Nov 14 2011
Nov 14

Alex, Tavish and I had a great time in the T Dot over the weekend at DrupalCamp Toronto. The camp was well-attended, there were lots of great presentations and BoFs, and we even came back with some very hardcore Druplicon touques (hats for you non-Canadians).

Here's a recap of the four sessions we presented at the camp:

Drupal 7 Higher Education Case Study

Alex did a case study on our recent work in using Drupal 7 to build an admissions portal for a major Canadian university, emphasizing how we were able to leverage Drupal 7's new Fields API to allow non-technical administrators to easily customize the online application form.

Responsive Design and Drupal Theming

I presented my approach to implementing responsive design in Drupal, including how to handling elements like Panels, tables, forms, and images. This session expanded on a blog post about responsive design and Drupal that I wrote last month.

Multilingual Site Building in Drupal 7

I also did a presentation on building multilingual sites with Drupal. My focus was on methods for content translation, which is also covered by this blog post.

Poutine Maker: A Tasty Introduction to the Field API in Drupal 7

Tavish, our superstar intern, introduced attendees to the Drupal 7 Field API with his popular Poutine-themed presentation. The presentation covered creating custom fields, including validation, saving, and formatting field data.

A huge thanks to all the organizers and sponsors for putting on such a great event, which gave us a chance to connect with many friends old and new. We're looking forward to heading back to Toronto for the Drupal Business Summit 2011 Toronto, on December 2nd, where Alex will be co-chairing a breakout session on Drupal in Higher Education with Jennifer Hols from ImageX Media.

About Drupal Sun

Drupal Sun is an Evolving Web project. It allows you to:

  • Do full-text search on all the articles in Drupal Planet (thanks to Apache Solr)
  • Facet based on tags, author, or feed
  • Flip through articles quickly (with j/k or arrow keys) to find what you're interested in
  • View the entire article text inline, or in the context of the site where it was created

See the blog post at Evolving Web

Evolving Web