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Nov 30 2020
Nov 30

We are currently planning for Drupal core to drop support for Internet Explorer 11 in Drupal 10 (scheduled to be released in June 2022). Drupal 9 will be supported until late 2023, which means that sites that want to support Internet Explorer 11 can continue using Drupal 9 until then.

Feedback needed from assistive technology stakeholders

WebAIM's survey of screen reader users shows Internet Explorer 11 usage dropping from 23.3% in October 2017 to 10.9% in September 2019. The next edition of their survey is likely to be released at the end of 2021, but we need to finalize our browser support within the next month in order to develop and release Drupal 10 on schedule.

We need feedback from assistive technology users and accessibility stakeholders. Do you or your users still use Internet Explorer 11 with screen readers? Do their screen readers support browsers other than Internet Explorer 11? How feasible is it to upgrade to a different browser for use with your screen reader? We are requesting feedback until December 18th, 2020.

Why would we drop support for Internet Explorer 11?

  • Microsoft stopped developing Internet Explorer 11 in 2015. For that reason it is significantly behind modern browsers that have continued development. Because more and more libraries are adopting the use of those features, there is a significant cost associated with maintaining Internet Explorer 11. For example, the latest major release of CKEditor has dropped support for Internet Explorer 11, which means that Drupal 10 cannot securely support both CKEditor5 and Internet Explorer 11.

  • Microsoft itself has dropped support for Internet Explorer 11 in many of its services, and the rest will drop support in mid-2021.

  • Usage of Internet Explorer 11 has decreased significantly. Drupal doesn’t collect analytics on browser usage from its end users, so we rely on data provided by other projects such as Wikimedia, WebAIM, and Statcounter. For example, in October 2019, Wikimedia had 4.4% of its traffic using Internet Explorer 11. At the same time this year the number had dropped to 1.4%. We assume that the number of Internet Explorer 11 users will continue decreasing before the release of Drupal 10.

  • Supporting Internet Explorer 11 degrades the experience for everyone. We currently supply all users extra code to make Internet Explorer 11 work. This increases the request size and makes page load time slower for everyone.

  • The additional requirements of Internet Explorer 11 demand additional development time that far exceeds the browser's market share. These efforts come at the expense of new features and bug fixes.

What if I need to support Internet Explorer 11?

Even if Drupal 10 drops support for Internet Explorer 11, you can continue using Drupal 9 until late 2023. We recommend advising your users to move to another browser before that. If you believe your users have specific requirements as to why they cannot move from Internet Explorer 11, post them on the Internet Explorer 11 policy discussion.

Would this affect Drupal 7?

No. Drupal 7 remains compatible with Internet Explorer 11. A separate announcement will be issued if that changes.

Oct 06 2020
Oct 06

In preparation for the minor release, Drupal 9.1.x will enter the alpha phase the week of October 19th, 2020. Core developers should plan to complete changes that are only allowed in minor releases prior to the alpha release. The 9.1.0-alpha1 deadline for most core patches is October 16. (More information on alpha and beta releases.)

  • Developers and site owners can begin testing the alpha after its release.

  • The 9.2.x branch of core will be created, and future feature and API additions will be targeted against that branch instead of 9.1.x. All outstanding issues filed against 9.1.x will be automatically migrated to 9.2.x.

  • Once 9.2.x is branched, alpha experimental modules will be removed from the 9.1.x codebase (so their development will continue in 9.2.x only). The Config Environment module is an alpha stability module in 9.1.x.

  • All issues filed against 9.0.x will then be migrated to 9.1.x, and subsequent bug reports should be targeted against the 9.1.x branch.

  • During the alpha phase, core issues will be committed according to the following policy:

    1. Most issues that are allowed for patch releases will be committed to 9.1.x and 9.2.x.
    2. Most issues that are only allowed in minor releases will be committed to 9.2.x only. A few strategic issues may be backported to 9.1.x, but only at committer discretion after the issue is fixed in 9.2.x (so leave them set to 9.2.x unless you are a committer), and only up until the beta deadline.

Drupal 9.1.0-beta1 will be released the week of November 2nd

Roughly two weeks after the alpha release, the first beta release will be created. All the restrictions of the alpha release apply to beta releases as well. The release of the first beta is a firm deadline for all feature and API additions. Even if an issue is pending in the Reviewed & Tested by the Community (RTBC) queue when the commit freeze for the beta begins, it will be committed to the next minor release only.

The release candidate phase will begin the week of November 16th. See the summarized key dates in the release cycle, allowed changes during the Drupal 8 and Drupal 9 release cycles, and Drupal 8 and 9 backwards compatibility and internal API policy for more information.

The scheduled release date of Drupal 9.1.0 is December 2nd, 2020.

Bugfix and security support of Drupal 9.0.x, 8.8.x and 8.9.x.

Security coverage for Drupal 8 and 9 is generally provided for the previous minor release as well as the newest minor release. However, Drupal 8.9.x is a Long-Term Support release where support is provided until November 2021. Based on these the following changes are upcoming:

Drupal 8.8.x Security releases will be provided until December 2nd, 2020. Drupal 8.9.x Security releases will be provided until November 2021. Bugfix support will continue into early 2021. Drupal 9.0.x Normal bugfix support ends on December 2nd, 2020. However, security releases are provided until the release of Drupal 9.2.0 on June 2, 2021.

Support timelines visualized

May 29 2020
May 29

Happy to announce we're attempting to kick off a new community initiative primarily focused on fixing and closing bugs.

We're hoping to

  • reduce the total amount of open core bugs
  • reduce the average age of open bugs
  • increase the number of closed bugs
  • mentor those looking to get more involved in contributing to core
  • give community members from countries in the Eastern Hemisphere the chance to participate in a core initiative in their local time zone.

We need you!

Resolving core bugs requires a wide range of skills - we're looking for volunteers to join us who can help with one or more of the following tasks:

  • Triaging and classifying bugs
  • Writing good bug reports, with steps to reproduce
  • Writing patches to resolve the bug
  • Writing automated test-cases to confirm the bug, and that it is resolved
  • Reviewing patches, through the lens of each of the core gates e.g. technical, accessibility, performance, backwards-compatibility, documentation, internationalization and usability.
  • Communicating with sub-system experts in order to gain sign off on non trivial changes
  • Writing documentation as required
  • Manual testing of the patch
  • Communicating any changes via blog posts, change records, release note snippets etc.
  • Coordination and management

If you are are looking to get involved - come join us on Slack in the #bugsmash channel.

We will meet asynchronously in the #bugsmash slack channel fortnightly on a Tuesday at 0400 UTC which maps to the following times:

  • 2pm AEST
  • 12 noon AWST, CST
  • 4pm NZST
  • 9.30am IST
  • 6.00am CEST
  • 5.00am BST
  • 8.00pm PST
  • 11.00pm EST
May 08 2020
xjm
May 08

In order to best resolve some packaging, dependency, and upgrade path issues that have come to our attention in the past week, we're extending the release windows for the following releases to the week of May 11:

  • 8.8.6 (final normal bugfix release of 8.8, which has security coverage afterward until December 2020)
  • 8.9.0-rc1
  • 9.0.0-rc1

The scheduled release date for 9.0.0 and 8.9.0 remains June 3. We will share another announcement with the community once 9.0.0-rc1 is available for testing.

Mar 20 2020
xjm
Mar 20

Huge thanks for responding to our call for contributors posted at the beginning of the month. All must-have beta requirements have been completed, so, we've released Drupal 9.0.0-beta1! Drupal 8.9.0-beta1 will be released next week (the week of March 23).

The release of the first betas is a firm deadline for all feature and API additions. Even if an issue is pending in the Reviewed & Tested by the Community (RTBC) queue when the commit freeze for the beta begins, it will be committed to the next minor release only.

  • Developers and site owners can begin testing the betas after their release.

  • Sites must be on 8.8 or later to update to 9.0.0-beta1. Therefore, we will also provide bugfix releases of 8.8 and 8.7 that resolve known upgrade path criticals, so sites that have not been able to update to 8.8 can test the upgrade.

  • Once 8.9.0-beta1 is released, the 9.1.x branch of core will open for development. This branch is where feature and API additions should be made. All outstanding issues filed against 8.9.x will be automatically migrated to 9.1.x.

  • Alpha experimental modules have been removed from the 8.9.x and 9.0.x codebases (so their development will continue in 9.1.x only).

  • Additional fixes will be committed to 9.0.x under the beta allowed changes policy through the end of the beta phase on April 28.

  • The release candidate phase will begin the week of May 4th.

See the summarized key dates in the release cycle, allowed changes during the Drupal 8 and 9 release cycle, and Drupal 8 and 9 backwards compatibility and internal API policy for more information.

Drupal 9.0.0 and Drupal 8.9.0 are both scheduled to be released on June 3, 2020.

Bugfixes and security support of Drupal 8.8 and 8.7

Drupal 8.8 will receive additional bugfix releases through May 4, 2020, and it has security coverage through December 2, 2020. Drupal 8.7 has security coverage until the release of 8.9.0 on June 3.

Mar 03 2020
xjm
Mar 03

This week is the first target release window for the Drupal 9 beta.

We’ve made significant progress on the beta requirements during the last couple of months thanks to the tremendous amount of work by the community. Based on the outstanding tasks in the meta issue, we are close to completing beta requirements, but not close enough to release it this week.

When will Drupal 9.0.0-beta1 be released?

Given how close we are to completing the beta requirements, we are considering releasing the beta in mid-March if the requirements are complete by March 13. If we do release the beta in 1-2 weeks, Drupal 9.0.0 will still be scheduled for release on June 3, 2020. We will make a final announcement by March 16 about whether there will be a June release.

If any must-have issues remain unresolved by March 13, we will move the beta target window to the first week of May, and Drupal 9.0.0 will be scheduled for August 3, 2020.

This does not affect the expected release date of Drupal 8.9.0 (scheduled for June 3, 2020) nor that of Drupal 9.1.0 (planned for December 2, 2020). The Drupal 8 and 7 end-of-life is also still November 2021.

We need your help to meet the beta deadline, whether it is March 13 or April 28! Drupal 9 readiness meetings are every Monday at 7pm UTC in the #d9readiness channel on https://drupal.org/slack. Help us with the issues below.

Current status and issues left for Drupal 9.0.0-beta1

Dependency updates

All PHP dependencies (Symfony, Laminas, Twig) have been updated to the versions we intend to use for Drupal 9.0.0, although we will continue to keep up to date with bugfix releases.

Nearly all JavaScript and CSS dependencies have been updated, with just two issues to go:
jQuery Cookie (needs review and testing from JavaScript developers!) and Normalize.css (RTBC and awaiting committer review).

Upgrade paths

In addition to deprecations, we are improving and simplifying in-place updates with update.php to ensure the Drupal 8 to 9 update is smooth and reliable. Four issues remain and could use additional help from experienced contributors:

We are also ensuring that all known critical Drupal 8 upgrade path bugs that may prevent updates from older Drupal 8 versions are fixed in 8.8 and 8.9. Only three remain. These technically difficult issues are critical for Drupal's data integrity:

Platform requirement changes

Drupal 9 has already raised the minimum PHP version to 7.3. We also want to increase MySQL, PostgreSQL, and SQLite requirements. This includes:

  • MySQL, MariaDB, and Percona (required prior to beta1)
  • PostgreSQL (Beta deadline; help needed! If you use Postgres, document what versions are available from your hosting provider.)
  • SQLite (Might be completed during the beta phase)

Drupal 9 base theme API

We want to add an up-to-date Drupal 9 version of the 'Stable' base theme. This issue and the related issues to decouple core themes from Drupal 8 base themes could use review and feedback from theme contributors.

Once all the above issues are complete, Drupal 9 is beta-ready. That means that we will have completed all of the significant code changes we intend to make, and that it should be possible to test updates of real sites against it if contributed and custom code has been ported. Site owners can use the Upgrade Status module to check the Drupal 9 readiness of their modules and themes; see the guide on updating to Drupal 9 for more information.

Other issues to complete prior to final release of Drupal 9

There is a second category of issues that we want to complete before Drupal 9.0.0 is released. Since we have fixed release windows, these also need to be either complete or close to completion, especially for the first beta window, since this gives the shortest amount of time to finish them.

Complete migrations for multilingual content so that all Drupal 7 sites can migrate before Drupal 7 reaches EOL.

Drupal.org and Drupal core should be able to fully handle contributed projects that are compatible with both 8.x and 9.x and not assume core compatibility based on the version or branch name. This requirement spans multiple projects and areas including project listings, the Composer façade, update.xml from Drupal.org, and localization files. Most of the minimum required changes for Drupal core and Drupal.org are already complete; however, there remains one outstanding core regression related to module compatibility as well as a number of followup issues.

Finally, Drupal 9 currently relies on Node.js 8 for transpiling and linting frontend assets. This is core-developer-facing only so we may raise the Node.js requirement after beta.

Jan 10 2020
xjm
Jan 10

Drupal 8 and higher provide a continuous upgrade path with a deprecation policy that requires old APIs to be marked deprecated and retained until the next major version. Drupal 8.8 was the final release to introduce new deprecations that will be removed in Drupal 9. This means that all new deprecations in 8.9 and higher will be retained in Drupal 9 and marked for removal in Drupal 10 instead.

For now, in order to continue work on issues that add new deprecations without causing disruption and noise for Drupal 9 readiness tools that detect deprecations, issues with new deprecations for Drupal 10 should be moved to the 9.1.x branch.

9.1.x is not yet open for development and so patches will not apply to it, but work can continue on these patches in the meanwhile by testing them against 9.0.x instead when the patch is uploaded:

The 'Test with' select field on Drupal.org issue file uploads

We may change our policy in the future and allow 10.0.x deprecations to be backported to 8.9.x and 9.0.x in certain cases (discussion in issue #3088246). Otherwise, 9.1.x will open for development in either March or April, depending on progress on Drupal 9 release blockers.

Jan 09 2020
Jan 09

We started the "All things Drupal 9" meetings all the way back in October 2018 to start preparing for the new major release. Now in 2020, the year of Drupal 9, it was natural to make the meeting happen every Monday given the target dates coming up fast.

Contributed project maintainers, site owners, core developers are all welcome. If you are planning a Drupal 9 project for later in the year, this is your place as well. We open the floor with equal opportunity for people to propose topics, so we can cover your pressing questions as well! Join at 7pm UTC in the #d9readiness channel on Drupal Slack any Monday. The next meeting will be on January 13th, 2020.

We've been promoting Drupal 9's June 3rd 2020 target release date a lot, but that can only happen if the Drupal 9.0.0 beta requirements are all done by the end of February 2020, which is coming up real fast. There are still a lot to do and we need your help! If that does not happen, then the release will happen in August or December. While that would give less time for Drupal 8 users to update, we cannot compromise on the stability of Drupal 9 out of the gate.

The three Drupal 9 release scenarios

Check out the detailed alternate timelines at https://www.drupal.org/core/release-cycle-overview

Dec 04 2019
Dec 04

Start: 

2019-12-04 (All day) UTC

Organizers: 

Event type: 

Online meeting (eg. IRC meeting)

Per the D7 release schedule we aim to release Drupal 7.68 on 2019-12-04.

Details of what will be in the release can be seen here:

https://www.drupal.org/project/drupal/issues/3097342

The final patches for 7.68 have been committed and the code is frozen (excluding documentation fixes and fixes for any regressions).

Relevant Change Record(s) for the release (this is not the full list of changes, rather only a list of notable API additions and other changes that might affect a number of other modules, so it's a good place to start looking for any problems):

If you do find any regressions, please report them in the issue queue. Thanks!

Nov 08 2019
Nov 08

The Drupal 7 maintainers have published a new D7 roadmap and release schedule:

https://www.drupal.org/core/drupal7-roadmap-release-schedule

There is also a new proposed D7 contributor / maintainer workflow issue:

https://www.drupal.org/project/drupal/issues/3093258

Finally, we're pleased to announce that the 7.x branch's core tests now pass in PHP 7.3!

Feedback is welcome, and thank you very much to all of the many D7 contributors!

Oct 03 2019
Oct 03

In preparation for the minor release, Drupal 8.8.x will enter the alpha phase the week of October 14th, 2019. Core developers should plan to complete changes that are only allowed in minor releases prior to the alpha release. The 8.8.0-alpha1 deadline for most core patches is October 11. (More information on alpha and beta releases.)

  • Developers and site owners can begin testing the alpha after its release.
  • The 8.9.x and 9.0.x branches of core will be created, and future feature and API additions will be targeted against that branch instead of 8.8.x. All outstanding issues filed against 8.8.x will be automatically migrated to 8.9.x.
  • Once 8.9.x is branched, new alpha experimental modules will be removed from the 8.8.x codebase (so their development will continue in 8.9.x only). The Help Topics and Config Environment modules are new alpha stability modules in 8.8.x.
  • All issues filed against 8.7.x will then be migrated to 8.8.x, and subsequent bug reports should be targeted against the 8.8.x branch.
  • During the alpha phase, core issues will be committed according to the following policy:
    1. Most issues that are allowed for patch releases will be committed to 8.8.x, 8.9.x, and 9.0.x.
    2. Most issues that are only allowed in minor releases will be committed to 8.9.x and 9.0.x only. A few strategic issues may be backported to 8.8.x, but only at committer discretion after the issue is fixed in 8.9.x (so leave them set to 8.9.x unless you are a committer), and only up until the beta deadline.

Drupal 8.8.0-beta1 will be released the week of November 4th

Roughly two weeks after the alpha release, the first beta release will be created. All the restrictions of the alpha release apply to beta releases as well. The release of the first beta is a firm deadline for all feature and API additions. Even if an issue is pending in the Reviewed & Tested by the Community (RTBC) queue when the commit freeze for the beta begins, it will be committed to the next minor release only.

The release candidate phase will begin the week of November 18th, and we will post further details at that time. See the summarized key dates in the release cycle, allowed changes during the Drupal 8 release cycle, and Drupal 8 backwards compatibility and internal API policy for more information.

Bugfixes and security support of Drupal 8.6.x and 8.7.x

Drupal 8 core provides security coverage for the previous minor release as well as the newest minor release. Accordingly, security releases for Drupal 8.7.x will be made available until June 4th when Drupal 8.9.0 is released. Bugfixes that are not security-related will only be committed until Drupal 8.7.x's final bugfix window on November 6th.
Normal bugfix support for Drupal 8.6.x ended in May 2019. However security support is provided for 8.6.x until the release of Drupal 8.8.0 on December 4th, 2019.

Note: June 4, 2020 is both the scheduled release date of 8.9.0 and also the target release date for Drupal 9.0.0. If 9.0.0 misses the June window, its fallback release date is December 2, 2020. Support and security coverage for 8.7.x, 8.8.x, and 8.9.x will remain the same in either scenario.

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