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Oct 12 2021
Oct 12

Submit Your Nomination Today

The Drupal Event Organizers Working Group is seeking nominations for Board Members and Advisory Committee Members. Anyone involved in organizing an existing or future community event is welcome to nominate. 

EOWG Board Members. We are currently looking for nominations to fill four (4) board seats. Interested organizers are encouraged to nominate themselves. 

The following members terms are expiring this year:

  • Kaleem Clarkson (first term)
  • Matthew Saunders (first term)
  • Suzanne Dergacheva (first term)
  • Andrii Podanenko (first term)
     

EOWG Advisory Committee. We are looking for advisory committee members. The advisory committee is designed to allow individuals to participate who may not have a consistent availability to meet or who are interested in joining the board in the future. 

Submit Your Nomination: To submit your nomination please visit the Issue below and submit your name, event name, country, territory/state, and a short reason why you would like to participate.  

Issue: https://www.drupal.org/project/event_organizers/issues/3241177 

Nomination Deadline:  Thursday, October 28, 2021 11:59 pm UTC

Jul 26 2021
Jul 26

Is there a Drupal 9 community-supported platform for organizing a DrupalCamp or Drupal event? What happened to the Conference Organizing Distribution (COD)? Join us on the 4th Tuesday (tomorrow) of the month at 2 PM EST to help contribute to building the next Drupal Events Platform. Join our Meeting Here.

Earlier this year, the Drupal Event Organizer's Working Group (EOWG), took a page out of the infamous Driesnote’s and announced the three initiatives for the working group to make a priority. The three initiatives are: Getting Started with Drupal, Drupal Events Database, and the Drupal Event Platform. You can read about each of the initiatives here.  

The Drupal Event Platform (DEP) initiative is aiming to solve a challenge for all event organizers, the website. The event website is one of the most important and laborious tasks associated with producing a quality Drupal event. For some events, the website is the main application that helps organize and build the entire experience from collecting session submissions to assigning presentations to the schedule.

The Drupal Event Platform (DEP) initiative is forming a committee within the Drupal Event Organizers Working Group (EOWG) that is looking to reduce the time and resources it takes to create an event website site through the creation of a flexible and customizable website starter kit for event organizers.

Goals

  • Focus the website creation efforts of event organizers on a single open-source platform to reduce duplication of efforts

  • Create an MVP (minimal viable product) that can meet the needs of at least 80% of Drupal events globally

  • Reach and maintain adoption by at least 40% of all Drupal events globally

  • Model for Drupal best practices including accessibility, usability, inclusive design, documentation, security, performance, and internationalization

  • Provide an extensible, modular platform that allows event organizers to choose to use default functionality or build custom components

Join us on the 4th Tuesday of the Month at 2pm EST.

For more information on how to join the meeting visit The Drupal Event Platform (DEP) initiative page today.

Jul 10 2020
Jul 10

DrupalCon Global is right around the corner and as usual, the Event Organizers will be everywhere! This year we've had a booth generously sponsored by the Drupal Association, so we'll have a place right in Hopin where you can come find us, chat about events, and even win some direct consulting time to help plan your next event! Whether you’re an event organizer, interested in starting an event in your area, or just want to flag one of us down, here’s where to look.

Jun 17 2020
Jun 17

Looking for More Drupal Event Organizers. This must be the place.

It feels like a lifetime ago that the event organizers’ request to become an official working group was approved by the Drupal Association at DrupalCon Amsterdam. Since then, 2020 has been a year that no-one will forget—from a global virus to social justice demonstrations—the world as we know it has been forever changed. 

Lessons We Are Learning in 2020

So far in 2020, we have learned some valuable lessons that we think will help us be a better working group moving forward. 

Organizing Events is Hard. Organizing volunteer-led events is difficult already, let alone during complete uncertainty. Many event organizers have had to make very difficult but swift decisions by either canceling or trying to pivot to a virtual conference format. 

Finding the Right Time is Hard. Organizing a global group of volunteer event organizers is also hard. As someone who has had little time on international teams, I admittedly thought of finding a meeting time a breeze. I was completely wrong. 

Global Representation is Hard. One of our top priorities was to have global representation to help foster growth and collaboration around the world but unfortunately due to either the meeting times or not enough focused marketing on international event organizers the participation was just not where the board felt it should be.

Changes We are Making

After a few emails and some friendly debates, the board looked for opportunities for change that can help solve some of the lessons we have learned. 
 
Alternating Meeting Times in UTC Format. To help foster more international participation, all scheduled meetings will alternate times all marketed and posted in the Coordinated Universal Time (UTC) format. Public meetings will now be at 12:00 pm UTC and 12:00 am UTC.   

Increase Board Membership to 9. The group decided to expand the board members to 9. We are highly encouraging organizers from around the world to submit their names for interest to increase our global representation. 

Maintain and Recruit Advisory Board Members. Succession planning is critical for any operation, and our advisory board provides more flexible commitment in participation which we hope will be our number one resource for new members down the road. 

Board Members Nominations. In addition to expanding the number of board seats, Suzanne Dergacheva from DrupalNorth (Canada) and Matthew Saunders (DrupalCamp Colorado) have accepted their nominations from advisors to board members. 

Current Board Members

  • Camilo Bravo (cambraca) - DrupalCamp Quito - Ecuador / Hungary
  • Baddý Sonja Breidert (baddysonja) - DrupalCamp Iceland, Germany, Europe, Splash Awards - Europe
  • Kaleem Clarkson (kclarkson) -DrupalCamp Atlanta  - Atlanta, GA, USA
  • Suzanne Dergacheva (pixelite) - DrupalNorth - Montreal, QC CANADA
  • Leslie Glynn (leslieg)  Design 4 Drupal Boston, NEDCamp - Boston MA
  • Matthew Saunders (MatthewS) - Drupalcamp Colorado - Denver, CO, USA
  • Avi Schwab (froboy) - MidCamp, Midwest Open Source Alliance - Chicago, IL, USA

Things We are Working On

There are so many things that all of us organizers would like to get working, but one of our goals has been to identify our top priorities.

Event Organizer Support. We are here to help. When volunteer organizers need guidance navigating event challenges, there are various channels to get help. 

Drupal Community Events Database. In collaboration with the Drupal Association, the EOWG has been working on putting together a new and improved event website database that will help market and collect valuable data for organizers around the world.
Submit your event today: https://www.drupal.org/community/events

Drupal Event Website Starter kit. To help organizers get events up and running quickly, an event website starter kit was identified as a valuable resource. Using the awesome work contributed by the Drupal Europe team, JD Leonard from DrupalNYC has taken the lead in updating the codebase. It is our hope more event organizers will help guide a collaborative effort and continue building an event starter kit that organizers can use. 

Join the Event Organizer Slack here and Join #event-website-starterkit

Seeking Event Organizers Board Members and Advisory Committee Members - Submit Your Nomination Today

The Drupal Event Organizers Working Group is seeking nominations for Board Members and Advisory Committee Members. Anyone involved in organizing an existing or future community event is welcome to nominate. 

EOWG Board Members. We are currently looking for nominations to fill two (2) board seats. For these seats, we are looking for diverse candidates that are event organizers from outside of North America. Interested organizers are encouraged to nominate themselves. 

EOWG Advisory Committee. We are looking for advisory committee members. The advisory committee is designed to allow individuals to participate who may not have a consistent availability to meet or who are interested in joining the board in the future. 

Nomination Selection Process: All remaining seats/positions will be selected by a majority vote of the EOWG board of directors. 

Submit Your Nomination: To submit your nomination please visit the Issue below and submit your name, event name, country, territory/state, and a short reason why you would like to participate.  

Issue: https://www.drupal.org/project/event_organizers/issues/3152319

Nomination Deadline:  Monday, July 6th, 11:59 pm UTC 

File attachments:  tim-mossholder-GOMhuCj-O9w-unsplash.jpg
Aug 30 2019
Aug 30

For over a decade* the Drupal community has gathered in volunteer-led “camps”, based on the BarCamp model, to follow in that camp’s initial goals:

  • Introduce web developers to the Drupal platform.
  • Skill sharing among established Drupal developers
  • Give back to the Drupal project (e.g. fix bugs, documentation, lesson materials)

The scope of Drupal Camps has expanded as our community has grown and matured, and camps now serve everyone in the community, not just developers. They serve as an on-ramp for new developers, a networking opportunity for clients and agencies, a marketing opportunity for service providers, and much more.

The Drupal Event Organizers have documentation of over 50 volunteer-led events with over 10,000 attendees worldwide in the past year, and we know there are almost double this number that we don’t have good data for. These events have evolved organically, with little central organization, and are estimated to comprise more than one million dollars in sponsorship and ticket sales worldwide, yearly.

The Event Organizers have organized in various forms over that time… from various documentation efforts to our current monthly meeting format. With Kaleem’s instigation, the group started toward a more formal organization in late 2018, and that process is almost a reality. 

We’ve established a formation board composed of organizers from across the globe and have been collaborating on a charter for the Event Organizers Working Group over the past few months. We’re looking forward to presenting it soon and beginning the next chapter of the Drupal Event Organizers.

Thanks to the following folks who have contributed to the effort thus far.

Our Formation Board members:

And our trusted advisers:

* Possibly starting at Drupal Camp Toronto, 2006? If you know of an earlier camp, please let us know in the comments.

May 15 2019
May 15

The Drupal Event Organizers Group had a very productive DrupalCon Seattle (look for a blog post soon) and is taking the momentum from our in-person meetings to keep the initiative moving forward. Our next step is to create an official charter (similar to that of the CWG) to solidify our mission, process, and membership.

To that end, the Event Organizers Group is putting out a call for members of our Formation Board. This small group will be tasked with drafting a charter, reviewing it with the larger group, and then getting approval from Dries, the Drupal Project Lead, within the next few months.

We have representation from the US, and our immediate need is for members across the globe. If you're passionate about event organizing in your area and would like to be involved, please reach out to Avi Schwab on the Event Organizers Slack. We'll be having meetings at least bi-monthly and working asynchronously between them to develop the charter. We're committed to ensuring global accessibility, and as such will be alternating meeting times across the globe.

Mar 27 2019
Mar 27

Less than two weeks remain until the start of DrupalCon Seattle and the Event Organizers have a packed schedule. We’ve been meeting virtually throughout the year, and we’re all looking forward to the opportunity to meet in person and dig into the conversations further. Here’s a list of where we’ll be—from “official” organizer events, to sessions and BoFs that are of interest for organizers. Whether you’re an event organizer, interested in starting an event in your area, or just want to flag one of us down, here’s where to look.

Tuesday, April 9

Wednesday, April 10

Thursday, April 11

Thanks to Kaleem Clarkson (of DrupalCamp Atlanta) for all of his hard work on organizing the organizers and John Rearick (of DrupalCorn) for digging through the schedule to find many of these sessions.

We'll see you at DrupalCon!

Jan 22 2019
Jan 22

This article was previously posted on Medium (Nov 2018). 27 Attendees representing 18 Drupal events from around the world. It’s been almost one month since I wrote the blog post, “DrupalCamp Organizers Unite: Is it Time for Camp Organizers to Become an Official Working Group” and a ton of things have transpired that will catapult us into 2019 with some great momentum. With the support of the many Drupal evangelists, over 50 Drupal event organizers from around the world signed up to attend our first official / unofficial video call.

Then on Friday, November 8, a few hours leading up to the video call, The Drupal Governance Taskforce 2018 Proposal was released. This proposal was put together by the Governance Taskforce in an effort establish a community directive that helps create the next generation of Drupalers. One of the recommendations in this proposal was to provide in-person events, more support, and to establish a Drupal community events working group. The timing of the proposal was perfect for our call. It was really great to see that us organizers were not the only ones who acknowledged that our community events are crucial to Drupal adoption.

Are you a Drupal Event Organizer? Well, join us at our next meeting on Tuesday, January 8, 2019, at 12 pm (EST). Register Here

When the time came to start the call I was a little nervous that not very many people would attend and then all of a sudden the chimes started going off and faces appeared on the screen. After 5 minutes we had 25 people on the call. It was inspirational to be a part of something big. It felt like we were the United Nations :).

Countries Represented
Canada, Mumbai, Netherlands, Switzerland, United Kingdom, United States.

Drupal Events Represented
BADCamp(2), Drupal Association(2), Drupal North, Drupal Camp Asheville, DrupalCamp Atlanta, Drupal Camp Chattanooga, DrupalCamp Colorado, DrupalCorn(2), Drupaldelphia, Drupal Mountain Camp, Drupal Camp Mumbai, DrupalCamp New Jersey, Florida Drupal Camp (2),Frontend United, GovCon, MidCamp(2), NED Camp(4),Victoria BC Meetup.

Major Points from the November 9th Meeting

  1. The next meeting will be held on Tuesday, January 8, 2019, at 12 pm (EST). Register Here
  2. Comment on Governance Taskforce Proposal Issue 
    To help Dries Buytaert, prioritize the recommendation of creating a Community Events Working Group, we need as many people as possible to comment on this issue. Please view the issue and indicate why you believe this working group is critical to the success of Drupal. Comment now!
  3. DrupalCamp Website Starter Kit 
    Out of all of the discussions, the common pain point is that the website takes up too much of our limited resources. The idea of an event starter kit, instead of a distribution, was really intriguing to us all. We also discussed all of the events donating funding to hire a professional project manager to scope out what a starter kit would look like.
  4. Drupal.org Events Website 
    Many of us use the great Drupical to let us know what events are happening. But if you don’t know about that website there is nowhere on Drupal.org that is easily accessible that promotes Drupal events. The idea that was brought to the table was to design a new section of the community page that is a space specifically for promoting and producing Drupal events.
  5. A Centralized Drupal Event Statistics Hub
    Another website related item that was brought up was the idea of centralized data hub that event organizers could submit crucial data of events (attendance, budget, programing etc.) so that Drupal.org could display the data and allow for data manipulation. For example, it would be great to know how many people attended Drupal events in one year. This data would be extremely powerful as it could help organizers to compare events, drive corporate sponsorships and adoption, and get more people involved with Drupal.
  6. DrupalTV — A website with all Drupal Videos
    The topic around Drupal video content came up and one of the biggest issues was that videos are all over the place and are not organized. To solve this problem, the idea of a centralized website (DrupalTV) where videos were tagged by topic, presenter, module, etc.. would allow for content to be easily found. This idea was started before our meeting and you can see a proof of concept here.

I was very happy to be a part of this first meeting and I hope that Drupal leadership also sees the work we do as critical and will make us an official working group. There were a lot of great conversations that took place so I am sure that I have missed something. Feel free to comment and let me know and I will update the post.

Are you a Drupal Event Organizer? Well, join us at our next meeting on Tuesday, January 8, 2019, at 12 pm (EST). Register Here

You can also join the Drupal Event Organizers Slack community. You can also register for any of our meetings to be added to our emailing list.

Jan 22 2019
Jan 22

This article was previously posted on Medium (Nov 2018).  You Can’t Put a Price Tag on Visibility, Creditability, and Collegiality. Organizing a DrupalCamp takes a lot of commitment from volunteers, so when someone gets motivated to help organize these events, the financial risks can be quite alarming and sometimes overwhelming. But forget all that mess, you are a Drupal enthusiast and have drummed up the courage to volunteer with the organization of your local DrupalCamp. During your first meeting, you find out that there are no free college or community spaces in the area and the estimated price tag is $25,000. Holy Batman that is a lot of money!

Naturally, you start thinking about how we are going to cover that price tag, so you immediately ask, “how many people usually attend?” Well unless you are one of the big 5, (BADCampNYCCampDrupal GovConMidCamp or FloridaCamp) we average between 100 and 200 people. Then you ask, “how much can we charge?” You are then told that we cannot charge more than $50 because camps are supposed to be affordable for the local community and that has been the culture of most DrupalCamps.

Are you interested in attending the first online DrupalCamp Organizers Meeting, on Friday, November 9th at 4:00pm (EST)? RSVP Here.

If Drupal is the Enterprise solution why are all of our camps priced and sponsored like we are still hobbyist in 2002?

Why Don’t We Treat DrupalCamps Like It’s the Enterprise Solution?

Drupal is the Enterprise solution. Drupal has forgotten about the hobbyist and is only concerned about large-scale projects. Drupal developers and companies make more per hour than Wordpress developers. These are all things I have heard from people within the community. So if any of these statements are valid, why are all the camps priced like it is 2002 and we are all sitting around in a circle singing Kumbaya? In 2016 for DrupalCamp Atlanta, we couldn’t make the numbers work, so we decided to raise the price of the camp from $45 to $65 (early bird) and $85 (regular rate). This was a long drawn out and heated debate that took nearly all of our 2 hours allotted for our google hangout. At the end of the day, one of our board members who is also a Diamond sponsor said,

“when you compare how other technology conferences are priced and what they are offering for sessions, DrupalCamps are severely under-priced for the value they provide to the community.

If a camp roughly costs $25,000 and you can only charge 150 people $50, how in the world are DrupalCamps produced? The simple answer, sponsors, sponsors, and more sponsors. Most camps solely rely on the sponsors to cover the costs. One camp, in particular, BADCamp has roughly 2,000 attendees and the registration is FREE. That’s right, the camp is completely free and did I forget to mention that it’s in San Francisco? Based on the BADCamp model and due to the fact the diamond sponsorship for DrupalCon Nashville was $50,000, getting 10 companies to sponsor your camp at $2,500 will be no sweat. Oh and don’t forget Drupal is the enterprise solution, right?

With all of your newfound confidence in obtaining sponsorships, you start contacting some of the larger Drupal shops in your area and after a week nothing. You reach out again maybe by phone this time and actually speak to someone but they are not committing because they want some more information as to why they should sponsor the camp such as, what other perks can you throw in for the sponsorship, are we guaranteed presentation slots, and do you provide the participant list. Of course, the worst response is the dreaded no, we cannot sponsor your conference because we have already met our sponsorship budget for the year.

At this point, you feel defeated and confused as to why organizations are not chomping at the bit to fork over $2,500 to be the sponsor. Yep, that’s right, twenty-five hundred, not $25,000 to be the highest level, sponsor. Mind you many Drupal shops charge anywhere between $150 — $250 an hour. So that means donating 10–17 hours of your organizations time to support a Drupal event in your local community. Yes, you understand that there are a lot of DrupalCamps contacting the same companies for sponsorship so you ask yourself, what has changed from years past?

Are you interested in attending the first online DrupalCamp Organizers Meeting, on Friday, November 9th at 4:00 pm (EST)? RSVP Here.

What Do Companies Expect to Gain From DrupalCamp Sponsorships?

At DrupalCon Nashville, I got an awesome opportunity to participate in a session around organizing DrupalCamps. It was really interesting to hear about how other organizers produce their camp and what were some of the biggest pain points.

During this session, we were talking about a centralized sponsorship program for all DrupalCamps (that I personally disagree with and will save that discussion for another blog post) and an individual asked the question,

“why should my company sponsor DrupalCamp Atlanta? There is nothing there for me that makes it worth it. We don’t pick up clients, you don’t distribute the participant list, so why should we sponsor the camp?”

Needless to say, they caught me completely off guard, so I paused then replied,

“DrupalCamp Atlanta has between 150–200 people, most of them from other Drupal shops, so what is it that you are expecting to get out of the sponsorship that would make it worth it to you? Why do you sponsor any DrupalCamps?”

Have Drupal Companies Outgrown the Need to Sponsor DrupalCamps?

On the plane ride back to the ATL it got me thinking, why does an organization sponsor DrupalCamps? What is the return on their investment? I started reminiscing of the very first DrupalCamp that I attended in 2008 and all the rage at that time (and still is), was inbound marketing and how using a content strategy and or conference presentations can establish your company as thought leaders in the field, therefore, clients will find your information useful and approach you when its time to hire for services. Maybe this is why so many camps received a ton of presentation submissions and why it was easy to find sponsors, but that was over 10 years ago now and some of those same companies have now been established as leaders in the field. Could it be, that established companies no longer need the visibility of DrupalCamps?

What happens to DrupalCamps when companies no longer need the visibility or credibility from the Drupal community?

The Drupal community thrives when Drupal shops become bigger and take on those huge projects because it results in contributions back to the code, therefore, making our project more competitive. But an unintended consequence of these Drupal shops becoming larger is that there is a lot more pressure on them to raise funding thus they need to spend more resources on obtaining clients outside of the Drupal community. Acquia, the company built by the founder of Drupal, Dries Buytaert, have made it clear that they are pulling back on their local camp sponsorships and have even created their own conference called Acquia Engage that showcases their enterprise clients. Now from a business perspective, I totally understand why they would create this event as it provides a much higher return on their investment but it results in competing with other camps (ahem, this year’s DrupalCamp Atlanta), but more importantly the sponsorship dollars all of us depend on are now being redirected to other initiatives.

Are you interested in attending the first online DrupalCamp Organizers Meeting, on Friday, November 9th at 4:00 pm (EST)? RSVP Here.

Why Should Established Companies Sponsor a DrupalCamp?

The reality of the situation is that sponsoring these DrupalCamps are most likely not going to land your next big client that pays your company a $500,000 contract. So what are true reasons to sponsor a DrupalCamp:

  • Visibility
    When sponsoring these DrupalCamps most of us organizers do a pretty good job of tweeting thanks to the company and if the organization has presenters we usually promote the sessions as well. In addition, most camps print logos on the website, merchandise, and name after parties. Yes, its only a little bit but the internet is forever and the more you are mentioned the better off you are. But you are from a well established Drupal shop so you don’t need any more visibility.
  • Credibility 
    Even the companies who are have been established need their staff to be credible. There will always be some amount of turnover and when that happens your clients still want to know if this person is talented. And if your company is new, being associated with Drupal in your local community does provide your company a sense of credibility.
  • Collegiality 
    I saved the best for last. Collegiality is highly overlooked when looking at sponsoring camps. Most companies have a referral program for new hires and when the time comes for you to hire, people tend to refer their friends and their professional acquaintances. There is no better place to meet and interact with other Drupalist than a DrupalCamp. What about employee engagement? In a recent focus group I participated in with a Drupal shop, many of the staff wanted more opportunities for professional development. These local camps are affordable and can allow staff to attend multiple events in a year when you have small budgets.

I must end by saying, that there are so many great Drupal companies that I have had the pleasure to work with and if it were not for the Acquia’s of the world Drupal wouldn’t exist. I understand that CEO’s are responsible for their employees and their families so I don’t want to underestimate the pressures that come with making payroll and having a client pipeline. The purpose of this post was to explain how it feels as a volunteer who is doing something for the community and the frustrations that sometimes come with it.

If you are interested in sponsoring a DrupalCamp check out Drupical and sponsor a camp today! All of us organizers need your help!!

Are you interested in attending the first online DrupalCamp Organizers Meeting, on Friday, November 9th at 4:00 pm (EST)? RSVP Here.

If you are also interested in contributing to the Atlanta Drupal Users Group (ADUG) Medium Blog publication, please feel free to reach out to us at [email protected]

Jan 20 2019
Jan 20

This article was previously posted on Medium (Oct 2018). Community, community and more community. One of the common themes we hear when it comes to evaluating Drupal against other content management systems (CMS), is that the community is made up of over 100,000 highly skilled and passionate developers who contribute code. And in many of these application evaluations, it’s the community, not the software that leads to Drupal winning the bid. We have also heard Dries Buytaert speak about the importance of the community at various DrupalCons and he is quoted on Drupal.org’s getting involved page:

“It’s really the Drupal community and not so much the software that makes the Drupal project what it is. So fostering the Drupal community is actually more important than just managing the code base.” — Dries Buytaert

My First Encounter with the Drupal Community

With this emphasis on community, I tried to think back to how and when I first interacted with the community. Like so many others, my first introduction to Drupal was at a local Meetup. I remember going to this office building in Atlanta and the room was packed with people, plenty of pizza, soda and, of course, laptops. It was a nice relaxed atmosphere where we introduced ourselves and got a chance to know each other a little bit. Then the lights dimmed, the projector turned on and the presentations kicked off, highlighting some new content strategy or a new module that can help layout your content. After that first meetup, I felt energized because until that point, I had never spoken with someone in person about Drupal and it was the first time that I was introduced to Drupal professionals and companies.

DrupalCamps Play An Integral Role in Fostering Community

After attending a few meetups, I joined the email list and I received an email announcing DrupalCamp Atlanta was going to be held at Georgia Tech and the call for proposals was now open for session submissions.

I purchased a ticket for a mere $30 and added it to my Google calendar. On the day of the event, I remember walking in the front door and being blown away by the professionalism of the conference as there were sponsor booths, giveaways, and four concurrent sessions throughout the day. But it wasn’t until I was inside the auditorium during the opening session and saw the 200 or so people pile in that made me realize this Drupal community thing I heard about was for real. Over the next couple of years, I decided that I would attend other camps instead of DrupalCon because the camps were more affordable and less intimidating. My first camp outside of Atlanta was Design4Drupal in Boston, DrupalCamp Charlotte, DrupalCamp Florida and BADCamp were all camps I went to before attending a DrupalCon. All of these camps were top notch but what I really loved is that each camp had their own identity and culture. It’s exactly what I think a community should be and for the very first time, I felt that I was a part of the Drupal community.

Why Establish the DrupalCamp Organizers Council?

As provided in my previous examples, one of the advantages of Drupal comes from the great community and DrupalCamps are an important aspect in fostering this community. Running any event can be challenging, but to pull off a respectable DrupalCamp you have consider so many things such as the website, credit card processing, food, accepting and rejecting sessions, finding a keynote speaker, the afterparty, pre-conference trainings, oh and did I mention the website? You get my drift, it's a lot of work. Many of these tasks just roll off my tongue from past experience so ask yourself;

  • Where can I share my knowledge with other people who organize camps?
  • What if there was some way that all of us DrupalCamp organizers could come together and implement services that make organizing camps easier?
  • How could we provide camp organizers with resources to produce great camps?

During the #AskDries session at DrupalCon Nashville (listen for yourself), Midwest DrupalCamp Organizer Avi Schwab asked Dries the following question;

“... giving the limited funding the Drupal Association has, where should we go in trying to support our smaller local community events?” — Avi Schwab

Dries then responded with:

“That’s a great question. I actually think its a great idea what they (WordCamp) do. Because these camps are a lot of work. ...I think having some sort of central service or lack of a better term, that helps local camp organizers, I think is a fantastic idea, because we could do a lot of things, like have a camp website out of the box, ... we could have all sorts of best practices out of the box .” — Dries Buytaert

DrupalCamp Slack Community was the first time that I was provided a link to a spreadsheet that had the camp history dating back to 2006 and people were adding their target camp dates even if they were just in the planning stages. As a camp organizer I felt connected, I felt empowered to make better decisions and most of all I could just ask everyone, hey, how are you doing this?

Are you interested in attending the first online DrupalCamp Organizers meeting, on Friday, November 9th at 4:00pm (EST)? RSVP Here.

Earlier this year I volunteered for the Drupal Diversity and Inclusion Initiative (DDI) and was inspired when I heard Tara King on the DrupalEasy podcast, talk about how she just created the ddi-contrib channel on the Drupal slack and started hosting meetings. All jazzed up and motivated by that podcast, I reached out to over 20 different camp organizers from various countries and asked them if they would be interested in being on something like this? And if not, would they feel represented if this council existed?

Here are some quotes from Camp Organizers:

“I think a DrupalCamp Organizers Council is a great idea. I would be interested in being a part of such a working group. Just now I’m restraining myself from pouring ideas forth, so I definitely think I’m interested in being a part.”

“I am interested in seeing something that gathers resources from the vast experiences of current/past organizers and provides support to camps.”

“I definitely would appreciate having such a council and taking part. I’ve now helped organize DrupalCamp four times, and this was the first year we were looped into the slack channels for the organizers.”

“I really like the idea — what do we need to do to get this started?”

What are the Next Steps?

Based on the positive feedback and the spike in interest from other camp organizers I have decided to take the plunge and establish our first meeting of DrupalCamp Organizers on Friday, November 9th at 4:00pm (EST). This will be an online Zoom video call to encourage people to use their cameras so we can actually get to know one another.

The agenda is simple:

  • Introductions from all callers, and one thing they would like to see from the council.
  • Brainstorm the list of items the council should be advocating for.
  • Identify procedures for electing people to the Council: ways to nominate, eligibility criteria, Drupal event organizer experience required etc.
  • Outline of a quick strategic plan.

About Drupal Sun

Drupal Sun is an Evolving Web project. It allows you to:

  • Do full-text search on all the articles in Drupal Planet (thanks to Apache Solr)
  • Facet based on tags, author, or feed
  • Flip through articles quickly (with j/k or arrow keys) to find what you're interested in
  • View the entire article text inline, or in the context of the site where it was created

See the blog post at Evolving Web

Evolving Web