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Apr 04 2019
Apr 04
Julia Gutierrez

DrupalCon2019 is heading to Seattle this year and there’s no shortage of exciting sessions and great networking events on this year’s schedule. We can’t wait to hear from some of the experts out in the Drupalverse next week, and we wanted to share with you a few of the sessions we’re most excited about.

Adam is looking forward to:

Government Summit on Monday, April 8th

“I’m looking forward to hearing what other digital offices are doing to improve constituents’ interactions with government so that we can bring some of their insights to the work our agencies are doing. I’m also excited to present on some of the civic tech projects we have been doing at MassGovDigital so that we can get feedback and new ideas from our peers.”

Bryan is looking forward to:

1. Introduction to Decoupled Drupal with Gatsby and React

Time: Wednesday, April 10th from 1:45 pm to 2:15 pm

Room: 6B | Level 6

“We’re using Gatsby and React today on to power Search.mass.gov and the state’s budget website, and Drupal for Mass.gov. Can’t wait to learn about Decoupled Drupal with Gatsby. I wonder if this could be the right recipe to help us make the leap!”

2. Why Will JSON API go into Core?

Time: Wednesday, April 10th from 2:30 pm to 3:00 pm

Room: 612 | Level 6

“Making data available in machine-readable formats via web services is critical to open data and to publish-once / single-source-of-truth editorial workflows. I’m grateful to Wim Leers and Mateu Aguilo Bosch for their important thought leadership and contributions in this space, and eager to learn how Mass.gov can best maximize our use of JSON API moving forward.”

I (Julia) am looking forward to:

1. Personalizing the Teach for America applicant journey

Time: Wednesday, April 10th from 1:00 pm to 1:30 pm

Room: 607 | Level 6

“I am really interested in learning from Teach for America on how they implemented personalization and integrated across applications to bring applicants a consistent look, feel, and experience when applying for a Teach for America position. We have created Mayflower, Massachusetts government’s design system, and we want to learn what a single sign-on for different government services might look like and how we might use personalization to improve the experience constituents have when interacting with Massachusetts government digitally. ”

2. Devsigners and Unicorns

Time: Wednesday, April 10th from 4:00 pm to 4:30 pm

Room: 612 | Level 6

“I’m hoping to hear if Chris Strahl has any ‘best-practices’ and ways for project managers to leverage the unique multi-skill abilities that Devsigners and unicorns possess while continuing to encourage a balanced workload for their team. This balancing act could lead towards better development and design products for Massachusetts constituents and I’d love to make that happen with his advice!”

Melissa is looking forward to:

1. DevOps: Why, How, and What

Time: Wednesday, April 10th from 1:45 pm to 2:15 pm

Room: 602–604 | Level 6

“Rob Bayliss and Kelly Albrecht will use a survey they released as well as some other important approaches to elaborate on why DevOps is so crucial to technological strategy. I took the survey back in November of 2018, and I want to see what those results from the survey. This presentation will help me identify if any changes should be made in our process to better serve constituents from these results.”

2. Advanced Automated Visual Testing

Time: Thursday, April 11th from 2:30 pm to 3:00 pm

Room: 608 | Level 6

“In this session Shweta Sharma will speak to what visual testings tools are currently out there and a comparison of the tools. I am excited to gain more insight into the automated visual testing in faster and quicker releases so we can identify any gotchas and improve our releases for Mass.gov users.

P.S. Watch a presentation I gave at this year’s NerdSummit in Boston, and stay tuned for a blog post on some automation tools we used at MassGovDigital coming out soon!”

We hope to see old friends and make new ones at DrupalCon2019, so be sure to say hi to Bryan, Adam, Melissa, Lisa, Moshe, or me when you see us. We will be at booth 321 (across from the VIP lounge) on Thursday giving interviews and chatting about technology in Massachusetts, we hope you’ll stop by!

Interested in a career in civic tech? Find job openings at Digital Services.
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Feb 03 2017
Feb 03
Be an artisan with your API

Beware, Drupal

The basics:

API reference

Mock server

For gold stars and a round of applause:

Tutorials, guides, cookbooks

Quick start

Useful tools

{
"nid": [
{
"value": "10"
}
],
"uuid": [
{
"value": "6bfe02da-b1d7-4f9b-a77a-c346b23fd0b3"
}
],
"vid": [
{
"value": "11"
}
],

}
{
"nid": "10",
"uuid": "6bfe02da-b1d7-4f9b-a77a-c346b23fd0b3",
"vid": "11",

}

What’s in a name?

GET /articles/5/comments/19
GET /articles/comments
GET /comments?contenttypes=articles

Support limiting response fields

GET /articles/5?fields=id,title,created

Support auto-loading related resources

GET /articles/5?embed=author.name,author.picture,author.created

Flexible formats

GET /api/v1/articles/5

Respond.

Authentication and security

Caching

Use HTTP status codes

Useful errors

Jan 25 2017
Jan 25

There are lots of situations in which you need to run a series of microsites for your business or organisation — running a marketing campaign; launching a new product or service; promoting an event; and so on. When you’re with Drupal, though, what options do you have for running your microsites? In this article I review and evaluate the options in Drupal 8, make a recommendation and build a proof of concept.

Joe Baker

Why use multisites

Caveat: is the end of multisites support on the horizon?

Classic problems with Drupal multisites …

… and how to mitigate them

Domain Access

Organic Groups

Best practice: with Git

RESTful web services and Drupal 8

Design your own web services API

Decoupled frontend

Jun 02 2015
Jun 02

In April 2015, NASA unveiled a brand new look and user experience for NASA.gov. This release revealed a site modernized to 1) work across all devices and screen sizes (responsive web design), 2) eliminate visual clutter, and 3) highlight the continuous flow of news updates, images, and videos.

With its latest site version, NASA—already an established leader in the digital space—has reached even higher heights by being one of the first federal sites to use a “headless” Drupal approach. Though this model was used when the site was initially migrated to Drupal in 2013, this most recent deployment rounded out the endeavor by using the Services module to provide a REST interface, and ember.js for the client-side, front-end framework.

Implementing a “headless” Drupal approach prepares NASA for the future of content management systems (CMS) by:

  1. Leveraging the strength and flexibility of Drupal’s back-end to easily architect content models and ingest content from other sources. As examples:

  • Our team created the concept of an “ubernode”, a content type which homogenizes fields across historically varied content types (e.g., features, images, press releases, etc.). Implementing an “ubernode” enables easy integration of content in web services feeds, allowing developers to seamlessly pull multiple content types into a single, “latest news” feed. This approach also provides a foundation for the agency to truly embrace the “Create Once, Publish Everywhere” philosophy of content development and syndication to multiple channels, including mobile applications, GovDelivery, iTunes, and other third party applications.

  • Additionally, the team harnessed Drupal’s power to integrate with other content stores and applications, successfully ingesting content from blogs.nasa.gov, svs.gsfc.nasa.gov, earthobservatory.nasa.gov, www.spc.noaa.gov, etc., and aggregating the sourced content for publication.

  1. Optimizing the front-end by building with a client-side, front-end framework, as opposed to a theme. For this task, our team chose ember.js, distinguished by both its maturity as a framework and its emphasis of convention over configuration. Ember embraces model-view-controller (MVC), and also excels at performance by batching updates to the document object model (DOM) and bindings.

In another stride toward maximizing “Headless” Drupal’s massive potential, we configured the site so that JSON feed records are published to an Amazon S3 bucket as an origin for a content delivery network (CDN), ultimately allowing for a high-security, high-performance, and highly available site.

Below is an example of how the technology stack which we implemented works:

Using ember.js, the NASA.gov home page requests a list of nodes of the latest content to display. Drupal provides this list as a JSON feed of nodes:

Ember then retrieves specific content for each node. Again, Drupal provides this content as a JSON response stored on Amazon S3:

Finally, Ember distributes these results into the individual items for the home page:

The result? A NASA.gov architected for the future. It is worth noting that upgrading to Drupal 8 can be done without reconfiguring the ember front-end. Further, migrating to another front-end framework (such as Angular or Backbone) does not require modification of the Drupal CMS.

About Drupal Sun

Drupal Sun is an Evolving Web project. It allows you to:

  • Do full-text search on all the articles in Drupal Planet (thanks to Apache Solr)
  • Facet based on tags, author, or feed
  • Flip through articles quickly (with j/k or arrow keys) to find what you're interested in
  • View the entire article text inline, or in the context of the site where it was created

See the blog post at Evolving Web

Evolving Web