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Mar 02 2020
Mar 02

As of Drupal 8.7, the Media and Media Library modules can be enabled and used out-of-box. Below, you'll find a quick tutorial on enabling and using these features.

out-of-box before media and media library

In the past there were two different ways to add an image to a page.

  1. An image could be added via a field, with the developer given control over its size and placement:
     

    Image field before media library
  2. An image could be added via the WYSIWYG editor, with the editor given some control over its size and placement:
     

    Image field upload choices screen

A very straightforward process, but these images could not be reused, as they were not part of a reusable media library.

reusing uploaded media Before Drupal 8.7

Overcoming image placement limitations in prior versions of Drupal required the use of several modules, a lot of configuration, and time. Sites could be set up to reference a media library that allowed editors to select and reuse images that had previously been uploaded, which we explained here.

This was a great time to be alive.

What is available with Media Library

Enabling the Media and Media Library modules extends a site's image functionality. First, ensure that the Media and Media Library core modules are enabled. 

Enable media library in drupal

A media entity reference field must be used with the Media Library. It will not work with a regular image field out-of-box.

Image field on manage display page

On the Manage form display page, select "Media library" widget. 

Media library widget on manage display page

On the "Node Add" and "Node Edit" forms, you’ll see the below difference between a regular image field and a field connected to the media library.

Media library field on node edit

Click on “Add media” and you’ll see a popup with the ability to add a new image to the library or to select an image that is already in the library.

Media field grid

With a simple configuration of the field, if multiple media types are allowed in the field, you’ll see vertical tabs for each media type.

Media grid with multiple media types

WYSIWYG configuration

The WYSIWYG editor requires a few steps when configuring the media library for a specific text format. First, a new icon will appear with a musical note overlapping the image icon. This should be added to the active toolbar and the regular image icon should be moved to the available buttons.

wysiwyg toolbar configuration

Under “Enabled filters,” enable “Embed media."  Under the filter settings, vertical tab settings can be chosen for media types and view modes. Once that configuration is saved, you’ll see on a WYSIWYG editor that you have the same popup dialog for adding a new image to the media library, or selecting an already-uploaded image.

wysiwyg media configuration

Once you are on a "Node Add or "Node Edit" page with a WYSIWYG element, you’ll see the media button (image icon plus musical note).

Media button on wysiwyg editor

Clicking on the media button brings up the same, familiar popup that we saw earlier from the image field:

media library grid

This article is an update to a previous explainer from last year. 

Dec 09 2019
Dec 09

With Drupal 9 set to be released later next year, upgrading to Drupal 8 may seem like a lost cause. However, beyond the fact that Drupal 8 is superior to its predecessors, it will also make the inevitable upgrade to Drupal 9, and future releases, much easier. 

Acquia puts it best in this eBook, where they cover common hangups that may prevent migration to Drupal 8 and the numerous reasons to push past them.

The Benefits of Drupal 8

To put it plainly, Drupal 8 is better. Upon its release, the upgrade shifted the way Drupal operates and has only improved through subsequent patches and iterations, most recently with the release of Drupal 8.8.0

Some new features of Drupal 8 that surpass those of Drupal 7 include improved page building tools and content authoring, multilingual support, and the inclusion of JSON:API as part of Drupal core. We discussed some of these additions in a previous blog post

Remaining on Drupal 7 means hanging on to a less capable CMS. Drupal 8 is simply more secure with better features.

What Does Any of This Have to Do With Drupal 9?

With an anticipated release date of June 3, 2020, Drupal 9 will see the CMS pivot to an iterative release model, moving away from the incremental releases that have made upgrading necessary in the past. That means that migrating to Drupal 8 is the last major migration Drupal sites will have to undertake. As Acquia points out, one might think “Why can’t I just wait to upgrade to Drupal 9?” 

While migration from Drupal 7 or Drupal 8 to Drupal 9 would be essentially the same process, Drupal 7 goes out of support in November 2021. As that deadline approaches, upgrading will only become an increasingly pressing necessity. By migrating to Drupal 8 now, you avoid the complications that come with a hurried migration and can take on the process incrementally. 

So why wait? 

To get started with Drupal migration, be sure to check out our Drupal Development Services, and come back to our blog for more updates and other business insights. 
 

Mar 13 2019
Mar 13

Note: This post refers to Drupal 8, but is very applicable to Drupal 7 sites as well

Most Drupal developers are experienced building sitewide search with Search API and Views. But it’s easy to learn and harder to master. These are the most common mistakes I see made when doing this task:

Not reviewing Analytics

Before you start, make sure you have access to analytics if relevant. You want to get an idea of how much sitewide search is being used and what the top searches are. On many sites, sitewide search usage is extremely low and you may need to explain this statistic to stakeholders asking for any time-consuming search features (and yourself before you start going down rabbit holes of refinements).

Take a look for yourself at how the sitewide search is currently performing for the top keywords users are giving it. Do the relevant pages come up first? You’ll take this into account when configuring boosts.

Using Solr for small sites

Drupal 8 Search API comes with database search included. Search API DB has come a long way over the years and is likely to have the features you need for smaller sites. Using a Solr backend is going to add complexity that may not be worth it for the amount of value your sitewide search is giving. Remember, if you use a Solr backend you have to have Solr running on all environments used in the project and you’ll have to reindex when you sync databases.

Not configuring all environments for working Solr

Which takes us to this one. If you do use Solr (or another server-side index) you need to also make sure your team has Solr running on their local environments and has an index for the site. 

Your settings.php needs to be configured to connect to the right index on each environment. We use Probo for review sandboxes so we need to configure our Probo builds to use the right search index and to index it on build.

Missing fields in index or wrong type

Always included the ‘Rendered HTML’ field in your search index rather than trying to capture every text field on all your content types and then having to come back to add more every time you add a field. Include the title field as well, but don’t forget to use ‘Fulltext’ as its field type. Only ‘Fulltext’ text fields are searchable by word.

Not configuring boosts

In your Processor settings, use Type-specific boosting and Tag-boosting via HTML filter. Tag boosting is straightforward: boost headers. For type-specific boosting you’re not necessarily just boosting the most important content types, but also thinking about what’s in the index and what people are likely looking for. Go back to your analytics for this. 

For example, when someone searches for a person’s name, are they likely wanting the top result to be the bio and contact info, a news posting mentioning that person, or a white paper authored by the person? So, even if staff bios are not the most important content on the site, perhaps they will need to be boosted high in search, where they are very relevant.

Not ordering by relevance

Whoops. This is a very common and devastating mistake. All your boost work be damned if you forget this. The View you make for search results needs to order results by Relevance: Descending.

Using AJAX

Don’t use the setting to ‘Use AJAX’ on your search results View. Doing so would mean that search results don’t have unique URLs, which is bad for user experience and analytics. It’s all about the URLs not about the whizzbang.

Not customizing the query string

Any time you configure a View with an exposed filter, take the extra second to customize the query string it is going to use. ‘search’ is a better query string than ‘search_api_fulltext’ for the search filter. URLs are part of your user interface.

No empty text

Similarly, when you add an exposed filter to a search you should also almost always be adding empty text. “No results match your search” is usually appropriate.

Facets that don’t speak to the audience

Facets can be useful for large search indexes and certain types of sites. But too many or too complex facets just create confusion. ‘Content-type’ is a very common facet, but if you use it, make sure you only include in its options the names of content types that are likely to make sense to visitors. For example, I don’t expect my visitors to understand the technical distinction between a ‘page’ and a ‘landing page’ so I don’t include facet links for these.

A screen shot of facets in DrupalYou can exclude confusing facet options 

Making search results page a node

I tell my team to make just about every page a visitor sees a node. This simplifies things for both editors and developers. It also ensures every page is in the search index: If you make key landing pages like ‘Events Calendar’ as Views pages or as custom routes these key pages will not be found in your search results. 

One important exception is the Search Results page itself. You don’t want your search results page in the search index: this can actually make an infinite loop when you search. Let this one be a Views page, not a Views block you embed into a node.

Important page content not in the ‘content’

Speaking of blocks and nodes, the way you architect your site will determine how well your search works. If you build your pages by placing blocks via core Block Layout, these blocks are not part of the page ‘content’ that gets indexed in the ‘Rendered HTML.’ Anything you want to be searchable needs to be part of the content. 

You can embed blocks in node templates with Twig Tweak, or you can reference blocks as part of the content (I use Paragraphs and Block Field.)

Not focusing on accessibility

The most accessible way to handle facets is to use ‘List of Links’ widget. You can also add some visually hidden help text just above your facet links. A common mistake is to hide the ‘Search’ label on the form. Instead of display: none, use the ‘visually-hidden’ class.

Dec 10 2018
Dec 10

Zivtech is happy to be offering a series of public Drupal 8 trainings at our office in downtown Philadelphia in January 2019. 

Whether you consider yourself a beginner or expert Drupal developer, our training workshops have everything you need to take your Drupal skills to the next level. 

Our experience

The Zivtech team has many years of combined expertise in training and community involvement. We have traveled all over the world conducting training sessions for a diverse range of clients including, the United States Department of Justice, the Government of Canada, CERN, Howard Hughes Medical Institute, Harvard University and more. 

We pride ourselves in educating others about open source, and attendees will leave our trainings with the knowledge to build custom Drupal sites, solve technical issues, make design changes, and perform security updates all on their own. We also offer private, onsite trainings that are tailored to your organization's specific needs. 

Our public Drupal trainings for January 2019 include:

Interested in learning more about our upcoming trainings? Click here. You can also reach out to us regarding multi-training and nonprofit discounts, or personalized trainings. 

We hope to see you in January!
 

Nov 09 2018
Nov 09

Last week, the Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) Vaccine Makers Project (VMP) won a PR News Digital Award in the category “Redesign/Relaunch of Site.” The awards gala honors the year’s best and brightest campaigns across a variety of media. 

PR News Award on a table.

Our CEO, Alex, and our Director of Client Engagement, Aaron, along with members of the Vaccine Makers team attended the event at the Yale Club in New York City.

Screenshot of a Tweet posted by the PR News. Source

The Vaccine Makers Project (VMP) is a subset of CHOP’s Vaccine Education Center (VEC). It’s a public education portal for students and teachers that features resources such as lesson plans, downloadable worksheets, and videos. 

The Vaccine Makers team first approached us in need of a site that aligned with the branding of CHOP’s existing site. They also wanted a better strategy for site organization and resource classification. Our team collaborated with theirs to build a new site that’s easy to navigate for all users. You can learn more about the project here.

Screenshot of a Tweet from Vaccine Makers team. Source

We’d like to thank CHOP and the Vaccine Makers team for giving us the opportunity to work on this project. We’d also like to thank PR News for recognizing our work and hosting such a wonderful event. 

Finally, we’d like to congratulate our incredible team for their endless effort and dedication to this project. 
 

Nov 06 2018
Nov 06
Jody's desk

Hardware

After a long run on MacBook Pros, I switched to an LG Gram laptop running Debian this year. It’s faster, lighter, and less expensive. 

If your development workflow now depends on Docker containers running Linux, the performance benefits you’ll get with a native Linux OS are huge. I wish I could go back in time and ditch Mac earlier.

Containers

For almost ten years I was doing local development in Linux virtual machines, but in the past year, I’ve moved to containers as these tools have matured. The change has also come with us doing less of our own hosting. My Zivtech engineering team has always held the philosophy that you need your local environment to match the production environment as closely as possible. 

But in order to work on many different projects and accomplish this in a virtual machine, we had to standardize our production environments by doing our own hosting. A project that ran on a different stack or just different versions could require us to run a separate virtual machine, slowing down our work. 

As the Drupal hosting ecosystem has matured (Pantheon, Platform.sh, Acquia, etc.), doing our own hosting began to make less sense. As we diversified our production environments more, container-based local development became more attractive, allowing us to have a more light-weight individualized stack for each project.

I’ve been happy using the Lando project, a Docker-based local web development system. It integrates well with Pantheon hosting, automatically making my local environment very close to the Pantheon environments and making it simple to refresh my local database from a Pantheon environment. 

Once I fully embraced containers and switched to a Linux host machine, I was in Docker paradise. Note: you do not need a new machine to free yourself from OSX. You can run Linux on your Mac hardware, and if you don’t want to cut the cord you could try a double boot.

Philadelphia City Hall outside Jody's office
A cool office view (like mine of Philly’s City Hall) is essential for development mojo

Editor

In terms of editors/IDEs I’m still using Sublime Text and vim, as I have for many years. I like Sublime for its performance, especially its ability to quickly search projects with 100,000 files. I search entire projects constantly. It’s an approach that has always served me well. 

I also recommend using a large font size. I’m at 14px. With a larger font size, I make fewer mistakes and read more easily. I’m not sure why most programmers use dark backgrounds and small fonts when it’s obvious that this decreases readability. I’m guessing it’s an ego thing.

Browser

In browser news, I’m back to Chrome after a time on Firefox, mainly because the LastPass plugin in Firefox didn’t let me copy passwords. But I have plenty of LastPass problems in any browser. When working on multiple projects with multiple people, a password manager is essential, but LastPass’s overall crappiness makes me miserable.

Wired: Linux, git, Docker, Lando
Tired: OSX, Virtual machines, small fonts
Undesired: LastPass, egos

Terminal

I typically only run the browser, the text editor, and the terminal, a few windows of each. In the terminal, I’m up to 16px font size. Recommend! A lot of the work I do in the terminal is running git commands. I also work in the MySQL CLI a good deal. I don’t run a lot of custom configuration in my shell – I like to keep it pretty vanilla so that when I work on various production servers I’m right at home.

Terminal screenshot

Git

I get a lot of value out of my git mastery. If you’re using git but don’t feel like a master, I recommend investing time into that. With basic git skills you can quickly uncover the history of code to better understand it, never lose any work in progress, and safely deploy exactly what you want to.

Once I mastered git I started finding all kinds of other uses for it. For example, I was recently working on a project in which I was scraping a thousand pages in order to migrate them to a new CMS. At the beginning of the project, I scraped the pages and stored them in JSON files, which I added to git.  At the end of the project, I re-scraped the pages and used git to tell me which pages had been updated and to show me which words had changed. 

On another project, I cut a daily import process from hours to seconds by using git to determine what had changed in a large inventory file. On a third, I used multiple remotes with Jenkins jobs to create a network of sites that run a shared codebase while allowing individual variations. Git is a good friend to have.

Hope you found something useful in my setup. Have any suggestions on taking it to the next level?
 

Oct 29 2018
Oct 29

At this year's BADCamp, our Senior Web Architect Nick Lewis led a session on Gatsby and the JAMstack. The JAMStack is a web development architecture based on client-side JavaScript, reusable APIs, and prebuilt Markup. Gatsby is one of the leading JAMstack based static page generators, and this session primarily covers how to integrate it with Drupal. 

Our team has been developing a "Gatsby Drupal Kit" over the past few months to help jump start Gatsby-Drupal integrations. This kit is designed to work with a minimal Drupal install as a jumping off point, and give a structure that can be extended to much larger, more complicated sites.

This session will leave you with: 

1. A base Drupal 8 site that is connected with Gatsby.  

2. Best practices for making Gatsby work for real sites in production.

3. Sane patterns for translating Drupal's structure into Gatsby components, templates, and pages.

This is not an advanced session for those already familiar with React and Gatsby. Recommended prerequisites are a basic knowledge of npm package management, git, CSS, Drupal, web services, and Javascript. Watch the full session below. 

Sep 25 2018
Sep 25

With phone in hand, laptop in bag and earbuds in place, the typical user quickly scans multiple sites. If your site takes too long to load, your visitor is gone. If your site isn’t mobile friendly, you’ve lost precious traffic. That’s why it’s essential to build well organized, mobile ready sites.

But how do you get good results?

  • Understand whom you’re building for
  • Employ the right frameworks
  • Organize your codebase
  • Make your life a lot easier with a CSS preprocessor

Let’s look at each of these points.

Design For Mobile

When you look at usage statistics, the trend is clear. This chart shows how mobile device usage has increased each year. 
 

Mobile device usage graphSource

A vast array of mobile devices accomplish a variety of tasks while running tons of applications. This plethora of device options means that you need to account for a wide assortment of display sizes in the design process.

As a front end developer, it’s vital to consider all possible end users when creating a web experience. Keeping so many display sizes in mind can be a challenge, and responsive design methodologies are useful to tackle that problem.

Frameworks that Work

Bootstrap, Zurb, and Jeet are among the frameworks that developers use to give websites a responsive layout. The concept of responsive web design provides for optimal viewing and interaction across many devices. Media queries are rules that developers write to adapt designs to specific screen widths or height.

Writing these from scratch can be time consuming and repetitive, so frameworks prepackage media queries using common screen size rules. They are worth a try even just as a starting point in a project.

Organizing A Large Code Base

Depending on the size of a web project, just the front end code can be difficult to organize. Creating an organizational standard that all developers on a team should follow can be a challenge. Here at Zivtech, we are moving toward the atomic design methodology pioneered by Brad Frost. Taking cues from chemistry, this design paradigm suggests that developers organize code into 5 categories:

  1. Atoms
  2. Molecules
  3. Organisms
  4. Templates
  5. Pages

Basic HTML tags like inputs, labels, and buttons would be considered atoms. Styling atoms can be done in one or more appropriate files. A search form, for example, is considered a molecule composed of a label atom, input atom, and button atom. The search form is styled around its atomic components, which can be tied in as partials or includes. The search form molecule is placed in the context of the header organism, which also contains the logo atom and the primary navigation molecule.

Now Add CSS Preprocessors

Although atomic design structure is a great start to organizing code, CSS preprocessors such as Sass are useful tools to streamline the development process. One cool feature of Sass is that it allows developers to define variables so that repetitive code can be defined once and reused throughout.

Here’s an example. If a project uses a specific shade of mint blue (#37FDFC), it can be defined in a Sass file as $mint-blue = #37FDFC. When styling, instead of typing the hex code every time, you can simply use $mint-blue. It makes the code easier to read and understand for the team. 

Let’s say the client rebrands and wants that blue changed to a slightly lighter shade (#97FFFF). Instead of manually finding all the areas where $mint-blue is referenced on multiples pages of code, a developer can easily revise the variable to equal the new shade ($mint-blue = #97FFFF; ). This change now automatically reflects everywhere $mint-blue was used.

Another useful feature of Sass is the ability to nest style rules. Traditionally, with plain CSS, a developer would have to repetitively type the parent selector multiple times to target each child component. With Sass, you can confidently nest styles within a parent tag, as shown below. The two examples here are equivalent, but when you use Sass, it’s a kind of shorthand that automates the process.

Traditional CSS

Sass

Although there are a lot of challenges organizing code and designing for a wide variety of screen sizes, keep in mind that there are excellent tools available to automate the development process, gracefully solve all your front end problems and keep your site traffic healthy.

This post was originally published on July 1, 2016 and has been updated for accuracy.

Sep 18 2018
Sep 18

A slick new feature was recently added to Drupal 8 starting with the 8.5 release  — out of the box off-canvas dialog support.

Off-canvas dialogs are those which slide out from off page. They push over existing content in order to make space for themselves while keeping the existing content unobstructed, unlike a traditional dialog popup. These dialogs are often used for menus on smaller screens. Most Drupal 8 users are familiar with Admin Toolbar's use of an off-canvas style menu tray, which is automatically enabled on smaller screens.

Admin toolbar off-canvas

Drupal founder Dries posted a tutorial and I finally got a chance to try it myself.

In my case, I was creating a form for reviewers to submit reviews of long and complicated application submissions. Reviewers needed to be able to easily access the entire application while entering their review. A form at the bottom of the screen would have meant too much scrolling, and a traditional popup would have blocked much of the content they needed to see. Therefore, an off-canvas style dialog was the perfect solution. 

Build your own

With the latest updates to Drupal core, you can now easily add your own off-canvas dialogs.

Create a page for Your off-canvas content 

The built in off-canvas integration is designed to load Drupal pages into the dialog window (and only pages as far as I can tell). So you will need either an existing page, such as a node edit form, or you'll need to create your custom own page through Drupal's routing system, which will contain your custom form or other content. In my case, I created a custom page with a custom form.

Create a Link

Once you have a page that you would like to render inside the dialog, you'll need to create a link to that page. This will function as the triggering element to load the dialog.

In my case, I wanted to render the review form dialog from the application full node display itself. I created an "extra field" using hook_entity_extra_field_info(), built the link in hook_ENTITY_TYPE_view(), and then configured the new link field using the Manage Display tab for my application entity. 

/*
 * Implements hook_entity_extra_field_info().
 */
function custom_entity_extra_field_info() {
  $extra['node']['application']['display']['review_form_link'] = array(
    'label' => t('Review Application'),
    'description' => t('Displays a link to the review form.'),
    'weight' => 0,
  );
  return $extra;
}

/**
 * Implements hook_ENTITY_TYPE_view().
 */
function custom_node_view(array &$build, Drupal\Core\Entity\EntityInterface $entity, Drupal\Core\Entity\Display\EntityViewDisplayInterface $display, $view_mode) {
  if ($display->getComponent('review_form_link')) {
    $build['review_link'] = array(
      '#title' => t('Review Application'),
      '#type' => 'link',
      '#url' => Url::fromRoute('custom.review_form', ['application' => $entity->id()]),
    );
  }
}

Add off-canvas to the link

Next you just need to set the link to open using off-canvas instead of as a new page.

There are four attributes to add to your link array in order to do this:

      '#attributes' => array(
        'class' => 'use-ajax',
        'data-dialog-renderer' => 'off_canvas',
        'data-dialog-type' => 'dialog',
        'data-dialog-options' => '{"width":"30%"}'
      ),
      '#attached' => [
        'library' => [
          'core/drupal.dialog.ajax',
        ],
      ],

The first three attributes are required to get your dialog working and the last is recommended, as it will let you control the size of the dialog.

Additionally, you'll need to attach the Drupal ajax dialog library. Before I added the library to my implementation, I was running into an issue where some user roles could access the dialog and others could not. It turned out this was because the library was being loaded for roles with access to the Admin Toolbar.

The rendered link will end up looking like:

Review Application

And that's it! Off-canvas dialog is done and ready for action.

off-canvas-demo-gif
May 18 2018
May 18

The Content Moderation core module was marked stable in Drupal 8.5. Think of it like the contributed module Workbench Moderation in Drupal 7, but without all the Workbench editor Views that never seemed to completely make sense. The Drupal.org documentation gives a good overview.

Content Moderation requires the Workflows core module, allowing you to set up custom editorial workflows. I've been doing some work with this for a new site for a large organization, and have some tips and tricks.

Less Is More

Resist increases in roles, workflows, and workflow states and make sure they are justified by a business need. Stakeholders may ask for many roles and many workflow states without knowing the increased complexity and likelihood of editorial confusion that results.

If you create an editorial workflow that is too strict and complex, editors will tend to find ways to work around the  system. A good compromise is to ask that the team tries something simple first and adds complexity down the line if needed.

Try to use the same workflow on all content types if you can. It makes a much simpler mental model for everyone.

Transitions are Key

Transitions between workflow states will be what you assign as permissions to roles. Typically, you'll want to lock down who can publish content, allowing content contributors to create new drafts only.

Transitions Image from Drupal.orgTransitions between workflow states must be thought through

You might want some paper to map out all the paths between workflow states that content might go through. The transitions should be named as verbs. If you can't think of a clear, descriptive verb that applies, you can go with 'Set state to %your_state" or "Mark as %your_state." Don't sweat the names of transitions too much though; they don't seem to ever appear in an editor-facing way anyway.

Don't forget to allow editors to undo transitions. If they can change the state from "Needs Work" to "Needs Review," make sure they can change it back to "Needs Work."

You must allow Non-Transitions

Make sure the transitions include non-transitions. The transitions represent which options will be available for the state when you edit content. In the above (default core) example, it is not possible to edit archived content and maintain the same state of archived. You'd have to change the status to published and then back to archived. In fact, it would be very easy to accidentally publish what you had archived, because editing the content will set it back to published as the default setting. Therefore, make sure that draft content can stay as draft when edited, etc. 

Transition Ordering is Crucial

Ordering of the transitions here is very important because the state options on the content editing form will appear as a select list of states ordered by the transition order, and it will default to the first available one.

If an editor misses setting this option correctly, they will simply get the first transition, so make sure that first transition is a good default. To set the right order, you have to map each state to what should be its default value when editing. You may have to add additional transitions to make this all make sense.

As for the ordering of workflow states themselves, this will only affect ordering when states are listed, for example in a Views exposed filter of workflow states or within the workflows administration.

Minimize Accidental Transitions

But why wouldn't my content's workflow state stay the same by default when editing the content (assuming the user has access to a transition that keeps it the same)? I have to set an order correctly to keep a default value from being lost?

Well, that's a bug as of 8.5.3 that will be fixed in the next 8.5 bugfix release. You can add the patch to your composer.json file if you're tired of your workflow states getting accidentally changed.

Test your Workflow

With all the states, transitions, transition ordering, roles, and permissions, there are plenty of opportunities for misconfiguration even for a total pro with great attention to detail like yourself. Make sure you run through each scenario using each role. Then document the setup in your site's editor documentation while it's all fresh and clear in your mind.

What DOES Published EVEN MEAN ANYMORE?

With Content Moderation, the term "published" now has two meanings. Both content and content revisions can be published (but only content can be unpublished).

For content, publishing status is a boolean, as it has always been. When you view published content, you will be viewing the latest revision, which is in a published workflow state.

For a content revision, "published" is a workflow state.

Therefore, when you view the content administration page, which shows you content, not content revisions, status refers to the publishing status of the content, and does not give you any information on whether there are unpublished new revisions.

Where's my Moderation Dashboard?

From the content administration page, there is a tab for "moderated content." This is where you can send your editors to see if there is content with drafts they need to review. Unfortunately, it's not a very useful report since it has neither filtering nor sorting. Luckily work has been done recently to make the Views integration for Content Moderation/Workflows decent, so I was able to replace this dashboard with a View and shared the config.

Using Views for a Moderation DashboardMy Views-based Content Moderation dashboard.

Reviewer Access

In a typical editorial workflow, content editors create draft edits and then need to solicit feedback and approval from stakeholders or even a legal team. To use content moderation, these stakeholders need to have Drupal accounts and log in to look at the "Latest Revision" tab on the content. This is an obstacle for many organizations because the stakeholders are either very busy, not very web-savvy, or both.

You may get requests for a workflow in which content creation and review takes place on a non-live environment and then require some sort of automated content deployment process. Content deployment across environments is possible using the Deploy module, but there is a lot of inherent complexity involved that you'll want to avoid if you can.

I created an Access Latest module that allows editors to share links with an access token that lets reviewers see the latest revision without logging in.

Access Latest lets reviewers see drafts without logging inAccess Latest lets reviewers see drafts without logging in

Log Messages BUG

As of 8.5.3, you may run into a bug in which users without "administer content" permission cannot add a revision log message when they edit content. There are a fewissues related to this, and the fix should be out in the next bugfix release. I had success with this patch and then re-saving all my content types.

About Drupal Sun

Drupal Sun is an Evolving Web project. It allows you to:

  • Do full-text search on all the articles in Drupal Planet (thanks to Apache Solr)
  • Facet based on tags, author, or feed
  • Flip through articles quickly (with j/k or arrow keys) to find what you're interested in
  • View the entire article text inline, or in the context of the site where it was created

See the blog post at Evolving Web

Evolving Web