number to call for the “Free international Conferencing”
https://association.drupal.org/about/meet
or this list that have a lot more nations added so you dont have to go international http://www.freeconferencecall.com/fcci/internationalnumbers.aspx?lang=US...

Call the number then Use the code 883587 Which is the DA meeting room

So if you dont make it no worries, the talks will be recorded & will be able to download them, hopefully in full lenght & noth as it happend yesterday and beeing cut off :(

No worries we all have to answer all of the questions afterwards in writing.
So come on in tonight and here us be clever on the future of Drupal & answer your questions

Sep 18 2012
Sep 18

Its now time for the yearly election of 2 Drupal Community members to step on the Drupal Association board - Heres a quick n dirty run down & is why you have to vote: It has been decided that if you DONT vote for the Drupal Associations Community members you are not allowed for the next year to complain, moan or cry over anything Drupal related - If you do vote you have that right!

if you dont vote for the Drupal Associations Board you are not allowed for the next year to complain over Drupal - If you do vote you have that right ;)

--- update
19 september: the so ever awesome @lindsayogden have a recording of the first meet the candidates:
IRC log: http://dl.dropbox.com/u/292569/DA-MeetCandidates1.txt
the last 25 minuts of the talk: http://dl.dropbox.com/u/292569/%2B15595461301%20on%202012-09-18%20at%201...

Okay so inside of the mighty Drupal, there is the Drupal Association(DA) and they have a board where clever people are placed (the Dries, webchick etc) The board take all kinds of decisions, when do we have Drupalcon's, What are we using the money on, making sure that the Drupal.org servers are running, and that nobody does fuckery with the GPL licensing, and all kinds of other fun things, running an Office over in portland etc.

So, to make sure that the DA dont loose completely touch with the Drupal community, there are 2 seats at the board for “community at-large” members/ directors whatever.
The rest of the boards members are appointed by a committee (which I'm not gonna come into here)
That means 2 people that are to be the “voice of the Drupal community” Come with input, show alternative points to the other members, keep a ear to the ground, and make a little noise if certain aspects are forgotten like “Hey yo don't put a Drupalcon in August in Europe, its still summer holiday, we cant build a buzz & france is btw closed”

Now its that time of year, its time to find two new “People of the Community” (hey it sounds a little bit more sexy, than “Drupal Association At Large Directors nominations”

The DA have asked community members to step forward, if they had the skills & something to bring to the board. 18 brave Souls took that step, and now ready to be counted!

What a list of candidates, its a pretty bad ass list if i may say so! That is pretty goddamn Awesome :)

Candidates

The list of the 18 Brave souls all grouped into reagions & added countries to the europeans so its a bit easier to figure out where we are from & the all link to the candidate page, so go check em out:

Europeans

Morten Birch Heide-Jørgensen - (mortendk) Dennmark <-thats me :)
Bert Boerland - (bertboerland) Holland
Pedro Cambra - (pcambra) Spain
Floh Klare - (SirFiChi) Germany
Jeffrey A. "jam" McGuire - (horncologne) Germany
Steve Purkiss - (stevepurkiss) England
Valery Lourie - (valthebald) Isreael

Austrailia

Simon Hobbs - (sime)
Chris Ward - (chrischinchilla)
Steven De Costa - (starl3n)
Aimee Maree Forsstrom - (amaree)

United States & Canada

Todd Tomlinson - (toddtomlinson) US
J. Matthew Saunders - (MatthewS) US Westminster
Narayan Newton - (nnewton) Portland
David Stoline - (dstol) Bethesda
Joseph Bachana - (joebachana) New York
Jeremy Thorson - (jthorson) Canada
Forest Mars - (forestmars) New York

If you wanna se where they all the candidates are living on a map: http://tiles.mapbox.com/jcnventura/map/map-qt4r3noq

Let me make it very clear I am running for the board, and with a strong desire of being elected! I know that any practical & sane person would have hoped, for a bunch of dupes. No-way! I'm thrilled to see this list. This means that we have a Community that take involvement serious, and if I don't get the peoples vote (sad panda) Then there will be good Men & Women to take on the task of representing the Drupal Community.

Vote for morten :)

You can read my nomination and my opinions on things (i promise its nothing to do with theming or markup) Its all about Drupal Association & the community If you doubt what it is i stand for well you can read into some of the Debates & issues i have rised the last couple of years:
The drupal app store
Drupal app store - That would kill our community
This was a hot potato, but if we take a desission we must do it with open eyes.
the Drupalcon Session Voting policy When it was clearly a waste of time & resources having votes for sessions at Drupalcon. Nobody had the stones to start this discussion & let status Quo rule, based on this the Drupalcon in Munich desided not to have Votes for the sessions & guess what, nobody complained cause the selection was done by competent people in the community that we all can trust.

The DrupalCOC
that started as an Political Correctness ruleset based on all that is not allowed" & was turned into a great result that enforced the positive values we have in the community (many many hours discussing back n forth over the pond)
- i must warn you - this is a dogfight over a couple of days with 200+ comments & a lot of anger in it, but now that im stepping forward i think its importent that if you vote for me you know what my values are:
The First Draft - where things exploded
My answer to 1 draft
Final Draft that is a piece of beaty

2nd rate citizens
Speaking out for those that dont have much & are not students
I got a little bit tired of the auto pilot: "if youre a student we wanna help you" but if you not - you probably makes a fortune, so sorry no help for those that dropped outta school, just started own companies etc. Im still a firm beliver in Equality

Vote for the other candidates!

Actually, besides of seeing myself as a huge benfit for the DA - I am so confident in all the candidates have common goal: “Make Drupal Better” - but its what that “make drupal better” means, and the abilities & background each candidate comes with to serve the Community best that you must decide.
Who are most suited for helping the Drupal Association keeping an ear to the ground in the community - If you cant figure out who to vote on, i can help you out ;)

Come and meet us all

The next week all the nominated candidates are gonna be (i hope) be available on IRC for talking, so you can get a chance to meet the 18 Brave Souls.
Hopefully its gonna be more than a popularity contest so swing by and ask away. Its good for the candidates & its good for the community and see if you can get the candidates to promise you obscure things: “Can i Get a pony, if i vote for you morten - yes off course you can fingers crossed”

Session 1
8pm Tues 18 Sep UTC
1pm Tues 18 Sep US Pacific Time
6am Wed 19 Sep Aus Eastern Time
IRC log: http://dl.dropbox.com/u/292569/DA-MeetCandidates1.txt
the last 25 minuts of the talk: http://dl.dropbox.com/u/292569/%2B15595461301%20on%202012-09-18%20at%201...

Session 2
8pm Wed 19 Sep UTC
1pm Wed 19 Sep US Pacific Time
6am Thu 20 Sep Aus Eastern Time

Session 3
10am Thu 20 Sep UTC
3am Thu 20 Sep US Pacific Time
8pm Thu 20 Sep Aus Eastern Time

Session 4
10am Fri 21 Sep UTC
3am Fri 21 Sep US Pacific Time
8pm Fri 21 Sep Aus Eastern Time

Its all on the mighty IRC, cause thats where the cool kids are hanging: "#drupal-association" on freenode if you not so keen on irc char clients use the Web interface: http://webchat.freenode.net/?channels=drupal-association
More about all this over here: https://association.drupal.org/election2013-update

When can you vote

The voting is from 24 september - 7 october 2 weeks of twitter mayhem ;)
When the “meet you candidates” sessions are over then its time for the actual voting - and maybe give the candidates a quick read again. The voting period will run for 2 weeks
so theres enough time for everybody to go and vote for the 2 community representive - That is gonna be a fun time on twitters, ooh my, theres probably gonna be a storm of "pretty please vote for me"

Now Who can vote?

Anybody that have an Drupal.org account, that have been active the last 12 months can vote - the account have to be created before 31 August So if thats you, you have the right to vote (Can you feel the responsibility pressures on you shoulders)

How are the voting done?

The voting is done with instant runoff / alternative vote method
I'm not gonna get into if this is good or bad, that an issue that those who got the hots for procedure can go on for hours, Its how the DA have decided it to be - so for now thats how it is.

But the concept is this To vote for your favorite you give that person 1, you next one 2 and so forth.
So as long as you remember that in front of Morten you put 1, you're gonna be on the safe side - trust me - would i lie ;)

Check out this video :

source: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wA3_t-08Vr0
or read up on
Wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Instant-runoff_voting

Why you must vote!

Well if you vote you get the right to bitch n moan over the Drupal Association for the next year - How about that! If you don't vote you have no right to any bitching n moaning not even in the issueque ;) Thats the rules, sorry so you better be ready, else theres no complaining over Drupal the next year!

Btw keep and eye on #votedrupal on ze twitters, so you know when the campaign wagon drives through you part of the interwebs

Can’t Decide - who should i vote on? go and read the candidates then go vote, again in doubt: morten: 1

May the best Dane win!

Aug 27 2012
Aug 27

From 20th to 24th to August 2012 the DrupalCon Europe came for the first time to Germany. During the week of this summer's hottest week so far 1800 Drupalistas from all over the world gathered under the motto "Open Up! Connecting systems and people" in the Grand Westin Hotel in Munich, Germany.

The DrupalCon started with a big surprise, announced on the opening session: Several European Drupal shops (NodeOne, Krimson, Mearra and Wunderkrau) fusion together to become the new, Captain Drupal powerd Wunderkraut - after Acquia, the next big elephant among Drupal companies. This surely will have a positive effect to the Drupal community as some people saw Acquia taking disproportional influence into Drupal development and having another big player in the community could diverse continued and strong development directions. For the smaller companies and start ups this will probably not cause disadvantages since it make Drupal generally stronger and more interesting to larger - industry size - companies, which would probably not hire a small shop, like Dries said on the opening session: "Elephants want to dance with elephants".


Personally I liked this DrupalCon a lot! As a developer I was positively surprised to see not as many sales persons but a lot of community members to talk to, exchanging knowledge, opinions and living the "momentum" about Drupal. The venue was awesome and not only the geek-friendly coffee stands all over the place made the attendees feel well. The food was remarkable excellent and with over €300k the biggest expense of all, but really, it is worth to keep everybody happy and good food achieves that more than anything else.


Although DrupalCons have become huge, it had the spirit of a perfectly sized conference since there were a lot of rooms with great sessions for everybody: Heavy programmers could come together for the core conversations track on a 5 minutes walking distance at the Sheraton hotel, which made it a cozy and productive place. The main sessions were nicely grouped into eight tracks with clear topics, this way, for all kinds of interests, good quality and interesting sessions were offered. It was definitively not a DrupalCon where you could follow all happenings, but rather everybody could enjoy exactly what one was looking for. You can find all the session's recordings on the schedule or the DrupalCon channel on blib.tv
Unfortunately I was a little bit disappointed by the keynotes: Dries' keynote was as a simple interview without any new information and Anke Domscheit-Berg's keynote was just a general summary of Open Data initiatives, an interested person could read together quickly through blog posts and general news. No innovative stuff here, but paired with some awkward invitations to participate. Yes, it is an important field, and we all need to demand actively and know about it, but somebody with more activist insight would have rocked way more.


For me, the motto had it's truth on the part connecting people: As the community lead for DrupalCon São Paulo I got to know personally and work with the staff and people from the Drupal Association, which outside of the US' Drupal community doesn't seem to have arrived yet. Surely, the Drupal Association is not working as open and community based as most of the community members would like, but they are really opening up, and it is the responsibility of the international community to get involved! I would like to point to the awesome session by Donna Benjamin Infiltration Day 853: Drupal Association Board. Confessions of a not-so-secret double agent, the only one of the non North-American board members. Where she did a great call to people to participate and form constructively the Drupal Association, which is important to all of us. A nice detail was that out of a quarter million people entitled to vote for members of the board only 650 actually made use of it. It is necessary that the community accepts the Drupal Association, not as a decision making instance rather than as a representative that forsters the Drupal community and for this reason the whole world and active groups have to participate in the election and forming process.


This DrupalCon in Munich was an important step for scaling Drupal (community) internationally: The German community, as they were cooking their own soup for a long time, now got deeply involved into the international scene, two next DrupalCons have been announced in new parts of the world (Latin America, Brazil, São Paulo and Australia, Sydney), a prosperously discussion about internationalizing the Drupal Association has begun and another huge Drupal company has arisen on the European Drupal horizon.

Drupal rocks! Drupal rockt! Drupal rockea!

Aug 01 2012
Aug 01

As mentioned last month, on July 16 - 17, 2012, several community leaders in the Drupal project sat down with several community leaders from other open source projects and tried to hash out a governance structure to support the Drupal community's continued growth. "Governance" in this case, encompassing all the things we do to organize ourselves, make plans and decisions together, get things done, and resolve conflicts.

Here are the proposals we came up with, and we are actively seeking community feedback on the ideas within.

What problems are we trying to solve?

We began the sprint by brainstorming a list of problems we're hitting, given the scale of our community. This list included items such as:

  • No obvious answer to the question, "Who can make a decision here?" and as a result, important decisions can get stale-mated, or in the worst case leave smouldering craters where a healthy, functioning community used to be.
  • Because the Code of Conduct punts on the topic of conflict resolution, a handful of already swamped individuals get tapped on an ad-hoc basis to intervene in conflict situations. This both burns out those individuals, and also leaves the vast majority of the community who don't know who those individuals are with no conflict resolution path apart from "repeat what I already said, but with more volume".
  • While our "do-ocracy" model generally works well for our community, it can also lead to situations like "Tyranny of the person with the most time on their hands." We need ways for smart people who can't be on IRC 18 hours a day or read 300+ reply issues to participate and be respected as equals.

Over the course of two days, Drupal community members Dries Buytaert, Angela Byron, Randy Fay, Greg Dunlap, and David Strauss met and discussed a variety of these and other governance topics, and we also received input from Jono Bacon, community manager for the Ubuntu project, Jared Smith, former project lead of the Fedora project, and David Eaves.

Steve Edwards also recorded a podcast about the Governance Sprint; it provides more background on what problems we are trying to solve.

Overview of proposed changes

We propose the creation of a number of "working groups" that essentially make more explicit community structures that already exist. Each working group would consist of ~5 people, appointed by Dries, in charge of collaborating with the community in order to establish effective policy. Each working group will have one "lead" member (chair) who communicates major items and works with Dries. Some working groups will have a set duration (e.g. life cycle of a Drupal core release), others may have terms. Dries, as project lead, also reserves the ability to terminate a group at any time if it feels like they are overstepping their scope (charter).

The summary, in essence:

  • Establish clearly chartered working groups where currently loosely defined individuals are taking on things that are community-shaping in their scope.
  • Empower these working groups to make decisions, so important community governance decisions do not get stalemated. Keep the groups small enough that decision-making can take place efficiently, but large enough that a diversity of opinions are represented.
  • Make it more transparent and obvious, to newcomers and community insiders alike, where "the buck stops" with decision-making in our community in various areas, what the structure of the community is, what's expected of them, and who to turn to for help.

"Drupal" groups

The "Drupal" groups encompass areas that touch Drupal core or contrib, or the Drupal community itself. The ultimate "buck stops here" with these groups is with Dries Buytaert, the Drupal project lead.

Governance sprint community

Inspired by the Fedora Community Working Group, this group would be responsible for maintaining a friendly and welcoming community, and their charter will likely consist of items such as:

  • Maintaining and updating community-governing policies like the Drupal Code of Conduct.
  • Helping with mentorship and on-boarding of new community members.
  • Ensuring existing community members have their needs met.
  • Intervening as mediators in cases of conflict resolution (where the conflict cannot be worked out among individuals first) or burnout.
  • Issuing sanctions in cases of extreme policy violations.

In other words, this working group tries to make sure the "people" side of our community is functioning well. It doesn't set technical policy or intervene in any code-related matters; this is the role of the Technical Working Group. The ideal make-up of this group would be community-minded people with extreme amounts of patience, empathy, and diplomacy skills.

A corollary to the Community Working Group, this group would set and maintain policies around the technical aspects of our community, including:

  • Develop and maintain policies around things such as:
  • Establishing best practices and recommendations around bug/issue workflows; for example, strongly encouraging a workflow of idea -> architecture review -> implementation -> code style/clean-up.
  • Recommending to the Drupal Association tool changes that will help accelerate contribution.
  • Intervening as mediators in cases of technical conflict (where the conflict cannot be worked out among individuals first).

In other words, this working group tries to make sure the "technical" side of our community is working well. "People" problems would be escalated to the Community Working Group. Nevertheless, the ideal make-up of this group would be community-minded people who are also technical, known to be fair, and adverse to making new rules.

Drupal Core

A lot of time was devoted at the sprint to discussing Drupal Core, and how to address some of the challenges surrounding its development. For example, there is currently a lot of tapping of internal networks to move things along in core, and those without access to those networks can feel blocked out. It's also very difficult to get an answer as to whether or not something is "core-worthy" until far too late in its development process, making major feature development a risky affair.

The recommendation from the Governance Sprint is something like the following, which would not take effect until the Drupal 9 development cycle.

Drupal Core Initiative Working Group

This group works with Dries Buytaert, the Drupal project lead, in order to tackle strategically vital initiatives within Drupal core. Membership includes the initiative leads. This would entail a bit more formalized structure, including milestones and progress tracking, bi-weekly meetings among the various initiatives, and so on.

This would be essentially formalizing what already exists today with the Drupal 8 initiatives and initiative leads.

Contributions repository

At the Governance Sprint, we agreed to continue not to impose any additional governance structure on contrib, by design. This allows contrib to be an incubator not only for technical solutions, but also for governance itself.

The exception would be conflicts between maintainers or maintainers and their users which are not able to be resolved among the individuals. These would then go to either the Community Working Group or Technical Working Group, as appropriate.

Security and documentation teams

We have a few overall "Teams" that touch elements of the product, including the Documentation Team and Security Team (we also discussed the establishment of a Support Team). As part of the new governance model, we recommend creating charters for these teams that make it explicit to others what their roles and responsibilities are, how to join, and what is expected of them. It's likely these charters will be modeled after something like the Documentation Team and Leader Responsibilities page.

"Operations / Administration" groups

These groups act in support of the Drupal project and its community. The ultimate "buck stops here" with these groups is with the Drupal Association board instead of Dries. Many of these have a financial impact on the Drupal Association and greatly affect its ability to get things done in support of its mission.

Governance sprint operations

And what about Drupal.org?

Governance sprint drupal org

Next to Drupal core, this is probably where we spent the most time discussing. Drupal.org is special, in that it straddles both the community side of things, as well as the operations / support side of things. It functions through a combination of numerous volunteers as well as funding via the Drupal Association for support staff and development on major initiatives.

At the moment, the best place to put Drupal.org seems like it's at a halfway point between the "Drupal" and "Operations" sides of things, and for the charter of this working group to include the necessity to work with the Drupal Association and community members alike. Though eventually, for both legal and simplicity reasons, it would be better for this to be located under the purview of the Drupal Association board.

A few areas there was broad agreement on, however, were the following:

  • Split off a separate "Drupal.org content" working group from the "Drupal.org webmasters" working group; different skills/levels of trust are needed for managing the content on Drupal.org versus managing access and performing moderation of abuse.
  • Identify a much smaller subset of the Drupal.org webmasters group to form policy for this team. Currently, there are nearly 150 members with "site maintainer" privileges, and they often make and enforce policy on an ad-hoc, individual basis. Community members currently encounter very inconsistent experiences in the queue.
  • While the Drupal Association doesn't manage these groups, it's generally expected that the charters of these groups will include directives to collaborate with the DA in their policy-making decisions in order to ensure the financial sustainability of Drupal.org.

Next steps

We're very interested in community feedback on this direction, either in comments below or privately. We'll provide an update on the progress at DrupalCon Munich.

We encourage everyone to come and get involved in this discussion. As our community grows, it is essential that we come up with a governance structure that matches our core values and allows us our community to be more sustainable for the long haul.

Jun 28 2012
Jun 28

I helped start the Drupal Association in 2006 because we needed a checking account for the $10,000 or so required to produce a Drupal conference and to support our infrastructure. In a short six years, we grew the Drupal Association from a volunteer-run organization to one of the largest Open Source non-profit foundations with an operating budget of $3 million USD and 8 full-time employees. Today, we support over 18,000 developers, 9,000 conference attendees, 2,300 individual donors, 800 organizations, and a web presence that reaches over two million people every month.

A lot of that credit goes to Jacob Redding, who took the position of Executive Director two years ago. Under Jacob's leadership we have broadened our activities, streamlined our operations, and significantly increased our revenues. We have supported the Drupal community in its exponential growth from 70,000 members to over 800,000 and from 700 committers to over 18,000. And we are just getting started.

Today, we are announcing an important leadership transition at the Drupal Association. We're sad to say that Jacob, who has worked tirelessly and effectively to grow the organization to where it is today, has told us he intends to step down later this year. Needless to say, it was a difficult decision for Jacob to leave, but he has agreed to stay on until the right replacement has been found, and plans to stay involved as a member and volunteer after his responsibilities have been transitioned.

This transition doesn't come as a surprise for the Drupal Association's Board of Directors. With Jacob's help, we have been preparing and planning for this transition for a while. The Drupal Association is in a good place; we are better organized than ever before and have more momentum than ever before.

This leaves us with a tremendous opportunity ahead. We are now seeking someone to help lay the foundation for our next stage of growth. Someone to help drive us to become the largest Open Source non-profit organization. This will need to be an experienced executive to take over Jacob's responsibilities and to grow the Drupal Association from a $3M organization to a $10M organization over the next few years so we can better support our massive growth as a community and project.

If you are interested, or if you know someone that is interested in this job, please take a look at the job description. I think this truly represents one of the most exciting opportunities out there for someone with a strong leadership background, and that is interested in fostering enormous growth within a non-profit and collaborating with an extensive and active volunteer network. Together with the Drupal community this person could change the way the world builds websites.

May 22 2012
May 22

The Drupal Association is pleased to announce a new Supporting Partner Program to allow a company to invest in Drupal Association community initiatives that will significantly help the overall Drupal community. Examples include funding for Drupal.org improvements, including the recent sprint that started the upgrade process of Drupal.org to Drupal 7, and hiring a web development team to make improvements on Drupal.org for web developers, site builders and businesses.  

The inaugural list of Supporting Partners includes active Drupal Community members that have already been contributing funds and volunteer hours in many ways, including contributions to the project and community through code, camp leadership, documentation, and work in the issue queue, as well as sponsoring DrupalCons.

Thank you to our new Supporting Partners:

Achieve Internet
Acquia
Amazee Labs
Aten Design Group
Blackmesh
Blink Reaction
Bluehost
Consult & Design International
Duo Consulting
Evolving Web GreenGeeks
ImageX Media
Isovera
Jackson River
Lullabot
Microsoft
Palantir.net
Phase2 Technology
The Cherry Hill Company


“The Supporting Partner program is a new chapter for the Drupal Association by providing a method for companies to solidify their commitment not only to the Association, but the Drupal community as a whole," said Jacob Redding, Executive Director of the Drupal Association. "The financial commitments made by these companies will allow us to educate more people about Drupal through more events, fund more initiatives on Drupal.org, and more consistently support our community by building better tools for collaboration on Drupal.org, and making it easier for people to find the right modules, snippets, or themes for their project. We’ve already made a significant amount of headway in the past several months, and now the momentum will continue.”

Supporting partners benefits include an early signup period for events and programs, a 10% DrupalCon sponsorship discounts, and more. See the complete program benefits.  

Thank you to the supporting partners for contributing to Drupal's growth. Learn how you can become a Supporting Partner. Contact Megan Sanicki today.

-The Entire Team at the Drupal Association

Feb 23 2012
Feb 23

This Friday, February 24, 2012 many of our community leaders are hosting low-cost or free Drupal Trainings through a new initiative we are forming called Drupal Days. While the Drupal Association will officially launch its Drupal Days program in June, 2012, the Drupal Association is very pleased and encouraged to see trainings taking place this week all over the world. This is a key initiative for the association to promote Drupal even more broadly this year. Drupal Days are full and half-day trainings introducing people to Drupal, or those wanting to learn more.

These trainings are ideal for anyone wanting to learn more on Drupal, including IT Leads, IT Engineers, Sysadmins, Webmasters, Web Editors, Content Creators and more. Or perhaps a company that has recently switched to Drupal and needs to learn more.

Drupal Day Trainings that are happening around the world on February 24th, 2012: Leuven, Belgium

Bordeaux, France


Dublin, Ireland
Kawasaki, Japan
Nairobi, Kenya

Dakar, Senegal


Saint-Louis, Senegal


Geneva, Switzerland
Kampala, Uganda
Brighton, UK

Get Involved!
Are you a training organization or a well-organized community leader? We’d love to see you involved in the next Drupal Days coming this June. We want to bring Drupal to new developers, engineers, themers, designers, end-users, and future community-organizers to our community but we need your help. Get involved by participating in the open discussion happening now.

Stay tuned for future dates for more Drupal Days trainings in June, September and December 2012.  You can find Drupal trainings year round from many partners around the world at http://drupal.org/learn-drupal.

There will also be many trainings at DrupalCon Denver, (March 19-23) in Denver, and DrupalCon Munich, (August 20-24), 2012.

Feb 04 2012
Feb 04

There truly is never a dull moment at Ixis HQ and this week I have been taking part in an election process in a bid to be a director at large of the international Drupal Association board.

The Drupal Association is a non-profit organisation dedicated to helping the open-source Drupal CMS project flourish. They help the community with funding, infrastructure, events, promotion and distribution.  I jumped at the chance to be involved in the process and I am delighted that I decided to.

My motivation for joining was to give something back to the community that has welcomed me so warmly and to use my experience of marketing, fundraising and business development to develop new opportunities for Drupal.

My overall vision is to drive forward Drupals promotion as a CMS of choice for business, government and public sector organisations. From my initial research, the UK Government is pushing for Open Source Systems and in particular Drupal for implementation across all local authority sites. I think this is a great time to become involved in pushing forward this agenda and proving the value.

I am also keen to promote Drupal due to my first hand experience that it can lead to job creation and training opportunities, which is of particular importance in this economic climate.

Finally, I am keen to encourage more diverse groups, particularly women into the Drupal community. This may be through promoting programming as an alternative career choice and develop more female leaders and management within the community. I felt “qualified” to get involved as I have taken a variety of advisory and Board member positions throughout my career.

The Association organised 2 “meetings” for members of the community to pose questions to the nominees and get to know each candidates ideas.  The first took place at 1am UK time along with representatives from Australia, Brazil, the US and China.  It was a perfect opportunity for us to share our vision for participation on the board and to hone our Q and A skills.  I wasn’t too sharp at that time of the morning but I was wide awake at the end of the call, my head was buzzing with ideas and full of enthusiasm. 

The second meeting took place the next afternoon so I was in the office surrounded by the Ixis giddy kippers keen to get in on the action!  I enjoyed the second call equally as we had a chance to meet more of the community and field additional questions. 

I’ve highlighted below some of the discussion points and my responses:

  1. How do we reach out to new members?
    It's hard to engage people who are not necessarily already involved. The key is to reach out, especially to women and more diverse groups.
  2. What are the barriers to accessing the community?
    Not having access to support groups is a huge barrier, as is the size of the network that developers can rely on.  In terms of developers finding leverage they've got access to within the community, marketing materials, wealth of community without access to the community we are just like any other software so this is a strength we need to better promote.
  3. What’s the Drupal Associations role?
    To harness and to promote the successes of Drupal and therefore allowing others to shine as well rather than instead of just focusing on specific shops/companies My role would be to support and encourage the community and promote what we can do together.  From my experience with working with smaller organisations and 1 man/woman bands, any access to learning and support is always great for small shops.
  4. What Key Skill Can I bring?
    My previous experience in marketing/fundraising is key here as is my understanding of client requirements and community needs and how to bridge those two - understanding of clients’ requirements, developers’ needs and how to bridge those.

Whilst I realise I might be considered relatively unknown in the Drupal community (despite meeting and greeting 1500 of the community at DrupalCon London last summer) I am grateful for an opportunity to present my perspective on how we can strengthen the board and the future of the association. 

I’ve also been bowled over by the other candidates who have shown enthusiasm and dedication as well as encouraging each other in the process.

Whatever comes out of this process and who ever is taken onto the board, I know that I will continue to be a Drupal evangelist and support the future of open source.

Once you've an idea on who to vote for you can place your candidate preference on the voting form. After clicking through, you will be asked to rank each of the eligible voters, from 1st (top choice) to 10th (last choice).

Voting closes at Midnight Tuesday 7th February and you must already have a drupal.org username to vote.

Jan 19 2012
Jan 19

When we designed a new governance structure for the Drupal Association last year, we decided that most of the board is selected through a nominating committee with the goal to carefully balance many factors like needed skills and geographical and sector representation. However, it was also deemed important that we have directors chosen directly by the Drupal community to make sure that the community is always well-represented.

I'm excited that we're holding our first open community elections. Two community "at large" directors will be elected to the Drupal Association Board of Directors. If you'd like to consider running, please have a look at the "At-large" nominations page. And if you're a Drupal community member, please make time to participate in discussions with candidates and of course to vote, starting January 26. (This process was vetted openly in the community by the Elections Committee and numerous community volunteers at http://groups.drupal.org/drupal-association.)

Your participation will help us take this next important step in implementing a new improved governance structure to strengthen the Drupal Association. Thanks!

Dec 15 2011
Dec 15

I have been thinking back and forth of how to best put my thoughts down on “paper”.

This week, I had my last day of work with the Drupal Association.
The Drupal Association is undergoing a lot of changes and this is a result of one of them. My position is being moved to Portland, Oregon, where the physical office of the Drupal Association is; and since I am halfway across the world from that place, I was let go.

I started working on DrupalCon Paris in 2009 and it became a heavy workload, which I was happy to do. The result was that I had a little burnout and my brain wouldn’t function for several days. Also, I barely remember the week itself, as I was sick and simply exhausted by the time all you guys flooded the halls. :-)
Nonetheless, I enjoyed working on DrupalCon Paris so much, that I decided to remain involved as a volunteer and as someone, who had done it once, so I can share some experience and knowledge. At that point, it became a bit more personal, as many members of the Drupal community know. - We, volunteers, put a lot of extra effort and time into Drupal and its development, because we care, believe in its success, because we like working with enthusiastic and passionate people and want to make something happen.
The road evidently led me to project-leading DrupalCon Copenhagen. I had the chance to be the link between the Drupal Association and the community. I considered it as part of my vision/understanding to represent the local community and to implement the maximum of their vision.
Everything, that I built until then, I didn’t want to let go. I was lucky to find someone like NodeOne, which offered me 50% of my work time to be dedicated to community efforts with NodeOne’s involvement.

In the meantime, there were a lot of things happening within the DA; staff got hired, among others an events manager and sponsor manager and DrupalCon, starting with DrupalCon Chicago, became more professionally organised, something more like a model for future DrupalCons to be built upon.
The Drupal Association needed more people to help with DrupalCons and I guess it was only a natural move to offer me a job as event coordinator.

I was very enthusiastic and motivated helping to better internal processes and documentation to make life easier for volunteers and to make DrupalCons even better for the community. However, there was little time (and little priority) to focus on long-term improvements. I had to focus on DrupalCon London, which had a higher priority.

I am not going to lie and say that everything was great, whilst working at the Drupal Association. There were misunderstandings, tensions, frustration, mis-communications, more frustration. I quickly realised, that I cannot do all I envisioned to do due to many reasons (no time and too many things, barriers, changes are hard).

Overall, I think, I have (had) a different approach on how to carry things forward. I think I always have considered myself as a representative for community interests and a link between the DA and the community volunteers, trying to implement and execute the conference to fulfil the needs and wishes of both sides. I also believe, that I have a very different approach in how to communicate and share information; I believe it is crucial to be as transparent as can be in an open source community. This makes it harder to manage people to get things done, true.

I guess it was time for me to go and to embrace something new. I am taking some time to reflect on what I want to do, whether it’ll be in Drupal or something entirely different. But just to make it clear: leaving the DA does not necessarily mean, that I’ll leave the Drupal community :-)

Despite what I wrote above (again, there is always good and bad), I learned a tremendous amount about working with other people, communication and processes. I thank the staff at the Drupal Association and DrupalCon volunteers for your knowledge, experience, support and wisdom in this journey.

A wonderful Christmas (or other) time!

Average:

Your rating: None Average: 3.3 (51 votes)

Mar 23 2011
Mar 23

DrupalCon is a Mecca for thousands of companies and individuals that call the Drupal community home and, naturally, several of the Larks attended DrupalCon Chicago earlier this month.

We’re very involved in our local and global professional communities and we participated at DrupalCon Chicago on several levels, from volunteering to organizing to presenting.

Sessions and BoFs (birds of a feather sessions)

Rain Breaw, who heads up our Drupal training program, presented to a filled auditorium on Views Demystified, a Drupal 7 update to her immensely popular session from DrupalCamp LA and DrupalCon San Francisco. Rain was also a DrupalCon volunteer and you may have seen her at conference registration.

Also at the conference was our Director of Business Development, Cary Gordon. Cary is a Board Member of the Drupal Association, the organization dedicated to Drupal’s funding, promotion and infrastructure, and he has been working to help build the Association’s professional events team. You may have seen Cary at the Library BoFs (I and II), the Domain Access BoF and several of the Core Conversations sessions.

As for myself, I co-presented on Building Successful Local Communities: Insights and Best Practices. I also participated in the DrupalCamp Organizing Round Table, where I shared how the Los Angeles Drupal community, already one of the largest Drupal user groups in the world, is dealing with the growing pains of nearly doubling in size in less than a year.

Drupal Fit: Drupal’s fitness movement and support group

For fun, I participated with dozens of others in the Drupal Fit BoF that ran throughout the entire conference. Drupal and fitness might sound like an unusual combination, but as Dries Buytaert, Drupal’s creator and project lead, once told me, “We want the Drupal community to be fit so that we make better open source software.”

During the conference, I recorded several new Drupal Fit interviews that will shine the spotlight on members of the community who are focused on getting and staying fit.

Looking to the future

DrupalCon is one of our favorite events and DrupalCon Chicago was no different. This time, DrupalCon felt like another turning point for the Drupal community. As Rudyard Kipling once said, “I have struck a city — a real city — and they call it Chicago,” and DrupalCon Chicago has without a doubt left a similar impression on everyone who attended and exhibited.

See you at the next DrupalCon at DrupalCon London!

Dec 17 2010
Dec 17

2010 has been a big year for the Drupal Association. Early in the year new members were brought on and the Board of Directors saw some changes. But most noteworthy is what the Drupal Association did for the Drupal community;

Screenshot of the newly redesigned Drupal.org.

Drupal.org Redesign Completion

Drupal.org has a new look and feel. If you have not seen it (have you been under a rock!?) go check out Drupal.org right now!

It took a few years and many iterations and volunteers, and even that was not enough. This year the Drupal Association came to the party with funding to finish the job. Contracts went to tender and were won by Neil Drumm, Achieve Internet and 3281d Consulting.

Thank you to everyone who contributed to the Drupal.org redesign for all your hard work and effort to pull this off. And especially thank you to the Drupal Association for funding the last several miles that could not be covered by volunteers alone.

Drupal.org will never be the same again! Find out what is next for Drupal.org.

DrupalCon San Francisco

Photo of chx with a large DrupalCon San Francisco logo on the projector screen behind him.
Photo by Kathleen Murtagh

How could we ever forget? DrupalCon San Francisco, was epic. By all measures, it was the largest and most spectacular Drupal event yet.

The Drupal Association bootstrapped the funding and locked in critical contracts in order to secure the venue and other services. Many of the DrupalCon San Francisco committee members also serve the Drupal Association. The Drupal Association managed all the finances for the event and coordinated the local team and service providers with the rest of the Drupal community.

And that is just the beginning of what the Drupal Association did to make DrupalCon San Francisco a reality!

Git Migration

Photo of Sam Boyer posing with a Druplipet on his head.
Sam Boyer. Photo by Fox

The Drupal Association recognized the urgency to update Drupal.org's version control system (currently CVS).

Drupal has an active, amazingly awesome and amiable community. One of the reasons for this, is that Drupal.org is our home. It has everything Drupal developers need, all in one place. However the last couple of years has seen a trend for contributions to be distributed elsewhere.

The Drupal Association realised that if Drupal.org did not offer modern version control and code-distribution tools, then Drupal.org would cease to be a central repository for contributed Drupal code. And that would ultimately be damaging to the community and the project.

Git logo

So earlier this year, the Drupal Association hired Sam Boyer to work on detailed planning and foundation work in preparation for the migration of Drupal's gigantic CVS repository, including about 9000 contributed themes modules and other projects, to Git.

This work is underway and is making good progress, but has some way to go yet. Sam is leading the effort but the success of the project is highly dependent on volunteer effort too. You can get involved on g.d.o.

Paid Staff

Early in the year, Treasurer Jacob Redding was hired as full-time General Manager for the Drupal Association. More recently, the Drupal Association hired Neil Kent as a Events Manager and Megan Sanicki as Sponsor Wrangler (Fundraising Manager).

Jacob does a wide range of tasks including managing financial assets and tasks, lawyers, accountants, contracts, bills, Drupal Association meetings and boot load of other tasks that arise.

Neil is working hard on a range of administrative, logistic and financial tasks related to DrupalCon Copenhagen 2010 and DrupalCon Chicago 2011, as well as trying to document it all and make DrupalCon production more sustainable, so that it is not so much work to reproduce DrupalCon in a new location every 6 months.

Megan is working on raising funds and managing relationships with past, future and potential sponsors, for both DrupalCon and other projects of the Drupal Association. She is also exploring new avenues of revenue.

These funds allow the Association to;

  • pay salaries of staff
  • fund hardware that keeps Drupal.org online
  • fund projects like the Drupal.org redesign and the Git migration
  • pay contractors to keep Drupal's websites up to date, secure and useful to the community

Megan's, Neil's and Jacob's responsibilities are critical to the health of the Drupal Association. Which is in turn, critical to the Drupal community and the resources they depend upon, such as Drupal.org and many other infrastructure services.

Legal and Financial Achievements

Through the careful management of Jacob Redding, the Drupal Association has managed to achieve all of this with less than 25% overhead. That is incredibly low for any non-profit or trade organisation.

DrupalCon Inc. received its 501c3 (not for profit) status, which allowed tens of thousands of dollars to be put right back into the Drupal community. This was a major process to work through the processes of the Internal Revenue Service agency of the US government.

Additionally, the Drupal Association;

  • got payment time for invoices down to less than 30 days (from more than 60)
  • turned over more than a million US dollars
  • registered for tax purposes in four countries
  • was a fiscal agent for 3 major DrupalCamps in the US; NYC, Colorado and Chicago

Mission Statement

Another important achievement of 2010 was updating our mission statement. We began this process in April in San Francisco at our full-day-long meeting, then iterated on it over the following months to reach the final wording.

You can read more about the process and work that went into the missions statement in this blog post by Robert Douglass. Or you can just skip to the result;

Mission Statement

The Drupal Association fosters and supports the Drupal software project, the community and its growth.

The Drupal Association does this by:

  1. Maintaining the hardware and software infrastructure of Drupal.org and other community sites.
  2. Empowering the Drupal community to participate in and contribute to the project.
  3. Protecting the GPL source code of the Drupal project and its community contributions.
  4. Protecting the Drupal project and community through legal work and advocacy.
  5. Organizing and promoting worldwide events.
  6. Communicating the benefits of the Drupal software.

The mission statement helps guide the Drupal Association in it's decision-making, and makes it clear to the community what the Drupal Association does and does not do.

Priorities

Another of the main outcomes of the full-day-long meeting in San Francisco was a list of the five highest priority goals;

  1. Completing the implementation of the Drupal.org redesign
  2. Continuing to build a sustainable model for DrupalCons
  3. Improving internal processes and decision-making
  4. Hiring permanent staff to help the DA better execute on its initiatives
  5. Improving the technical infrastructure of drupal.org

We completed items 1 and 4. Double yay!

We made excellent progress on item 2, including hiring an Events Manager and outsourcing website development to Growing Venture Solutions. However scaling the production of 3000-person bi-annual events is a large project that will take time and never be completely finished.

Similarly, item 5 is never really "done". Maintaining Drupal.org hardware, software and infrastructure is a never-ending job that volunteers work at tirelessly and with very little thanks from the hundreds of thousands of members and visitors to Drupal.org. The Drupal Association applauds their hard work and thanks them sincerely. The Drupal Association funds some of this work from time to time when volunteered time is not sufficient, and also pays for hardware and expenses required for the task.

As for item 3, the mission statement is one significant achievement towards this goal, but there is a lot more to it than that. Additionally, the Drupal Association has hired a consultant experienced with non-profit organisations to help us determine changes to structure that will help us achieve this goal. We are looking forward to report the changes that we decide to implement and how this will improve the efficiency of the Drupal Association to better serve the Drupal community.

Thank You!

Thank you for empowering the Drupal Association with your financial contributions and volunteer effort. You can continue to donate to the Drupal Association by;

Jul 14 2010
Jul 14

We have a new Drupal.org Redesign initiative page, a good way to organize issues. I still have a lot of work to do filling out issues. This should be best place to track progress and get started.

The infrastructure team and myself have been working to improve the staging site, redesign.drupal.org, access to code in BZR, access to a database, and even complete development environments.

There is still plenty of organizing to do; I expect volunteers will be able to be immediately productive next week.

Jul 10 2010
Jul 10

We have a new staging site at redesign.drupal.org. There are a lot of rough edges. It will be a good way to see our progress. As much as possible, it is automated; theme changes every minute and database changes from drupal.org every day. More on the infrastructure is in the handbook.

I’ve been busy collecting everything that has been done so far; making sure everything is either committed to the correct place or has an issue on Drupal.org, including work from 10 SVN sandboxes. Issue queues still need review. If you would like to hear an audio update, Lullabot did a podcast with Git migrator Sam Boyer and myself.

  • Theme
  • Dashboard content and implementation
  • Home page, including the map
  • And much more
Jun 21 2010
Jun 21

I’m pleased to announce that, starting today, I am starting as the Drupal.org Redesign Architect, joining Git migration lead Sam Boyer and 3 more forthcoming positions. My responsibilities are:

  • , including infrastructure team, theme maintainers, project module maintainers, implementers and project managers.
  • Create an implementation plan for each section with functional descriptions and user stories of the work to be implemented so teams can complete them. Includes priorities and rough time estimates.
  • Manage the deployment of each redesigned site.
  • Provide regular updates to the community.

I’ve been volunteering on the redesign implementation since the start, but I haven't been responsible for high-level planning until now. This week I’ll be jumping in to see where everything is and what I can get launched.

  • Get the Bluecheese theme running on subsites. The Drupal Association launched shortly after DrupalCon SF, and Localize last week. API and Groups are next. These sites are a good testing ground for the new theme before it goes to Drupal.org.
  • Meet with everyone and see where everything is; especially, content, search, project, and dashboard.
  • Familiarize myself with recent infrastructure developments; we now manage deployments with BZR and Hudson.
  • Go through issue queues for all components.
  • I’m excited to get this project done. Drupal.org is a large Drupal deployment with a lot of moving parts. It is a bit daunting and will take a few weeks. With a new Drupal.org we can provide a better home for contributors to work and new users to learn.

May 06 2010
May 06

Part of improving communication towards the Drupal community, is writing about is done within the DA.
Here three posts that you may have missed:

Thanks to the people working on those.

Average:

Your rating: None Average: 1.5 (26 votes)

Apr 23 2010
Apr 23

Right now there is still the Drupal Association retreat in San Francisco going on. I, among other stranded members in the EU, participated via Skype thanks to Cary Gordon (Director or Events).

The main focus of this get together is to define the objectives and focuses and what the DA should really do. This includes writing a new mission statement that will capture the essence of who, what, why and how.

There have also been short discussions about the issue of the trademark, local events, local associations as well as marketing and how the DA is perceived in EU and US. In a previous post, I mentioned a questionnaire conceived especially for this retreat. It turns out, we are all not so far from each other and identified all the same issues, that need resolving step by step. I guess we cannot forget that change doesn't happen over night, but that this is a good first step in a new direction.

It was harder and harder to follow the brainstorming and discussions from a distance, so I hope that there will be a public summary of things that have been discussed and decided upon.

Average:

Your rating: None Average: 1.3 (15 votes)

Apr 23 2010
Apr 23

As the ash cloud prevented me from going to DrupalCon San Francisco, I decided to join the DrupalVolCon in Antwerp at Krimson's office.

I took this opportunity to do a BoF session on getting feedback from the community directly on the Drupal Association. I based my questions on a questionnaire, that was devised for the Drupal Association retreat taking place today.

A lot of people were interested in the session, around 12 people attended from a total of 30.

After reading the current mission statement to the attendees, I asked what, in their opinion, the DA should be/do.

Many said that the DA should be a formal representation of the informal Drupal community towards other communities, industries, businesses. It should provide a forum for discussion, provide financing and assistance for DrupalCons, centralise knowledge and funds for DrupalCons and then the community adds its local twist to it. The drupal.org redesign was also mentioned as a focus of the DA.

A point, that all agreed on was, that the DA should deal with legal aspects and protecting the Drupal trademark. Though someone also mentioned that it belongs to Dries and raised the question what would happen if the current situation should change.

The conversation developed towards a discussion about growing the Drupal Community. Suggestions were made that the DA needs to invest strategically in events, and support events in new markets such as Africa and eventually Asia. Another suggestion was a structured approach to support students financially with a framework that is public and clear. Why not a Drupal Summer of Code or a Drupal Winter of Code?

Attendees also addressed the development of DrupalCons and local community events. It is understood that eventually the DrupalCons get bigger and develop a different focus, though local events should stay community events. For example, sponsorship fees increase substantially from one local event to another and bigger Drupal companies are not able to keep sponsoring.

Suggestions were made, that they would appreciate a guideline and general support for events from the DA of how to organise an event, what to pay attention to (a check list), marketing materials and maybe some financial support. If there should be such a thing as individual sponsorships for DrupalCamps, there should be a clear framework for the selection process, so that everyone knows why that individual person is being sponsored to attend an event. It is a sensitive issue and attendees said, that it should essentially not be the focus of the DA, but left to the local organisers to deal with.

Concerning the organisation of events, it was said that there should be more creativity in finding cheap solutions. Also, attendees present at the BoF would appreciate to have options concerning food at events. They rather pay a conference ticket excluding the catering or have the choice whether or not to pay the full package.

There has already been a short discussion within the DA concerning local associations and creating links between local ones and the DA. Questions were raised whether local associations weren't already connected to the DA; if not, why not and it was suggested that it would be a good idea to do so, to keep the communities together.

Finally, on my question what else the DA should focus on this year. An answer, that I found surprising:"trainings with official certification by the Drupal Association; it is weird that Acquia is doing it now." I remember talking to Dries about offering trainings through the DA at DrupalCon Paris last year. This issue appears now to be a conflict of interest.

I think this open session and simply receiving feedback from the community was very fruitful. I think that this is needed to be done at other local events throughout the EU. After all, we are all about community building from the bottom up.

Any person from the DA participating in a Drupal event should use the opportunity to pose exactly these kind of questions (What does the DA do, what is/should be the focus) and make answers public. It is not done to connect with a few people over a beer.

Roy Scholten asked me already if the questions I asked can be made public, so that he can ask others from the community and get more feedback. I suggest doing this on the association.drupal.org site to have all feedback in one spot, easy to fill out and public for everyone.

Average:

Your rating: None Average: 3.2 (18 votes)

Apr 14 2010
Apr 14

The new year (this post is a little late!) has brought me new opportunities and some new roles;

NowPublic, Crowd Powered Media

New job at NowPublic

At NowPublic I work on front end theming and customizations for NowPublic.com and Scan — a realtime twitter and social media tracker for NowPublic.com, Examiner.com, WashingtonExaminer.com, SFexaminer.com and The Vancouver Sun.

Currently I am the skeleton dev team that maintains NowPublic.com, while the rest of the NowPublic dev team works on the Examiner.com migration to Drupal 7. Though I spend most of my dev time in the depths of the javascript and theme layer of Scan.

One of the most exciting things about this job is that I am able to work with an amazing team of developers including some other CivicActions alumni, whom I respect and seek to learn from. Such as chx, kkaefer, douggreen and Morbus Iff and many others.

Head On Vancouver

Vancouver

The new job at NowPublic saw me relocate to Vancouver for two and a half months, from just after DrupalSouth Wellington

at the end of January, until DrupalCon San Francisco, this week.

Vancouver has been astounding! Some highlights of my first trip ever to Canada and my stay in Vancouver include;

Returning to New Zealand

This Friday 16 April I depart Vancouver for San Francisco, where I will stay with the Clarity Digital Group developer team at Westin Hotel Market street for 8 days, for the Drupal core developer summit, DrupalCon SF, code sprints, meetings, social events, and a Drupal Association retreat.

Finally, on April 26 (after losing April 25 to the date line) I will arrive home to Christchurch NZ to stay indefinitely. It will be exactly 8 months since my wife and I departed Christchurch for DrupalCon Paris and a journey across 5 continents. I am looking forward to having a home (when we find and rent one!) and our bed back.

Drupal Association

Permanent Member of the Drupal Association General Assembly

Being elected onto the Drupal Association's General Assembly was largely unexpected and came as a surprise to me. I have been a core part of the DrupalCon Asia-Pacific Organisers (DCAPO) group on groups.drupal.org since it started in September 2009 and collaborated a little with Cary Gordon (Drupal Association Board, Director of Events) over that time. Cary asked me to join the Drupal Association to help centralise international DrupalCon coordination efforts (as per the events plan) and provide the association with a more internationalised perspective.

It is still early days at the association, but my goal (as per my application) at the Drupal Association is to empower a team to organise and run a DrupalCon somewhere in the Asia-Pacific region, hopefully around 2011. There are some ideas and projects at the association to do with scholarships and mini-conferences — but I will save that for another time, when it is ready.

Feb 07 2010
Feb 07

Hi Everybody,

First up, we, the European DrupalCon Selection Taskforce, apologize for the delay and lack of communication.

Consider this account of what has happened and what we discussed about, an attempt to improve the process, that we have started for the very first time.

The Drupal Association changed the way that DrupalCon planning is done. In September, the European Regional DrupalCon Organizers formed and developed a set of guidelines and scorecards for managing location nominations. At the beginning of December, the Board of Directors approved the proposal to have this year's DrupalCon in Copenhagen.

After much deliberation and consideration, including valuable counsel from professional events organizers and both the German and the UK team, the Location Selection Taskforce would like to recommend London for the 2011 DrupalCon. This means that we will now work with the London team to present the current proposal to the Board of Directors at an upcoming meeting for ratification. Kristof will be in direct contact with the London team.

And what happens to the Berlin team? We know, that we haven't mentioned 2012 in the process at all, but here is what we would like to introduce. We would like to keep the candidature of the German team for 2012, as they made a compelling case for holding DrupalCon in Germany.
We want to take the next step in transitioning the way DrupalCon's are organized and move further away from the Olympics model with competing teams towards a pan-European organizing group. Since DrupalCon will grow in the next 2 years, we would like to review with the German team and Blue Projects what city and what venue would be our best choice for the conference.

Everybody involved has been very patient and understanding as we've changed the process by which DrupalCons are planned. It wasn't without problems, but we think we're having success in building teams, planning further out into the future, and bringing DrupalCon to great locations in Europe. Thank you so much for your ongoing help.

We would like to congratulate the UK and the German team, and thank everyone who worked on and submitted nominations for DrupalCon in 2010 and 2011. We were lucky enough to have 3 great candidate teams (Copenhagen, Berlin, London), these are great prospects for DrupalCon.

Average:

Your rating: None Average: 1.4 (32 votes)

Sep 24 2009
Sep 24

Today was a big milestone for the Drupal Association and for the future of European DrupalCons. Over 70 people met in IRC for over two hours to discuss and ratify two documents which lay out the process by which we will select DrupalCon locations going forward, and how the production teams to run DrupalCon will be managed. These are the two documents:

If you belong to a local group somewhere in Europe and you want to see DrupalCon happen in your city, region, or country, read both of these documents carefully. The time for nominating locations is now open, you can read the exact details of how it is done via the links provided above. Nominations must be submitted before October 1. That means there are only six full days to work on proposals. Nominations are being taken for both 2010 and 2011. The nominations will be evaluated, as per the plans in the documents, by October 15. They then get submitted to the Drupal Association Board of Directors, who have to meet and ratify the suggestions.

The important point in all of this is the level of openness and transparancy that is being brought to the system. The Drupal Association is working hard to involve the community in decisions, and to have well defined proceses for making important decisions, like where DrupalCon is held. Today we had a great discourse, thoroughly discussed all of the points that were important to people, and came to nearly unanimous agreements about how things will be done. That is what makes Drupal a nice community to live in.

Feb 25 2009
Feb 25

created on Tue, 2009-02-24 21:00

The 2009 North American DrupalCon is just around the corner. From March 4th-7th, Drupal fanatics from around the globe will be descending on Washington, DC for four days of open-source madness. The conference is already sold out, so if you were lucky enough to get tickets you're in for a treat. With over 1200 people attending, this is going to be the largest DrupalCon ever.

For those who are not familiar, DrupalCon is the official Drupal unconference and one of the best chances for the Drupal community to get together and have some fun in person. This year's conference has a fantastic lineup of presenters and is bound to be great experience for everyone attending. Everyone seems pretty excited about the state of Drupal 6 and its contributed modules. There's been a lot of hard work and the future is looking good for Drupal.

Raincity Studios is a sponsor again this year and we'll absolutely be attending. Come visit us at our sponsor table, check out some of the projects we've been working on and learn about some new services we have coming down the pipe. We're looking forward to meeting everyone so please don't be shy.

The conference will be held at the Walter E Washington Convention Centre and early registration will begin at 4pm on Tuesday, March 3rd. To get the details, check out the DC DrupalCon website for scheduleand venue information.

This conference wouldn't be possible without the hard work of many dedicated individuals. We owe a big thank you to the Drupal Association for carrying this torch and we'd especially like to offer many kudos to the good people at Development Seed, Jacob Redding and the DC Drupal Community for their hard work this time around.

See you at DrupalCon!

Tags:

About Drupal Sun

Drupal Sun is an Evolving Web project. It allows you to:

  • Do full-text search on all the articles in Drupal Planet (thanks to Apache Solr)
  • Facet based on tags, author, or feed
  • Flip through articles quickly (with j/k or arrow keys) to find what you're interested in
  • View the entire article text inline, or in the context of the site where it was created

See the blog post at Evolving Web

Evolving Web