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Feb 11 2021
Feb 11

Last week one of our clients was asking me about how they should think about the myriad of options for website hosting, and it inspired me to share a few thoughts. 

The different kinds of hosting

I think about hosting for WordPress and Drupal websites as falling into one of three groups. We’re going to compare the options using an example of a fairly common size of website — one with traffic (as reported by Google Analytics) in the range of 50,000–100,000 visitors per month. Adjust accordingly for your situation. 

  • “Low cost/low frills” hosting — Inexpensive website hosting would cost in the range of $50–$1,000/yr for a site with our example amount of traffic. Examples of lower cost hosts include GoDaddy, Bluehost, etc.  Though inexpensive, these kinds of hosts have none of the infrastructure that’s needed to do ongoing web development in a safe/controlled way such as the ability to spin up a copy of the website at the click of a button, make a change, get approval from stakeholders, then deploy to the live site. Also, if you get a traffic spike, you will likely see much slower page loads. 
  • “Unmanaged”, “Bare metal”, or “DIY” hosting — Our example website will likely cost in the range of $500–$2,500/yr. Examples of this type of hosting include: AWS, Rackspace, Linode, etc. or just a computer in your closet. Here you get a server, but that’s it. You have to set up all the software, put security measures in place, and set up the workflow so that you can get stuff done. Then it’s your responsibility to keep that all maintained year over year, perhaps even to install and maintain firewalls for security purposes. 
  • “Serverless” hosting¹ It’s not that there aren’t servers, they’re just transparent to you. Our example website would likely cost in the range of $2500–5000/yr. Examples of this kind of hosting: Pantheon, WP Engine, Acquia, Platform.sh. These hosts are very specialized for WordPress and/or Drupal websites. You just plug in your code and database, and you’re off. Because they’re highly specialized, they have all the security/performance/workflow/operations in place that 90% of Drupal/WordPress websites need.

How to decide?

I recommend two guiding principles when it comes to these kinds of decisions:

  1. The cost of services (like hosting) are much cheaper than the cost of people. Whether that’s the time that your staff is spending maintaining a server, or if you’re working with an agency like Advomatic, then your monthly subscription with us. Maybe even 10x.  So saving $1,000/yr on hosting is only worth it if it costs less than a handful of hours per year of someone’s time. 
  2. Prioritize putting as much of your budget towards advancing your organization’s mission as possible. If two options have a similar cost, we should go with the option that will burn fewer brain cells doing “maintenance” and other manual tasks, and instead choose the option where we can spend more of our time thinking strategically and advancing the mission.

This means that you should probably disregard the “unmanaged/bare/DIY” group. Whoever manages the site will spend too much time running security updates, and doing other maintenance and monitoring tasks. 

We also encourage you to disregard the “low cost” group. Your team will waste too much time tripping over the limitations, and cleaning up mistakes that could be prevented on a more robust platform.

So that leaves the “serverless” group. With these, you’ll get the tools that will help streamline every change made to your website. Many of the rote tasks are also taken care of as part of the package. 

Doing vs. Thinking

It’s easy to get caught up in doing stuff. And it’s easy to make little decisions over time that mean you spend all your days just trying to keep up with the doing. The decision that you make about hosting is one way that you can get things back on track to be more focused on the strategy of how to make your website better. 

¹ The more technical members of the audience will know that “serverless” is technically a bit different.  You’d instead call this “platform-as-a-service” or “infrastructure-as-a-service”. But we said we’d avoid buzzwords.

Nov 11 2020
Nov 11

 workflow automation diagram with gears and icons with connection line network in background

If you know us at Mediacurrent, you know we create amazing digital experiences with Drupal. Did you know we also support WordPress websites?

Since 2007, Mediacurrent has been the open source expansion partner for enterprises and global brands. As certified experts, we have a reputation for providing best-in-class digital solutions and growing long-term, strategic partnerships for clients like Weather.com, MagMutual, and Emory University

With thousands of implementations and thought leadership resources completed, we have been continuously looking for ways to add more value to our customers. We've seen a rising need in our Drupal community through hours of partnerships, and that need is more WordPress support. 

WordPress in the enterprise has risen 16%, driven largely by the rise of multiple CMS use.

- Source: The Rise of Multi-CMS in the Enterprise

Why the Expansion?

For over a decade, we have been helping customers migrate from WordPress to Drupal, and we've proven ourselves a trustworthy partner in the migration process. As we've grown, we’ve expanded our Drupal expertise into deep open source strategies—partnering with clients on a long-term basis to solve their technology challenges.

Many enterprise organizations that have standardized on Drupal will still have some non-Drupal sites in their ecosystem. That's where Mediacurrent comes in as a single-source digital partner. 

What We've Done So Far

Currently, Mediacurrent is assisting large-scale enterprises with their WordPress sites. What started as Drupal legacy clients have turned into an opportunity to better serve our customers. Our open source software clients came to us with similar pain points, and thanks to our long-term partnership, we were able to provide crucial benefits that provided a valuable impact on their return of investment, including but not limited to:

  • Engaging UX - Our recent WordPress customers faced the challenge of creating an engaging user experience. Mediacurrent planned for a full redesign of the website's look and feel, providing branding, design, and value proposition workshops and including considerations for persona needs and critical business objectives.
  • Data-driven Strategy - These organizations needed to maximize the return on their digital investment. Mediacurrent is continuing to incorporate best practices for content, page layout, navigation, lead generation, and search engine optimization.
  • Open Source Training - Designs were implemented using the Elementor page builder plugin for WordPress. Mediacurrent’s training team provided specialized instruction on Elementor page design to create page layouts and components. 
  • Post-Launch Support - Monthly support agreements help to optimize for performance and security, providing immediate value to our legacy customers. Security updates to WordPress and plugins can (and do) come at any moment. You must have a dedicated support team closely monitoring and upgrading the code regularly.

Where We're Going

Moving forward, we will expand our support for open source clients who maintain Drupal and WordPress websites within their organizations. If 2020 has taught us anything, it’s that Mediacurrent needs to pivot with our customers' needs and continue to provide the best solutions possible.

As your digital partner, Mediacurrent will evaluate your web properties by assessing several core functionalities including;

  • Security - Making sure your WordPress site stays updated and secure.
  • Responsive Design and Development - Mobile-first designs backed by data and user research.
  • Search Engine Optimization - We consider three factors when it comes to perfecting your on-page optimization: Page load times, Schema.org implementation, and CDN.
  • Content Authoring Experience - A seamless publishing workflow is the key to empower content creators. Tools like Elementor let teams create and design new page layouts on the fly using a drag and drop interface. We've found this very similar to Drupal's Layout Builder, but more advanced and easier to use. 

We see organizations growing, and the need to evolve our services to support others who have more than one CMS to manage. 

49% of enterprises are planning to expand to additional CMSs in the future.

- Source: The Rise of Multi-CMS in the Enterprise

How We Can Help 

Desktop computer background in office and handshake hologram drawing

Mediacurrent is excited to continue to expand our unique value proposition to organizations that aren’t standardized on a single platform and require peace of mind in terms of quality, security, and consistency. We have a reputation as a valued partner that is driven by growth strategy, risk mitigation, solving complex business problems, and producing real, bottom-line value with our solutions.

If you’re already running on Drupal and need help managing additional WordPress sites, or just have a lot of questions about migration, security, or future support, please reach out to the Mediacurrent team. We are available to discuss your websites' future, how we can help you efficiently manage your existing platforms, and provide a strategic roadmap that will keep your multi-CMS organization on the path to success  

Aug 04 2020
Aug 04

argument-open-sourceargument-open-source Like many developers, some of our first websites were built on the backbones of WordPress. It’s the hyper-popular king of content management systems. It has name recognition, an overflowing user base, and plenty of third-party integrations that help cut your development time. But, over the years, we’ve migrated almost exclusively to Drupal. So why did we switch? What is it about Drupal that leaves developers drooling? And why would anyone pick Drupal — which has around 1.3 million users — over WordPress —which has over 400 million users? Today, we’re going to compare David to Goliath. Why is Drupal, the third most active CMS behind WordPress and Joomla, a good choice for businesses looking to build a refreshing, impactful, and feature-rich website?

UNDERSTANDING THE CORE DIFFERENCES BETWEEN DRUPAL AND WORDPRESS

By far, the most significant difference between WordPress and Drupal is the overall development need. WordPress is simple. There are hundreds of thousands of third-party plugins that you can leverage to build an entire website with virtually no coding or developing knowledge. And, that’s the single biggest reason that WordPress is so massive. Anyone can build a WordPress site. It’s easy. Drupal requires development. If you want to build a Drupal website, you’re going to have to hire some developers. So, naturally, Drupal has fewer overall users. But, it’s essential to make that distinction. Drupal is built for businesses, public entities, and enterprises. WordPress is built for your everyday website. It’s important to keep this main difference in mind. It’s this difference that resonates throughout these core pillars. And, it’s this core difference that creates pros and cons for each platform.

DRUPAL VS. WORDPRESS: SECURITY, FLEXIBILITY, AND SCALABILITY

We consider security, flexibility, and scalability to be the three primary pillars of a CMS. An amazing designer can make a fantastic template or theme regardless of the CMS. And ease-of-use is relative to your plugins/modules, familiarity with the platform, and overall development capabilities. So those are both highly subjective. Security, flexibility, and scalability aren’t subjective; they are what they are.

SECURITY

WordPress has a security problem. Alone, WordPress accounts for 90% of all hacked websites that use a CMS. There’s a tradeoff that comes with leveraging third-party plugins to build websites. You increase your threat landscape. WPScan Vulnerability Database shows 21,675 vulnerabilities in WordPress’s core and with third-party plugins. This security vulnerability issue has been an ongoing headache for WordPress from the start. If we do a play-by-play, year-over-year of WordPress’s history, we see an ongoing and consistent security issue:

  • 2013: 70% of the top 40,000 most popular WordPress websites were vulnerable to hackers
  • 2014: SoakSoak compromises +100,000 websites, a massive DDOS attack hits 160,000 websites, and All In One SEO Pack puts +19 million sites at risk.
  • 2015: A core vulnerability puts millions of websites at risk, Akismet opens millions of websites to hackers, and YoastSEO puts over 14 million websites in hackers’ crosshairs.
  • 2016: At this point, millions of hacks are happening every week across plugins. Check out this WordFence weekly update during this period.
  • 2017: The hacks continue. The average small business website using WordPress is attacked 44 times a day at this point, and WordPress websites are 2x more likely to be hacked than other CMS.

The list goes on. Year-over-year, more vulnerabilities happen across WordPress. And this is an important point. WordPress has subpar security by design. It’s the tradeoff they made to build an ecosystem that doesn’t require development. We aren’t saying that the core of WordPress is inherently security-stripped. It’s not. But, given the scale, scope, and third-party-fanatic nature of the platform, it’s weak on security by nature. Drupal, on the other hand, is the opposite. Websites require development time, each website is customized to the user, and building a website takes time and patience. The tradeoff is better security. Drupal has built-in enterprise-scale security, and you don’t rely on a hotchpotch of third-party applications to build your website’s functionality. There’s a reason that NASA, the White House, and other government entities use (or used) Drupal. It has better security. We want to take a second to make the distinction. WordPress has a secure core. We would argue that Drupal has a more secure core. But the difference isn’t massive. WordPress’s security vulnerabilities are a product of its reliance on third-party applications to make a functional website.

FLEXIBILITY

WordPress is more flexible than Drupal to some users. And Drupal is more flexible than WordPress to some users. That may sound complicated. But it comes down to your development capabilities. Drupal has more features than WordPress. Its core is filled with rich taxonomies, content blocks, and unique blocks than WordPress. But, if you aren’t experienced, you probably won’t find and/or use many of these functionalities. On the surface, WordPress has more accessible features. At the core, Drupal is the single most feature-rich CMS on the planet. So, for businesses (especially public entities and larger enterprises), Drupal has a more robust architecture to tackle large-scale projects that have hyper-specific needs. For small businesses and personal website owners, WordPress is easier to use and requires far less development experience to tap into its functionalities, features, and flexibility.

SCALABILITY

Drupal has better scalability. This one isn’t a competition. Again, this comes down to the dev-heavy nature of the platform. To scale WordPress websites, you add more plugins. To scale Drupal websites, you develop more. There’s a key practical difference here. Drupal modules, taxonomies, and content blocks all exist in the same ecosystem. Each WordPress plugin is its own micro-ecosystem. So, with WordPress, most users are stringing together a ton of third-party ecosystems in an attempt to create one overarching website. Also, Drupal is built for enterprise-scale projects. So there’s backend support and a large landscape of community support around large-scale projects. WordPress is a catch-all CMS that has a little of everything. If WordPress is a Swiss army knife, Drupal is a custom, hand-forged bread knife — explicitly designed to help you scale, slice, and butter larger projects.

ARE YOU READY TO DEVELOP YOUR PERFECT DRUPAL WEBSITE?

At Mobomo, we specialize in Drupal development projects. Our agile-based team of top-level design, development, and support talent can help you launch and scale your website to fit your unique needs. From NASA to Great Minds, we help private and public entities build dreams and execute visions.

Contact us to learn more.

Jul 11 2019
Jul 11

On September 12–14, at Hilton Garden Inn Atlanta-Buckhead

Kaleem ClarksonKyle Mathews, 2019 DrupalCamp Atlanta Keynote

Trainings

Dec 11 2018
Dec 11

Custom Post Types in WordPress

By Andrea Roenning

Custom post types are the key to taking a WordPress website from a simple blog to a robust system for managing many types of content and data. They help create a WordPress administrator experience which makes it easy for editors to add and edit repetitive content and gives the developer flexibility to create unique web pages to fit the site’s individual needs.

The Flexibility of Drupal 8

By Michael Miles

This article demonstrates six different methods of changing content and functionality in Drupal. Each method requires a different skill set and level of expertise, from non-technical inexperienced users to advanced Drupal developers. For each method, we describe the components, skills, knowledge, and limitations involved. The goal is to highlight Drupal’s flexibility as a Content Management framework.

How to Learn PHP Unit Testing With Katas

By David Hayes

Sometimes code is first tested when the unfortunate client or user feels like using the feature and tests the developer’s work. Hopefully, they’re not disappointed. That’s why you should be interested in unit testing and Test-Driven Development (TDD)—because it makes your life as a programmer better. It would have saved me hours of work in situations like those outlined in the last paragraph. TDD and automated testing let us focus on what we’re there for: solving complicated problems with code and leaving the computers to do more of the rest.

It’s About Time

By Colin DeCarlo

As applications scale and gain adoption, dates and time become much more of a concern than they once were. Bugs crop up, and developers start learning the woes of time zones and daylight saving time. Why did that reminder get sent a day early? How could that comment have been made at 5:30 a.m. if the post didn’t get published until 9:00 a.m.? Indiana has how man time zones?!

The Dev Lead Trenches: Creating a Culture

By Chris Tankersley

I have spent much time talking about creating and managing a working team, but there is one important piece I’ve left out of the puzzle until now—creating and crafting a culture that makes people want to work on your team and stay on your team. If you have a company culture which does not attract people, employees will be hard to find.

The Workshop: Producing Packages, Part Three

By Joe Ferguson

Over the past two months we’ve been building PHP Easy Math a purposely simple example library to demonstrate how to build a reusable package for the PHP ecosystem. Make sure to check the previous issues if you’re just now joining us! This article is the third and final installment in this series. We’re going to cover triaging and managing issues users may open as well as pull requests to your library.

Education Station: Interview Coding Challenges

By Edward Barnard

Meanwhile, the days where employees stay with the same company 20-30 years are long gone. We move around or move on from contract to contract. For many of us, this means formal job interviews. Many of those interviews include coding challenges; that can be a problem. Let’s talk about that!

Security Corner: Adventures in Hashing

By Eric Mann

Last month, the PHP community had the opportunity to come together for the excellent php[world] conference in Washington, D.C. As part of the event, we held a hackathon to work through some of the challenges posed by Cryptopals. Some of the cryptographic primitives we discussed were hashes, and it’s useful to take a more in-depth look at what they are and how to use them in PHP.

By James Titcumb

The final days of 2018 are looming on us, and I wanted to take a look back on some of the things, good and bad, that happened in and around the PHP community this year.

finally{}: The Seven Deadly Sins of Programming: Greed

By Eli White

As you are reading this magazine, we are in a time of winter holidays and typically associated with a spirit of goodwill towards others. That is embodied often as giving presents to people as a gesture of that goodwill. Unfortunately, this can have the opposite effect at times of causing greed to form as people want more and more given to them. Alternatively, they may misinterpret it as greed, as a specific green haired character learns in his holiday tale.

May 24 2017
May 24

WordPress and Drupal WordPress and Drupal

President of Mobomo, Ken Fang, recently sat down with Clutch for a Q and A about all things WordPress and Drupal.

What should people consider when choosing a CMS or a website platform?

They should probably consider ease of use. We like open-source because of the pricing, and pricing is another thing they should take into account. Finally, for us, a lot of it revolves around how popular that particular type of technology is. Being able to find developers or even content editors that are used to that technology or CMS is important.

Could you speak about what differentiates Drupal and WordPress from each other?

Both of them are open-source platforms, and they’re probably the most popular CMS’s out there. WordPress is probably the most popular, with Drupal running a close second. Drupal is more popular in our federal space. I think the main difference is that WordPress started off more as a blogging platform, so it was typically for smaller sites. Whereas Drupal was considered to be more enterprise-grade, and therefore a lot of the larger commercial clients and larger federal clients would go with Drupal implementation.

They’ve obviously both grown a lot over the years. We’re now finding that both of the platforms are pretty comparable. WordPress has built a lot of enterprise functionality, and Drupal has built in a lot more ease of use. They’re getting closer and closer together. We still see that main segregation, with WordPress being for smaller sites, easier to use, and then Drupal for more enterprise-grade.

Could you describe the ideal client for each platform? What type of client would you recommend each platform for?

Definitely on the federal side, Drupal is a much more popular platform. Federal and enterprise clients should move to the Drupal platform, especially if they have other systems they want to integrate with, or more complex workflow and capability. WordPress we see much more on the commercial side, smaller sites. The nice thing about WordPress is that it’s pretty quick to get up and running. It’s a lot easier for the end user because of its limited capability. If you want to get something up more cost-effectively, that’s pretty simple, WordPress is a good way to go.

Could you speak about the importance of technical coding knowledge when building a website on either platform, from a client’s perspective?

Most of these main CMS’s are actually built in PHP, and most of them have a technology stack that requires different skillsets. So, on the frontend side, both of them require theming. It’s not only knowing HTML, CSS, and JavaScript, but it’s also understanding how each of the content management systems incorporate that into a theme. You usually start off with a base theme, and then you customize it as each client wants. As such, you need either WordPress or Drupal themers to do that frontend work. For any backend development, you do need PHP developers. For Drupal, it’s called modules. There are open-source modules that people contribute that you can just use, you can customize them, or you can even build your own custom modules from scratch. For WordPress, they’re called plugins, but it’s a very similar process. You can incorporate a plugin, customize it, or write your own custom plugin.

In between all of this, because it is a content management framework and platform, there are site builders or site configurators. The nice part about that is that you can literally fire up a Drupal website and not have to know any PHP coding or whatever. If you’re just doing a plain vanilla website, you can get everything up and running through the administrative interface. A Drupal or WordPress site builder can basically do that, provided they are savvy with how the system actually works form an administration standpoint. So, those are the technical skills that we typically see, that clients would need to have. In many cases, we’ll build out a website and they’ll want to maintain it. They’ll need somebody in-house, at least a Drupal site builder or a themer, or something like that.

Do you have any terms or any codes that clients should be aware of or should know prior to trying to launch a project in Drupal or WordPress?

PHP is definitely the main language they should know, and then HTML, JavaScript, and CSS for the frontend stuff. Drupal 8 has some newer technologies. Twig is used for theming as an example, so there’s a set of technologies associated with Drupal 8 they need to know as well.

Is there a particular feature of WordPress or Drupal that impressed you and potential users should know about?

I’m going to lean a little more into the Drupal world because a lot of people are starting to move to Drupal 8, which was a big rewrite. There are now a lot of sites starting to use that in production. They did quite a bit of overhaul on it. It is more API-driven now. Everything you do in Drupal 8 can be published as a web service. You can even do a lot of what they call headless Drupal implementations. That means you can use some of the more sexy frameworks, like Angular or React, to build out more intricate frontends, and still use Drupal as a CMS, but really as a web service.

Are there any features of the two platforms that could be improved to make it a better CMS?

I think they’re pretty evolved CMS’s. On both of them, platforms are getting into place to build right on the CMS’s without having to install them. Platforms like Acquia, WordPress.com, Automaticc. These platforms are profitable because from an enterprise standpoint right now, it is hard doing multisite implementations at that scale, managing all of the architecture, and stuff like that. From a technical standpoint, if you get into an enterprise, clients who says they want to be able to run a thousand sites on a single platform, that becomes difficult to do from a technical perspective. They both have the ability to support multisite implementations, but advancements in there to make those types of implementations easier to use and deploy would be a significant advancement for both platforms.

What should companies and clients expect in terms of cost for setting up a website, maintaining it, and adding new features?

For a very basic site, where you’re just taking things off the shelf – implementing the site with a theme that’s already built, and using basic content – I would say a customer can get up and running anywhere from two to six weeks, $20,000-30,000. Typically, those implementations are for very small sites. We’ve seen implementations that have run into the millions, that are pretty complex. These are sites that receive millions of hits a day; they have award-winning user experience and design, custom theming, integration with a lot of backend systems, etc. Those can take anywhere from six to twelve months, and $500,000 to $1 million to get up and running.

Can you give some insight into SEO and security when building a website?

The nice thing about Drupal and WordPress is that there are a lot of modules and plugins that will manage that, from Google Analytics to HubSpot, all sort of SEO engines. You can pretty much plug and play those things. It doesn’t replace the need for your traditional content marketing, analyzing those results and then making sure your pages have the appropriate content and keywords driving traffic into them, or whatever funnel you want. All your analytic tools usually have some sort of module or plugin, whether it’s Google, Salesforce, Pardot, or whatever. A lot of those things are already pretty baked in. You can easily get it up and running. That’s the nice thing about the SEO portion of it.

The other nice thing about it being open-source is that there are constant updates on sort of security. Using these CMS systems, because they tie to all the open-source projects, if you download a module, anytime there’s a security update for it, you’ll get alerted within your administrative interface. It’s usually just a one-click installation to install that upgrade for security patches. That’s nice, as you’re literally talking hundreds of thousands of modules and millions of users. They’re usually found and patched pretty quickly. As long as you stay on that security patching cycle, you should be okay. You could still do stupid stuff as an administrator. You could leave the default password, and somebody could get in, so you still have to manage those things. From a software perspective, as long as you’re using highly-active, contributed modules and the core, security patches and findings come out pretty regularly on those things.

As a company, because we do stuff with some regulated industries like banking and federal agencies, we usually have to go a level above on security. Take a WordPress site or whatever, we would actually remove that form the public so it couldn’t be hit from outside of a VPN or internal network, and then have it publish out actual content and static pages so the outside just doesn’t even connect to the back-end system. That does take some custom programming and specialty to do. Most people just implement your regular website with the appropriate security controls, and it’s not a big issue.

Are there any additional aspects of building a website or dealing with a CMS that you’d like to mention? Or any other CMS platforms you’d like to give some insight on?

For us, because we are such a big mobile player, we typically would say that, whatever you build, your CMS, obviously focus on user experience. Most people are doing a good job of that these days. One of the areas that is still a little weak is this whole idea of a content syndication. There’s still a big push where the content editors build webpages, and they want to control the layout, pages, etc. They get measured by the number of visitors to the website and all that stuff. I’m not saying that’s not important; however, we’re trying to push an idea of a web service content syndication. So, how you use these CMS’s to do that, so your content gets syndicated worldwide. It doesn’t necessarily have to be measured by how many people hit your website. It should be measured by the number of impressions.

For instance, with the work we’ve done at NASA, they announced the TRAPPIST-1 discovery of potential Earth-like planets. That drove a huge amount of traffic to the website, probably close to nine million hits that day. If you look at the actual reach of that content and NASA’s message – through the CMS’s integration with social media, with API’s that other websites were taking, with Flickr, that sort of thing – it hit over 2.5 billion social media posts. That’s an important thing to measure. How are you using your content management system more as a content syndication platform, opposed to just building webpages? USGS has also done a really solid job of this ‘create once, publish everywhere’ philosophy. I think people should be looking at content management systems as content management systems, not as website management systems.

We ask that you rate Drupal and WordPress on a scale of 1 – 5, with 5 being the best score.

How would you rate them for their functionalities and available features?

Drupal – 5 – We have a bias towards Drupal because it’s more enterprise-grade. It fits what a lot of our clients need. I think they’ve come a long way with both the 7 and 8 versions and have really brought down the cost of implementation and improved the ease of use.

WordPress – 4 – I think it’s fantastic. It’s obviously extremely popular and very easy to set up and use. I give it a 4 and not a 5 because it’s not as easy to extend to enterprise-grade implementations. For some functionalities, you still have to dig into core, and nobody wants to be modifying core modules.

How would you rate them for ease of use and ease of implementation?

Drupal – 4.5 for ease of use, because it’s not as easy as WordPress, and 4.5 for ease of installation.WordPress – 5 for ease of use, and 4 for ease of implementation. If you want to go out of the box, it’s a little more difficult. Configuring multisite is a real difficulty in WordPress.

How would you rate them for support, as in the response of their team and the helpfulness of available online resources?

Drupal – 4

WordPress – 4

Being open-source projects, there are a ton of people contributing. They’re very active, so you usually can get your answers. In many cases, to get something embedded into core, it does have to get reviewed by the organization, which is a bunch of volunteers for the most part. Because of that, it does take a while for things to get embedded.

How likely are you to recommend each platform for a client?

Drupal – 5

WordPress – 5

I think they’re the strongest CMS’s out there for the price.

How likely are you to recommend each platform for a user to build their own DIY website?

Drupal – 3

WordPress – 4  

If you’re going to build your own website, and you have zero technical skills, you might want to look into a Weebly, Wix, or something like that. There is a need to know how to do site-building if you use Drupal or WordPress. Somebody has to configure it and understand it.

How would you rate your overall satisfaction collaborating with each platform?

Drupal – 5

WordPress – 5

We implement on both of them regularly, and they’re really great. They solve the need for a lot of our clients to migrate from much more expensive legacy systems.

Clutch.co interview: https://clutch.co/website-builders/expert-interview/interview-mobomo-dru...

May 12 2016
May 12

drupal-nasa-website-monitordrupal-nasa-website-monitor

A content management system, or CMS, is a web application designed to make it easy for non-technical users to add, edit and manage a website. We use WordPress and Drupal the most for CMS development, but it is all dependent on our clients’ needs. Not only do content management systems help website users with content editing, they also take care of a lot of behind the scenes work.

Whenever it comes to developing a website from scratch, and for a client who wants to be able to manage the site after the launch it is important as a developer to find a tool that the client will be able to use. When we think about web development it’s always better for the client and for the company to find a good content management system or CMS, because it solves problems that you will never have to worry about from the UI of the backend to the front-end wanted features it solves a lot of issues upfront that you will not have to worry about later.  As a website evolves, it will never stay in the final version you delivered to your client, when we develop we need to always think to the site’s future.

WordPress is one of the most popular tools because it is very adaptable. The amount of plugins (solutions to your problems) are endless. Not only does it have great features but it has a friendly UI backend. All of the advantages mentioned lower the development time, which helps the client to lower their costs. In short, WordPress saves time and money! The most recent example is our very own website Mobomo.

Another resource for a CMS is Drupal. Drupal may be a little more difficult to develop with because it can handle bigger sites with much more data and a ton of users but this system is better for newspapers or government sites such as NASA. 

Each CMS will have their own advantages but our first priority is making it adaptable to the client’s needs.

Jul 15 2015
Jul 15

Regardless of industry, staff size, and budget, many of today’s organizations have one thing in common: they’re demanding the best content management systems (CMS) to build their websites on. With requirement lists that can range from 10 to 100 features, an already short list of “best CMS options” shrinks even further once “user-friendly”, “rapidly-deployable”, and “cost-effective” are added to the list.

There is one CMS, though, that not only meets the core criteria of ease-of-use, reasonable pricing, and flexibility, but a long list of other valuable features, too: Drupal.

With Drupal, both developers and non-developer admins can deploy a long list of robust functionalities right out-of-the-box. This powerful, open source CMS allows for easy content creation and editing, as well as seamless integration with numerous 3rd party platforms (including social media and e-commerce). Drupal is highly scalable, cloud-friendly, and highly intuitive. Did we mention it’s effectively-priced, too?

In our “Why Drupal?” 3-part series, we’ll highlight some features (many which you know you need, and others which you may not have even considered) that make Drupal a clear front-runner in the CMS market.

For a personalized synopsis of how your organization’s site can be built on or migrated to Drupal with amazing results, grab a free ticket to Drupal GovCon 2015 where you can speak with one of our site migration experts for free, or contact us through our website.

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SEO + Social Networking:

Unlike other content software, Drupal does not get in the way of SEO or social networking. By using a properly built theme–as well as add-on modules–a highly optimized site can be created. There are even modules that will provide an SEO checklist and monitor the site’s SEO performance. The Metatags module ensures continued support for the latest metatags used by various social networking sites when content is shared from Drupal.

SEO Search Engine Optimization, Ranking algorithmSEO Search Engine Optimization, Ranking algorithm

E-Commerce:

Drupal Commerce is an excellent e-commerce platform that uses Drupal’s native information architecture features. One can easily add desired fields to products and orders without having to write any code. There are numerous add-on modules for reports, order workflows, shipping calculators, payment processors, and other commerce-based tools.

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Search:

Drupal’s native search functionality is strong. There is also a Search API module that allows site managers to build custom search widgets with layered search capabilities. Additionally, there are modules that enable integration of third-party search engines, such as Google Search Appliance and Apache Solr.

Third-Party Integration:

Drupal not only allows for the integration of search engines, but a long list of other tools, too. The Feeds module allows Drupal to consume structured data (for example, .xml and .json) from various sources. The consumed content can be manipulated and presented just like content that is created natively in Drupal. Content can also be exposed through a RESTful API using the Services module. The format and structure of the exposed content is also highly configurable, and requires no programming.

Taxonomy + Tagging:

Taxonomy and tagging are core Drupal features. The ability to create categories (dubbed “vocabularies” by Drupal) and then create unlimited terms within that vocabulary is connected to the platform’s robust information architecture. To make taxonomy even easier, Drupal even provides a drag-n-drop interface to organize the terms into a hierarchy, if needed. Content managers are able to use vocabularies for various functions, eliminating the need to replicate efforts. For example, a vocabulary could be used for both content tagging and making complex drop-down lists and user groups, or even building a menu structure.

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Workflows:

There are a few contributor modules that provide workflow functionality in Drupal. They all provide common functionality along with unique features for various use cases. The most popular options are Maestro and Workbench.

Security:

Drupal has a dedicated security team that is very quick to react to vulnerabilities that are found in Drupal core as well as contributed modules. If a security issue is found within a contrib module, the security team will notify the module maintainer and give them a deadline to fix it. If the module does not get fixed by the deadline, the security team will issue an advisory recommending that the module be disabled, and will also classify the module as unsupported.

Cloud, Scalability, and Performance:

Drupal’s architecture makes it incredibly “cloud friendly”. It is easy to create a Drupal site that can be setup to auto-scale (i.e., add more servers during peak traffic times and shut them down when not needed). Some modules integrate with cloud storage such as S3. Further, Drupal is built for caching. By default, Drupal caches content in the database for quick delivery; support for other caching mechanisms (such as Memcache) can be added to make the caching lightning fast.

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Multi-Site Deployments:

Drupal is architected to allow for multiple sites to share a single codebase. This feature is built-in and, unlike WordPress, it does not require any cumbersome add-ons. This can be a tremendous benefit for customers who want to have multiple sites that share similar functionality. There are few–if any–limitations to a multi-site configuration. Each site can have its own modules and themes that are completely separate from the customer’s other sites.

Want to know other amazing functionalities that Drupal has to offer? Stay tuned for the final installment of our 3-part “Why Drupal?” series!

Apr 13 2015
Apr 13

finalrest
The future of the web is inarguably mobile. Mobile use is clearly increasing as people spend more time on their phones, and the rate that people are using dedicated mobile apps rather than their mobile browser is also increasing. But with web services, mobile apps can integrate popular web-based content management systems and in the process save hundreds of development hours while providing enhanced user experience for both the end user and web editors. This also creates tremendous, largely untapped business opportunity for agencies.

View our conversion service.

Drupal and WordPress power 2.1% and 23.3% of the web, respectively. There are many contrasts you can make to decide “which is better,” but in the end it comes down to the question of “what is the right tool for the job?” Drupal runs a smaller percentage of the web so it is targeted less by hackers, thus making it less vulnerable. In Drupal all contributed code or “modules,” are peer reviewed at http://drupal.org, helping to ensure quality and stability. Conversely, because of the smaller community and the strict review process there are less modules that get released than WordPress “plugins.” This puts Drupal at a distant second in the volume of contributed plugins/modules that are available. Still, Drupal 8 (the next release of Drupal), shows foresight into the future direction of the web, taking into account “the web of things” or to many web developers the “elephant in the room” Mobile Apps.

Drupal has fully mature projects that turn it into a powerful backend or RESTful “web service” that can be used to provide data to mobile apps via API calls. Drupal 8 comes with the very powerful and stable “Services” module built into D8 core, meaning it will come bundled in every new site of Drupal 8.

To put it simply, your Drupal or WordPress website could be powering the next best mobile app. “The web of things” is another way to say web services, the things that make the apps we use every day “do” things or “talk to” things. Snapchat for example is a popular app, but the native code, the kind written by an iOS or Android developer in the languages Java or Objective C, is quite simple. The heavy lifting is done by a web server somewhere which exposes data through “REST endpoints”;” this web server could be a web app like Drupal or WordPress running the ubiquitous language PHP.

PHP runs on about 75% of websites today, it can be looked at as a big ship – it takes a while for it to turn around (incorporate latest innovations) but it eventually does. While newer languages innovate quicker, PHP has proved to have a dedicated community that eventually does evolve with the times. For these reasons PHP is here to stay.

There are a variety of methods to utilize Drupal or WordPress to create an app that can be purchased on the iOS and Android app stores. For larger budget projects or projects started from scratch, the best method is to code the entire front-end presentation layer of the app in a native language, then use a web service to pull data in from a Drupal/Wordpress web app on “the cloud.” Some people may be able understand this by thinking in the terms of “feeds,” though the technology is quite different. The benefits are clear — you could have a powerful website and also a mobile app for less effort than it would cost to develop each individually with completely unique data sources. It also allows editors to login to their familiar Drupal/Wordpress editors and push out content that will then go to the app and website simultaneously.

Another hybrid method I developed which is very useful for smaller budget projects and for websites that already exist, is to create an API only for the login interface. I created a very simple API and native front-end to handle the login and password reset functionality. The rest of the app is a web view or “wrapper,” meaning that after you login, you just see the website. What makes this so cool is that it does feel quite “appy.” The native feel is enhanced by native navigation and custom offline messaging. After the user enters their email and password into the native interface they never have to login again, thus giving an experience identical to an app in every way. They simply click the icon on their homescreen and they are in. What is happening behind the scenes is that the email and password are getting saved and the user is being logged into the website via the API every time they click the icon.

Through the growth of RESTful web services we can have it all. We can build both web and mobile apps with greater ease than ever before, by simply reusing the same backend infrastructure for multiple platforms.

Oct 12 2014
FEM
Oct 12

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Too many websites claim to be able to turn your website into a mobile app but not one of them deliver results as expected, the simple truth is you can’t automate the process, it will always leave something to be desired. Our software couple with custom implementation can turn your Drupal or WordPress website into a mobile feeling app. With native login functionality the user does not need to repeatedly login to the app giving the illusion of a 100% native mobile app from a website that lies behind a login.   After logging in once the user simply clicks the homescreen icon and will be taken to the authenticated/logged in website area. All viewed from within a native iOS or Android wrapper. Custom offline messages and native navigation can all be implemented out of the box with our software. The overall time to implement the basic service for your app is $3000, the source code is yours forever with no annual fees, and you publish directly from your developer account. This services service will get you better results than an automated do-it-yourself platform,and also authentication and login which platforms like Appresser can’t do. To convert a a website/webapp the one click homescreen icon app experience.  The API currently exists for Drupal 6 or Drupal 7 sites. App software is written in both native iOS (Objective C) and Android (Java) code.

View sample apps Android, iOS

If you are a developer and want to try to do this for yourself or a client we can share some of our experience and code with you

Read about other more extensive options we offer for converting to a mobile app using REST

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Sign up using your email or Facebook SDK, the app communicates via a REST API. Screenshot_2015-10-08-05-51-32

Choose to sign in with Facebook once and then sign in automatically by clicking your homescreen icon.

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App gets added to homescreen and login via one click.
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Preloader provides instant touch feedback for a native feel.

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Custom offline message instead of web browser “page not found”.

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Turn any responsive website into an app.

About Drupal Sun

Drupal Sun is an Evolving Web project. It allows you to:

  • Do full-text search on all the articles in Drupal Planet (thanks to Apache Solr)
  • Facet based on tags, author, or feed
  • Flip through articles quickly (with j/k or arrow keys) to find what you're interested in
  • View the entire article text inline, or in the context of the site where it was created

See the blog post at Evolving Web

Evolving Web