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Jan 25 2019
Jan 25

Let's say you've been working on this contributed project for a few months now. It has gone from Beta 1 to Beta 2 to Beta... Now, how long till its final release? How do you know when it's ready for the Drupal community to see and use? And this is precisely why the Drupal quality initiative was launched in the first place.

So that can we finally have some sort of a checklist at hand to use whenever we need to assess our code's level of quality:
 

  • the standards that we should evaluate our contributed projects by 
  • the specific elements that go into the quality of our projects, such as contributed Drupal modules
  • a certain hierarchy of quality that we could rate our own projects by
     

And so on...

For, let's admit it now:

Except for our own personal methodologies for self-assessment, there's no standardized benchmark that could help us evaluate our contributed Drupal projects. There's no way of knowing for sure when our projects are 100% ready to go from beta to... full release.

Now, here are the legitimate questions that this initiative brings forward, along with some of the suggested paths to take:
 

1. What Drupal-Specific Quality Metrics Should We Use to Evaluate Our Code?

How do you know when your contributed project is efficient enough to... be used by other members of the Drupal community?

You need some sort of criteria for measuring its level of quality, right? 
 

2. The Drupal Quality Initiative: A Checklist for Project Quality Assessment

And this is how the “Big Checklist” for Drupal modules has been put together. One outlining all those areas of a contributed Drupal project that you should carefully evaluate when assessing its quality.

Areas such as:
 

  • team management
  • documentation
  • testing
  • code
  • design
  • requirements
  • DevOps
     

All those factors and Drupal-specific elements that go into the quality of a contributed project.


3. Introducing the Idea of a Multi-Leveled Quality Hierarchy

What if we had multiple levels of quality to rate our Drupal projects?

Imagine some sort of hierarchy of quality that would challenge us to keep improving the way we write code for Drupal. To keep growing as teams working with Drupal.

Your project might be rated “level 1”, from a quality standpoint, on its first release. But it would still stand stand the chance to get a higher score for if you strove to meet all the other criteria on the checklist.


4. You'll Be Particularly Interested in The Drupal Quality Initiative If You're A...
 

  1. Site builder, scanning through the pile of contributed Drupal modules in search of the ones that perfectly suit your project's specific needs
  2. Drupal contributor in need of some sort of checklist that would include all those standards of quality and best practices to help you assess your own code's value
     

5. What About Non-Drupal Software Projects? How Is Their Quality Assessed?

In other words: how do other communities assess their projects' levels of quality?

What metrics do they use?

And here, the Drupal quality initiative's... initiator gives the “The Capability Maturity Level”, set up by the Software Engineering Institute, as an example.

The process model highlights 5 levels of “maturity” that a project can reach throughout its different development phases.They range from:
 

  • the“initial chaos”
  • to planning and collecting project requirements
  • … all the way to continuous process improvement
     

Now, just imagine a similar multi-level evolutionary benchmark that we could use to assess our own Drupal projects' levels of... maturity.
 

6. A Few Quality Indicators and Suggested Tools

And the whole Drupal Quality Initiative comes down to identifying the key endpoints for assessing a project's quality, right?

Here are just some of the suggested questions to use during this evaluation process:
 

  • Is it easy to use?
  • Does it perform the intended functions?
  • Is it efficient enough?
  • How many detected bugs are there per 1000 lines of code
  • How secure is it?
     

Now, for giving the most accurate answers to these quality assessing questions, you'll need the right toolbox, right?

All those powerful tools to help you:
 

  • check whether your code is spell checked
  • monitor the status of specific operations
  • check whether all strings use translation
  • see whether your code has been properly formatted
     

The END! And this is just a brief overview of the Drupal Quality Initiative.

What do you think now, does the suggested checklist stand the chance to turn into a standardized Drupal benchmark for assessing quality?

How do you currently determine your contributed projects' value?

Sep 28 2018
Sep 28

Just imagine... automatic updates in Drupal core.

Such a feature would put an end to all those never-ending debates and ongoing discussions taking place in the Drupal community about the expectations and concerns with implementing such an auto-update system.

Moreover, it would be a much-awaited upgrade for all those users who've been looking for (not to say “longing for") ways to automate Drupal core and modules for... years now. Who've been legitimately asking themselves:

“Why doesn't Drupal offer an auto-update feature like WordPress?”

And how did we get this far? From idea to a steady-growing initiative?
 

  1. first, it was the need to automate Drupal module and security updates
  2. then, the issues queues filled with opinions grounded in skepticism, valid concerns and high hopes started to “pile up” on Drupal.org,
  3. then, there was Dries' keynote presentation at Drupalcon Vienna in 2017, raising awareness around the need to re-structure Drupal core in order to support a secure auto-update system
  4. … which grew into the current Auto Update Initiative
  5. that echoed, recently, at Drupal Europe 2018, during the “Hackers Automate, but the Drupal Community still Downloads Modules from Drupal.org” session
     

Many concerns and issues have been pointed out. Many questions have been added to the long list.

Yet, one thing's for sure:

There still is a pressing, ever-growing need for an auto-update feature in Drupal...

So, let me try to answer my best to some of your questions regarding this much-awaited addition to Drupal core:
 

  • What's in it for you precisely? How will an auto-update pre-built feature benefit you? 
  • Does the user persona profile suit you, too? Is it exclusively low-end websites that such a feature would benefit? Or are enterprise-level, company websites targeted, as well?
  • What are the main concerns about this implementation?
     

1. The Automatic Updates Initiative: Goal & Main Challenges 

Let's shift focus instead and pass in review the inconveniences of manually installing updates in Drupal:
 

  • it's time-consuming
  • it's can get risky if you don't know what you're doing
  • it can be an intimidatingly complex process if you have no dedicated Drupal support & maintenance team to rely on
  • it can get quite expensive, especially for a small site or blog owner
     

See where I'm heading at?

This initiative's main objective is to spare Drupal users of all these... inconveniences when it comes to updating and maintaining their websites. Inconveniences that can easily grow into reasons why some might get too discouraged to adopt Drupal in the first place.

The goal is to develop an auto-update mechanism for Drupal core conceptually similar to those already implemented on other platforms (e.g. WordPress).

And now, let's dig up and expose the key challenges in meeting this goal:
 

  • enabling update automation in Drupal core demands a complete re-engineering of the codebase; it calls for a reconstructing of its architecture and code layout in order to support a perfectly secure auto-update system 
  • such an implementation will have a major impact on the development cycle itself, causing unwanted disruption
  • such a built-in auto-update feature could get exploited for distributing and injecting malware into a whole mass of Drupal websites
     

2. Automatic Updates in Drupal: Basic Implementation Requirements 

What would be the ideal context for implementing such a perfectly secure auto-update system? 

Well, its implementation would call for:
 

  • multiple (up to date) environments
  • released updates to be detected automatically and instantly
  • an update pipeline for quality assurance
  • existing automate tests with full coverage
  • a development team to review any changes applied during the update process 
     

3. How Would These Auto-Updates Benefit You, the Drupal User?

Let's see, maybe answering these key questions would help you identify the benefits that you'd reap (if any):
 

  • is your Drupal website currently maintained by a professional team?
  • has it been a... breeze for you so far to cope with Drupal 8's release cycle (one new patch each month and a new minor release every 6 months sure claim for a lot of your time)?
  • have you ever got tangled up in Composer's complexities and a whole load of third-party libraries when trying to update your Drupal 8 website?
  • did you run the Drupalgeddon update fast enough?
  • have you been secretly “fancying” about a functionality that would just update Drupal core and modules, by default, right on the live server?
     

To sum up: having automatic updates in Drupal core would keep your website secured and properly maintained without you having to invest time or money for this.
 

4. Drupal Updating Itself: Main Concerns

And concerns increase exponentially as the need for an update automation in Drupal rises (along with the expectations).

Now, let's outline some of the most frequently expressed ones:
 

  • there is no control over the update process, no quality assurance pipeline; basically, there's no time schedule system enabling you to test any given update, in a development environment, before pushing it live
  • there's no clearly defined policy on what updates (security updates only, all updates, highly critical updates etc.) should be pushed
  • with Drupal updating itself, rolling back changes wouldn't be possible anymore (or discouragingly difficult) with no GIT for version control
  • again: automatic updates in Drupal could turn into a vulnerability for hackers to exploit for a mass malware attack 
  • there's no clear policy regarding NodeJS, PHP and all the JS libraries in Drupal 8, all carrying their own vulnerabilities, too
  • it's too risky with all those core and module conflicts and bugs that could break through
  • such a feature should be disabled by default; thus, it would be every site owner's decision whether to turn it on or not
  • could this auto-update system cater to all the possible update workflows and specific behaviors out there? Could it meet all the different security requirements?
     

So, you get the point: no control over the update pipeline and no policy for handling updates are the aspects that concern developers the most.
 

6. Does It Cater for Both Small & Enterprise-Level Websites' Needs? 

There is this shared consensus that implementing automatic updates in Drupal core would:
 

  1. not meet large company websites' security requirements; that it would not fit their specific update workflows
  2. benefit exclusively small, low-end websites that don't benefit from professional maintenance services
     

Even the team behind the automatic updates initiative have prioritized low-end websites in their roadmap.

But, is that really the case?

Should this initiative target small websites, with simple needs and writable systems, that rarely update and to overlook enterprise-level websites by default?

Or should this much-wanted functionality be adjusted so that it meets the latter's needs, as well? 

In this case, the first step would be building an update pipeline that would ensure quality.

What do you think?
 

7. How About Now?"What Are My Options for Automating Updates in Drupal?"

In other words: what are the currently available solutions if you want to automate the Drupal module and security updates? 
 

7.1. You Can Use Custom Scripts to Automate Updates

… one that's executed by Jerkins or another CI platform. 

Note: do bear in mind that properly maintaining a heavy load of scrips and keeping up with all the new libraries, tools, and DevOp changes won't be precisely a “child's play”. Also, with no workflow and no integrated tools, ensuring quality's going to be a challenge to consider.
 

7.2. You Can Opt for a Drupal Hosting Provider's Built-In Solution

“Teaming up” with a Drupal hosting provider that offers you automated updates services, too, is another option at hand.

In this respect, solutions for auto-updating, such as those provided by Pantheon or Acquia, could fit your specific requirements. 

Note: again, you'll need to consider that these built-in solutions do not integrate with your specific DevOps workflows and tools.
 

And my monologue on automatic updates in Drupal ends here, but I do hope that it will grow into a discussion/debate in the comments here below:

Would you turn it on, if such a feature already existed in Drupal core?

  1. Definitely yes
  2. No way
  3. It depends on whether...
Sep 21 2018
Sep 21

The media management experience had been one of the well-known sources of frustration for Drupal content editors for a long time. For, let's face it: Drupal's out-of-the-box media support was just... basic. But not anymore: there are new exciting features for media handling in Drupal 8.6.0 that will dramatically change the way you manage your media assets on your Drupal website!

Now, let's take a sneak peek at these most-anticipated media handling features that Drupal 8.6.0 comes equipped with:
 

  • adding media from a remote source
  • adding various types of media
  • embedding Youtube and Vimeo videos in the content (via URL)
  • easily accessing and reusing the existing media
  • uploading new media types right out of the box
     

And this is almost... overwhelming:

From almost no built-in media support in Drupal, for so many years, to a whole set of modern, powerful media management options now in Drupal 8.6.0.

But let's not ramble about this topic anymore and dive right in! Into the pile of new features meant to enhance the whole media management experience in Drupal:
 

But First: An Update on The Progress of the Media in Drupal 8 Initiative

The main goal of this media initiative was to:

Add a rich media support to Drupal 8.

One that would empower the content editors to easily reuse existing media assets, add new media entities and to overall gain more control (and meta information) over their media.

And there are 3 core milestones that we can trace while tracking the progress of this initiative for Drupal 8:
 

  1. adding the experimental Media module to Drupal 8.4 in late 2017
  2. leveling up this module from experimental to stable phase in Drupal 8.5.0
  3. turning it into the standard way of storing media in Drupal 
     

Moreover, starting with Drupal 8.6.0 a new key module for handling media has been added to core — Media Library — along with a few more exciting options:
 

  • quick access to the existing media assets
  • oEmbed support
  • a new media type: remote video content
     

Quite a “leap” forward, to a great media management experience in Drupal, I would say...
 

2. Welcome a New Media Type in Drupal 8: Remote Video

Let us list the 4 media types that you could add to your site's content up to Drupal 8.6.0:
 

  1. file
  2. image
  3. video
  4. audio
     

OK, now it's time you welcomed a new media type to the group: remote video!

Basically, as a content editor you're now able to add videos from remote sources, as well — Vimeo and Youtube — via their URLs.

Handling Media in Drupal 8.6.0- New Media Type: Remote Video

In short: you're no longer constrained to settle for the default media types in Drupal 8. No sir, now you get to create new custom ones mentioning their media sources.

Summing up: embedding new media to your website content is nothing but a two-step process: Content-Add Media.

Handling Media in Drupal 8.6.0- Add New Media Type


3. Reusing Media Is Now Possible: Media Library

One of the much-awaited features for media handling in Drupal 8.6.0 had been reusable media.

Well, here it is now: Media Library! It's where you can save and store all your media assets to be further reused whenever needed.

Note: do keep in mind that this an experimental module and that you'll also need to enable the Media module first things first.

“And how does it work more precisely?”
 

  1. while in your content edit screen
  2. just browse through all the media assets stored in your Media Library
  3. select the one you need
  4. and simply “inject” it into your page
     

Note: it's the “Media library” widget, added to the Media field, that enables you to scan through all your media entities straight from the content edit screen.

Handling Media in Drupal 8.6.0- Media Library Widget


4. The New “Media” Field: A Quick Way to Embed Media in Your Content

Handling media in Drupal 8.6.0 is as simple as... adding a new field — “Media” —  to the content type in question (be it news, blog post, article and so on).

Handling Media in Drupal 8.6.0- Add a New Media Field

Once the new field is added on, just go through the 5 media types available in Drupal 8.6.0 and select the one you need to embed.

Next, you can simply integrate it into your content, while in your edit screen, positioning it to your liking.
 

5. New Media Handling in Drupal 8.6.0: Youtube & Vimeo Embeds

A new media management tool that significantly improves the whole content editing experience in Drupal.

You're able to embed remote videos from Youtube and Vimeo via URL, thanks to the now added oEmbed media support.

“How precisely?” Basically, you simply:
 

  1. add that new “Media” field to your content type, as previously stated
  2. select the “Remote Video” option from the “Media Type” drop-down menu
  3. enter your video's URL in the “Video URL” field, while in your “Add Remote Video” screen
  4. and click “Save”
     

And voila: you'll have your remote video integrated into your content!

The END!

As Steve Burge from OSTraining would say:

“Finally we're getting somewhere with media in Drupal!”  

What do you think about the new features for media handling in Drupal 8.6.0? What other options and tools are there on your wishlist?

To be able to embed remote videos right from the node create page, maybe? Or to have other video platforms, as well, supported in Drupal?

Aug 17 2018
Aug 17

It's a robust, flexible and admin feature-packed CMS, there's no point in denying it. And yet: Drupal (still) lacks a modern UI that would make building rich web content —  such as landing pages — a breeze. But there is hope: the Gutenberg editor has been ported over, promising a better editing experience in Drupal 8.

The team behind this daring project? Frontkom, a Norwegian digital services agency that:
 

  • refused to just sit and wait (for a year or two) for the in-progress initiative of modernizing Drupal's admin UI to grow into a core solution
  • decided to capitalize on their experience in working with the Gutenberg page builder 
  • … and on this content editor's open source nature, too
  • … to bring it over to Drupal 8
     

Now, if you're determined to improve the editorial UX on your Drupal site, to “spoil” your editors with a modern, intuitive and flexible admin UI, keep on reading...
 

1. The Drupal Gutenberg Project: Aiming for a Modern Admin UI in Drupal 8

And by “modern” I do mean the opposite of the Panels & Paragraphs & Layout combo solutions currently available for editing text in Drupal.

Solutions which only manage to make the entire workflow... discouragingly complex.

Especially if it's rich web content that editors need to create via the Drupal admin UI.

And this is precisely the context where the Drupal Gutenberg project was born: Drupal desperately needed/needs a modern, JavaScript-based admin UI.

With WordPress 5 users already enjoying this fancy content editor and the Frontkom team's having gained experience in using it, the idea of porting it to Drupal started to form:

"Why wouldn't we make it possible for Drupal users, too, to benefit from this content editor?" 

And here are some of the original Gutenberg project's features that lead them into thinking that, once ported, the editor would significantly improve the editing experience in Drupal 8:
 

  • it's (highly) decoupled
  • it's open source
  • it's React.js-based 
  • it provides a simplified, smooth and cool functionality-packed admin UI
  • it's Medium and Squarespace's inspired
  • it turns the creation of complex landing pages into a breeze
     

Page editing in Drupal 8 wasn't going to be the same again!

Their initiative turned into a Drupal 8 module —  Gutenberg Editor —  currently still an experimental one. 

Curious enough?

The first step to satisfy your curiosity is to take a look at their live demo: an interactive glimpse into the Gutenberg text editor implemented in Drupal 8.
 

2. The New Gutenberg for Drupal: Top Features Improving the Editing Experience in Drupal 8
 

2.1. All the Page Elements Are... Content Blocks

That's right, the team behind this project capitalized on the “everything is a block” Drupal 8 concept when adapting the Gutenberg UI to Drupal.

The result?

Both the Drupal core blocks and 20+ Gutenberg blocks are available in the resulting admin UI.

Basically, a Drupal 8 editor can insert into the web page that he/she's creating any of the core Drupal blocks and of the Gutenberg blocks of choice.

Speaking of which, let me point out just a few:
 

  • Heading
  • Image gallery
  • Auto embedded social posts
  • Buttons
  • Custom Drupal blocks
  • Layout blocks
     

Needless to add that you're free to enrich this list with your own custom blocks, too.
 

2.2. Easy Switch from Visual to Code Editor

That's right, the Gutenberg UI enables you/your editors to quickly switch to code editor —  opening up a neat markup —  and to apply any needed tweaks on the output.
 

2.3. Positioning Content Is Straightforwardly Intuitive

Editors get to select precisely where they want to position different types of content on a page.

And the very same results that they generate while in the Gutenberg admin UI get instantly reflected on the live web page, as well.

And there's more! More great admin features improving editing experience in Drupal. For instance:

Full control over font sizes and colors; tweaking them becomes a breeze with the new editor.
 

2.4. There's a Blocks Search Box

And not only that:
 

  1. using this search box you can track down precisely those content blocks that you need to add to your page
  2. but you can access them inline, as well, using “/”.
     

2.5. Full Control of the Layout

Another great thing about the content blocks available in the Gutenberg UI is that: they can have child blocks, too!

This way, it'll get unexpectedly easy for your editors to split their used blocks into columns on a grid.
 

2.6. Auto Embedded Social Posts/Videos

And all it takes is pasting their URL.
 

The Story of a Real Challenge: Making Gutenberg CMS-Agnostic

Open source, but not fully CMS-agnostic... 

The team behind the Drupal Gutenberg project had to come up with a suitable solution for this challenge. And they did come up with a multi-step solution to make the fancy text editor work in Drupal 8, as well:
 

  • first, they created a fork and removed the WordPress specific features
  • they used the Gutenberg editor as a dependency 
  • next, they set up a standalone NPM package
  • then they built the Gutenberg Editor module
     

In short: a fork of the initial Gutenberg project is still maintained while being used as a dependency of the new Drupal 8 module. Therefore, each time Gutenberg gets an update, the corresponding Drupal module, too, gets a new release.

Now, digging deeper into the project's architectural design, we discover 2 elements that the team had to re-write for Drupal:
 

  1. the URL defining the editor routes (edit page route, new page route, preview page route)
  2. the api-request, now configured to “talk to” Drupal (instead of the WordPress API)
     

How does the new module work?
 

  • as a text editor, which can be easily enabled for each content type
  • all it takes is a long text field for it to work: it replaces the node edit UI for that specific content type
     

Note: the Frontkom team also “promises” us to re-use many of the Drupal-specific styling for the editor's UI elements in order to add a familiar Drupal feeling to it.
 

What Next? What's The Project Roadmap

Ok, so what we know for sure now, regarding this ambitious initiative turned into a Drupal module is that:
 

  1. the Drupal Gutenberg module is downloadable, yet still experimental (for developer use only)
  2. the team's still working on the project, implementing new features and functionalities aimed at making it feel more... Drupal native
  3. the final version will be presented to the eager/intrigued/curious/skeptical Drupal users and developers in the coming months
     

The END! Can't hide that I'm more than curious what you think about this contrib solution for improving the editing experience in Drupal 8:
 

  1. Are you looking forward to using it, hoping that this editor would make up for the inconveniences of working with Drupal's current admin UI?
  2. Are you skeptical about the perspective of being tied up to a WordPress page builder?
Jul 02 2018
Jul 02

Save the date(s): 10-12 August! And join us for a 3-day conference on building with Drupal, driving this open-source technology forward and strengthening & growing the community behind it: Drupal North Regional Summit 2018

You'll find us in our booth at the Toronto Reference Library's exhibit hall, to be more specific, since this year OPTASY's a proud gold sponsor of the fourth edition of this event: 

The biggest annual summit in Canada focused on promoting Drupal. 
 

Why Would You Attend Drupal North Regional Summit 2018?

That's right: why would you pack your bags and get en route for Toronto's Reference Library when summer is at its peak and everyone's looking for a place in the sun?

For a bunch of strong reasons, actually:
 

  • first of all, if you're already living in Canada, why would you want to miss the biggest annual event in North America promoting Drupal?
  • no less than 300+ individuals and organizations will be attending it
  • if you're a Drupal developer, this is a once-in-a-year opportunity to grow and to... outgrow yourself; the event's schedule is “overcrowded” with sessions covering a variety of Drupal-related topics, with “can't miss” keynote sessions and networking opportunities
  • … grow your profile by sharing your knowledge and expertise all while enriching it as you learn from other Drupalists attending the event
  • as a Drupal-powered organization, Drupal North Regional Summit 2018 is a great chance to recruit new talent (and this is the event's key “mandate”: to showcase Canadian Drupal talent), to make connections with other Drupal-fueled businesses...
     

Whether you're:
 

  1. in the government, nonprofit, education, business field
  2. a freelancing Drupal enthusiast looking to keep his/her knowledge up to date

… don't miss the largest summit in Canada promoting Drupal!
 

It'll be a win-win-win type of situation:
 

  • you (the Drupal developer) get to keep your knowledge up to date
  • you (the organization) get to dig through a pool of Drupal talent and also to network with other key decision-makers from some of the most notorious companies in Canada running their businesses on Drupal
  • and it's a winning situation for Drupal itself: all the individuals and companies attending the summit will help to extend its reach to more people and more businesses 
     

OPTASY Proudly Supports Drupal and the Drupal North Regional Summit 2018

Why? What's in it for us? Why are we so proud to be one of the gold sponsors of this Drupal summit in Canada?

Because we like to practice what we preach:

To give back to the (Drupal) community, what the community gave to us for free. And along these +15 years years since we've been developing in Drupal there's been plenty of work done by all those developers contributing to Drupal and moving this open-source technology forward that we leveraged in our own projects. It's only but common sense to give something back now and to contribute ourselves, too.

And sponsoring Drupal events is one way that we can do that.

But there are other reasons, too, why we decided to support the Drupal North Regional Summit 2018 as a gold sponsor. All of them deriving from the above-presented reasoning:
 

  • the 3-day conference makes the perfect “lab” where brilliant solutions to well-known issues in Drupal get identified and shared with the community, new Drupal modules get put into the spotlight, new ways of innovating this technology get presented
  • in other words: investing in this Drupal summit we invest in us, as a team and as a company, and implicitly in our own clients, as well
  • ... all the knowledge and “steamy-fresh information” that we get from this conference will then be put to use when working on our clients' future projects
  • it's also a great place to network with existing and potentially new Drupal-using companies
  • and an opportunity for us to “expose” the key advantages that set OPTASY apart as a Drupal agency: +15 years hands-on experience, proven Drupal expertise, pure passion for what we do, a strong work ethic and stellar communication skills confirmed by our clients
     

So, are you curious about Drupal's main strengths as a technology of the future? Interested to discover what precisely helps it stand out?

Are you looking for a Drupal partner with both the proven experience and the proper “weakness” for innovation to turn your ideas into digital reality? Stop by our booth then, in August, and let's talk Drupal, growth opportunities and everything in between!

About Drupal Sun

Drupal Sun is an Evolving Web project. It allows you to:

  • Do full-text search on all the articles in Drupal Planet (thanks to Apache Solr)
  • Facet based on tags, author, or feed
  • Flip through articles quickly (with j/k or arrow keys) to find what you're interested in
  • View the entire article text inline, or in the context of the site where it was created

See the blog post at Evolving Web

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