Oct 17 2019
Oct 17

Integrating With Key Systems

One of the overall goals when embarking on this redesign was to create an experience that mimicked the streamlined usability of an ecommerce site. HonorHealth wanted to create a place where patients could easily make choices about their care and schedule appointments with minimal effort. In order to provide this experience, it was imperative that the new platform could play well with HonorHealth’s external services and created a firm foundation to integrate more self-service tools in the future.

In particular, Palantir integrated with three services as part of the build: SymphonyRM, Docscores, and Clockwise.

  • SymphonyRM offers a rich set of data served by a dynamic API. HonorHealth leverages SymphonyRM’s Provider Operations services to hold its practice location and physician data. Palantir worked closely with Symphony to help define the data structure. Through this work, HonorHealth was able to reduce the number of steps and people required to maintain their provider and location data. By leveraging the strategy work done and the technical consultation of Palantir’s Technical Architecture Owner, HonorHealth was able to keep focused on the most valuable content to their users throughout all of their integrated systems.
  • Docscores provides a platform for gathering high-quality ratings and review data on healthcare practitioners and locations. Palantir integrated this data directly with the physician and location data provided from SymphonyRM to create a research and discovery tool for HonorHealth users. On the new HonorHealth website, users can find physicians near a specific location and read about other patients’ experiences with them.
  • Clockwise provides real-time wait estimates for people looking for Urgent Care services in their area. Each of these individual “under the hood” integrations don’t represent a significant shift for website users, but when all of these changes are coupled with the intense focus on putting the user experience of the site first, the result speaks for itself: a beautiful website that works well and empowers people to engage in their ongoing healthcare in meaningful ways.

Each of these individual “under the hood” integrations don’t represent a significant shift for website users, but when all of these changes are coupled with the intense focus on putting the user experience of the site first, the result speaks for itself: a beautiful website that works well and empowers people to engage in their ongoing healthcare in meaningful ways.

Oct 17 2019
Oct 17

We’re excited to once again be sponsoring Acquia Engage. At Engage, today’s most impressive digital leaders share their expertise, their insights, and their secrets to creating customer experiences that truly make a difference.

Join Sr. Director of Consulting, Ken Rickard for a session on the search challenges commonly presented to large organizations and how using an open source solution solves these challenges.

The Digital Services team for the state of Georgia (DSGa) run a Drupal 7 platform for over 100 websites. During 2019, they began to transition those sites to a new Drupal 8 platform. Their flagship site, Georgia.gov, needs to search content from across the entire site network. While both sets of sites are hosted on Acquia and use Acquia Search, their Drupal 7 search solution could not incorporate content from the new Drupal 8 sites.

Fortunately, open source software gave them a different option. What we built is called Federated Search, and is freely available on Drupal.org. Using Drupal, Acquia Search, and React, Palantir collaborated with the DSGa and their development partners (Lullabot and MediaCurrent, respectively) to re-launch network-wide search in both Drupal 8 and Drupal 7.

In this session, we’ll explore how Federated Search integrates with Acquia Search and hosting and details for getting started using the application in Drupal 7 and Drupal 8.

  • Date: Tuesday, November 5, 2019
  • Time: 11:00 - 11:45 AM ET
Oct 17 2019
Oct 17

A few weeks ago, I earned my first ever Drupal contribution credit for my DrupalCamp Colorado keynote. While I am oddly excited about that, I also find it somewhat ironic, as that keynote should not be mistaken for my first contribution to Drupal.

According to my Drupal.org profile, I’ve been a community member for over twelve years. In that time, I’ve presented keynotes for three other DrupalCamps, presented sessions and participated in panels going back to DrupalCon Boston 2008, led the RFP process for the redesign of Drupal.org, chaired DrupalCon Chicago 2011, served on the board of the Drupal Association for nine years and, most recently, served on the Executive Director Search committee. That is but a partial tally of my individual contributions; of course my company, Palantir.net, has also made considerable contributions of time, talent, and treasure over all these years.

Recognition is not my motivation for these efforts; like so many open source contributors, I give back to Drupal because I am committed to stepping up when I see a need or an opportunity. When I was new to the community, the karma earned from such efforts, code and non-code, was informally held in the living memory of those who were there. I always felt that I had earned the credibility and support of those with whom I collaborated closely to move on to the next opportunity, to tackle and solve the next problem. In many ways, as a woman on/of the internet, I appreciated the relative anonymity of it.

In that way, Drupal has become the largest independent community-driven open source project. And many of us believed that our collective success and the impact we made was enough to sustain the virtuous cycle of open source. But was it?

Open source has won: we now have legions of people and companies who rely on Drupal and other open source tools and products; however, these companies picked the best tool, which just happened to be an open source tool, and they don’t necessarily yet know the open source way. Twelve years ago, the Drupal community was small enough that those established norms and expectations were passed on person-to-person, along with the lore and the legends. The old ways of influencing behavior and enforcing norms through social bonds (aka peer pressure) aren’t strong or explicit enough for the swells of newcomers.

There is a lack of shared understanding, visibility and support for what it takes to not just keep Drupal sustainable, but to have it thrive and win in a competitive landscape. This lack of clarity has led to the emergence of multiple subcultures within the commercial ecosystem and a worrying disparity between those who benefit the most from Drupal versus those who give the most.

In his Amsterdam 2014 keynote, Dries noted that while open source has a long history of credit (for code) to the individual contributors, this does not adequately recognize (or incentive) the organizations. He proposed a simple way to give organizations credit in addition to individual credits for the core issues their teams either performed directly or sponsored, which the Drupal Association released in late 2015. Over time, this system has been expanded to capture more than just code contributions.

And yet, the contribution credit system has not wholly replaced karma. As my own experience shows, so much of the vital work that Drupal relies on is not yet captured in credits. Due to my privilege (not looking for a job, having well-established connections in the community, etc.), the lack of visibility was a feature, not a bug, for me as an individual contributor.

However, wearing my Palantir CEO hat I’ve come to realize that the failure to capture fully what and how companies do (and are expected) to contribute is far more problematic for the sustainability of the project. Some of the most essential work in the community (Drupal Association Board of Directors, the Community Working Group (CWG), the Security Team and non-code Core team work including release management, communication, sprint organizing and overall project and initiative coordination) is severely undervalued or all-in-all ignored by the contribution system. George DeMet's ongoing commitments as the chair of the CWG often average anywhere from ¼ - ½ of his time (more at intense times) and over the last year he received four credits (the other members of the CWG received even less!). The community and the project suffer because this invisibility obscures, and indeed over time deteriorates, the community expectations and norms by measuring what is easy, rather than what matters.

When Drupal 7 was released, the firms that built Drupal enjoyed a competitive advantage: those who wanted to use Drupal knew which firms meaningfully contributed and why it mattered. However, over the last five years, the Drupal ecosystem has expanded to include many new, larger firms that leveraged partnership and sponsorship programs to establish their Drupal credentials.

These programs and the new implementers and agencies they ushered into the Drupal community are essential to Drupal’s growth and adoption. They are a welcome addition to the ecosystem. However, there are serious problems with the ways that these programs have been structured to date and their unintended impact on our culture of contribution:

  • Status within these programs is primarily pay-to-play and non-financial contributions to the project are not required.
  • The programs do not directly directly support or indirectly incentivize the time or talent contributions on which the Drupal project depends.
  • The financial proceeds of such programs benefit infrastructure initiatives (Drupal.org and more broadly the Association) and market visibility, which are not necessarily the areas of greatest need for the project or community.
  • These programs have undermined the reputational system that prioritized successful outcomes (successful client implementations AND contributions back to the project) and replaced it with one that favored outputs (financial success and client list).

Allowing companies to position themselves as leading experts in Drupal without validation that these firms are contributing commensurate with the benefits derived from Drupal has been corrosive to the sustainability of the project. This has tacitly supported the commoditization of Drupal services, devalued the competitive advantage received from direct contribution, and simultaneously incentivized and conditioned all in the ecosystem to increase indirect contribution (sponsorship and advertising on Drupal.org and events including DrupalCon).

As I noted on a panel at OSCON, I see all of this as a success problem. Having more companies, including large scale implementers and agencies, working with Drupal is a good and necessary thing. What we need to improve is the way that we onboard, recognize, and differentiate those who help sustain and innovate Drupal to (re)establish a culture of contribution for Drupal. Doing this well will involve creating new and easy-to-access avenues for contribution that match the project’s weighted needs and companies’ available resources (be they time, talent or treasure). A concerted focus on what matters will shore up Drupal’s path to long-term sustainability.

Oct 17 2019
Oct 17

Palantir is excited to return to Denver as a sponsor for DrupalCamp Colorado 2019, featuring a keynote from our CEO, Tiffany Farriss. Tiffany will be discussing the role of organizational culture and open source projects like Drupal in the success of tech companies. We hope to see you there!

  • Location: TBD
  • Date: August 3rd, 2019
  • Time: 9 AM - 10 AM MDT
Oct 17 2019
Oct 17

Identifying “Top Tasks”

The biggest negative factor of the previous ETF site’s user experience was its confusing menus. The site presented too many options and pathways for people to find information such as which health insurance plan they belong to or how to apply for retirement benefits, and the pathways often led to different pages about the same topic. Frequently, people would give up or call customer support, which is only open during typical business hours.

Palantir knew the redesign would have the most impact if the site was restructured to fit the needs of ETF’s customers. In order to guarantee we were addressing customers’ most important needs, we used the Top Task Identification methodology developed by customer experience researcher and advocate Gerry McGovern.

Through the use of this method, we organized ETF’s content by the tasks site users deemed most important, with multiple paths to get to content through their homepage, site and organic search, and related content.

Oct 17 2019
Oct 17

Open source looks very different now compared to 20 years ago, and with such a vast community of developers, it is difficult to define the exact role of a “good” open source citizen.

Palantir is thrilled to be participating in Keeping Open Source Open -- a panel including CEO, Tiffany Farriss for a spirited discussion on open source strategy and the future of open source.

Other panelists include Zaheda Bhorat (Amazon Web Services) and Matt Asay (Adobe). The panel will air some of the strongest opinions on Twitter.

  • Time: 1:30 PM - 2:20 PM
  • Location: F150/151
Oct 17 2019
Oct 17

Our team is so enthusiastic to participate in the third iteration of Decoupled Days. Palantir is excited to sponsor this year’s event and continue to share our insights into Content Management Systems.

Join Senior Engineer and Technical Architect Dan Montgomery for a session on content modeling. He’ll break down:

  • How a master content model can enable scalable growth
  • How to create a standardized structure for content
  • How Drupal can function as a content repository that serves other products

You’ll walk away with an understanding of how to develop architecture and structures that are scalable for future, unknown endpoints.

  • Date: Thursday, July 18
  • Time: 9:00am
  • Location: Room 
Oct 17 2019
Oct 17

Design System artifacts go by many names - Living Style Guides, Pattern Libraries, UI Libraries, and just plain Design Systems. The core idea is to give digital teams greater flexibility and control over their website. Instead of having to decide exactly what all pages should look like in one big redesign and then sticking with those templates until the next redesign, a design system gives you a “lego box” of components the team can use to create consistent, beautiful interfaces. Component-based design is how you SCALE.

At Palantir we build content management systems, so we’ve named our design system artifact a “style guide” in a nod to the editorial space.

Our style guides are organized into three sections:

  1. 'Design Elements' which are the very basic building blocks for the website.
  2. 'Components' which combine design elements into working pieces of code that serve a defined purpose.
  3. 'Page Templates' which combine the elements and components into page templates that are used to display the content at destination URLs.

But how do we help our clients determine what the list of elements, components and page templates should be?

How to Identify Elements for Your Design System

In this post I’ll walk through how we worked with the University of Miami Health System to create a style guide that enabled the marketing team to build a consistent, branded experience for a system with 1,200 doctors and scientists, three primary locations, and multiple local clinics.

1. Start by generating a list of your most important types of content.

Why are people coming to your site? What content helps them complete the task they are there to do? This content list is ground zero for component ideation: how can design support and elevate the information your site delivers?

Table of content types

The list of content serving user needs is your starting point for components. In addition, we can use this list to identify a few page templates right off the bat:

  • Home page
  • Treatment landing page
  • Search page
  • Listing page: Search results, news, classes
  • Clinical trials landing page
  • Clinical trial detail page
  • Location landing page
  • Appointment landing page
  • Appointment detail page
  • Basic page (About us, contact us, general information)

This is just the start of the UHealth style guide; we ultimately created about 80 components and 17 page templates. But it gives you a sense of how we tackled the challenge!

2. Sort your list of important types of content into groups by similarities.

Visitors should be able to scan your website for the information they need, and distinctive component designs help them differentiate content without having to read every word. In addition, being rigorous about consistently using components for specific kinds of information creates predictable interfaces, and predictable interfaces are easy for your visitors to use.

In this step, you should audit the design and photo assets you have available now, and assess your capacity to create them going forward. If, for example, you have a limited photo library and no graphic artist on staff, you’ll want to choose a set of components that don’t heavily rely on photos and graphics.

Component example for UHealth site

In this example, we have three component types: News, Events/Classes, and a Simple Success story.

  1. News Component: This component has no images. This is largely about content management; UHealth publishes a lot of news, and they didn’t want to create a bottleneck in their publishing schedule by requiring each story to have a digital-ready photo.
  2. Events/Classes Component: This component has an option for images or a pattern. Because UHealth wants visitors to take action on this content by signing up, we wanted these to have an eye-catching image. Requiring a photo introduces a potential bottleneck in publishing, so we also gave them the option to make the image a pattern or graphic.
  3. Simple success story: This is the most visually complex component because successful health narratives are an important element of UHealth’s content strategy. We were able to create a complex component here because there’s a smaller number of success stories compared to news stories or classes and events. That means the marketing team can dedicate significant time and resources to making the content for this component as effective as possible.

3. Now that you’ve sorted your list by content, do a cross-check for functionality.

Unlike paper publications, websites are built to enable actions like searching, subscribing, and making appointments. Your component set should include interfaces for your functionality.

Some simple and common functions for the UHealth site included searching for a treatment by letter, map blocks, and step forms.

In a more complex example, the Sylvester Cancer Center included a dynamic “Find a lab” functionality that was powered by a database. We designed the template around the limitations of the data set powering the feature, rather than ideating the ideal interface. Search is another feature that benefits from planning during the design phase.

For example, these components for a side bar location search and a full screen location search require carefully structured databases to support them. The design and technical teams must be in alignment on the capacity and limits of the functionality underlying the interface.

4. Differentiate components by brand.

UHealth is an enormous health care system, and there are several centers of excellence within the system that have their own logos and distinct content strategies. As a result, we created several components that were differentiated by brand.

UHealth navigation bars

In this example, you see navigation interfaces that are different by brand and language. Incorporating the differentiated logos for the core UHealth system and the Centers of Excellence is fairly straightforward. But as you can see the Sylvester Center also has three additional top nav options: Cancer treatments, Research, and For Healthcare Professionals.

That content change necessitated a different nav bar - you can see that it’s longer. We also created a component for the nav in Spanish, because sometimes in other languages you find that the menu labels are different lengths and need to be adjusted for. In this case, they didn’t, but we kept it as a reference for the site builders.

5. Review the list: can you combine any components?

Your overall goal should be creating the smallest possible set of components. Depending on the complexity and variety of your content and functionality, this might be a set of 100 components or it might be just 20. The UHealth Design System has about 80 components, and another 17 page templates.

The key is that each of the components does a specific job and is visually differentiated from components that do different jobs. You want clear visual differences that signal clear content differences to your audience, and you don’t want your web team spending time trying to parse minor differences - that’s not how you scale!

In my experience, the biggest stumbling block to creating a streamlined list of components is stakeholders asking for maximum flexibility and control. I’ve found the best way to manage this challenge is to provide stakeholders with the option to differentiate their fiefdoms through content rather than components.

UHealth component examples

In this example, we have the exact same component featuring different images, which allows for two widely different experiences. You can also enable minor differentiation within a component: maybe you can leave off a sub-head, or allow for two buttons instead of one.

6. Start building your design system and stay flexible.

The list you generated here will get you 80% of the way there, but as you proceed with designing and building your design system, you will almost certainly uncover new component needs. When you do, first double check that you can’t use an existing component. This can be a little tricky, because of course content can essentially be displayed any way you want.

At Palantir, we solve for this challenge by building our Style Guide components with real content. This approach solves for a few key challenges with building a design system:

  1. Showing the “why” of a component. Each component is designed for a specific type of content - news, classes, header, testimonial, directory, etc. This consistency is critical for scaling design: the goal is to create consistent interfaces to create ease of use for your visitors. By building our Style Guides with real content, we document the thought process behind creating a specific component.
  2. Consistency. Digital teams change and grow. We use content in our Style Guide to show your digital team how each component should be used, even if they weren’t a part of the original design process.
  3. Capturing User Testing. Some of our components, like menus, are heavily user-tested to ensure that we’re creating intuitive interfaces. By building the components with the tested content in place, we’re capturing that research and ensuring it goes forward in the design.
  4. Identifying gaps. If you’ve got a piece of content or functionality that you think needs a new component, you can check your assumptions against the Style Guide. Does the content you’re working with actually fit within an existing pattern, or is it really new? If it is, add it to the project backlog!

Outcomes

The most important takeaway here is that design systems let your web team scale. Through the use of design systems, your digital team can generate gorgeous, consistent and branded pages as new needs arise.

But don’t take our word for it! Tauffyt Aguilar, the Executive Director of Digital Solutions for Miller School of Medicine and UHealth, describes the impact of their new design system:

“One of the major improvements is Marketing’s ability to maintain and grow their site moving forward. Previously each page was designed and developed individually. The ability to create or edit pages using various elements and components of the Design System is a significant improvement in the turnaround time and efficiency for the Marketing department.”

My favorite example of a new page constructed with the UHealth design system is this gorgeous interface for the Sports Medicine Institute.

Sports Medicine homepage

The Sports Medicine audience has unique needs and interests: they are professional and amateur athletes who need to get back in the game. The UHealth team used basic components plus an attention-grabbing image to create this interface for finding experts by issue.

And ultimately, that’s Palantir’s goal: your digital team should have the tools to create gorgeous, effective websites.

Oct 17 2019
Oct 17

Palantir recently partnered with a patient engagement solutions company that specializes in delivering patient and physician education to deliver improved health outcomes and an enhanced patient experience. They have an extensive library of patient education content that they use to build education playlists which are delivered to more than 51,000 physician offices, 1,000 hospitals, and 140,000 healthcare providers - and they are still growing.

The company is in the process of completely overhauling their technical stack so that they can rapidly scale up the number of products they use to deliver their patient education library. Currently, every piece of content needs to be entered separately for each product it can be delivered on, which forces the content teams to work in silos. In addition, because they use a dozen different taxonomies and doing so correctly requires a high level of context and nuance, any tagging of content can only be done at the manager level or above. The company partnered with Palantir.net to remove these bottlenecks and plan for future scalability.

Oct 17 2019
Oct 17

Facilitating design workshops with key stakeholders allows them to have insight into the process of "how the sausage is made" and provides the product team buy-in from the get-go.

Join Palantir's Director of UX Operations, Lesley Guthrie, for a session on design workshops. She'll go over:

  • How to choose the right exercises 
  • How to play to the team skill sets
  • Ways to adjust the workshop to fit the needs of the project 

You'll learn how to sell it the idea of the design workshop to stakeholders and collaborate with them on a solution that can be tested and validated with real users.

Sep 26 2019
Sep 26

Although web accessibility begins on a foundation built by content strategists, designers, and engineers, the buck does not stop there (or at site launch). Content marketers play a huge role in maintaining web accessibility standards as they publish new content over time.

“Web accessibility means that people with disabilities can perceive, understand, navigate, and interact with the Web, and that they can contribute to the Web.” - W3

Why Accessibility Standards are Important to Marketers

Web accessibility standards are often thought to assist audiences who are affected by common disabilities like low vision/blindness, deafness, or limited dexterity. In addition to these audiences, web accessibility also benefits those with a temporary or situational disability. This could include someone who is nursing an injury, someone who is working from a coffee shop with slow wifi, or someone who is in a public space and doesn’t want to become a nuisance to others by playing audio out loud.

Accessibility relies on empathy and understanding of a wide range of user experiences. People perceive your content through different senses depending on their own needs and preferences. If someone isn’t physically seeing the blog post you wrote or can’t hear the audio of the podcast you published, that doesn’t mean you as a marketer don’t care about providing that information to that audience, it just means you need to adapt in the way you are delivering that information to that audience.

10 Tips for Publishing Accessible Content

These tips have been curated and compiled from a handful of different resources including the WCAG standards set forth by W3C, and our team of accessibility gurus at Palantir. All of the informing resources are linked in a handy list at the end of this post. 

1. Consider the type of content and provide meaningful text alternatives.

Text alternatives should help your audience understand the content and context of each image, video, or audio file. It also makes that information accessible to technology that cannot see or hear your content, like search engines (which translates to better SEO).

Icons to show image, audio, video

Types of text alternatives you can provide:

  • Images - Provide alternative text.
  • Audio - Provide transcripts.
  • Video - Provide captions and video descriptions in action.

This tip affects those situational use cases mentioned above as well. Think about the last time you sent out an email newsletter. If someone has images turned off on their email to preserve cellular data, you want to make sure your email still makes sense. Providing a text alternative means your reader still has all of the context they need to understand your email, even without that image.

2. Write proper alt text.

Alternative text or alt text is a brief text description that can be attributed to the HTML tag for an image on a web page. Alt text enables users who cannot see the images on a page to better understand your content. Screen readers and other assistive technology can’t interpret the meaning of an image without alt text.

With the addition of required alternative text, Drupal 8 has made it easier to build accessibility into your publishing workflow. However, content creators still need to be able to write effective alt text. Below I’ve listed a handful of things to consider when writing alt text for your content.

  • Be as descriptive and accurate as possible. Provide context. Especially if your image is serving a specific function, people who don’t see the image should have the same understanding as if they had.
  • If you’re sharing a chart or other data visualization, include that data in the alt text so people have all of the important information.
  • Avoid using “image of,” “picture of,” or something similar. It’s already assumed that the alt text is referencing an image, and you are losing precious character space (most screen readers cut off alt text at around 125 characters). The caveat to this is if you are describing a work of art, like a painting or illustration.
  • No spammy keyword stuffing. Alt text does help with SEO, but that’s not it’s primary purpose, so don’t abuse it. Find that happy medium between including all of the vital information and also including maybe one or two of those keywords you’re trying to target.
Illustration of red car with flames shooting out of the back, flying over line of cars on sunny roadway.Example of good alt text: “Red car in the sky.”
Example of better alt text: “Illustration of red car with flames shooting out of the back, flying over line of cars on sunny roadway.”

3. Establish a hierarchy.

Upside down pyramid split into three sections labeled high importance, medium importance, low importance

Accessibility is more than just making everything on a page available as text. It also affects the way you structure your content, and how you guide your users through a page. When drafting content, put the most important information first. Group similar content, and clearly separate different topics with headings. You want to make sure your ideas are organized in a logical way to improve scannability and encourage better understanding amongst your readers.

4. Use headings, lists, sections, and other structural elements to support your content hierarchy.

Users should be able to quickly assess what information is on a page and how it is organized. Using headings, subheadings and other structural elements helps establish hierarchy and makes web pages easily understandable by both the human eye and a screen reader. Also, when possible, opt for using lists over tables. Tables are ultimately more difficult for screen reader users to navigate.

If you’re curious to see how structured your content is, scan the URL using WAVE, an accessibility tool that allows you to see an outline of the structural elements on any web page. Using WAVE can help you better visualize how someone who is using assistive technologies might be viewing your page.

5. Write a descriptive title for every page.

This one is pretty straight forward. Users should be able to quickly assess the purpose of each page. Screen readers announce the page title when they load a web page, so writing a descriptive title helps those users make more informed page selections.

Page titles impact:

  • Users with low vision who need to be able to easily distinguish between pages
  • Users with cognitive disabilities, limited short-term memory, and reading disabilities.

6. Be intentional with your link text.

Write link text that makes each link’s purpose clear to the user. Links should provide info on where you will end up or what will happen if you click on that link. If someone is using a screen reader to tab through 3 links on a page that all read “click here,” that doesn’t really help them figure out what each link’s purpose is and ultimately decide which link they should click on.

Additional tips:

  • Any contextual information should directly precede links.
  • Don’t use urls as link text; they aren’t informative. A
  • void writing long paragraphs with multiple links. If you have multiple links to share on one topic, it’s better to write a short piece of text followed by a list of bulleted links.

EX: Use "Learn more about our new Federated Search application" not "Learn more".

7. Avoid using images of text in place of actual text.

The exact guideline set forth by W3 here is “Make it easier for users to see and hear content including separating foreground from background.” 

There are many reasons why this is a good practice that reach beyond accessibility implications. Using actual text helps with SEO, allows for on-page search ability for users, and creates the ability to highlight for copy/pasting. There are some exceptions that can be made if the image is essential to include (like a logo). Providing alt text also may be a solution for certain use cases.

8. Avoid idioms, jargon, abbreviations, and other nonliteral words.

The guideline set forth by W3 is to “make text content readable and understandable.” Accessibility aside, this is important for us marketers In the Drupal-world, because it’s really easy to include a plethora of jargon that your client audience might not be familiar with. So be accessible AND client-friendly, and if you have to use jargon or abbreviations, make sure you provide a definition of the word, link to the definition, or include an explanation of any abbreviations on first reference.

Think about it this way: if you are writing in terms people aren’t familiar with, how will they know to search for them? Plain language = better SEO.

9. Create clear content for your audience’s reading level.

For most Americans, the average reading level is a lower secondary education level. Even if you are marketing to a group of savvy individuals who are capable of understanding pretty complicated material, the truth is, most people are pressed for time and might become stressed if they have to read super complicated marketing materials. This is also important to keep in mind for people with cognitive disabilities, or reading disabilities, like dyslexia.

I know what you’re thinking, “but I am selling a complicated service.” If you need to include technical or complicated material to get your point across, then provide supplemental content such as an infographic or illustration, or a bulleted list of key points.

There are a number of tools online that you can use to determine the readability of your content, and WebAIM has a really great resource for guidelines on writing clearly.

10. Clearly label form input elements.

If you are in content marketing, chances are you have built a form or two in your time. No matter whether you’re creating those in Drupal or an external tool like Hubspot, you want to make sure you are labeling form fields clearly so that the user can understand how to complete the form. For example, expected data formats (such as day, month, year) are helpful. Also, required fields should be clearly marked. This is important for accessibility, but also then you as a marketer end up with better data.

Helpful Resources

Here are a few guides I've found useful in the quest to publish accessible content:

Accessibility Tools

Sep 22 2019
Sep 22

Our testing approach was two-fold, with one underlying question to answer: what is the most intuitive site structure for users?

Test #1: Top Task survey

During the Top Task survey, we had users rank a list of tasks we think they are trying to complete on the site, so that we have visibility into their priorities. The results from this survey informed a revised version of the navigation labels and structure, which we then tested in the following tree test. The survey was conducted via Google forms with existing Center audiences, aiming for 75+ completions.

We then used these audience-defined “top tasks” to inform the new information architecture, which we tested in our second test.

Test #2: IA tree test

During the tree testing of the Information Architecture, we stripped out any visuals and tested the outline of the menu structure. We began with a mailing list of about 2,500 people, split the list into two segments, and A/B tested the new proposed structure (Variant) vs. the current structure (Benchmark). Both trees were tested with the same tasks but using different labels and structure to see with which tree people could complete the tasks quicker and more successfully.

Aug 07 2019
Aug 07

Our team is always excited to catch up with fellow Drupal community members (and each other) in person during DrupalCon. Here’s what we have on deck for this year’s event:

Visit us at booth #709

Drop by and say hi in the exhibit hall! We’ll be at booth number 709, giving away some new swag that is very special to us. Have a lot to talk about? Schedule a meeting with us

Palantiri Sessions

Keeping That New Car Smell: Tips for Publishing Accessible Content by Alex Brandt and Nelson Harris

Content editors play a huge role in maintaining web accessibility standards as they publish new content over time. Alex and Nelson will go over a handful of tips to make sure your content is accessible for your audience.


Fostering Community Health and Demystifying the CWG by George DeMet and friends

The Drupal Community Working Group is tasked with fostering community health. This Q&A format session hopes to bring to light our charter, our processes, our impact and how we can improve.


The Challenge of Emotional Labor in Open Source Communities by Ken Rickard

Emotional labor is, in one sense, the invisible thread that ties all our work together. Emotional labor supports and enables the creation and maintenance of our products. It is a critical community resource, yet undervalued and often dismissed. In this session, we'll take a look at a few reasons why that may be the case and discuss some ways in which open source communities are starting to recognize the value of emotional labor.

  • Date: Thursday, April 11
  • Time: 2:30pm
  • Location: Exhibit Stage | Level 4


The Remote Work Toolkit: Tricks for Keeping Healthy and Happy by Kristen Mayer and Luke Wertz

Moving from working in a physical office to a remote office can be a big change, yet have a lot of benefits. Kristen and Luke will talk about transitioning from working in an office environment to working remotely - how to embrace the good things about remote work, but also ways in which you might need to change your behavior to mitigate the challenges and stay mentally healthy.

Join us for Trivia Night 

Thursday night we will be sponsoring one of our favorite parts of DrupalCon, Trivia Night. Brush up on your Drupal facts, grab some friends, and don't forget to bring your badge! Flying solo to DrupalCon? We would love to have you on our team!

  • Date: Thursday, April 11
  • Time: 8pm - 11:45pm
  • Location: Armory at Seattle Center | 305 Harrison Street

We'll see you all next week!

Aug 01 2019
Aug 01

Palantir defined personas for the various site audiences. The site needed to be able to surface relevant content for teens, parents, physicians, and people in crisis situations. We tested wireframes in-depth and performed chalkmark tests around the menu structure, both of which helped make sure pathways were simple and straightforward for all audiences.

For general site search, we implemented Solr-based Acquia Search, which provided more advanced capabilities than the standard Drupal search functionality. Palantir added recommended results, so if there is something our client wants to bump to the top of search results based on a specific keyword, they now have that ability. For example, if a user were to search for the term “cancer,” our client can now make sure that results for the oncology department get bumped to the top of the results list.

Jul 22 2019
Jul 22

Since our initial release, we’ve been doing agile, iterative development on the software. Working with our partners at the University of Michigan and the State of Georgia, we’ve made refinements to both the application and the Drupal integration.

Better search results

Default searches now target the entire index and not the more narrow tm_rendered_item field. This change allows Solr admins to have better control over the refinement of search results, including the use of field boosting and elevate.xml query enhancements.

Autocomplete search results

We added support for search autocomplete at both the application and Drupal block levels -- and the two can use the same or different data sources to populate results. We took a configurable approach to autocomplete, which supports “search as you type” completion of partial text. These results can also include keyboard navigation for accessibility.

Since the Drupal block is independent of the React application, we made it configurable so that the block can have a distinct API endpoint from the application. We did this because the state of Georgia has specific requirements that their default search behavior should be to search the local site first, looking for items marked with a special “highlighted content” field.

Enter search terms field with list of suggested results

Wildcard searching

We fully support wildcard searches as a configuration option, so that a search for “run” will automatically pass “run” and “run*” as search terms.

Default facet control

The default facets sets for the application -- Site, Content Type, and Date Range -- can now be disabled on a per-site basis. This feature is useful for sites that contribute content to a network but only wish to search their own site’s content.

Enhanced query parameters

We’ve added additional support for term-based facets to be passed from the search query string. This means that all facet options except dates can be passed directly via external URL before loading the search form.

Better Drupal theming

We split the module’s display into proper theme templates for the block and it’s form, and we added template suggestions for each form element so that themes can easily enhance or override the default styling of the Drupal block. We also removed some overly opinionated CSS from the base style of the application. This change should allow CSS overrides to have better control over element styling.

What’s Next for Users?

All of these changes should be backward compatible for existing users, though minor changes to the configuration may be required, Users of the Drupal 8.x-2.0 release will need to run the Drupal update script to load the new default settings. Sites that override CSS should confirm that they address the new styles.

Currently, the changes only apply to Drupal 8 sites. We’ll be backporting the new features to Drupal 7 in the upcoming month.

Users of the 1.0 release may continue to use both the existing Drupal module and their current JS and CSS files until the end of 2019. We recommend upgrading to the 2.0 versions of both, which requires minor CSS and configuration changes you can read about in the upgrade documentation.

Special Thanks

Palantir senior engineer Jes Constantine worked through the most significant changes to the application and integration code. Senior front-end developer Nate Striedinger worked through the template design and CSS. And engineer Matt Carmichael provided QA and code review. And a special shoutout to James Sansbury of Lullabot -- our first external contributor.

Jul 19 2019
Jul 19
August 2 - August 4, 2019 King Center, Auraria Campus, Denver, Colorado DrupalCamp Colorado 2019 (Official Site)

Palantir is excited to return to Denver as a sponsor for DrupalCamp Colorado 2019, featuring a keynote from our CEO, Tiffany Farriss. Tiffany will be discussing the role of organizational culture and open source projects like Drupal in the success of tech companies. We hope to see you there!

  • Location: TBD
  • Date: August 3rd, 2019
  • Time: 9 AM - 10 AM MDT
Jul 19 2019
Jul 19
July 16th, 2019 Oregon Convention Center, Portland, Oregon [email protected] (official site)

Open source looks very different now compared to 20 years ago, and with such a vast community of developers, it is difficult to define the exact role of a “good” open source citizen.

Palantir is thrilled to be participating in Keeping Open Source Open -- a panel including CEO, Tiffany Farriss for a spirited discussion on open source strategy and the future of open source.

Other panelists include Zaheda Bhorat (Amazon Web Services) and Matt Asay (Adobe). The panel will air some of the strongest opinions on Twitter.

  • Time: 1:30 PM - 2:20 PM
  • Location: F150/151

 

Jul 19 2019
Jul 19
July 17 - 18, 2019 John Jay College of Criminal Justice, New York City, New York Decoupled Days (Official Site)

Our team is so enthusiastic to participate in the third iteration of Decoupled Days. Palantir is excited to sponsor this year’s event and continue to share our insights into Content Management Systems.

Content Modeling for Decoupled Drupal

Join Senior Engineer and Technical Architect Dan Montgomery for a session on content modeling. He’ll break down:

  • How a master content model can enable scalable growth
  • How to create a standardized structure for content
  • How Drupal can function as a content repository that serves other products

You’ll walk away with an understanding of how to develop architecture and structures that are scalable for future, unknown endpoints.

  • Date: Thursday, July 18
  • Time: 9:00am
  • Location: Room 
Jul 19 2019
Jul 19

A design system gives you a “lego box” of components that you can use to create consistent, beautiful interfaces.

Design System artifacts go by many names - Living Style Guides, Pattern Libraries, UI Libraries, and just plain Design Systems. The core idea is to give digital teams greater flexibility and control over their website. Instead of having to decide exactly what all pages should look like in one big redesign and then sticking with those templates until the next redesign, a design system gives you a “lego box” of components the team can use to create consistent, beautiful interfaces. Component-based design is how you SCALE.

At Palantir we build content management systems, so we’ve named our design system artifact a “style guide” in a nod to the editorial space.

Our style guides are organized into three sections:

  1. 'Design Elements' which are the very basic building blocks for the website.
  2. 'Components' which combine design elements into working pieces of code that serve a defined purpose.
  3. 'Page Templates' which combine the elements and components into page templates that are used to display the content at destination URLs.

But how do we help our clients determine what the list of elements, components and page templates should be?

How to Identify Elements for Your Design System

In this post I’ll walk through how we worked with the University of Miami Health System to create a style guide that enabled the marketing team to build a consistent, branded experience for a system with 1,200 doctors and scientists, three primary locations, and multiple local clinics.

1. Start by generating a list of your most important types of content.

Why are people coming to your site? What content helps them complete the task they are there to do? This content list is ground zero for component ideation: how can design support and elevate the information your site delivers?

Table of content types

The list of content serving user needs is your starting point for components. In addition, we can use this list to identify a few page templates right off the bat:

  • Home page
  • Treatment landing page
  • Search page
  • Listing page: Search results, news, classes
  • Clinical trials landing page
  • Clinical trial detail page
  • Location landing page
  • Appointment landing page
  • Appointment detail page
  • Basic page (About us, contact us, general information)

This is just the start of the UHealth style guide; we ultimately created about 80 components and 17 page templates. But it gives you a sense of how we tackled the challenge!

2. Sort your list of important types of content into groups by similarities.

Visitors should be able to scan your website for the information they need, and distinctive component designs help them differentiate content without having to read every word. In addition, being rigorous about consistently using components for specific kinds of information creates predictable interfaces, and predictable interfaces are easy for your visitors to use.

In this step, you should audit the design and photo assets you have available now, and assess your capacity to create them going forward. If, for example, you have a limited photo library and no graphic artist on staff, you’ll want to choose a set of components that don’t heavily rely on photos and graphics.

Component example for UHealth site

In this example, we have three component types: News, Events/Classes, and a Simple Success story.

  1. News Component: This component has no images. This is largely about content management; UHealth publishes a lot of news, and they didn’t want to create a bottleneck in their publishing schedule by requiring each story to have a digital-ready photo.
  2. Events/Classes Component: This component has an option for images or a pattern. Because UHealth wants visitors to take action on this content by signing up, we wanted these to have an eye-catching image. Requiring a photo introduces a potential bottleneck in publishing, so we also gave them the option to make the image a pattern or graphic.
  3. Simple success story: This is the most visually complex component because successful health narratives are an important element of UHealth’s content strategy. We were able to create a complex component here because there’s a smaller number of success stories compared to news stories or classes and events. That means the marketing team can dedicate significant time and resources to making the content for this component as effective as possible.

3. Now that you’ve sorted your list by content, do a cross-check for functionality.

Unlike paper publications, websites are built to enable actions like searching, subscribing, and making appointments. Your component set should include interfaces for your functionality.

Some simple and common functions for the UHealth site included searching for a treatment by letter, map blocks, and step forms.

In a more complex example, the Sylvester Cancer Center included a dynamic “Find a lab” functionality that was powered by a database. We designed the template around the limitations of the data set powering the feature, rather than ideating the ideal interface. Search is another feature that benefits from planning during the design phase.

For example, these components for a side bar location search and a full screen location search require carefully structured databases to support them. The design and technical teams must be in alignment on the capacity and limits of the functionality underlying the interface.

4. Differentiate components by brand.

UHealth is an enormous health care system, and there are several centers of excellence within the system that have their own logos and distinct content strategies. As a result, we created several components that were differentiated by brand.

UHealth navigation bars

In this example, you see navigation interfaces that are different by brand and language. Incorporating the differentiated logos for the core UHealth system and the Centers of Excellence is fairly straightforward. But as you can see the Sylvester Center also has three additional top nav options: Cancer treatments, Research, and For Healthcare Professionals.

That content change necessitated a different nav bar - you can see that it’s longer. We also created a component for the nav in Spanish, because sometimes in other languages you find that the menu labels are different lengths and need to be adjusted for. In this case, they didn’t, but we kept it as a reference for the site builders.

5. Review the list: can you combine any components?

Your overall goal should be creating the smallest possible set of components. Depending on the complexity and variety of your content and functionality, this might be a set of 100 components or it might be just 20. The UHealth Design System has about 80 components, and another 17 page templates.

The key is that each of the components does a specific job and is visually differentiated from components that do different jobs. You want clear visual differences that signal clear content differences to your audience, and you don’t want your web team spending time trying to parse minor differences - that’s not how you scale!

In my experience, the biggest stumbling block to creating a streamlined list of components is stakeholders asking for maximum flexibility and control. I’ve found the best way to manage this challenge is to provide stakeholders with the option to differentiate their fiefdoms through content rather than components.

UHealth component examples

In this example, we have the exact same component featuring different images, which allows for two widely different experiences. You can also enable minor differentiation within a component: maybe you can leave off a sub-head, or allow for two buttons instead of one.

6. Start building your design system and stay flexible.

The list you generated here will get you 80% of the way there, but as you proceed with designing and building your design system, you will almost certainly uncover new component needs. When you do, first double check that you can’t use an existing component. This can be a little tricky, because of course content can essentially be displayed any way you want.

At Palantir, we solve for this challenge by building our Style Guide components with real content. This approach solves for a few key challenges with building a design system:

  1. Showing the “why” of a component. Each component is designed for a specific type of content - news, classes, header, testimonial, directory, etc. This consistency is critical for scaling design: the goal is to create consistent interfaces to create ease of use for your visitors. By building our Style Guides with real content, we document the thought process behind creating a specific component.
  2. Consistency. Digital teams change and grow. We use content in our Style Guide to show your digital team how each component should be used, even if they weren’t a part of the original design process.
  3. Capturing User Testing. Some of our components, like menus, are heavily user-tested to ensure that we’re creating intuitive interfaces. By building the components with the tested content in place, we’re capturing that research and ensuring it goes forward in the design.
  4. Identifying gaps. If you’ve got a piece of content or functionality that you think needs a new component, you can check your assumptions against the Style Guide. Does the content you’re working with actually fit within an existing pattern, or is it really new? If it is, add it to the project backlog!

Outcomes

The most important takeaway here is that design systems let your web team scale. Through the use of design systems, your digital team can generate gorgeous, consistent and branded pages as new needs arise.

But don’t take our word for it! Tauffyt Aguilar, the Executive Director of Digital Solutions for Miller School of Medicine and UHealth, describes the impact of their new design system:

“One of the major improvements is Marketing’s ability to maintain and grow their site moving forward. Previously each page was designed and developed individually. The ability to create or edit pages using various elements and components of the Design System is a significant improvement in the turnaround time and efficiency for the Marketing department.”

My favorite example of a new page constructed with the UHealth design system is this gorgeous interface for the Sports Medicine Institute.

Sports Medicine homepage

The Sports Medicine audience has unique needs and interests: they are professional and amateur athletes who need to get back in the game. The UHealth team used basic components plus an attention-grabbing image to create this interface for finding experts by issue.

And ultimately, that’s Palantir’s goal: your digital team should have the tools to create gorgeous, effective websites.

Content Strategy Design

Industries

Healthcare
Jul 19 2019
Jul 19
Patient engagement solutions company homepage on laptop

Content modeling as a practical foundation for future scalability in Drupal.

Content modeling as a practical foundation for future scalability On

Palantir recently partnered with a patient engagement solutions company that specializes in delivering patient and physician education to deliver improved health outcomes and an enhanced patient experience. They have an extensive library of patient education content that they use to build education playlists which are delivered to more than 51,000 physician offices, 1,000 hospitals, and 140,000 healthcare providers - and they are still growing.

The company is in the process of completely overhauling their technical stack so that they can rapidly scale up the number of products they use to deliver their patient education library. Currently, every piece of content needs to be entered separately for each product it can be delivered on, which forces the content teams to work in silos. In addition, because they use a dozen different taxonomies and doing so correctly requires a high level of context and nuance, any tagging of content can only be done at the manager level or above. The company partnered with Palantir.net to remove these bottlenecks and plan for future scalability.

Key Outcome

Palantir teamed up with this patient engagement solutions company to develop a master content model that:

  • Captures key content types and their relationships
  • Creates a standardized structure for content, including fields that enable serving content variations based on end-point devices and localization
  • Incorporates a taxonomy that enables content admins to quickly filter and select content relevant to their needs and device

Enabling Scalable Growth

The company’s content library is only getting larger over time, so the core need driving the master content model is to enable scalable growth. Specifically, that means a future state where:

  • New products can be added and old products deprecated without restructuring content. 
  • Content filtering can scale up for new product capabilities, languages, and specialties without having to be fundamentally reworked. 
  • Clients using the taxonomy find it intuitive and require minimal specific training to create and amend their own patient education playlists. 

These principles guided our recommendations for the content model and taxonomy.

Example of content model and related content

Content Model

Our client’s content model is currently organized by the end product that content is delivered through - for example, a waiting room screen vs. an interactive exam room touchscreen. This approach requires the digital team to enter the same piece of content multiple times.

To streamline this process for the team, we recommended a master content model that is organized by the purpose of the content, including the mindset of the audience and the high-level strategy for delivering value with that content.

For example, a “highlight” is a small piece of content intended to engage the audience and draw them into deeper exploration, while a “quiz” is a test of knowledge of a particular topic as training or entertainment.

Example of quiz and responses

This approach allows the company to separate the content types from products, which in turn makes them easier to scale. For example, this wireframe shows how a single piece of quiz content can be delivered on a range of endpoint devices depending on which fields that device uses. This approach allows us to show how a quiz might be delivered on a voice device, which is a product the company does not yet support, but could in the future.

“Our content is tailored to different audiences with different endpoints. Palantir took the initiative to not only learn about all of our content paths, but to also learn how our content managers interact with it on a daily basis. We’ve relied heavily on their expertise, especially for taxonomy, and they delivered.”

Executive Vice President, Content & Creative

Taxonomy

The company’s taxonomy has 12 separate vocabularies, and using them to construct meaningful content playlists requires a deep understanding of both the content and the audience. Existing content has been tagged based on both the information it contains and based on the patients to whom it would be relevant.

For example, a significant proportion of cardiology patients are affected by diabetes, so a piece of content titled "Healthy Eating with Diabetes" would be tagged with both "Diabetes" and "Cardiology". Additionally, many tags have subtle differences in how they are used — when do you use "cardiology" vs. "cardiovascular conditions"? "OB/GYN" vs. "Women's Health"?

This system requires that everyone managing the content — from content creators to healthcare providers and staff selecting content to appear in their medical practice — understand the full set of terms and the nuance of how they are applied in order to tag content consistently.

Our goal was to develop a taxonomy that can be used to filter content effectively without requiring deep platform-specific context and nuance.

Our guiding principles were to:

  • Tag based on the information in the content.
  • Use terms that are meaningful to a general audience.
  • Use combinations of tags to provide granularity.
  • Avoid duplicate information that is available as properties of the content
Back-end of Drupal editorial experience

We ultimately recommended a set of eight vocabularies. Two of them are based on company-specific business processes, and the remaining six are standards-based so that any practitioner can use them. By using combinations of terms, users can create playlists that are balanced in terms of educational and editorial content.

For example, in our recommended taxonomy, relevant content is tagged as referencing diabetes, so that the person building the playlist can still construct effective content playlists, without needing to carry in their head the nuance that many cardiology patients are also diabetic.

Moving Forward With Next Steps

This content modeling engagement spanned 9 weeks, and the Palantir team delivered:

  • A high-level content model identifying the core content types and their relationships
  • A set of global content fields that all content types in the model should have
  • A field level content model for the four most important content types
  • A new taxonomy approach based on internal user testing
  • A Drupal Demo code base showing how the content types and taxonomy can be built in Drupal 8

 

In the future, the company’s ultimate goal for the platform is to scale their engagement offerings with new content and new technology. With our purpose-driven content model and refined taxonomy, the company can scale their business by breaking down internal content silos and making tagging and filtering content consistent and predictable for their internal team and eventually, their customers. Palantir’s master content modeling work forms a practical foundation for the company’s radical re-platforming work.

Jul 19 2019
Jul 19
Monday, June 17, 2019 WeWork, 111 W Illinois Street, Chicago, IL Chicago IA/UX Meetup (official site)

Facilitating design workshops with key stakeholders allows them to have insight into the process of "how the sausage is made" and provides the product team buy-in from the get-go.

Join Palantir's Director of UX Operations, Lesley Guthrie, for a session on design workshops. She'll go over:

  • How to choose the right exercises 
  • How to play to the team skill sets
  • Ways to adjust the workshop to fit the needs of the project 

You'll learn how to sell it the idea of the design workshop to stakeholders and collaborate with them on a solution that can be tested and validated with real users.

Jul 19 2019
Jul 19

Content editors can help make the web a more accessible place, one published moment at a time.

Although web accessibility begins on a foundation built by content strategists, designers, and engineers, the buck does not stop there (or at site launch). Content marketers play a huge role in maintaining web accessibility standards as they publish new content over time.

“Web accessibility means that people with disabilities can perceive, understand, navigate, and interact with the Web, and that they can contribute to the Web.” - W3

Why Accessibility Standards are Important to Marketers

Web accessibility standards are often thought to assist audiences who are affected by common disabilities like low vision/blindness, deafness, or limited dexterity. In addition to these audiences, web accessibility also benefits those with a temporary or situational disability. This could include someone who is nursing an injury, someone who is working from a coffee shop with slow wifi, or someone who is in a public space and doesn’t want to become a nuisance to others by playing audio out loud.

Accessibility relies on empathy and understanding of a wide range of user experiences. People perceive your content through different senses depending on their own needs and preferences. If someone isn’t physically seeing the blog post you wrote or can’t hear the audio of the podcast you published, that doesn’t mean you as a marketer don’t care about providing that information to that audience, it just means you need to adapt in the way you are delivering that information to that audience.

10 Tips for Publishing Accessible Content

These tips have been curated and compiled from a handful of different resources including the WCAG standards set forth by W3C, and our team of accessibility gurus at Palantir. All of the informing resources are linked in a handy list at the end of this post. 

1. Consider the type of content and provide meaningful text alternatives.

Text alternatives should help your audience understand the content and context of each image, video, or audio file. It also makes that information accessible to technology that cannot see or hear your content, like search engines (which translates to better SEO).

Icons to show image, audio, video

Types of text alternatives you can provide:

  • Images - Provide alternative text.
  • Audio - Provide transcripts.
  • Video - Provide captions and video descriptions in action.

This tip affects those situational use cases mentioned above as well. Think about the last time you sent out an email newsletter. If someone has images turned off on their email to preserve cellular data, you want to make sure your email still makes sense. Providing a text alternative means your reader still has all of the context they need to understand your email, even without that image.

2. Write proper alt text.

Alternative text or alt text is a brief text description that can be attributed to the HTML tag for an image on a web page. Alt text enables users who cannot see the images on a page to better understand your content. Screen readers and other assistive technology can’t interpret the meaning of an image without alt text.

With the addition of required alternative text, Drupal 8 has made it easier to build accessibility into your publishing workflow. However, content creators still need to be able to write effective alt text. Below I’ve listed a handful of things to consider when writing alt text for your content.

  • Be as descriptive and accurate as possible. Provide context. Especially if your image is serving a specific function, people who don’t see the image should have the same understanding as if they had.
  • If you’re sharing a chart or other data visualization, include that data in the alt text so people have all of the important information.
  • Avoid using “image of,” “picture of,” or something similar. It’s already assumed that the alt text is referencing an image, and you are losing precious character space (most screen readers cut off alt text at around 125 characters). The caveat to this is if you are describing a work of art, like a painting or illustration.
  • No spammy keyword stuffing. Alt text does help with SEO, but that’s not it’s primary purpose, so don’t abuse it. Find that happy medium between including all of the vital information and also including maybe one or two of those keywords you’re trying to target.
Illustration of red car with flames shooting out of the back, flying over line of cars on sunny roadway.Example of good alt text: “Red car in the sky.”
Example of better alt text: “Illustration of red car with flames shooting out of the back, flying over line of cars on sunny roadway.”

3. Establish a hierarchy.

Upside down pyramid split into three sections labeled high importance, medium importance, low importance

Accessibility is more than just making everything on a page available as text. It also affects the way you structure your content, and how you guide your users through a page. When drafting content, put the most important information first. Group similar content, and clearly separate different topics with headings. You want to make sure your ideas are organized in a logical way to improve scannability and encourage better understanding amongst your readers.

4. Use headings, lists, sections, and other structural elements to support your content hierarchy.

Users should be able to quickly assess what information is on a page and how it is organized. Using headings, subheadings and other structural elements helps establish hierarchy and makes web pages easily understandable by both the human eye and a screen reader. Also, when possible, opt for using lists over tables. Tables are ultimately more difficult for screen reader users to navigate.

If you’re curious to see how structured your content is, scan the URL using WAVE, an accessibility tool that allows you to see an outline of the structural elements on any web page. Using WAVE can help you better visualize how someone who is using assistive technologies might be viewing your page.

5. Write a descriptive title for every page.

This one is pretty straight forward. Users should be able to quickly assess the purpose of each page. Screen readers announce the page title when they load a web page, so writing a descriptive title helps those users make more informed page selections.

Page titles impact:

  • Users with low vision who need to be able to easily distinguish between pages
  • Users with cognitive disabilities, limited short-term memory, and reading disabilities.

6. Be intentional with your link text.

Write link text that makes each link’s purpose clear to the user. Links should provide info on where you will end up or what will happen if you click on that link. If someone is using a screen reader to tab through 3 links on a page that all read “click here,” that doesn’t really help them figure out what each link’s purpose is and ultimately decide which link they should click on.

Additional tips:

  • Any contextual information should directly precede links.
  • Don’t use urls as link text; they aren’t informative. A
  • void writing long paragraphs with multiple links. If you have multiple links to share on one topic, it’s better to write a short piece of text followed by a list of bulleted links.

EX: Use "Learn more about our new Federated Search application" not "Learn more".

7. Avoid using images of text in place of actual text.

The exact guideline set forth by W3 here is “Make it easier for users to see and hear content including separating foreground from background.” 

There are many reasons why this is a good practice that reach beyond accessibility implications. Using actual text helps with SEO, allows for on-page search ability for users, and creates the ability to highlight for copy/pasting. There are some exceptions that can be made if the image is essential to include (like a logo). Providing alt text also may be a solution for certain use cases.

8. Avoid idioms, jargon, abbreviations, and other nonliteral words.

The guideline set forth by W3 is to “make text content readable and understandable.” Accessibility aside, this is important for us marketers In the Drupal-world, because it’s really easy to include a plethora of jargon that your client audience might not be familiar with. So be accessible AND client-friendly, and if you have to use jargon or abbreviations, make sure you provide a definition of the word, link to the definition, or include an explanation of any abbreviations on first reference.

Think about it this way: if you are writing in terms people aren’t familiar with, how will they know to search for them? Plain language = better SEO.

9. Create clear content for your audience’s reading level.

For most Americans, the average reading level is a lower secondary education level. Even if you are marketing to a group of savvy individuals who are capable of understanding pretty complicated material, the truth is, most people are pressed for time and might become stressed if they have to read super complicated marketing materials. This is also important to keep in mind for people with cognitive disabilities, or reading disabilities, like dyslexia.

I know what you’re thinking, “but I am selling a complicated service.” If you need to include technical or complicated material to get your point across, then provide supplemental content such as an infographic or illustration, or a bulleted list of key points.

There are a number of tools online that you can use to determine the readability of your content, and WebAIM has a really great resource for guidelines on writing clearly.

10. Clearly label form input elements.

If you are in content marketing, chances are you have built a form or two in your time. No matter whether you’re creating those in Drupal or an external tool like Hubspot, you want to make sure you are labeling form fields clearly so that the user can understand how to complete the form. For example, expected data formats (such as day, month, year) are helpful. Also, required fields should be clearly marked. This is important for accessibility, but also then you as a marketer end up with better data.

Helpful Resources

Here are a few guides I've found useful in the quest to publish accessible content:

Accessibility Tools

People
Jul 19 2019
Jul 19
NRHRC homepage on a laptop computer sitting on a table with a small plant next to the laptop

How we helped NRHRC conduct user testing to validate an audience-centric navigation. 

ruralcenter.org User Testing to Validate an Audience-Centric Navigation On

The National Rural Health Resource Center (The Center) is a nonprofit organization dedicated to sustaining and improving health care in rural communities by providing technical assistance, information, tools, and resources. Users on The Center’s site are looking for information relating to services they provide, programs and events they coordinate, and resources that have been developed to guide and support rural health stakeholders, like webinars, articles, and presentations.

The Center had been making iterative modifications to their Drupal site to improve wayfinding for their visitors, but the team had not yet been able to conduct any user testing on the organization of the site. The Center partnered with Palantir.net to build on previous architecture work and test, validate, and provide recommendations for a more effective, user-centric navigation that lowers user effort on their site.
 

The goals of the engagement were to: 


 

  • Make navigation labels and structure relevant and intuitive to users
  • Test and validate hypotheses with real user data
  • Have the web team partner hands-on with Palantir, so they could see how the user testing processes and tools work and execute these research methods on their own for future optimization efforts

The project had two key constraints:

  • Testing needed to focus on copy and labeling rather than new features. The Center’s goal was to surface UX improvements that their team could implement within the Drupal CMS by iterating on menu labels, menu structure, and copy.
  • Limited budget. The Center’s budget could cover a limited set of tests, so Palantir needed to formulate a testing plan that maximized the value of the user testing.

Palantir and the Center teamed up to run a Top Task survey to inform a new Information Architecture (IA) and then ran a tree test to validate the new IA.

Key results with the new Information Architecture and the optimized tree:

  • 17% higher success rate overall for users completing tasks
  • 8% increase in overall “directness” rate (tasks completed with fewer backtracks)

How did we get there?

Palantir implemented a three-step process:

  1. Work with key stakeholders at the Center to identify key metrics.
  2. Design and implement tests.
  3. Handoff our recommendations for the Center to implement.

Step 1: Work with key stakeholders at the Center to identify key metrics.

It was imperative to understand the Center’s goals as they relate to their user’s goals to be able to optimize the site structure and test against what users find important. 

Because the Center’s site is a resource site first, the goals focused on users being able to find the resources they are looking for.

Key Performance Indicators (KPIs)

How we planned to measure success against our established goals:

  • Customer-reported satisfaction with “findability”
    • “Did this content answer your question?” feature (example)
  • Improvement in task performance indicators
    • Webinar participation
    • Completion of Self-Assessment form
    • Download of publications
  • Qualified, interested service leads

Step 2: Design and implement tests.

Our testing approach was two-fold, with one underlying question to answer: what is the most intuitive site structure for users?

Test #1: Top Task survey

During the Top Task survey, we had users rank a list of tasks we think they are trying to complete on the site, so that we have visibility into their priorities. The results from this survey informed a revised version of the navigation labels and structure, which we then tested in the following tree test. The survey was conducted via Google forms with existing Center audiences, aiming for 75+ completions.

We then used these audience-defined “top tasks” to inform the new information architecture, which we tested in our second test.

Test #2: IA tree test

During the tree testing of the Information Architecture, we stripped out any visuals and tested the outline of the menu structure. We began with a mailing list of about 2,500 people, split the list into two segments, and A/B tested the new proposed structure (Variant) vs. the current structure (Benchmark). Both trees were tested with the same tasks but using different labels and structure to see with which tree people could complete the tasks quicker and more successfully.

Step 3: Handoff our recommendations for the Center to implement.

Once the tests were completed, users’ behavior was compared to an “ideal” path, and success rates were analyzed. The test results informed our recommendations to help the Center think about label changes that are more user-centric as opposed to internal jargon. 

The Center has worked with Palantir on multiple projects. Palantir delivers their service in close partnership with our small team. This approach has allowed us to build our internal website development capacity and repeat success even after Palantir’s contract work was completed.

Phillip Birk

Senior IT Specialist

Chart showing overall success rate by task

The Outcomes

Overall, users had a 17% higher success rate with the optimized tree, and they completed the tasks with fewer “backtracks” (less second-guessing their path) on the variant.

One of the most impressive results for the Center was that 29% more users could find recorded webinars with the newly proposed tree. 
 

Next steps for the Center will be to implement the top-level navigation recommendations made by Palantir, and then select KPIs to monitor long-term. They’ll also follow up with program-specific tree test projects.

The greatest mark of success for this project is that the Center’s web team now has knowledge of the tools and processes needed to run these tests on their own, so they can continue to make iterative improvements over time. Websites are one of the most important tools used to deliver business value, and just like your business’ needs evolve over time, so do the needs of your audience. It’s never too late to perform user testing and improve upon your user experience.

Jul 19 2019
Jul 19
April 8 - 12, 2019 Washington State Convention Center, Seattle, Washington DrupalCon (official site)

Our team is always excited to catch up with fellow Drupal community members (and each other) in person during DrupalCon. Here’s what we have on deck for this year’s event:

Visit us at booth #709

Drop by and say hi in the exhibit hall! We’ll be at booth number 709, giving away some new swag that is very special to us. Have a lot to talk about? Schedule a meeting with us

Palantiri Sessions

Keeping That New Car Smell: Tips for Publishing Accessible Content by Alex Brandt and Nelson Harris

Content editors play a huge role in maintaining web accessibility standards as they publish new content over time. Alex and Nelson will go over a handful of tips to make sure your content is accessible for your audience.


Fostering Community Health and Demystifying the CWG by George DeMet and friends

The Drupal Community Working Group is tasked with fostering community health. This Q&A format session hopes to bring to light our charter, our processes, our impact and how we can improve.


The Challenge of Emotional Labor in Open Source Communities by Ken Rickard

Emotional labor is, in one sense, the invisible thread that ties all our work together. Emotional labor supports and enables the creation and maintenance of our products. It is a critical community resource, yet undervalued and often dismissed. In this session, we'll take a look at a few reasons why that may be the case and discuss some ways in which open source communities are starting to recognize the value of emotional labor.

  • Date: Thursday, April 11
  • Time: 2:30pm
  • Location: Exhibit Stage | Level 4


The Remote Work Toolkit: Tricks for Keeping Healthy and Happy by Kristen Mayer and Luke Wertz

Moving from working in a physical office to a remote office can be a big change, yet have a lot of benefits. Kristen and Luke will talk about transitioning from working in an office environment to working remotely - how to embrace the good things about remote work, but also ways in which you might need to change your behavior to mitigate the challenges and stay mentally healthy.

Join us for Trivia Night 

Thursday night we will be sponsoring one of our favorite parts of DrupalCon, Trivia Night. Brush up on your Drupal facts, grab some friends, and don't forget to bring your badge! Flying solo to DrupalCon? We would love to have you on our team!

  • Date: Thursday, April 11
  • Time: 8pm - 11:45pm
  • Location: Armory at Seattle Center | 305 Harrison Street

We'll see you all next week!

Jul 19 2019
Jul 19

We have released version 2.0 of our Federated Search application and Drupal integration.

Since our initial release, we’ve been doing agile, iterative development on the software. Working with our partners at the University of Michigan and the State of Georgia, we’ve made refinements to both the application and the Drupal integration.

Better search results

Default searches now target the entire index and not the more narrow tm_rendered_item field. This change allows Solr admins to have better control over the refinement of search results, including the use of field boosting and elevate.xml query enhancements.

Autocomplete search results

We added support for search autocomplete at both the application and Drupal block levels -- and the two can use the same or different data sources to populate results. We took a configurable approach to autocomplete, which supports “search as you type” completion of partial text. These results can also include keyboard navigation for accessibility.

Since the Drupal block is independent of the React application, we made it configurable so that the block can have a distinct API endpoint from the application. We did this because the state of Georgia has specific requirements that their default search behavior should be to search the local site first, looking for items marked with a special “highlighted content” field.

Enter search terms field with list of suggested results

Wildcard searching

We fully support wildcard searches as a configuration option, so that a search for “run” will automatically pass “run” and “run*” as search terms.

Default facet control

The default facets sets for the application -- Site, Content Type, and Date Range -- can now be disabled on a per-site basis. This feature is useful for sites that contribute content to a network but only wish to search their own site’s content.

Enhanced query parameters

We’ve added additional support for term-based facets to be passed from the search query string. This means that all facet options except dates can be passed directly via external URL before loading the search form.

Better Drupal theming

We split the module’s display into proper theme templates for the block and it’s form, and we added template suggestions for each form element so that themes can easily enhance or override the default styling of the Drupal block. We also removed some overly opinionated CSS from the base style of the application. This change should allow CSS overrides to have better control over element styling.

What’s Next for Users?

All of these changes should be backward compatible for existing users, though minor changes to the configuration may be required, Users of the Drupal 8.x-2.0 release will need to run the Drupal update script to load the new default settings. Sites that override CSS should confirm that they address the new styles.

Currently, the changes only apply to Drupal 8 sites. We’ll be backporting the new features to Drupal 7 in the upcoming month.

Users of the 1.0 release may continue to use both the existing Drupal module and their current JS and CSS files until the end of 2019. We recommend upgrading to the 2.0 versions of both, which requires minor CSS and configuration changes you can read about in the upgrade documentation.

Special Thanks

Palantir senior engineer Jes Constantine worked through the most significant changes to the application and integration code. Senior front-end developer Nate Striedinger worked through the template design and CSS. And engineer Matt Carmichael provided QA and code review. And a special shoutout to James Sansbury of Lullabot -- our first external contributor.

Development Drupal Open Source
Mar 15 2019
Mar 15

The business world is competitive by nature. An organization’s intellectual property and the custom software that costs valuable time and money to develop is an incredibly prized possession - one that’s important to protect. That’s why the idea of procuring an open source solution (free software that can be used by anyone) can be such a foreign and challenging concept for many in the business world.

In this article, we’ll walk through some of the most common questions that clients have about procuring open source software, so that you’ll understand how this software is licensed, what you can and can't do with it, and hopefully help you make an informed decision about procuring and extending open source software services.

How does open source licensing work, exactly?

Open source software turns the traditional software licensing model on its head by allowing users to modify and freely redistribute software. Open source is defined by criteria intended to promote and protect software freedom, and support the communities which contribute to the success of open source projects.

Are there any laws that prevent someone from making changes to the software and repackaging the entire thing for sale?

Many open source projects are able to survive and thrive because there are protections in place that prevent someone from turning the project into something proprietary. Drupal and many other open source projects are covered under the GNU Public License or GPL, one of the most common open source licenses. The GPL prevents anyone from distributing the software that it covers without also sharing its source code. This ensures that the project covered by the GPL remains open source.

Does this mean that if I pay a contractor for custom code to be developed that adds to an existing GPL-covered open source project, I’ll be required to release that work to the public for free?

The short answer is simply “no”. If you work on or pay for someone to work on custom code that modifies a GPL-covered open source project, you won’t be required to give that work away to the community at large.

The GPL only requires that you release your source code if you plan to sell or release (“distribute”) your custom code. If you’re just planning to use the code internally, or as part of a hosted solution that you control, there’s no need to share it with the world.

But shouldn’t I share the code? Isn’t that how open source works?

Many users of open source software do decide to share their source code with the world through contributions to the open source project in question, such as a contributed module in Drupal. There is no requirement to do this, but there are some advantages.

Source code is the actual text document that a software developer creates. It’s uncompiled, meaning that it’s written in programming language that can be read and edited by a human. The reason that distinction is important here is that source code is raw and can be inspected and modified. This practice helps improve both the security and the usability of the software.

By sharing your source code, other people may decide to improve on it and fix it for free, because it’s mutually beneficial. It’s much harder to staff a team of internal developers to keep your code tested, maintained, and bug-free while planning an improvement roadmap to add new features and create new software integrations. Having others work on your code means it is made better both for you and for them. Sometimes the advantage of having software that works really well and has updates and features added more quickly outweighs the advantage of keeping your innovation secret from your competitors.

Curious if open source software is right for your business? Read our post on how you can save money using open source technologies.

Mar 15 2019
Mar 15

Keynote: Learning @ Work

Join Palantir's CEO, Tiffany Farriss, for the keynote at this year's DrupalCorn Camp. With tech still struggling to achieve its diversity and inclusion goals and average job tenure down to less than 3 years, we need to transform how we think about our organizational cultures.

How do we create environments that succeed because of the teams, but where that success is not dependent on any one person? How do we align the company and individual interests so that everyone benefits from however much time that they work together? This presentation explores the role that culture and learning have for organizations and individuals as they work to answering those questions.

  • Date: Friday, September 28, 2018
  • Time: 9:00am
  • Location: Gym - lecture room 2nd floor

Update: Recording of this session is now available on Drupal.tv

Mar 15 2019
Mar 15

With the announcement that the Google Search Appliance was End of Life, many universities started looking around for replacement options. At Palantir, we wanted to provide an open source option that could solve the following needs:

  • A simple way to store, retrieve, and parse content.
  • A cross-platform search application.
  • A speedy, usable, responsive front-end.
  • A flexible, extensible, reusable model.
  • A drop-in replacement for deprecated Google Products

Working with the University of Michigan, we architected and developed a solution. Join Ken Rickard to learn more about Federated Search and to see a live demo.

  • Date: Saturday, February 16
  • Time: 11:00am to 11:45am
  • Location: Room 179 

Update: Video of this session is now available on Drupal.tv

Mar 07 2019
Mar 07

This year is the sixth annual Midwest Drupal Camp (aka MidCamp). Palantir is excited to sponsor this year’s event and also have multiple Palantiri presenting sessions!

Palantir Sessions and Events

Community Working Group Update and Q&A by George DeMet

The mission of the Drupal Community Working Group (CWG) is to uphold the Drupal Code of Conduct and maintain a friendly and welcoming community for the Drupal project. In this session, CWG members George DeMet (gdemet) and Michael Anello (ultimike) will provide an update on some of the CWG's recent activities and what the group is working on in 2019, as well as answer audience questions.

  • Thursday @ 2:50pm
  • Room 314A


Federated Search with Drupal, SOLR, and React (AKA the Decoupled Ouroboros) by Matt Carmichael and Dan Montgomery

Our session will begin with a tour through a recent project developed by Palantir.net for the University of Michigan — bringing content from disparate sites (D7, D8, Wordpress) into a single index and then serve results out in a consistent manner, allowing users to search across all included properties. We’ll discuss how we got started with React, our process for hooking up to SOLR, and how we used Drupal to tie the whole thing together.

  • Friday @ 9am
  • Room 324


Overcoming Imposter Syndrome: How Weightlifting Helped Me Accept My Place in Tech by Kristen Mayer

Weightlifting and tech. On the surface, these two things may not seem to have much in common, but as a woman trying to navigate both of these male-dominated spheres, I’ve often been intimidated and doubted whether I really belonged. In this session, I’ll look at the strategies that helped me overcome imposter syndrome in the gym, and my journey of applying them to my professional life. I hope that anyone attending this session will walk away feeling empowered about their position and skills within the tech community!

  • Thursday @ 3:40pm
  • Room 312


Understanding Migration Development in Drupal 8: Strategies and Tools to See What's Happening by Dan Montgomery

Migrations in Drupal can be challenging for developers because the tools and strategies to get started and peer behind the curtain are different than those used in most backend development. This is an intermediate topic intended for developers who have a basic understanding of Drupal 8 concepts including plugins and the way entities and fields are used in Drupal to manage content.

  • Thursday @ 11:40am
  • Room 314B


Game Night!

Head to the second floor for a fun night of board games, camaraderie and conversation. Camp registration is required to attend this event.

  • Thursday from 6-9pm
  • 2nd Level


We'll see you there!

Jan 07 2019
Jan 07

We recently published a blog post introducing our solution to Google Search Appliance being discontinued—an open source application we built and named Federated Search. If you haven’t already, we recommend checking out that first blog post to get the basics on how we built the application and why. Read on here to learn how you can see for yourself what the application does.

Search API Federated Solr is a complex application, and the best way to understand what's going on is to see it in action! Since the application requires a Solr instance in addition to a number of Drupal modules, we're not able to use Simplytest.me for demos. Instead, we've bundled all of the pieces together with Palantir's open source dev tools — the-vagrant and the-build — for a seamless demo experience that runs in a local virtual machine (VM) running on Vagrant. Head to GitHub to review the requirements, and then clone the repo and get started.

Setting up the environment

The-vagrant is a customizable vagrant environment that can be built into a project from scratch or easily retrofit an existing project (such as a new support client). On first setup, a handy install wizard takes users through a configuration process to choose hostnames, enable optional services like Solr, and enable further customization through Ansible tasks. The-vagrant is capable of handling single site, multi-site, or multiple-site (many docroot) setups in a single box, so it was a perfect match for our Federated Search environment.

The-build is a set of reusable phing targets for building Drupal projects. Once our VM is up and running, we use a standard set of these tasks to automate a number of complex tasks, such as:

  • Copying settings and services files into Drupal sites directories
  • Installing Drupal using an install profile and any existing config
  • Running post-install tasks like migrations
  • Running test suites
  • Importing databases from hosting environments
  • Deploying code to hosting environments

We have a shared set of phing targets that provide the foundation for many of these tasks, and each project extends them to meet their specific needs.

Building the demo

The Federated Search Demo repo builds a simulated multiple site environment, with a Solr server to boot, in the comfort of your own VM. Our demo site is expressly designed for both testing and development.

Because the application supports multisite, Domain Access, and standalone sites, we wanted to be able to demo (and develop for) all possible scenarios. To this end, the demo contains four docroots: Drupal 7 standalone, Drupal 7 Domain Access (coming soon), Drupal 8 standalone, Drupal 8 Domain Access. The D8 sites use the amazing core Umami profile to demo with real content, while the D7 site uses Devel Generate for some lorem ipsum-based content.

As of this writing, Domain Access is supported in the Drupal 7 module code, but not installed in the demo profile. The reverse is true for Drupal 8, and making the Drupal 8 version of Federated Search support Domain Access is under active development. We literally had to build the VM in order to finish those features!

There are a lot of dependencies involved, so let’s go to an application diagram:

Repo diagram

There’s a lot going on there, but we suggest grabbing the repo and seeing for yourself.

What to expect

Once you clone the demo repo, there are full instructions on getting the VM and Drupal up and running. After installing all of the sites, you can start by visiting http://d8.fs-demo.local and use the search box to test a search (maybe try mushrooms, yum). You should see the React-powered search page with your results and a number of filters on the left side which you can experiment with.

Search results page for mushrooms

Once you see the search results, you can dig in to how it works. In the Search App Settings (found at admin/config/search-api-federated-solr/search-app/settings) you can control a number of pieces of how the search page is displayed including it’s route and title. We set the page to default to ‘/search-app’ so as not to conflict with the default core configuration. Any changes made on this page should clear the cache for the search application and immediately be reflected on refresh.

Drupal interface

Next, you may want to see how data is indexed. The search index field config page (found at admin/config/search/search-api/index/federated_search_index/fields) will show a list of all of the mapped fields the site is sending to the index. Clicking on Edit will show you the details of each, showing each bundle in the site and how it’s being sent to the index. The Edit modal includes a token picker, showing the true power of this tool—the ability to use tokens or text at the bundle level to send data to our index.

Manage fields for search index

Edit field Federated Image

From this screen, try editing the config for a field, adding a token or changing a format. Once you do that, Search API will prompt you to re-index your data.

You can do so, then refresh the search results to see the changes. You might also want to inspect the raw data being sent to Solr. To do that, visit the Solr dashboard (at http://federated-search-demo.local:8983/solr/#/drupal8/query) and execute the default query. There you can see all of the fields being sent to the index.

Solr index

Coming back to the search page, inspecting the results with the React Dev Tools will help you understand how the application is handling data. Once you install the browser extension, you can inspect the app, view the React components, see props being passed through the stack, and more. For an even deeper dive into the React application, you can clone that project and build it locally.

Inspecting results

Contributing

In addition to providing a full demo environment, this repo also serves as a development environment for Search API Federated Solr and Search API Field Map. While those modules are installed by composer, the repo also links them into the ‘/src/’ directory for easy access. From there, you can add a GitHub remote or create patches for Drupal.org.

Issues for the demo can be raised on GitHub, and issues for the modules can be on either GitHub or Drupal.org. Be sure to read the handbook on Drupal.org for even more detail on how the system works.

Learn more about Federated Search in this presentation from Decoupled Days (or just view the slides).

Jan 07 2019
Jan 07

Last year, Google announced Google Search Appliance would be discontinued. This announcement means that enterprise clients needing a simple yet customizable search application for their internal properties will be left without a solution some time in 2019.

As the request of an existing client, Palantir has worked for the past year to produce a replacement for the GSA and other federated search applications using open-source tools. We abstracted this project into a reusable product to index and serve data across disparate data sources, Drupal and otherwise, and we’re now happy to share it with the community.

What is Federated Search?

We have created an application that allows you to index multiple Drupal (or other) sites to a single search application, and then serve the results out in a consistent manner with a drop-in application that will work on any site where you’re able to add a little CSS and JavaScript.

Federated Search is being released publicly as an open source solution to a common problem. It works out-of-the-box, and can also be customized. There are three main parts to the product:

  • Content indexing via Drupal integration (provided)
  • Result serving via React application (provided)
  • Data storage in a Solr backend (required; we can recommend SearchStax as an option.)

How was Federated Search built?

Every search application, no matter what the implementation, has three main parts: the source, the index, and the results.

Working from the results backward, we began with identifying a schema in which all of our source data would be stored. A basic review of search pages across the internet reveals a fairly common set of features. A title, some descriptive text, and a link are the absolute minimum for displaying search results. Some extra metadata like an image, date, and type are also useful to give the user a richer experience and some filter criteria. Finally, since we’re searching across sites, we’ll need some data about where the item comes from.

sitewide search results page from prototype

With that schema in mind, and knowing Drupal would be our data source, we identified a need to get data from some unknown structure in Drupal (because every site might have vastly different content types) into a fixed set of buckets. Since much of the terminology is the same, the Metatag module quickly came to mind — Metatag allows users to take data from Drupal fields using Tokens and output it into specific meta-tags on the site. With that same pattern in mind, we built Search API Field Map. This module allows us to use tokens to set bundle-level patterns, which all get indexed into the same field in our index.

At Palantir, search is part of every project. We’ve implemented numerous custom and complex search configurations, and almost every time we lean on Apache Solr for our backend. Solr is a CMS-agnostic search index that has a well-supported and robust existing toolchain for Drupal. Search API and Search API Solr provided a solid groundwork from which to build our source plugins, so then the last step was getting our data out. Solr comes out of the box with “Response Writers” that cover almost every known data format, so our options were wide open.

We knew we wanted to provide our client with a CMS-agnostic drop-in interface and that we had a data source that’s fluent in JSON, so that immediately pointed us in the direction of a Javascript framework. The JS space is incredibly dense at the moment, but after some investigation, we settled on React to provide us the robust data management and user interface for our search application.

We started with an existing framework to provide the query handlers and basic front-end components, then extended it with our own set of component packs to build out the user interface. Search API Federated Solr provides the React application as a Drupal library, adds a search block, and surfaces some custom per-site configuration for the search application.

A Flexible, Open Source Search Solution

With Drupal, Solr, and React working together, we’re able to index data from completely arbitrary sources, standardize it, and then output it in an easily consumable way. This approach means more flexibility for site administrators and a cleaner experience for users.

A number of commercial applications exist to provide this functionality, but our solution provides a number of benefits:

  • Keeping the data source tightly coupled with Drupal allows for maximum customization and access to the source content.
  • Providing a decoupled front-end allows us to surface results anywhere, even outside of Drupal.
  • Being built on 100% open-source code allows for community improvement and sharing.

How can you use this or download the code?

Between the Drupal modules and React code, there’s a lot going on to make this application work, and even with those, you’ll still need to bring your own Solr backend to index the data. Luckily, we’ve put all those pieces together into a fully functional demo box using Palantir’s open source Vagrant environment and build tasks.

If you’d like to inspect the pieces individually, here they are:

Palantir plans to maintain these projects as a cohesive unit moving forward, and pull requests or D.o issues on the projects above are always welcome.

Does it have to be a Drupal site?

No! While we provide everything needed to index a Drupal 8 or Drupal 7 site, there’s no reason you can’t configure an additional data source to send content to the same Solr index, as long as it conforms to the required schema. The front-end is also CMS-agnostic, so you could search Drupal sites from Wordpress, another CMS, or even from a statically generated site.

You can read how to see Federated Search in action in our Demo blog post or learn more about Federated Search in this presentation from Decoupled Days (or just view the slides).

Oct 30 2018
Oct 30

More than 1 million websites worldwide use Drupal to combine great design with power, speed and security that Drupal provides. From large enterprises to NGOs, Drupal is actively helping organizations change the world through their digital experiences. One of these institutions is the Commonwealth of Massachusetts.

In a recent report published by ITIF (an independent, nonpartisan think tank), the official website for the Commonwealth of Massachusetts (mass.gov) was named #3 in the nation for its overall web presence.

“This report assesses four criteria: page-load speed, mobile friendliness, security, and accessibility. For page-load speed, we reviewed both desktop page-load speed and mobile page-load speed.” - ITIF

Building a Better Experience for Constituents

The Commonwealth set out to better the digital experience for the constituents of Massachusetts back in 2016 when they began engaging with outside vendors to take on the responsibility of redesigning and developing mass.gov using the open source CMS Drupal 8. The end goal for the Commonwealth was to restructure their site’s content in a way that made it intuitive for people to accomplish their goals.

With the help of Palantir.net, Massachusetts launched the new platform in October 2017 designed to better serve constituent needs in the digital age.

“We’ve redesigned Mass.gov for you, the people of the Commonwealth. We have one goal: to make it easy for you to find what you need.” - Mass.gov homepage

We’re proud of Mass.gov for this amazing achievement, and we’re not surprised. Good web design in government is about ensuring a great experience for constituents of diverse backgrounds and creating an open and accessible government for all users.

The goal of ITIF’s report was to assess state government websites based on seven popular state e-government services. Download the full report to see how your state’s website ranked.

Oct 26 2018
Oct 26

RFF will be measuring the success of the consortium’s website by looking at factors like how the site’s audience grows over time. They hope that the VALUABLES community will use the platform to learn more about the consortium’s activities, access information about the case studies the consortium is completing, and share the tools it is building.

RFF takes an economic lens toward environmental and energy-based issues, highlighting how decisions affect both our environment and our economy. Historically, RFF has played an important role in environmental economics by developing the methods and studies that help policymakers understand the value of things that are hard to value, like clean air and clean water. Now, a few decades later, RFF is working with NASA on this initiative to value information. Work to quantify the societal benefits of Earth observations is important for a number of reasons. For example, it can help demonstrate return on investments in satellites. It can also provide Earth scientists with an effective way to communicate the value of satellite remote sensing work to policymakers and the public.

Oct 24 2018
Oct 24

In order to move the needle on business outcomes, methods must be backed with real, actionable insights and data. For Extension, this meant developing a deep understanding of their users’ behavior and motivations.

First, we defined key audience segments and generated personas and user journeys. Then, we validated the way that each segment interacts with the site through menu testing and in-person usability testing. This user research gave us direct and applicable insights which established the foundation for what kinds of features prospective students need and expect from the site.

Sep 20 2018
Sep 20

In his blog post outlining the roadmap to Drupal 9 published last week, Dries Buytaert states that “if you are on Drupal 8, you just have to keep your Drupal 8 site up-to-date and you'll be ready for Drupal 9.” The maturity of Drupal 8 and its solid upgrade path make this the time to migrate your site to Drupal 8.

We’re excited to announce that the Palantir team released a new Workbench module this month for Drupal 8 called Workbench Tabs. We have used this module to improve editorial usability on nearly all of our Drupal 8 projects, and it has been public on Github for a while now, but now it's available on Drupal.org!

What is Workbench?

Workbench is a suite of modules released by Palantir to help solve common editorial problems in Drupal. The core Workbench module is largely a collection of custom Views that create dashboards for content editors. Its widespread use by organizations in government, higher education, nonprofits, and media is a testament to the module suite, and its capabilities have been helping editorial teams manage workflows and permissions since Drupal 7.

What does Workbench Tabs do?

Workbench Tabs integrates local task tabs and Drupal messages into the Toolbar. What exactly does that mean?

  • Editorial usability is improved by placing the "Edit," "View," "Revisions," and "Delete" tabs in a consistent location
  • Custom themes don't need to place and style the local task tabs
  • Drupal messages will be separated from the content layout

++ to the Palantir team members that made this happen: Patrick, Ashley, Ken, Avi, and Bec.

Want to learn more about Workbench in Drupal 8? Drop us a line through our contact form, or reach out to us on Twitter @Palantir.

Aug 23 2018
Aug 23

MIT Press’ internal database already housed a record of all of their books, including information like when a title was published, cover image files, and more. Because it was already part of their workflow as a publishing house, MIT Press needed to continue maintaining book information using that specific system.

The main challenge they faced was how to pull all of that book data in from their publishing system and expose it on the new website. Their previous workflow involved exporting a large file from the publishing database and then importing that data into the website, but this produced challenges as there was no control over editorial workflow or how information appeared on the site. It also meant updates to titles on the site only happened when they had time to import massive files to their site.

After migrating the site to Drupal 8, Palantir integrated custom Drupal entities with MIT Press’ custom API which provides all of their book data. Nearly all of the information about books and contributors comes from the MIT Press API, even related book titles. The MIT Press marketing team can now use information pulled in through the API to spin up the landing pages and other content that help showcase their collection.

The API integration between the internal publishing system and the Drupal website allows MIT Press content authors to continue using their existing editorial workflows, which frees up precious time for their team to concentrate on higher level strategic objectives.

Aug 13 2018
Aug 13

Federated Search with Drupal, SOLR, and React (AKA the Decoupled Ouroboros)

Join Palantir's Avi Schwab for a discussion at the Drupal Chicago Meetup. He'll be going over a recent Palantir project and how we bring content from disparate sites (D7, D8, Wordpress) into a single index and then serve results out in a consistent manner, allowing users to search across all included properties. Avi will discuss how we got started with React, our process for hooking up to SOLR, and how we used Drupal to tie the whole thing together.

  • Date: Wednesday, July 11, 2018
  • Time: 5:30 - 7:30pm
  • Location: Caxy Interactive, 212 West Van Buren Street, Chicago, IL
Aug 13 2018
Aug 13

Decoupled Drupal was a hot topic at DrupalCon Nashville, and Palantir is very excited to be Silver Sponsors of this year's Decoupled Drupal Days. Keep an eye out for Patrick Weston and Avi Schwab; they'll be attending the event and would love to hear about your recent decoupled projects. 

Federated Search with Drupal, SOLR, and React (AKA the Decoupled Ouroboros)

Avi will be presenting on Friday and giving an overview of a recent Palantir project. He'll explain how we bring content from disparate sites (D7, D8, Wordpress) into a single index and then serve results out in a consistent manner, allowing users to search across all included properties. He'll also go over how we got started with React, our process for hooking up to SOLR, and how we used Drupal to tie the whole thing together. More details can be found on the official site

  • Date: Friday, August 17, 2018
  • Time: 2:45 PM
  • Room: Aten Design Group Lecture Hall
Jul 13 2018
Jul 13

Updated 8/23/2018: This survey is now closed! Thank you for participating. Survey results can be read here

Do you use Drupal? Before working at Palantir, I used Drupal only once: to help a legacy client with their Drupal 6 website. They had a support contract with my company, so if they had an issue or question I would do my best to help them, even though the original team who built the site had moved on to other jobs, and even though my company focused on WordPress sites.

I remember scrutinizing every menu item of the admin section, trying to familiarize myself with the platform while careful not to misclick and mess up something on the client’s site. Some of the terms I could understand—users, taxonomy—but some were new or vague, and not very clear to their meaning such as nodes, views, and blocks. While I was able to help the client at the time, I felt Drupal was too obtuse of a platform for me.

Redesign planned for Drupal

Now that I’m at Palantir, and knowing Drupal is a bigger part of my job, I’m still struck by how user unfriendly the platform can be out-of-the box, especially to a non-developer. While add-on modules like Workbench and Content Moderation can mitigate some of this complexity, installing and configuring those requires specialized knowledge. From talking to current clients, I know that I’m not the only one who feels intimidated by Drupal’s default administrative interface.

The Drupal community is also aware of the high learning curve to Drupal, and is in the process of modernizing the look and feel of the admin experience to make it more intuitive. Given how big the changes are, it’s the perfect time to include the people who work with Drupal every day to make sure Drupal is a system everyone feels comfortable using.

Therefore, I am working with fellow Palantir web strategist Michelle Jackson, Drupal front-end designer Cristina Chumillas, co-founder and front-end lead at Evolving Web Suzanne Dergacheva, project manager Antonella Severo, design consultant Roy Scholten, folks from the Drupal Association and other interested volunteers to conduct research on popular content management systems and web platforms such as Drupal, WordPress, Squarespace, and Joomla in order to learn how best to update Drupal.

Here’s where you come in

We want to make Drupal the best platform for content editors and managers to use everyday. Therefore, if your job involves updating the company blog, swapping out images, tagging content to group related information, or some other way you interact with your website, we want to hear from you.

We put together a quick, 5-10 minute survey that asks about your general familiarity with Drupal. For example, we want to know common tasks you perform on the platform as well as frustrating pain points. This way we can target our redesign efforts to make Drupal work better for you.

In addition to the opportunity to shape the future of Drupal, at the end of the survey you’ll have the opportunity to enter into a drawing for two great prizes: 1 full conference ticket to the (new) DrupalCon Content Marketing track at DrupalCon Seattle 2019 - $695 value (flight and hotel not included), or 1 two-day, online Drupal 8 training session from fellow Drupal agency Evolving Web.

Take the Survey

So what happens next?

This survey is step one of our research efforts. After reviewing the common tasks, we’ll ask folks who had provided their email address if they are willing to participate in card sort exercises to determine the best label for grouping common tasks together. Next we’ll design solutions to address the biggest pain points and ask participants to validate our assumptions through usability tests.

Looking at the long term, we are interested in comparing Drupal with other popular systems such as WordPress and Squarespace. We plan to reach out to people who use those platforms to find out what they find easy or difficult about them, which may inform the direction of the Drupal redesign. No matter which direction our research takes, we want to ensure we’re building a product with you, the content editor, in mind.

More ways to help

We want to make the new Drupal as intuitive as can be on a global scale, but as a small team of volunteers, there’s only so much we can do on our own. If you develop or design for Drupal, and are interested in our research efforts, there are a number of ways to get involved. First, check out the Admin UI and JavaScript Modernization initiative on Drupal.org. Then, reach out to us on the #admin-ui channel on Slack. We can show you how to copy the survey so you can run your own tests. We’re especially grateful if you’re able to translate it and test users in Africa, Asia, and Latin America.

It shouldn’t take specialized knowledge to update and maintain a website on Drupal. With your help, we can make Drupal a more approachable platform for content editors. I can’t wait to hear from you!

May 08 2018
May 08

When we first migrated our website (https://www.palantir.net) from Drupal 7 to Drupal 8 in the summer of 2016, it was an exciting time for our marketing team. From an editorial perspective, Drupal 8 is a much easier to use interface than D7, and it instantly allowed us greater flexibility with our content.

However, even though we now had a more flexible site, we still felt like the digital experience for our audience missed a few marks. We quickly established a list of goals for phase two of the redesign, and these goals were related to both the overall digital experience and internal business goals.

The Overall Digital Experience

With the next iteration of our site, we wanted to focus on making the site more intuitive for visitors and also surface content in a way that was most beneficial to them. Would future clients prefer to filter case studies by service category or industry? What were visitors hoping or expecting to find on the homepage? What kind of information about Palantir were potential new hires trying to find?

These questions informed the following goals for the site:

  • To be simple and easy to use by having meaningful (and working) filters, allowing users to filter by industry, and curating collections around topics that most interest our audience.
  • To inspire applicants by demonstrating solid work, showcasing our cultural story, and making it easy to find career information.
  • To tell the story of Palantir with crisper messaging, improved visuals, and better storytelling throughout via weaving client testimonials with staff stories and case studies.
  • To be future forward by creating a visual theme with a timeless solution.

Business Goals

We also had a few items we wanted to address that related to our overall business goals. Our website is an important sales and marketing tool for us, and we wanted to make sure it was doing its job. We needed the new site to:

  • Showcase our work better by making it more prominent, showing more visuals and making our visuals more consistent.
  • Capture leads and bring in more business by making it easy for people to contact us no matter where they are on the site, and by simplifying newsletter sign-up.
  • Elevate the Palantir brand by creating a newly themed site that in itself is a demonstration of our design and development skill, showcasing our work in a superior way, and talking more intelligently — but concisely — about ourselves, our work, and our services.

The Process

Just like we recommend for our clients, we began our process with a Discovery phase. One of our web strategists, Michelle Jackson, completed a competitive analysis to inform next steps. A few of the things she evaluated were:

  • What are our peers doing right?
  • What are the current industry standards?
  • What are agencies that we aspire to emulate doing?

The results from this analysis helped us prioritize our wishlist of future site features. We then handed off this wishlist to the designer on the project, Carl Martens. Carl worked through the design phase which included creating wireframes, moving things into a prototype, and then building out the new theme in partnership with Ken Rickard, who completed all of the development. The design was done using our standard process: we built in a modular way using site components, and then compiled them into a living style guide. Particular attention was paid to typographic details, use of color, and how to most effectively use images.

Another design problem we needed to solve was one common to all companies that list their team members: what do you do when a new employee joins the team, and you don’t have a photo for them that matches the others? Even our photographer (who only does our headshots once per year) said, “all my clients have this problem. Let me know when you figure it out!” We thought of several options on how to fix this, and ended up with the chalkboard solution. It allows us to inject some personality into our page while not distracting from the other headshots by having it be a headshot in a different style or lighting.

Chalkboard with text "Out for a run, Jose"

More details about the technical implementation of the Drupal 8 site can be found in Ken's blog post.

New Features and Integrations

The latest version of www.palantir.net has an abundance of new features that allow us to weave storytelling throughout the site.

Searchable Homepage

Our previous homepage had much of the important content buried beneath the fold. To fix this, we wanted to turn our homepage into a hub where site visitors could search for content that was relevant to them, no matter where that content lived on the site. The new homepage can filter all of our content by both topic and industry, and helps surface the most relevant pieces of content for our audience. The new homepage also features a collapsible side navigation, so you can see more relevant content at one time.

Topic-Based Collection Pages

Tying into the goals of our searchable homepage, we curated new collection pages based on topics we thought our audience would search for most (which include Planning, Business Strategy, Security, Design & UX, Development, Governance, Content Strategy and Accessibility). That way when someone asks, “what do you do for accessibility?” we can send them directly to a curated page that shows blog posts and case studies specific to that topic. These collection pages can be found at the bottom of our services page.

Business Strategy collection

Culture and Careers Content

With the next iteration of the site, we wanted to make sure we were catering to the audience who might be interested in working for us in the future. We achieved this by showcasing all of the great things about working at Palantir, and on these pages we included more images to help show rather than tell that information. Our new Culture and Careers page houses much of the information a potential new Palantiri might look for, including what we think are the key elements of our culture. It also links to our Benefits page which outlines the many perks of working for Palantir, and to our current openings.

Case Studies That Tell a Story

Some of the most important pieces of content on our site are our case studies. It is vital as an agency to be able to showcase our work and capabilities dynamically. The old version of our case studies were extremely text-heavy and did not feature nearly enough visual representation of the process or final product of each project.

The new format of our new case studies are broken into different chunks of content, with the ability to show each bit of information in a way that fits what is being communicated. We can then weave each of these pieces together into one comprehensive, dynamic storyline. By breaking the case studies into smaller, more visual pieces, they are much easier to scan too. We still have to update some of our older case studies, so this is still a work in progress.

Case study content block

Updated Services Page

One would think a services page would be the first page to be refined on a business’ site, but somehow our previous services page was a complete afterthought. Buried in the footer, it was a glorified bulleted list. This page was a high priority for us to fix, because we wanted to make sure potential clients could find information about what services we provide. The new services page is easy to find in the main site navigation, and in addition to the afore-mentioned collections, it also features information about our partnerships.

Hubspot Integration

Hubspot is a new sales and marketing tool for us that we have been implementing since the beginning of the year. It helps us track new project opportunities on the sales side, and it also houses all of our marketing tools. One of the new Hubspot tools that we have implemented on our new site is called a lead flow. Lead flows are abbreviated contact forms that we can choose to display on specific pages, granting our site visitors a quick way to subscribe to our email newsletter.

Always Evolving

In true agile fashion, we had an MVP with the goal of launching by DrupalCon Nashville, but we plan to keep iterating and improving the site in the coming months. So, what do we have planned next?

  • New photos for new staff
  • Video that reiterates the Palantir story
  • A timeline of the history of Palantir
  • Listing of awards and press mentions (Great Place to Work, Clutch.co, etc.)
  • Rewriting and adding more case studies

Accessibility

Of course, we also want to make sure our site is accessible. In addition to baking accessibility into our process along the way, we use a tool provided by our partner, Siteimprove, to scan our site and determine if it meets accessibility standards. Siteimprove is a great tool because it flags both quality assurance items (like misspellings and broken links) as well as accessibility requirements (like those provided by WCAG and AA). We use the reports provided by Siteimprove to continuously clean up our content and ensure an enjoyable digital experience for all users.

Tell Us What You Think

So far we’ve had one client tell us this: “The redesign clearly marks a maturation and growth of Palantir. If progressing towards a more serious, trustworthy, and refined company was the goal, I think you nailed it.” We sure hope so!

We’d love to hear what you think about the new site. Share your thoughts on Twitter (@palantir) or by reaching out through our contact form.

Pages

About Drupal Sun

Drupal Sun is an Evolving Web project. It allows you to:

  • Do full-text search on all the articles in Drupal Planet (thanks to Apache Solr)
  • Facet based on tags, author, or feed
  • Flip through articles quickly (with j/k or arrow keys) to find what you're interested in
  • View the entire article text inline, or in the context of the site where it was created

See the blog post at Evolving Web

Evolving Web